* Posts by sisk

2164 posts • joined 17 Mar 2010

KFC turns Japanese bath tubs into party buckets

sisk
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Re: KFC scented anything

I'm actually with you, but for good reason. Many moons ago I had a roommate who worked there and whose hygiene and general cleaning skills both left quite a lot to be desired. The whole apartment stank of rotten chicken grease. I finally told him to either do his damn laundry or at least keep his bedroom door closed so I didn't have to smell it. Ever since KFC has never been a place I go to willingly.

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A surefire hit with the opposite sex.

Well, I suppose that's one way to get someone to lick you...

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SCO vs. IBM case over who owns Linux comes back to life. Again

sisk
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And to help pay Reg hacks' salaries too

I strongly suspect that Reg hacks will be the group that finds this the second most profitable (behind lawyers). I believe that the least profitable group is going to be SCO, with IBM not far ahead.

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Only good guys would use an automated GPU-powered password-cracker ... right?

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The joke is you haven't enabled password complexity rules.

We haven't been allowed to. I've been pushing for complexity rules ever since I was promoted into my current position a decade ago, and lecturing people on the importance of good passwords for the 5 prior years that I've been here.

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I just test accounts with two passwords: 123456 and then the user's first name. That generally reveals plenty of people who need a lesson in secure passwords around here.

Sadly, that's not a joke.

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Submarine builder admits dismembering journalist's body

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You know, for a guy smart enough to design and build a working sub killing a famous reporter while giving her a ride on it is a real dumb move. He couldn't possibly have thought he was going to get away with it.

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Samsung to let proper Linux distros run on Galaxy smartmobes

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Samsung's announcement suggests developers will “code using their mobile on-the-go and with Samsung DeX

Code on a phone? Not if I have a choice.

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So the 'Year of Linux' never happened. When is it Chrome OS's turn?

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Re: Widespread Linux on the desktop remains elusive.

And yet it makes absolutely no headway against existing Word/Excel/Access users, particularly in regards to specific features (like scripts, formulae, et al) of the old guard. Since many of these are business-critical, you'll never get them to jump until you can assure them their custom jobs can go with them. There's also the matter of server (Back Office) infrastructure.

Never mind that those features are used by a vanishingly small percentage of MS Office users, right? No, the real reason that LibreOffice gains no traction is the same reason any other non-industry standard fails to gain traction: A replacement for an industry standard solution is never considered by most companies, and individual users are a drop in the bucket by comparison.

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Re: Widespread Linux on the desktop remains elusive.

Don't say LibreOffice. It looks like a 1998 shareware application.

You clearly haven't used it in the last decade or so. It looks almost exactly like an older version of MS Office. Which is a GOOD THING because it doesn't have the damned ribbon. (Yeah, a decade on and I still hate the ribbon.) It's a polished, reliable, and full featured product that absolutely fulfills the role of an office suite. In fact, at one point in time, I kept a LibreOffice install around just to recover files that MS Office had corrupted (this was in the Office2003 era, that problem is far less common these days). Why wouldn't it count? Just because MS owns that particular market?

But, yeah, you're right. Linux lacks apps in a lot of other areas. Gaming is sparse despite the presence of Steam, and though Linux has at least one solid app in every category you could imagine it lacks most of the industry standard apps. KDen Live may be a spectacular video editing system, but it's not Premiere Pro. GIMP may be able to do everything Photoshop can, but it's still not Photoshop. That list could go on for a long time.

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Supreme Court to rule on whether US has right to data stored overseas

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Re: Of course, the DoJ will win

The trumpster will throw a hissy fit if they don't.

Irrelevant. The DOJ is under Trump's control, but the SCUSA is actually supposed to serve as a check and balance on his power. In other words, it's their job to tell him when he's overstepping his boundaries, and no amount of hissy fit he throws can affect them (in theory, of course).

- Americans rule the world (Doh!)

No we don't, despite how much the extreme right might wish it so.

Make America Great and them means that everyone else has to roll over and give them what they want

Judging by his actions in office so far I think "Make America Great" in Trumpese translates to "Make Donald Trump richer and more powerful" in English.

And there is already a law that proclaims that US Law applies everwhere on the planet.

So far as I know that law's never been challenged in SCUSA, and given that I'm pretty sure it violates international law I wouldn't expect it to hold up to scrutiny.

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Personally, I would think this is an open and shut case. I would think it rather obvious that the government of one nation cannot require a company to violate laws in another nation regarding servers in that nation

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Look! Over there! Intel's cooked a 17-qubit chip quantum package

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Re: around the size of a US quarter

Around 1.5 thumbs.

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'There has never been a right to absolute privacy' – US Deputy AG slams 'warrant-proof' crypto

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The law recognizes that legitimate law enforcement needs can outweigh personal privacy concerns.

Key word: legitimate. I absolutely agree that law enforcement should be able to gather evidence of crimes, especially in a system that places the burden of proof on them. The problem is that they've not limited their searches to areas where they have a reasonable expectation of finding such evidence. They have, in short, repeatedly and wantonly committed the very act that the Fourth is intended to protect us from.

Here in the US we have the reality of cops making the owner of a car stand out in the cold for hours waiting for their car to be searched simply because they're teens. And should the teen be aware of their rights and try to prevent it they'll bring over a drug dog and have it jump on the car on cue to give them probable cause. We live in a world where data on your laptop can be searched simply because you carried it through an airport with no reason to suspect you've committed any crime. We live in a world where every single email we send or phone call we make is probably being monitored by bots to flag suspicious ones.

He's right that we don't have an absolute right to privacy. Law enforcement has always been able to get warrants to search whatever they need to if they can give a good reason. But we do have a reasonable right to privacy, and warrant-proof encryption has become the only way we can enforce it in a world where law enforcement has developed a habit of skipping the warrant.

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Computers4Christians miraculously appears on Ubuntu wiki

sisk
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Re: RE: Sisk

Ooh, downvoted by defensive christians.

Has it ever occurred to you that you got downvoted for being a jerk?

I've personally no problem with people who disagree with my religion. I've even debated the subject in a civilized manner with multiple people and have always walked away from such discussions with no hard feelings and a mutually improved understanding of the other person's point of view. But what you did above amounts to nothing more than an unprovoked textual jab at someone simply for having a different worldview than you do. It was stupid and petty.

You don't share my religion. That's fine. You're entitled to your own beliefs and worldview and I'm not going to cram mine down your throat. I don't think it's so much to ask the same courtesy from you.

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Speaking as a Christian, I condemn this action. Vandalism is fundamentally incompatible with the teachings of Christ. So are the hate and intolerance that so many non-Christians think are central to the faith because of a very loud vocal minority. This is just one more instance of some idiot who seems to have missed the important parts of Christ's teachings making us all look bad.

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BOFH: Come on, PFY, let's pick a Boss

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Wouldn't it have been easier to tamper with whatever database the robot was accessing that to try to find a better boss? Or just program it to say that Systems had completed all projects in record time regardless of outstanding projects?

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White House staffers jabbed with probe over private email use

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Re: why

I am curious about all the evil things she has done.

Have....you not been paying attention? I mean, seriously, are you truly this clueless? You are talking about the single American politician whose name has come up in more scandals in the last decade than any two others. Whether you believe she was guilty or that she was just being targeted by political enemies feigning ignorance is silly.

Personally I believe the woman to be a corrupt sociopath, but I also consider "corrupt sociopath" and "professional politician" to be almost synonyms. Not that they're all sociopaths. Just the successful ones.

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Hypocrisy in American politics? Consider me surprised and shocked to a degree appropriate for this news.

Which is to say, not at all.

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Alleged dark web drug baron cuffed – after he flew to US for World Beard Championships

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Re: USA has one highest incarceration rates in the world

This isn't well-known in western countries, who are friendly with USA. This is like a blind spot for westerners and even for people who live in USA. Which isn't surprising.

Americans are well aware that we have more prisoners per capita than any other nation. The problem is that half the country doesn't recognize that as a problem and think we should be locking up even more "criminals". But to be fair most of our prisoners are in for drug offenses, so staying out of jail in America is as simple as not doing drugs (which, admittedly, is easier said than done for an addict). Our authorities simply refuse to recognize any other way of dealing with drug epidemics. A whole lot of them, when you point to countries that have successfully dealt with the problem, will say something ignorant about "dirty socialists".

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Re: PGP crypto keys..

IIRC, a device with a fingerprint scanner is a lot safer as you cannot be forced to unlock the device.

Fingerprint readers are stupid easy to defeat. I mean they weren't exactly difficult to get around to begin with, and then the Mythbusters went and did a bit on them and showed the whole world multiple ways to fool them in the process. And this is the Mythbusters. Yeah, they're smart guys, but they're not exactly security experts. If they could do it with minimal effort how long do you think it's going to take someone who's job description includes knowing how to defeat security measures?

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Re: PGP crypto keys..

I think it's a safe assumption that he had the private key. Despite rumors to the contrary the US authorities do know the difference. But aside from that I would imagine that they found BitCoin wallets known to belong to OxyMonster. You can rest assured that the brief summary of evidence in this article is far from a complete list of what they had against him.

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Clearly a naughty boy, but what part of US law covers the sale and distribution of substances in Europe?

You clearly don't understand how US law works. It's basically impossible to get through a day without unknowingly committing a felony in the US. They've got an excuse to arrest anyone they damn well please here. Though, to be fair, most of those offenses would likely get thrown out via jury nullification.

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Re: I believe the word we are all struggling to vocalise is ...

If you carried $500,000 of dollar or euro bills across the border that you had earned from drug dealing, I think you would be arrested. No reason why bitcoins should be any different.

There's no law against carrying large amounts of money. They would have to be able to prove the money was from illegal activities to be able to arrest you, and even then unless you'd violated a law in the jurisdiction you're in at the time there's still nothing they can do about it. No reason why bitcoin should be any different.

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Re: I believe the word we are all struggling to vocalise is ...

What sort of idiot takes electronic devices themselves to the USA on a visit these days?

Some of us don't have much choice in the matter, what with living here and all.

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Cisco polishes the axe for more HQ job cuts

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I find it hard to believe that a company that has a commanding market share even while charging up to 3x what their competitors do for equivalent products has any kind of cash flow problems. They're cutting jobs because they think it's a good idea, not because, as is usually the case in these situations, they need to.

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Bill Gates says he'd do CTRL-ALT-DEL with one key if given the chance to go back through time

sisk
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I actually do have a single key that sends a Ctrl-Alt-Delete (the advantages of a programmable keyboard are many), though these days it's more to get the login screen or lock my computer than as an interrupt. It's very convenient. I can see why Gates would want to turn back the clock on this one.

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Everyone loves programming in Python! You disagree? But it's the fastest growing, says Stack Overflow

sisk
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I can't help but think that Python's position as the go-to language for GPIO programming on Raspberry Pi and other SBCs is at least partially responsible for this.

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Dude who claimed he invented email is told by judge: It's safe to say you didn't invent email

sisk
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So he's claiming to have invented email based on a system he wrote in 1978......when email in a form recognizable as such by modern users has been around since 1973...and then slamming people for "false speech" for calling him out on it.

I believe the appropriate phrase from modern yoof culture would be "GTFO".

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Oracle 'systematically denies' its sales reps their commissions, forces them to work to pay off 'debts', court told

sisk
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Aren't retroactive pay cuts illegal? And the whole debt thing sounds an awful lot like the old company store scam that I know is illegal.

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VW engineer sent to the clink for three years for emissions-busting code

sisk
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Re: Did He Have An Option ???

This is exactly what I was thinking. The guy's options were to either do as he was told or file for unemployment and have his employment record show that he was fired for insubordination. And if he went whistle blower on it and VW's legal team did their job well then he'd be dragged through the mud and his career would be effectively over.

The punishment certainly does not fit the circumstances of the crime in this case. If the judge wanted to make an example of someone then that "someone" should not have been the most junior member of the team who probably felt they had no choice in the matter. It should have been the most senior executive, the one with the power to tell the others "Do it or GTFO".

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Minnesota Senator calls out US watchdogs: Why so cozy with Amazon?

sisk
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I'm confused, is the Senate's Antitrust Subcommittee a misnomer?

Not at all. They're working quite hard to ensure Americans never trust the Senate.

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I have two thoughts on this matter. First, the question really isn't "w/hy was this approved so fast". It's "Why the hell does this normally take several months?"

Second, I wanna know how big a "campaign contribution" Klobuchar just got from Wal-Mart.

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Kill animals and destroy property before hurting humans, Germany tells future self-driving cars

sisk
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Re: Traffic light failure

To be fair it'd be pretty damned hard to handle it worse than some people.

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Re: Who

I was pulled up by a policeman who considered this suspicious behaviour. Apparently "normal" people get back in their car and drive to the parking lot of the store on the other side of the road.

I run into this all the time. A preference for walking is highly unusual in the US.

On a related topic, you should have seen my parents faces when I told them I was excited about moving closer to town because it would put me within cycling distance of a lot of places I frequent. They thought I'd lost my mind when they realized I considered a store just under mile away to be within "cycling distance". And I thought they were going to have me committed when I told them that it was actually within walking distance if I wasn't in a hurry.

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El Reg gets schooled on why SSDs will NOT kill off the trusty hard drive

sisk
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I expect to see SSD replace HDD eventually, but it's not going to happen soon. Maybe (MAYBE) by 2030, but definitely not by 2020. There's just too much of a price difference between the two. It's going to take time for SSD technology to improve to the point that they can match the price of HDDs, and 3 years is not anywhere near enough time for that to happen.

Of course by 2050 we'll have kids who've never seen a computer with a HDD just like we've got kids today who've never seen a floppy disk.

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Are Asimov's laws enough to stop AI stomping humanity?

sisk
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It should be pointed out that in Asimov's stories the 3 laws failed in rather spectacular fashion.

And besides that, do you have any concept of the amount of programming that goes into making a computer capable of understanding a statement like "A robot shall not, through action or inaction, harm a human being or allow a human being to be harmed"? By the time we have an AI capable of even understanding that concept it's a little late to try to make it a motivational priority.

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Windows Subsystem for Linux is coming to Windows Server

sisk
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Embrace, Expand, Extinguish

Microsoft's long-term plan for dealing with competition hasn't changed in 30 years. I see no reason to celebrate their embracing of something I currently use.

Then again, their position isn't as strong as it once was. Linux completely owns the OS market. The year of the Linux desktop is probably never coming, true, but the year of the Linux everything else just keeps repeating itself and getting bigger every time. Everything else is a MUCH bigger market.

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70% of Windows 10 users are totally happy with our big telemetry slurp, beams Microsoft

sisk
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In this context "30% of users have turned it off" is more or less equivalent to "almost everyone who knows it's there and how to shut it off has done so".

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WannaCrypt victims paid out over $140k in Bitcoin to get files unscrambled

sisk
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Re: If it was the work of US/UK intelligence

Care to clue us into why, Mr. Tinfoil Hat? What do they have to gain? They don't do things - especially things that cause issues in the public sphere - unless they have a reason.

The US government has done worse to the public than WannaCry - Tuskagee for instance - and attempted even worse than that - Operation Northwoods for example. And that's just what they openly admit to. When you get into the top secret stuff, who knows what goes on in the minds of spooks.

Not that I actually believe for an instant that this was a US/UK intelligence mission. That's absurd. But don't kid yourself into think that the reason it's absurd is because they wouldn't. If some CIA analyst thought that the US might stand half a chance to gain something of even the most wispy significance from it they absolutely would, and their reasoning would not necessarily be readily apparent. It's absurd because the whole thing was orders of magnitude less sophisticated than it would be had it come from a group of 1st world state sponsored hackers.

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I read somewhere (not sure where) that security researchers had analyzed the data stream on an infection and figured out that the malware discarded the key rather than sending it to the C&C server, so decryption wasn't actually possible even if you paid the ransom.

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Linux kernel hardeners Grsecurity sue open source's Bruce Perens

sisk
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By my understanding of the GPLv2 Grsecurity is completely without a legal leg to stand on here. They're illegally tacking conditions onto existing code which MUST be licensed under the GPL (as all Linux kernel patches must be thanks to the copyleft nature of the GPL). In short, either GPLv2 is valid or Grsecurity will lose.

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Why do you cry when chopping onions? No, it's not crippling anxiety, it's this weird chemical

sisk
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Wasn't this already known? Or am I mistaken about that?

At any rate, I've never had much of a problem with onions. Only the most potent of potent onions seem to affect me, so 99% of the time I can cut them up with impunity. The other 1% of the time folks in the next room are tearing up from them.

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Thought your divorce was ugly? Bloke sues wife for wiretapping – 'cos she read his email

sisk
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I'll be watching this one

My ex accessed my email without permission during our divorce (about 90% sure it was her anyway, given that I traced it as far as the tiny town that she was living in at the time and, frankly, what are the odds that the only time anyone has gotten into my email it was anyone other than the person who had a reason to be digging up dirt and happened to know the password?). There was nothing in there I'd be unwilling to publish to World + Dog, so I changed the password and let it go and made sure she knew she'd been caught. It just wasn't worth the effort of pushing it any further than that. Hell, I even racked the whole thing up as my own dumb fault for not changing the password as soon as she moved out.

Still, I'll be interested in the outcome here.

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Authorities go hard on coffee maker for stiff Viagra-powered brew

sisk
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Given that it was marketed as a male enhancement product I suspect most of the men drinking it are aware of the extra ingredient. Let's just hope that their wives didn't grab a cup of coffee though.

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Jodie Who-ttaker? The Doctor is in

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Re: Hardly shocking

As an avid fan of the likes of Asimov and Clark who studies quantum physics for fun in my spare time, I resent that remark.

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Re: Wading in late

The educational focus of the show was more on history, not science.

It was actually about half and half. Go back and watch season 1 of the classic again and you'll see it, particularly in The Daleks (the second story), where they go into pretty good detail about the basics of electricity. Considering that they were working with a 20 minute episode format the amount of time spent on the subject can't be anything less than an intentional lesson for the viewers.

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Re: Was the Dr ever male or female?

The Doctor has always been decidedly of the male gender and mostly - with the exception of a couple incarnations - of asexual orientation. It least he's always seemed completely uninterested in romantic/sexual entanglements. Which, if you've ever read the book that deals with Time Lord reproduction (I'm not certain of the title right at the moment. Lungbarrow maybe?), makes perfect sense. 8 and 10 seemed heterosexual, 11 seemed omnisexual (in the sense that he was totally oblivious to gender beyond using it as a method to assign pronouns) but didn't have much of a libido. 12 has hinted a couple times at a mild, cautious attraction to Missy, but he's unwilling to explore it for, I think, obvious reasons.Though that may just be me reading into scenes something that wasn't there. And I think it quite obvious, especially in the last couple episodes, that Missy was very attracted to him.

I think we can safely say that Time Lords do indeed have male and female genders.

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Crazy bug of the week: Gnome Files' .MSI parser runs evil VBScripts

sisk
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fully recognise inputs before processing them

Programming concepts and best practices don't get any more basic than that. Seriously, first a hard dependency on a questionable init system and now this? WTF Gnome team?

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Linus Torvalds may have damned systemd with faint praise

sisk
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If you consider that half the Reg readership moves to DEFCOM 2 at the first mention of systemd

There's a good reason for that. Systemd is a horrendous bit of code being foisted on us by a small group that refuses to take constructive criticism as a cue to improve their product. And, on top of that, some of their decisions are just stupid to begin with. For instance, what kind of fool thinks binary logs are a good idea? What are you supposed to do with those when you can't get into the system, the time you need the logs most? And that's just one of a dozen major design flaws with it. Forget the fact that the entire thing utterly fails the test of doing one thing well and instead is mediocre at a whole bunch of things. It's just got flawed premises at the foundations.

There's an axim that states that a complex system that's broken will be found to have either evolved from or replaced a simple system that worked just fine. This is absolutely the case with systemd. Fortunately, at least for the time being, most of us (sorry Gnome users) can switch to OpenRC instead.

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