* Posts by Phil W

881 posts • joined 10 Mar 2010

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Samsung set a fire under battery-makers to make the Galaxy Note 7 flaming brilliant

Phil W
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Comparison of outrage

I think the real shock with the Note 7 saga, is that the level of outrage on these battery fires seems to be substantially higher than that which surrounded the battery fires onboard the Boeing 787 Dreamliners.

The potential loss of life with the Boeing problems was much higher than the Note 7 as far as I can see, yet most people seem to have largely forgotten about that one now.

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Phil W
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Re: Amazing that somehow only Samsung was affected

1. So these two suppliers never made batteries for Samsung, or anyone else before?

Well given that one of them is another division of Samsung, it seems quite likely they did make batteries for Samsung devices previously.

2. If they did, then why no major problems with other models, or brands?

Because this device demanded higher battery capacity in a smaller space than any previous device

3. If the two battery makers are brand new manufacturers then why wasn't rigorous Quality Assurance/Quality Control inspections performed including periodic design compliance and random test-until-failure checks performed as part of the manufacturing production process?

Firstly they aren't brand new manufacturers, secondly from the available information the known percentage failure rate is sufficiently small as to easily pass any quality control procedures without detection.

4. What exactly was so radically different with the N-ferno 7 vs the standard Galaxy S7?

A lot? They're entirely different beasts really, in terms of dimensions and power draw not to mention the fact that they, and this is key, don't use the same battery. That's about as useful a question as what was so radically different with the Note 7 vs an Xperia Z or HTC 10.

5. Speaking of S7, who made the batteries for S7 and other Samsung models?

What's that got to do with it? It's not the same battery. It's a fault with a specific battery model design not all batteries from a particular manufacturer.

5. Considering that N-ferno 7 incorporated the ubiquitous—but possibly dangerous—lithium batteries then why wasn't safety a top priority at Samsung for a brand new FLAGSHIP model... including its apparently BRAND NEW DESIGN batteries?

As I've pointed out previously, from the known data the failure rate is so small as to easily escape detection until exposure to mass market. Unless you're suggesting that internal testing prior to release should consist of at least several hundred thousand devices used for weeks?

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Phil W
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Re: Amazing that somehow only Samsung was affected

"It strains credulity that TWO suppliers (one of which is Samsung SDI, i.e. basically itself!) had the same problems and somehow didn't notice."

No, not really.

"after all this investigation couldn't figure it out"

Seems quite likely to be honest. As far as I can find there were 112 (or there abouts, Samsung wouldn't officially acknowledge all of those either) reported fires/explosions from Note 7 devices. Samsung shipped something like 2.5 million of them, so as a percentage the number that actually caught fire is vanishingly small, somewhere around 0.004%, it's just that things exploding and injuring people tends to draw a lot of attention.

It's clearly not the case that every single phone had the problem, and even if you were to say 1000 times more phones had the fault than were reported, that's only 4% of the 2.5 million phones that shipped, the probability that Samsung managed to find one of the phones that actually had the fault and then managed to reproduce it in such a way that they could definitively say what happened is quite remote.

The answer they've given is clearly an educated guess. and that's ok. They've taken the blame, they haven't tried to pass it all off to the battery manufacturers (even if that was a division of themselves) and they haven't tried to say it was the consumer's fault using it wrong in some way.

Situations like this are an unfortunate consequence of selling bleeding edge technology to consumers, but companies like Samsung are doing so because they have to in order to compete in the market, not because they want to. If they could get away with selling only older proven technologies while still competing at the highest levels I'm sure they'd love to.

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Boffins ready to demo 1.44 petabit-per-second fibre cables

Phil W
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Re: Those vulnerable cables

Honestly I don't think cable cutting is a huge threat to any nation.

I can't speak for every country, but I'm fairly confident most have more than one route in and out data wise, so cutting them off would be quite time consuming.

More importantly though, particularly when it comes to the major superpowers, they'd rather have their enemies online so they can perform cyber attacks on them.

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Phil W
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"We can either build more submarine cables or more efficient submarine cables"

What?! Either is very much the wrong word there.

First off "More efficient submarine cables" is a subset of the group "more submarine cables" the statement above is logically impossible you can't build more efficient cables unless you build at least one more cable for that more efficient one to exist.

Secondly the statement of "either" implies that if we make a more efficient cable we won't need to lay anymore of them, however history doesn't support that argument our data usage has rapidly increased over time and will certainly continue to do so, and given that this innovation will take 10 years to be ready it likely won't seem as impressive by the time it is.

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Annoyingly precocious teen who ruined Trek is now an asteroid

Phil W
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N.B. If you want to pick on implausible plot/character points, how about Picard? Who despite having his body and mind altered by advanced alien nanotechnology is allowed to take command of the flagship again only weeks (ok maybe a couple of months) after having it removed.

Or Reg Barclay, who is allowed to continue not only serving in Starfleet at the relatively senior rank of lieutenant, but also to continue to work in sensitive engineering areas or on highly advanced and secret projects despite having had his brain reprogrammed by an alien probe and taking over the ship, being de-evolved into a spider creature, and suffering from numerous psychological conditions that made him unreliable and at times unstable.

By comparison to these two (just for starters there's far more unbelievable characters in TNG,DS9 and Voyager), Wesley Crusher is just a bright young kid who happens to have come up with good ideas and got lucky that his mother was serving aboard the right ship.

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Phil W
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Agreed on both counts. Wil is a cool guy.

As for Wesley? I've never understood the hate either. Saying he saves the Enterprise more times than seems plausible is silly, not just for the use of the word plausible to describe sci-fi but because he actually rarely saves the Enterprise at all. Sure he often comes up with good ideas that save the day, but he rarely executes them alone there is usually extensive help from LaForge or Data or others sometimes to the point that Wes did little more than provide the idea. In fact in The Game he barely discovers the problem before becoming a victim, it's Data that does all the actual saving of the day.

As for his excessive nobility? He's a kid trying to live up to ideals set by his dead father, and Picard as his surrogate father, so he's going to be trying harder than your average young person to be noble and achieve. He actually often fails to do so just like any kid trying to do such a thing. There's nothing strange about a young person being too idealistic and failing.

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Brilliant phishing attack probes sent mail, sends fake attachments

Phil W
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Re: Sigh. Not again.

"If people are so clueless that they're scanning or photographing printed pages, then converting into a PDF"

Unless of course you happen to work somewhere that operates a fleet of major brand MFDs which scan to email in PDF format (with an option for TIFF but that's not really better is it).

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Amazon asks for spectrum to try out IoT networking gear

Phil W
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It appears to have the same structural meaning as "24 hours a day, 7 days a week, 365 days a year", the second and third statements serve no actual purpose.

The only alternative I can think of is that they mean "5 minutes of each hour every day of the week, or an equivalent thereof" so that they could do 24 separate 5 minute broadcasts every day for seven days, or one continuous broadcast of 840 minutes in a seven day period, or any combination in between to add up to 840 minutes in seven day period.

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BT installs phone 'spam filter', says it'll strain out mass cold-callers

Phil W
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Re: Free as part of Line Rental? Thought not.

"It's free now but for how long?"

To the residential consumer, free forever. However don't be surprised when we hear that BT start offering to whitelist companies for a nominal fee.

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Phil W
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Re: Interesting development

The solution there would be to find out the number currently on the line before calling them, one would hope with that information they might be able to find something.

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Just give up: 123456 is still the world's most popular password

Phil W
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Re: Don't Just Blame Users

"I prefer to teach people to use strong, gibberish passwords, minimum 12 characters"

This will almost certainly mean their passwords are getting written down. It takes a very special kind of mind to remember a completely random sequence of letters, numbers and other characters and also associate that random sequence with a particular website.

"Teach them to use a password safe."

All password safe type applications I've seen have the same obvious flaw, in that you use a password to access them. Sure no-one can guess or easily brute force your online account passwords if they're massively complex, but if you store them in a password safe all that's need is to compromise the security of the password safe and ALL of your passwords have been simultaneously compromised.

The best solution is to teach people to create passwords that are complex enough that they can't be guessed or brute forced easily, but are based on some meaningful pattern that allows the user to remember them.

As long as you don't pick an obvious pattern, like your spouse's initials and date of birth this can be sufficiently secure for almost any purpose. Pick two or memorable but unrelated pieces of information, for example your work post (zip) code and a sibling's date of birth.

You can even harness old fashioned simple cipher techniques for instance take the reg (license) plate number of a car you used to own (but not your current one just to add obscurity), then to make that even more secure alternately increment and decrement each character by one so X81 EDR becomes Y72 DEQ.

These systems are by no means foolproof, and can still be forgotten, but at least they are meaningful enough that you stand a chance of remembering them but seemingly random enough that they can't easily be guessed or brute forced.

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Customer: BT admitted it had 'mis-sold' me fibre broadband

Phil W
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Re: Cable?

"which takes us back to the whole question of the package being mis-sold"

Yes it does, and I wasn't for a moment arguing that it wasn't mis-sold. I was simply pointing out the problem described in the article doesn't make sense.

As for how it happened, it's more than likely the records for which cabinet that particular phone line go to were wrong and some other cabinet nearby is FTTC enabled. Not an excuse of course, but bearing in mind some of the phone lines out there have been in place since they were put in by GPO before BT ever existed it's at least a little understandable if the occasional record is inaccurate.

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Phil W
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Re: What are customers moaning about?

"I need the 400m of loop that goes down the road to the green cab at the bottom of the street. I don't need the pair that meanders from there back to the exchange."

No but you do need the fibre back to the Exchange, and the ducts that it runs though. You also need someone to repair that 400m of cable to your house if it gets broken or damaged. Perhaps you'd be willing to pay the hourly rate for engineers to work on it if that happens? It could quite easily be years of line rental if the break is hard to find I assure you.

Your 'line rental' pays for the ongoing maintenance of the network infrastructure. Which is why you don't pay when cables degrade or get broken, or a duct collapses and has to be repaired.

Don't be fooled by the ISPs like Vodafone, who now don't have specific line rental charges. All they've done is roll it into the cost of the broadband and put the broadband charge up.

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Phil W
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Cable?

"After being told contradictory information by BT customer services, it transpired he was not eligible for fibre broadband because the cable only went to the cabinet - and not to his home."

Up to 85Mbps is an FTTC speed not an FTTP speed, so the above makes no sense.

Presumably what has actually occurred is that his cabinet is not FTTC and he can only get ADSL2 which would be up to 24Mbps making 18Mbps far more likely.

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TCL snags global deal to build n'flog BlackBerrys

Phil W
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So what's changed?

So the DTEK handsets were essentially TCL devices anyways, so really by licensing the BlackBerry name to TCL nothing much is really going to change?

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Sysadmin 'fixed' PC by hiding it on a bookshelf for a few weeks

Phil W
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Re: Aaron is NOT a twat

Have one yourself.

The correct time to apply it is after you've given it a quick once over to make sure it's not actually/obviously broken, not before. Putting it on a shelf without even bothering to switch it on is twat territory.

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Information on smart meters? Yep. They're great. That works, right? – UK.gov

Phil W
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Re: estimated net "benefit" of £5.7bn by 2020

@PrivateCitizen

In regards to accuracy, from what I've seen smart meters (or at least the part of them that goes inline with the incoming supply, not the fancy wirelessly connected gadget) still have a cumulative unit read out, just like a conventional meter.

Have you any reason to believe that this function on a smart meter is any less accurate than that of a conventional meter? Unless you do, you can check the readout on the meter just like you do now.

If you do believe that the cumulative read out on the inline element of a smart meter is in some way inaccurate or unreliable, then I would raise the question how do you know that the read out on your conventional meter is accurate?

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Phil W
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Re: estimated net "benefit" of £5.7bn by 2020

@Dominion

Not sure why you were downvoted, but I agree with you entirely.

I have tried and failed, to remember to regularly submit my meter readings, not to mention the fact that the gas meter being outside means going out in the cold or pissing rain to do so at this time of year. Having gas and electricity meters that eliminate the need sounds like a great idea to me. Mine is due to be installed at the weekend.

Having a smart meter is unlikely to reduce my energy consumption. In fact, I intend to pay no attention what so ever to my smart meter, for me the whole point of it is to reduce how much I bother to look at my usage figures not increase it.

As for concerns over my supply being turned off using the meter? Firstly, can smart meters even do that? I don't know, but even if they can I think it's far more likely to happen as a result of supplier incompetence than through a security flaw in the meter, and the probably of being cut off due to supplier incompetence already exists now.

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Engineers say safety features got squished out of cramped Samsung Note 7

Phil W
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Re: So the pathetic arms race has found a public victim.

I would pay literally ridiculous sums of money for an N900 (or N950 because it was sexier) with more modern specs running Android.

Currently have a Priv, which is the closest thing there is currently.

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Sysadmin figures out dating agency worker lied in his profile

Phil W
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Re: Enter == submit

Hello my name is Joshua, my sense of humour is very logical, my interests include chess and global thermonuclear war, my dislikes include tic-tac-toe which is a very strange game.

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Hackers waste Xbox One, PS4, MacBook, Pixel, with USB zapper

Phil W
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Covert

This biggest threat these things pose I think, it not people maliciously plugging them in themselves, but the fact that due to their size they could easily be placed inside the housing of many models of USB flash drive. It would take minimal work in many circumstances then, to swap someones genuine USB flash drive for a disguised USBkill device.

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Jeremy Hunt: Telcos must block teens from sexting each other

Phil W
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"Can't think Won't think" the game show where contestants have to categorise politicians and celebrities into those that are terminally stupid and those who have a brain but are thoroughly ignorant.

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Confirmation of who constitutes average whisky consumer helps resolve dispute

Phil W
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Re: Blended

""Monkey Shoulder"? Really?"

Yes really, apparently it's a historical term from the whisky industry for a condition the malt turners would get from using their arms heavily all day, where their arm would hang like a monkey's. Not just a weird 'hip' phrase in this case, presuming it's true.

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Phil W
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Re: Blended

While I could easily be called a whisky snob, ruling out a whisky immediately because it's blended malt has it's flaws. I agree that in 90% of cases blended malts are foul, there is the odd exception.

Blending malts is actually a perfectly reasonable thing to, it's no more obscene than switching to different barrels during maturation to achieve a different flavour. The key point with blending malts though, is to pick the right malts not just throw any old shit together in a bottle a call it "Finest blended whisky".

Supermarket own label piss, and stuff like Bells and Teachers is only suitable for use as a cleaning fluid. But then there are things like Monkey Shoulder which while technically a blended malt, is blended by people who actually know what they're doing which is pretty decent.

In general I'd always choose a nice single malt first, I'm always open to bribes that have a Balvenie label on them, but I'd certainly rather drink a bottle of Monkey Shoulder than throw it away (which is what I'd most likely do if someone gave me a bottle of Teachers).

Also the other blended piss does serve a purpose, it gives the idiots who like to mix "whisky" with coke something to use instead of wasting a perfectly decent malt.

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Rivals' keyword marketing activity censured by High Court

Phil W
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Re: Gavels.

No they don't, I believe it's an Americanism. Is it just coincidence that their judiciary system borrows a feature from a system used for selling stuff to the highest bidder?

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Integrator fired chap for hiding drugs conviction, told to pay compo for violating his rights

Phil W
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Re: When you've done the penalty, that should be it.

"AW says he specifically asked Data#3's interviewers if he needed to pass a criminal record check"

What I don't get here is if they consider him not revealing that he had a criminal record to be a problem that shows a lack of integrity, why did they not to respond to his queries at interview about whether he needed to pass a criminal record check with "Why? Do you have a criminal record?" or if there is some Australian law preventing them from directly asking that question simply asking "Would it be a problem if you did have to pass one?" (note that answering yes to this is not the same as saying you have a criminal record, you many simply object to being checked up on).

Even more simply, they could not pick him for the job in the first place on the basis that his queries on the subject indicate a personality that would not fit with the company.

As has been suggested, I suspect what really happened here was that they really wanted rid of him for some other reason and used the fact that someone noted his query at the interview to find a reason.

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Red squirrels! Adorable, right? Wrong – they're riddled with leprosy

Phil W
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Re: Poxy squirrels

"grey squirrel is similar to rat"

So good "onna stick" and/or with plenty of ketchup?

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Robot solves Rubik's Cubes in 637 milliseconds

Phil W
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No no, the implication is that after your driver-less car piles you into the side of a truck, this robot or it's descendants will be able to examine the mess and unpick your car and the bits of your body from each other.

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European F-35 avionics to be overhauled at Sealand, says UK.gov

Phil W
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Expansion

"most of the old RAF station has been sold to developers"

It's been maybe a year since I last went that way, but last time I did a fairly substantially portion of it is still there. More than enough for this kind of project.

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A British phone you're not embarrassed to carry? You heard that right

Phil W
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Paris Hilton

Re: Diasappointing

Someone who knows they should have a second number for talking to their mistress, but misunderstands the point of having it and also wants to make "home videos" with said mistress.

Paris, because she has all the necessary qualities for both being a mistress and misunderstanding things.

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Hell desk thought PC fire report was a first-day-on-the-job prank

Phil W
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Re: @ DropBear Respect in the tech sector isn't assumed - it's earned.

"the computer still plugged in and, astonishingly, whilst wearing an anti-static strap"

Let me guess, on his left wrist to make absolutely sure that if he got electrocuted the current would go through his heart and down his left arm, killing him?

I think the important difference with your prank compared to say the one described above with soft cheese on a briefcase handle, is that there is no lasting effect from polysterene packing bursting out at you, where as soft cheese makes a mess of your hands and could stain your clothes and the leather of the briefcase. I think that is an important differentiation between pranks that are a light hearted joke and those that go to far, do they cause any unpleasant or lasting side effects?

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Phil W
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Re: so..

"...you bullied someone because you didn't like the way they dressed and behaved, eventually managing to make them buy a receptacle that you thought acceptable."

While I see your point, only in our modern overly politically correct world would this been seen as bullying.

In reality this team member dressing and behaving differently, even if that difference is smarter, actually makes the company look bad, rather than the opposite as you might expect. Jeans and t-shirts and an ordinary tool bag might not be an official uniform but if that is the normal practice in the business, rather than suit and tie and briefcase, some new guy turning up and dressing that way actually makes it look like the rest of the team are lazy and/or under dressed to an outsider.

It's important to try and fit in, not just for you and your teammates but for the business to.

Before anyone points out that if there's no uniform, some people may feel uncomfortable dressing so informally for work. There's always a middle ground, if not jeans and t-shirt, some smart trousers and a plain work shirt with no tie (frankly no one who is opening up electronic equipment routinely should wear a tie for work anyway, it's a danger unless you take it off all the time). Jacket optional.

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Graduate recruitment site exposed 50,000 CVs sent to Virgin Media UK

Phil W
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Re: What's all this?

Would you prefer Curriculum Vitae?

Except this is a .co.uk site not .roman.empire site.

Romani ite domum!

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Finally, that tech fad's over: Smartwatch sales tank more than 50%

Phil W
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Re: Garmin

"You know hands-free devices are just as distracting to use whilst driving, right?"

This is true, the only way I tend to use my phone while driving is by voice command, with Google Now set up and the phone unlocked and charging in it's cradle before I set off I can make phone calls or send text messages by voice command (usually just "I'm going to be late" or "I'm stuck in traffic", things I don't need to read a reply for) without looking at the phone at all.

Is it still dangerous to make hands free phone calls while driving, even when not looking at or touching the device? Possibly, but I would argue no more so than it is to hold a conversation with a passenger and how many of us sit in absolute silence ignoring our passengers while driving?

I've also always been annoyed by the specific addition of use of mobile phones while driving to UK law. Not because I have anything against the law as such, but firstly because it was pretty much covered by "due care and attention" and secondly because it doesn't take any account of CB radios that farmers/HGV drivers use all the time while driving, arguable with far greater risk because of the size of vehicles they're operating.

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Phil W
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Re: Garmin

"But the main advantage is that I can see who is calling or texting me with the flick of a wrist. Makes in invaluable when driving as I do not need to take my hands from the wheel"

Yeah because turning your head to look at your wrist instead of the road while you read a message on a tiny screen on your wrist isn't dangerous at all!

I would strongly advise against trying to read messages while driving at all, but at least with your phone in a cradle on the dash you can glance at it without turning your head away from the road.

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Will AI spell the end of humanity? The tech industry wants you to think so

Phil W
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Misreading

I misread this headline as "Will.i.am spells the end of humanity", frankly this is probably closer to the truth.

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Judge nailed for trying to bribe Fed with fizzy water (aka Bud Light)

Phil W
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Re: Not Really

@chivo243

It's not that there's lots of Hillary supporters here, there are lots of techies here who think that her use of a private email email server for government work was stupid.

However while we may criticise Hillary, we don't compound that with accusing the FBI of being corrupt or ineffective, or assuming we're better qualified to judge her legal culpability without either seeing the evidence or having any legal training.

I have little doubt that the issue of her emails, while bad and stupid, was technically not a crime. Whether it was a sufficient violation of policy and should in some way disqualify her from holding some or all public offices in future is an entirely different matter, which I am undecided on.

But really I think in terms of whether she should be allowed to run for president as a result, that is something for the Democrat party to decide on in the first instance, and the people in the form of voting in the second.

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Meet the slimeballs who are openly sabotaging Virgin Media

Phil W
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Re: Exploding rodents ...

I assume you've never had a pet rabbit/hamster/gerbal/guinea pig/other rodent. I think you'd be surprised at the piercing ability of rodent teeth. It's not just about the hardness of the teeth but also the sharpness and the surface area combined to jaw muscle power ratio which is surprisingly high.

Armoured cables are in general intended to withstand strikes from tools and digging equipment, a spade driven by a human or a mechanical digger may be powerful but the power is spread over the whole surface of the digging implement.

Also I think in a lot of cases when builders damage armoured cable, it's not so much the initial impact that damages the cable but also the pulling and torsional stress as the digging implement tries to pull the cable out of the ground along with the surrounding earth. A squirrel on the other hand can't really apply much force to the cable as a whole.

Not to mention it has to be possible to cut the armour with something, otherwise how would you ever get the correct length of cable :)

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Virgin Media boss warns Brexit could hamstring broadband investment

Phil W
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Re: Christmas Time is here!

"With no real world evidence that things will be worse"

Sure, there's no evidence things will be worse, it's hard to have evidence about the future particular when the planned shape of that future has yet to be detemined, but there is evidence that things are already worse.

Most price rises we're seeing now are as a result of a fairly steep decline in the value of GBP against both USD and EUR, causing import costs to sky rocket immediately for any business without currency hedging and with a clear expectation of them sky rocketing for those who did hedge.

With further declines in GBP value likely and expected up until the UK reaches a new deal with the EU and/or Article 50 is actually triggered and the two year leave period has passed, businesses have no choice but to raise prices for the time being. (I admit there may well be some profiteering going on but there are genuine cost increases as well).

Whether GBP will continue to decline after the actual exit/new trade deal negotiation remains to be seen. It's perfectly possible it's value could rise back to where it used to be it. But businesses cannot base their current pricing on the possible value of the currency in an uncertain future in 5 - 10 years time, they can only base it on the current value of the currency and what that makes their costs come out at now and perhaps at best the predicted value of the next year or so.

As for companies saying their prices will continue to rise after Brexit is complete? That seems a perfectly reasonable thing to say, given that the current currency value has dropped and is continuing that trend as a result of the referendum result, but before Brexit has actually happened, it is reasonable to predict that the same trend could continue following the actual exit.

Sure it might not, but would you prefer companies who believe that their prices will be affected to lie to you and tell you that they won't need to put their prices up and if it then turns out they do just say "Sorry we have to charge you more after all"?

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Basic income after automation? That’s not how capitalism works

Phil W
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Fallacy

While I believe that to a certain degree it is correct that automation doesn't necessarily result in less human work, the view taken and example in the article is fundamentally flawed.

In the case of the shoe factory given the example of a machine, operated by a human, being replaced with a more efficient machine not reducing the human work hours because the company simply produces more shoes has never been the concern about automation.

The idea that automation allows you to either increase efficiency or production volume or both is of course the driving force behind automation but the concern about job losses doesn't come from replacing one machine with a more efficient version of the same, it comes from the possibility of the automation removing the need for a particular skill set that a certain group of employees have.

If your skill set is no longer needed in your profession because the job has been automated, there may well still be human work to be done in the form operating and monitoring the new automated equipment but this is not part of your skill set and you are now out of a job.

To say that "there is no reason to fear (or hope) that automation will put people out of work permanently" may well be true on the grander scale, as a percentage of the population and over time certainly the unemployment will be temporary.

But what of the workers who are made unemployed by automation who don't have another skill set to gain employment with, and are of such an age where once they have retrained to do something else their prospects of gaining new employment are exceedingly low.

HGV or Taxi drivers are a good example of this, if we reach a point where all driving work of this nature becomes automated, what does a say 55-65 year old HGV driver with no other skills or work experience beyond driving HGVs and no qualifications besides a HGV licence do when he is made redundant? Where does his income come from when he can't find work because the only work he was qualified for has been automated, and he is still a number of years from being able to retire and draw pension.

Certainly I would agree that in the long term, on a large societal scale, there is no reason to fear automation putting people out of work. Since as certain areas of work are eliminated by automation, the education system will adjust to direct people toward other forms of work and training and new young employees will be seeking different kinds of work.

But to say "The Automation Argument simply misunderstands how our economy works" is not true. The Automation Argument does understand how our economy works, but our economy doesn't give a flying fuck about the individual worker it only takes account of the population at large scale.

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Outlook-on-Android alternative 'Nine' leaked Exchange Server creds

Phil W
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It says in the article, they already have

"could have placed their enterprise credentials at risk through a since-closed vulnerability"

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Phil W
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"Although nobody should be using the Outlook app anyway, because it's terrible."

Honestly from a usability point of view I don't think it is terrible, particularly for free, as long as you're not concerned about the whole cloud storage thing.

I was using the official Outlook app quite happily for my personal mail until I bought Nine to use for my work email, because once you've bought it, why not use it for all compatible email accounts.

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Phil W
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"Attacks are unlikely but should serve as a warning for those using third-party apps to access corporate credentials."

Third-party apps as opposed to the 'official' Microsoft Outlook for Android app which is actually just a third party app Microsoft bought and rebranded, which in its original incarnation used AWS to store your credentials and a certain amount of your mail. It still does that now, although it uses Microsoft's own cloud services now I believe, it's still holding your data on servers outside of your control and outside of your country potential violating data protection laws depending on where you are based.

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Pwned Clinton aide Trumped

Phil W
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Re: Zero Progress

"I'm a top brass, so policies and rules don't apply to me because I'm obviously smarter than anybody else"

Given that his role is as an aide to a presidential candidate (who is to a large extent just a private individual), rather than an actual government official, I'm not sure there are any rules or policies beyond internal party ones and certainly no laws that were being broken. I think, much as I believe was the case with Hilary's email fiasco, stupidity rather than arrogance or criminality is the order of the day here.

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‘Inflexion point’ BlackBerry washes hands of hardware biz

Phil W
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Re: Really??

A new Milestone with modern specs? That would be a dream come true!

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Phil W
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My BlackBerry Priv says Made in Mexico on it.

I've actually quite enjoyed my Priv, I'm slightly saddened that there is now unlikely to be a successor of any real quality. Back to Samsung Notes I guess, as long as they can stop them exploding, my Note 2 and 3 were fantastic aside from the lack of keyboard.

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Virgin Media costs balloon by MEEELLIONS in wake of Brexit

Phil W
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" is anyone not on a promotional offer with them?"

Unfortunately yes. Their half price for the first 6 month type offers are only available to new customers.

Also I don't know if it's the case with call customers, but following the end of my contract with them they offered me a loyalty discount to stay however it was not for the full term of the new contract only about half of it and doesn't isolate me from price increases I guess because it's a discount and not a promotional offer strictly speaking.

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Microsoft sues Wisconsin man (again) for copyright infringement (again)

Phil W
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Re: Go Check eBay

There are also a fair number of windows and office keys listed by those who aren't bright enough to blur or otherwise obscure them in their listing photos....

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