* Posts by Phil W

975 posts • joined 10 Mar 2010

Page:

Shhh! There's a new BlackBerry and... no, we've said too much

Phil W
Silver badge

Not a Blackberry

As far as I'm concerned this phone isn't a Blackberry. It's a generic Android phone that if it's anything like the Priv and the KeyOne will be underpowered and run too hot.

The Priv and the KeyOne can be forgiven for their flaws, as long as top tier CPU power isn't something you need in a phone, because their keyboards set them apart from the Android crowd in a practical and useful way.

The Motion is just the same as all the other Android devices across the market.

Give us something interesting Blackberry/TCL, how about a horizontal slider a la the Motorola Milestone days.

3
0
Phil W
Silver badge

Your complaint appears to be that you, knowingly, bought a device that runs a different OS, and that that OS does not work the same way as the old one.

This is like buying a PC and complaining it doesn't behave like a Mac or vice versa.

Android is great, welcome to the club. BB OS is exceptionally good at what it does (or was originally intended to do) i.e. combined messaging platforms of email,SMS,BBM and phone calls etc, it's probably better than Android at those things. But it's pretty weak at going beyond that which is part of the reason BlackBerry dumped it.

2
2

Home Sec Amber Rudd: Yeah, I don't understand encryption. So what?

Phil W
Silver badge

Re: From the BBC article

"Remember, when management asks you if something can be done, they are not asking you if it can be done affordably. They think that's their decision, not yours."

Sure, but there are plenty of things that quite literally can't be done but management don't understand that.

Or the thing they want done is extremely costly and/or time consuming and you warn of this, but they assume that you're just being "unhelpful" and proceed anyway. Only to complain later that said thing has taken a long time or cost too much.

This is why it's important to have managers who understand what they're managing, not just managers who know how to managers. Managers who don't understand the field they're managing, and ignore the "unhelpful" feedback from their underlings tend to make poor decisions.

3
0
Phil W
Silver badge

Re: From the BBC article

"It's not very clear what she means here. Work with them how?"

Unfortunately she doesn't know what she means either.

It's the same situation management and IT,and likely other technical departments, face daily.

Management ask for something to be done, IT say it can't be done and/or doesn't work like that. Management say "You're not being very helpful".

19
0
Phil W
Silver badge

Re: The Home Office

Coming next week, Amber Rudd will make a speech about how great the Internet is and she's managed to borrow it to show everyone *cue small black box* "it's wireless!".

13
0

Sysadmin tells user CSI-style password guessing never w– wait WTF?! It's 'PASSWORD1'!

Phil W
Silver badge

Re: "They looked for the password on the CD . . ."

Yeah, my biggest criticism of the password being PASSWORD1 would be the 1.

This password was clearly there because the certificate export process required it, not because security concerns mandated it.

Given that it would have been better to go with "password" "Password" or "PASSWORD" so that it was easier to guess in circumstances like this.

Given that this certificate was sent on a CD, probably by courier or recorded mail, no extra security was required, if by some chance it didn't make it to the recipient the certificate could be revoked.

It's up to the recipient to physically secure the CD i.e. lock it in a safe.

Security is important to get right, where it is needed, but also important to remove and/or simplify where it isn't.

18
0

Lanarkshire NHS infection named as Bitpaymer variant

Phil W
Silver badge

Re: I'm curious

Lync/Skype for Business perhaps?

There are also a variety of Windows SIP servers that could probably be used with generic SIP handsets.

It could also be that this was a Hyper-V or other Windows based virtualisation host that was hit, and the phone system that was hit was in a VM which opens up a whole host of other possibilities as well.

5
0

US Navy suffers third ship collision this year

Phil W
Silver badge

Re: Well if the US ships want the Chinese to keep out of the way

While it is true that other ships hit the USN ships on some of these occasions they were hit in the starboard side. It is standard maritime practice to give way to vessels approaching from your starboard side, rather than remaining ignorant of them until they hit you.

18
0

Can North Korean nukes hit US mainland? Maybe. But EMP blast threat is 'highly credible'

Phil W
Silver badge

"I strongly suspect that massive retaliation would be under way before the damage had been assessed, not that it is going to help anyone else in the world (least of all those moderately close to NK)."

I think that very much depends on whether Trump decides the strategy or someone with more intelligence i.e. one of his Generals. Nuking the entirity of North Korea would be bad for everyone, neighbouring countries would be worst off but the fallout from that kind of sustained strike would have global effects.

Nuking the capital with a few lower yield warheads, to hopefully take out most of the leadership, followed by conventional airstrikes on military facilities rounded off with ground invasion would be far more effective and have far less impact on the neighbouring countries and none (directly anyway) on the rest of the world.

14
3

DJI's Spark drones to be bricked by September 1 unless firmware updated

Phil W
Silver badge

Re: So they are bricking the devices?

"it seems rather short notice and quite unfair on any owners who might be away from their drones during that period."

Why? There's nothing to indicate you can't update the firmware at any time after the given deadline. It's just that you can't fly it until you do. You could stick your drone in a box until next year then get it out, update it, and fly no problems. As for it being short notice, unless you were planning to be away until 31st August 23:00 and were going to fly your drone at 00:00 1st September then you've got plenty of time to do a quick firmware update.

I don't see any problem with this at all frankly. It's no different than when Samsung said they'd brick/seriously hobble Note 7s that hadn't been returned, because they presented a genuine danger to customers and the public at large. Drones, when used incorrectly/illegally, pose an even greater danger.

4
1

So, Nokia. What makes you think the world wants your phones?

Phil W
Silver badge

Re: S club 7

Hannah first surely?

0
0

Bank IT fella accused of masterminding multimillion-dollar insider-trading scam

Phil W
Silver badge

It has a lot more to do with how much you cheat the system by I think.

This guy could very likely have got away with it if he'd stuck to just doing it for his own gain and not shared the info with so many others. A few thousand dollars a year extra would pad his pocket nicely and be low enough value for him to either not have been spotted, or if he had been spotted quite possibly not investigated/prosecuted.

4
0

Hell desk to user: 'I know you're wrong. I wrote the software. And the protocol it runs on'

Phil W
Silver badge

Re: Possible or easy?

While that can be true, in many cases it can simply be that although the software can do something, it wasn't part of the original intended use when it was written, and consequently isn't in the documentation.

It would be ridiculous to expect developers to document every technically possible use case for something, especially one's they'd never envisioned.

20
3

Samsung drops 128TB SSD and kinetic-type flash drive bombshells

Phil W
Silver badge

Re: key and value

"Filesystems should all be databases"

They are in essence, file allocation table is your database index, journelling on filesystems that have it is much like change tracking on a database.

"Exchange / email is just a big database"

Which actually just goes to prove that file systems/disks are just databases. Exchange uses the disk structure as part of the database indexing, which is why it officially only really supports 512n disks not 4k/512e (though it looks like that may be changing soon, kind of has to really given the death of 512n disks due to larger capacities)

"And databases should be an internal, core, OS function (why is something like SQL not built-into the machine as an OS-level thing?)"

It is, at least in Windows Server 2008 onwards. Let me introduce you to WID.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Windows_Internal_Database

1
0
Phil W
Silver badge

Re: The millibit/second strikes again!

I think you mean Mebibit vs Megabit, there is no such thing as a Millibit for all intents and purposes, since the SI Prefit Milli means 1/1000th or 10-3 a Millibit would mean 0.001 of a bit which clearly can't exist (at least in conventional computing).

The IEC prefixes for binary powers are kibi, mebi, gibi and tebi. These are stupid made up portmanteau prefixes which the ISO standard kilo with bi from binary to make kibi and so on, but those smart arses at IEC, IETF and ISO thought they were a good idea.

Hate them myself I don't see the need, aside from the capitalisation of the b on the short name being pretty obvious usually (KB Kilobyte vs Kb Kilobit) in any context where there is likely to be confusion the proper long names to clearly show bit vs byte can be used.

2
1
Phil W
Silver badge

New interface

Given that as the article states NGSFF is the same size as the maximum size M.2(NGFF) chip then I fail to see their argument for a new interface.

There's no mechanical reason a board plugging into an M.2 interface is actually limited to that maximum size anyway. Simply use M.2 and make the card wider and/or longer which from the pictures it appears is what they've done.

If it's necessary to put extra holes in for screw supports put them at the edges, as long as they're outside the standard M.2 footprints then the slot will still be compatible with normal M.2 chips, but could also accommodate Samsung chunky monsters. This doesn't need a new name, M.2 already has a variety of sizes requiring you to check whether a card will fit in your device, this is just an extension of that.

8
0

Google's macho memo man fired, say reports

Phil W
Silver badge

That's certainly true, if you have 2 or 3 candidates who all interview equally well and are equally qualified and experienced, then perhaps selecting based on gender, ethnicity or whatever can be helpful as a deciding factor. But it should very much be a factor of last resort, not a short listing criteria or considered post interview except as a tie breaker.

4
1
Phil W
Silver badge

Fired, but what about the leaker?

So Google fired this guy for expressing a critical opinion of Google's policies, on an internal discussion board. Aside from the fact that when read properly his post isn't really bad or wrong, firing seems a little excess for such an internal action.

On the other hand, somebody at Google took that internal only communication and posted it on reddit for all the world to see. Surely disseminating internal corporate communications to the world (unless whistle blowing on some illegal activity) should be a sackable offence?

15
2
Phil W
Silver badge

Indeed, the world at large seems to have read "the distribution of preferences and abilities of men and women differ in part due to biological causes" as "all women are naturally crap at coding and only men can do it" which is totally not the point he was making.

His point is perfectly valid in the sense that there are biological differences between men and women when looked at in a broad statistical way, such as spatial awareness, upper body strength, and the brain's ability to handle different kinds of problem.

This doesn't mean no women are capable of being coders, or that no men are capable of being musicians or artists or poets. It simply means that in general you will likely see a gender bias in each of these areas, and there is no reason to consider this a "bad thing".

What is a "bad thing" is to turn down women for coding jobs because they're female, or equally to turn down men from being midwives because they're men.

But equally bad is picking a woman for a coding job, or employing a man as a midwife to even out your gender balance in the work place regardless of whether another applicant of the other gender was better.

He also points out that because less women want to be coders, the available pool of potential female employees is smaller and therefore as a result the number of good female candidates is smaller. This is also a perfectly reasonable point. Dinner ladies (lunchtime assistants, sorry) tend to be ladies because in general more women choose to stay at home to look after children and therefore are more likely to look for part time work, often nearby and in their community. Should schools employ unemployed single men with no childcare experience instead in order to balance the numbers?

Certainly we should be encouraging kids of both genders to pursue whatever they want in school, and make sure all opportunities are equally presented and available to boys and girls, and perhaps in the longer term this will result in the gender bias of tech industry balancing out a bit. But if you tried to put as much focus on getting more men to be midwives as their currently seems to be on getting women into tech, people would call you an idiot or worse.

Trying to make companies demonstrate that they're equal opportunity employers by ensuring they have an equal number of male and female employees in every role completely misses the point of gender equality, and achieves nothing but discrimination of another form.

If companies force themselves to employ people because of their gender, race or other protected characteristic in order to fill out numbers in that area, rather than because of their ability to do the job then not only do they reduce the effectiveness of the company but as the ex-Googler pointed out they may well demoralise the existing staff who see new colleagues coming in who were not the best choice for the job.

30
2

Engineer gets 18 months in the clink for looting ex-bosses' FTP server

Phil W
Silver badge

Hacking?

Not entirely convinced this was "hacking" as it is labelled in the article. The company say they rotated passwords but I think the reality is they didn't or at least not for all accounts.

11
0

CMD.EXE gets first makeover in 20 years in new Windows 10 build

Phil W
Silver badge

What's the point?

Not sure why they've done this, surely it would have just been easier to retire it and replace it with Powershell. There's already a tickbox somewhere in Win10 to do exactly that.

As far as I'm aware anything that works in a command prompt work in Powershell?

4
18

Skype for Business is not Skype – realising that is half the battle

Phil W
Silver badge

Re: Skype for business is pretty sad

"SfB clients use SILK by default (older versions use RTA).

G.711 is what comes out of your SfB mediation server to the PSTN"

Unless you enable media bypass. This allows the client to communicate directly with the other endpoint or SIP gateway and the client can speak G.711 in that case.

Whether you should use media bypass very much depends on the rest of your environment though.

1
0
Phil W
Silver badge

Re: Skype for business is pretty sad

1. Can't say I've ever really seen that problem. Windows do tend to shuffled about a bit if you start using meeting content i.e. presentations or desktop sharing but for IM calls I've never had a problem.

2. That's not a Skype for Business/Lync issue, that's a "Bluetooth is crap" issue. I've yet to come across a Bluetooth headset that qualifies as "very good" or better, when used with Skype for Business or not. Personally I have a Plantronics Voyager Legend UC ML headset that qualifies as "good".

3. That will very much depend on the setup of your PC. If your Bluetooth device is one of those fancy ones that comes with it's own dongle, then the audio driver may well be attached to the dongle not the headset, so Windows is unaware when it disconnects. If it is through normal Bluetooth adapter, then the audio device will cease to exist, and admittedly Skype for Business could tell you when that happened. As for low battery notification, again that's the devices responsibility as there is no proper standard (or at least not on that that's used in Windows or Android) within Bluetooth for notifying the host about the battery state.

4. Never seen that myself, but most likely down to QoS? HD quality audio has always worked fine for me whether internally over the FrontEnd servers or even coming in via Edge. WiFi has presented some issues but we've solved those now.

5. They can be, but it depends how much money you spend. Sennheiser and Plantronics do some nice Lync Certified wireless headsets, but they cost a small fortune. There's no reason you have to user a certified device though, there's plenty of good uncertified devices.

6. Mostly agreed on this, it's not great.

7. Personally I've never had a problem with the UI, either the old Lync 2010 and 2013 UI or the new Skype for Business 2016, and I've not had any users I've had to show things more than once.

The backend UI on the server on the other hand.... Still uses Silverlight for the main part of the web GUI, uses another crappier web interface for configuring response groups, and has no GUI at all for configuring Common Area Phones and some other things. If any part of the GUI needs work, it's the server side.

Also as for what the article says about "the directory search will find new contacts by their Microsoft account address, but never by their Skype name." That's not exactly true, you can add a Skype user by their Skype username by entering it as skypeusername@skypeids.net this has been the case for a number of years and was introduced in Lync 2013 Server before Skype for Business was even a thing.

Skype for Business could certainly use work, both client and server side. Some bits of it are even questionable as to whether they should be in production use. But overall it's actually quite a good system, and has a great deal of potential. Just don't blame it for the failings of your hardware or OS, or your network infrastructure.

3
0

'SambaCry' malware scum return with a Windows encore

Phil W
Silver badge

Re: Enough with the cute names already!

More importantly why names that don't seem to have any basis, wtf is CowerSnail?

I'd have gone for something like MyLittlePwny (Friendship is Hacking)

9
0

Currys PC World rapped after Knowhow Cloud ad ruled to be 'misleading'

Phil W
Silver badge

Re: As a rule of thumb

Military Grade Snake Oil?

For Military Grade Snakes?

The whole "Military Grade" marketing thing is annoying anyway. Because as a headline it's meaningless, for a start whose military are you talking about? If it's one of the big ones like USA, UK, Canada or whatever then they'll certainly have various named/numbered standards for things, such as hardware components and software compliance, but rather crucially those standards won't be uniform (no pun intended) across those countries.

Plus it could be referring to the military of for instance the Central African Republic, who I seriously doubt have any defined standards for computer hardware or software.

8
0

Snopes.com asks for bailout amid dispute over who runs the site and collects ad dollars

Phil W
Silver badge

Re: 'Detect fact news'

Depends how you look at it. With so much fake news around perhaps 'detecting fact news' is the process of picking out the things which are true?

4
0

User filed fake trouble tickets to take helpful sysadmin to lunches

Phil W
Silver badge

Re: "He would put in a (fake) trouble ticket and request me."

I think it stops being stalking once you go to dinner with them.

At that point it's either a date because you went voluntarily, or kidnapping because you didn't.

44
1

UK government's war on e-cigs is over

Phil W
Silver badge

Re: Jesus, NO!

'"It does contain a known carcinogen and various irritants."

So do tomatoes!'

Yes and if you liquidised tomatoes then heated them to vapour a blew it around an office we shared or a pub we were both in I'd have a problem with that to.

I'm not going to argue whether vaping is directly or passively harmful, there's no evidence it is (not that lack of evidence is proof) but it's not important.

This isn't a health related debate it's a social one.

I agree that we don't need specific legislation banning vaping indoors in public places or work places. Not because it should be allowed but because people just shouldn't do it out of consideration for others.

If I turned up at the pub or my office with a steam cleaner and just sat there letting off puffs of steam because I enjoy it I'd be told to fuck off, and rightly so. Just because your behaviour isn't specifically illegal and doesn't harm other people's health doesn't make it ok.

6
0

Jodie Who-ttaker? The Doctor is in

Phil W
Silver badge

"Why don't you see it as just a simple choice that reflects the times that we are living in?"

Because Doctor Who isn't a character from the times we're living in?

If it was another male Doctor Who but he'd picked up a new companion from 2017 who was transgender there would be far less conversation about it, and it would be much more relevant to the times we're living in.

To me it simply doesn't make sense, it would be akin to Star Trek Discovery having a transporter accident that changes the Captain's gender and they decide to stay that way. It just feels like shoehorning a gender change for the sake of it.

3
2
Phil W
Silver badge

Re: If you're all in favour of strong female roles...

"then why exclude shows with strong followings? "

I'm not. I'm more than happy for a show with a strong following to kill off a main character and replace them with a female lead. However in Doctor Who they aren't killing off the main character it's supposed to be the same person albeit with a new body and personality.

I'd also have no problem with a character being transgender if that was clearly the writer's intention from the start. But Doctor Who has regenerated a dozen times now and never been female, suddenly deciding to do it now seems very much to be pandering decision not a planned plot choice.

9
4
Phil W
Silver badge
Joke

I think you mean Cyberperson, how dare you assume their gender!

15
0
Phil W
Silver badge

You mean Cleopeter, and Frankentina.

5
0
Phil W
Silver badge

How about a person with white skin who identifies as Black, or vice versa, who is also non-binary gender and gets super offended if you assume their gender.

7
2
Phil W
Silver badge

I'm all in favour of strong female lead roles, Voyager is my second favourite Trek partly for that reason (Patrick Stewart is too awesome to come second), but making The Doctor female seems like pandering to political correctness/feminism to me. It's not like the show hasn't had numerous fantastic female characters, they don't need to prove their credentials on female characters.

I've seen talk of making James Bond female, but really why? Create a new spy in a similar style sure but why the need to change existing characters.

What TV producers should be doing is creating high quality new shows with female leads, or strong new female characters in existing Universes.

It's not like it's even that hard to create new shows or characters like that, there's Janeway as I already mentioned, Rey in Star Wars, Dutch in Kill Joys, Two In Dark Matter and so many others.

29
5

Dear racist Airbnb host, we've enrolled you in an Asian American studies course

Phil W
Silver badge

Re: Contrition

""Native Americans" are not native either. They migrated from Russia/China through Alaska."

They were however the first humans to settle there, which short of evolving there in the first place is about as native as it gets.

1
0

Hackers able to turbo-charge DJI drones way beyond what's legal

Phil W
Silver badge

Re: DJI can't police this.

I didn't actually downvote you for disagreeing with my argument, however I would point out that it doesn't really work. You can do considerable damage to other people with a car/van with no risk to yourself, as unfortunately recent terrorist attacks have shown.

5
1
Phil W
Silver badge

Re: DJI can't police this.

I'm with Chris on this one, DJI aren't (and shouldn't be) under any obligation to put these restrictions in in the first place, let alone continually patch them when people find ways to hack/mod them. It's more impressive that they bother in the first place, given the vast number of other manufacturers who won't be.

Responsibility for complying with the law lies with the operator of the drone, both legally and morally, not with the manufacturer.

Requiring manufacturers to make sure drone operators can't fly beyond visual range, or over certain altitudes is akin to saying car manufacturers have to make sure people can't drive cars with their eyes shut or break any speed limits.

30
8

Openreach kicks off 'rebrand' by painting over BT logo on vans

Phil W
Silver badge

Re: Will it really make any differece?

"this is an ongoing cost that could switch from ISP to ISP as the customer does, n'cest pas?"

No, because that makes the assumptions that the property will be continuously occupied for the lifetime of the loan and that all the occupants in that period of time will be willing to fork out for fibre.

If the current occupants moves out/dies/whatever and the property is empty for an extended period, nothing gets paid. If the new occupant says "15Mbps is more than enough, no fibre for me thanks" they won't be paying either.

It looks like another poster has assumed I work for BT, I don't and never have. But I do work in IT and have first hand understanding of the difficulty of old cabling infrastructure and ducting, and the massive cost of getting new fibre put in. Businesses pay these costs, generally up front, separately to the ongoing service cost, but for some reason residential consumers seem to expect Openreach or ISPs to absorb this massive cost with no guarantee, or even decent probability, of recouping it.

2
1
Phil W
Silver badge

Re: Will it really make any differece?

"a senior BT executive told our community that we would never get anything better than FTTC as there was no profit to be made"

Given the cost of providing FTTP, especially in areas where the ducts are difficult to access, collapsed, or already at capacity, or you're too far from the nearest cabinet due to the bizarre route to your property, the man hours required to assess and deal with that not to mention the actual materials cost, I'd say that saying there's no profit to be made is a generous statement. The reality is more likely there's massive loss to be made.

If you were to fully fund an average to difficult FTTP installation yourself it would easily cost thousands of pounds. For Openreach/an ISP to fund that would be exceedingly difficult. To stand any realistic prospect of breaking even on the install you'd need to be tying the consumer into a 5-10 year contract which almost no residential user is likely to agree to.

Not to mention if you're in a rural area there may not be sufficient upstream capacity from your exchange to cope with any quantity of FTTP households.

2
1

Trump tramples US Constitution by blocking Twitter critics – lawsuit

Phil W
Silver badge

Re: ID 10 T alert

@AC and steve 124 "Mexicans and Muslims (non-naturalized) have no 1st amendment rights as they are not American citizens."

Despite what Trump and the media may tell you "Muslim" is not a nationality, it is a religion just like Christianity, Judaism, Taoism, Buddhism or the Flying Spaghetti Monster, and has nothing more to do with rights of citizenship than any of them do.

While you may be right about Mexicans (or citizens of any other country), there are plenty of Muslims in the USA whose families have been there for countless generations so no naturlisation involved.

@BillG "yes, you have the right to voice your opinion. You do NOT have the right to demand others listen to your opinion"

While that is generally true, this is a bit of grey area because it's social media (hence the legal case which will firm this up). If the @RealDonaldTrump account is to be consider an official public communications channel of the President, then blocking people from seeing what the President says there has serious legal implications since in practice it is akin to trying to the President trying to prevent that person seeing any other official public statement he makes, and making any kind of public response to that statement.

You'd think it ridiculous if the President tried to issue an Executive Order stating that Steven King wasn't allowed to read any newspaper articles with his statements in or watch any of his statements/interviews of TV, and wasn't allowed to publicly publish any criticism of them.

Fundamentally the problem here is that Trump is using 'Block' rather than 'Mute', one limits what the other person can do while the other just prevents you having to see what they have to say, for someone like the POTUS there is an important legal difference.

14
1

GSM gateway ban U-turn casts doubt on 8-year prosecution in Blighty

Phil W
Silver badge

Re: "The Crown Prosecution Service has been contacted ...."

"Once they've wiped the egg off their faces.

Got their collective feet out of their mouths."

These 2 epithets don't make sense, the CPS was pursuing a prosecution under the law as is their purpose. They made no mistake in doing so and will likely drop the case if the law is no longer current. If there's egg on anybody's face it's Ofcom's for introducing the law in the first place.

"And got their thumbs out of their arses."

Harder to argue with that one.

9
0

Judge used personal email to send out details of sensitive case

Phil W
Silver badge

Re: Weird

Most people accused of murder did it, therefore I accuse you of murder. Off to prison with you.

13
0
Phil W
Silver badge

Re: At least it seems it's an exception

It's my understanding that Google don't sell telemetry data either, not directly anyway.

They certainly use it to target advertising, but it's for their own advertising service, the clients of which don't get to see the data in question they just get sold an advertising target market i.e. 18-24 year old males living in this area with these interests, who have visited these websites.

Selling the actual personal data wouldn't be as profitable, since once they've sold it they can't continue to squeeze that particular client for money.

6
0

May the excessive force be with you: Chap cuffed after Star Trek v Star Wars row turns bloody

Phil W
Silver badge

The long night has come...

Andromeda gets far too little credit in these threads. It had it's flaws but it was very watchable in a lot of ways.

9
0

Should Conversion of Bitcoin to Money Be Illegal?

Phil W
Silver badge

"the only people who currently use Bitcoin are criminal hackers, money launderers and drug dealers"

Uh no, so wrong it's impossible to imagine how you could be any more incorrect.

I use bitcoin fairly regularly, for the simple reason that using the graphics cards I already have for gaming to earn Bitcoin is incredibly easy. I use this Bitcoin to eithere buy things I wouldn't otherwise have the money for or reinvest it into more graphics cards to increase my BTC income.

I am not a hacker, money laundered or drug dealer.

There are thousands of people like me doing the same thing, as well as people who simply buy and sell bitcoin to make money from exchange rate variations the same as with any other currency.

While there may well be criminal elements using Bitcoin they are far from the majority. Trying to ban bitcoin because criminals might transfer their currency using it is little different than saying let's ban international currency exchanges to block criminal activity, or ban people from investing in business because money can be laundered that way.

In fact people use cash to buy drugs don't they? Let's ban physical currency altogether, used bank notes that you didn't withdraw from an ATM yourself are even less traceable than Bitcoin.

0
0

Google Chrome's HTTPS ban-hammer drops on WoSign, StartCom in two months

Phil W
Silver badge

Re: EU Anyone

Bloody ages if the affected entities are not complying with obvious independently created security standards not just upsetting Google. Not to mention the the companies in question are not even remotely in the EU

5
0

Create a user called '0day', get bonus root privs – thanks, Systemd!

Phil W
Silver badge

Re: it's a not a critical security issue

No it doesn't make it MORE of an issue.

A good sysadmin will either have the system locked down and audit-able enough that making such a change would be traceable to him anyway, or they are sufficiently skilled to do whatever you're bunging them £20 for without being traced anyway.

While this clearly is a problem and there needs to be some way to mitigate it, there is a good argument for not doing so or at least not doing so by default.

What if there are environments where numeric users are being used intentionally (regardless of the fact they're invalid/unsupported) such as the idea of using employee numbers as another poster mentioned. Changing a fundamental behaviour of username handling that's been in place for years has a potentially huge impact, and when it's only exploitable by taking action as root in the first place we're really only a step or two away from saying "a root user being to give another user root access is a security flaw".

What this needs is an option flag that can be set in a config file to say "numeric usernames default access=" and the option to set root or user, and perhaps for now have it set to root by default, and in a few versions time switch to user by default.

Those that consider this a threat could then fix it now, those that don't have some time before they need to change any configuration.

More importantly I think you need to reassess the level of bribe you're offering, £20 is nowhere near enough to do anything that stands even the remotest chance of coming back on me.

2
0

Pwned UK SME fined £60K for leaving itself vulnerable to hack attack

Phil W
Silver badge

Re: OK

Your point certainly has some merit morally, but equally it kind of rings of the childish excuse "but everyone else was doing it", just because no-one else is complying with the rules properly doesn't mean it's ok for you not to as well.

There's also an argument that if you're a small operation then you have fewer systems to maintain and therefore securing them, and testing that security should be much simpler.

Big corps have a lot more systems which can be a lot more complex and therefore harder to secure and security test. Not that that is any excuse of course, big corps should also have the resources to tackle such things, either internally or by outsourcing, but it is easier to understand how the odd thing could slip through the net where as in this case it's a small outfit who've failed to take even basic precautions.

8
2

We'll drag Microsoft in front of Supremes over Irish email spat – DoJ

Phil W
Silver badge

Doubling up

"Microsoft, meanwhile, said that it is hoping the matter could be resolved outside of the court, preferably with legislation."

You mean that legislation that already exists in the form of existing international treaties with Ireland which provide a mechanism for getting the information with co-operation of Irish law enforcement agencies?

I presume the suggestion is that there should be new US legislation allowing them to retrieve things held overseas without bothering to consult with that nation's government/law enforcement. Putting aside whether such a thing would be legal under international law (it wouldn't), it's also completely unnecessary. You could maybe try and make a case it were needed if foreign governments regularly refused to co-operate, but that never happens.

The only reasoning I can see here is that the DOJ and other US agencies don't want to have to go to the time and effort or dealing with foreign governments, but it seems to me in equivalent the time and cost taken on this legal case they could have made the proper international requests for several dozen warrants at least.

7
0

Grenfell Tower -- IT angle

Phil W
Silver badge

Re: Grenfell Tower -- IT angle

Yes but it's a publicly run thing, so much like public sector IT even if the technical people suggest such a thing is absolutely essential those holding the purse strings will decide saving money is more important.

0
0

Page:

Forums

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2017