* Posts by JimmyPage

2417 posts • joined 5 Mar 2010

Three-years-late fit-to-work IT tool will cost taxpayers £76m

JimmyPage
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Re: Whaaat?

On the radio today, the egregious Ms. Hillier was forced to admit that the means testing cost *more* than it saves.

Like the bedroom tax (which has cost the UK far more than it will ever "save") this is proof that "austerity" is a political and moral process, not a fiscal or practical one.

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BT and EE, O2 and Three: Are we in for a year of Euro telco mega-mergers?

JimmyPage
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Re: What do you think Virgin Media is

Crap ?

I suggested 5 years ago they could offer a combined mobile-landline-BB-TV deal, such that you could have a "family" of mobiles that would be free-call to each other (cf. giffgaff). The application being even if your sprogs have used up their credit, they can call home.

Given Virgins unique capability to offer such a service, you'd think it would be a no-brainer.

Didn't even get a reply (which it turns out is SOP whenever Virgin have a business opportunity).

The older I get, they less impressed I am by "the market".

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JimmyPage
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Is it a losing battle ?

As far as I know, every time "competition" has been fostered, then end result is fewer players.

The UK energy and cable markets being a paradigm.

We started off in the 80s, with several small, localised cable operators.

Now there's only Virgin.

We started off in the late 90s with several small, localised energy suppliers[1].

Now there's EON/EDF and BG (who all have resellers - not the same thing as competition)

[1]In 2002 I signed up with Amerada. In a shadow of the old "how do you know you work for a dotcom company ?" (you've worked for 5 companies in two years and never moved desks) I found myself with 3 different outfits over 4 years without ever changing.

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Americans massively back call for more police body camera tech

JimmyPage
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Re: USA is a "War" nation

Echoes of Mussolini, and his program for Italy

"Battle for Grain" (great)

"Battle for Land" (hmm, less so - ask Ethiopia)

"Battle for Births" (yes, really)

cf. "5 year plans (Stalins USSR)"

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LogMeIn adds emergency break-in feature to LastPass

JimmyPage
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Mushroom

Of course any password manager

is just a link in a chain of security.

Not that you'd think that from some of the more hysterical tinfoil-hattery being exhibited here.

If you make the assumption that *any* form or credentials caching - regardless of implementation - is susceptible to being read by 3rd parties, you take appropriate preventive measures.

In my case, even though my card details are stored in LastPass, an attacker with full access to my vault (which would require going through a 2FA challenge, so already they'd need to crack the Google authenticator mechanism) would not be able to use them, since my bank *also* demands 2FA. And all my saved payment details require the CVV number from the card. Which is *not* stored anywhere - not even on the card (use a soldering iron, the digits are embossed).

Anyone who criticises LastPass for "not being secure enough" is clearly stupid enough to think their security needs are capable of being met by a single application. And that person is - at best - "naive", and at worst, a moron. Especially if after lambasting LastPass for "not being secure enough" it turns out they have a safe inside the locked doors of their house.

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JimmyPage
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Re: AgileBits

(btw, I *up*voted you, for a sensible reply)

Just curious, if AgileBits isn't

- open source

or

- free

then what's the difference between it and LastPass ?

I'm not thrilled about the LMI takeover of LP, but I can't find another tool that does the job the way I like it - irrespective of price.

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JimmyPage
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Mushroom

Of course at $12/year

(that's less than £10) ... for the *premium* LP (base version is free) you have to consider value for money ....

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JimmyPage
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Seems sensible ...

setting up MrsJPs Facebook over Xmas, I was impressed* with the ability to designate a trusted contact to help a user out, plus the feature to nominate a legacy contact to take control of your account when you join the choir invisible.

*despite actively hating Facebook for years, having dabbled now for a few months, I realise it was Facebookers I disliked with a vengeance. Being objective, FB is a very well written and designed site.

There's a saying about not discarding tools because you don't like the colour. Has anyone found anything to replace Lastpass ? I've tried a few (all suggested by El Reggers), and they haven't come close.

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Outfit throws fit, hits FitBit's hit kit with writ (Apple also involved)

JimmyPage
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Stop

Dick Tracy ..

didn't he have a smartish (2-way radio) watch ?

Maybe the patent needs to go back further ?

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Curiosity Rover eyes Mars' creeping dunes

JimmyPage
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Re: Curious

and it's exactly why actually going places and doing stuff is so good for science. Either the science underpinning your expectations is wrong or incomplete (in which case we need to know more), or your application of current science wrong or incomplete (which is also good, since mistakes can be highly informative).

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Day 2: Millions of HSBC customers still locked out of online banking

JimmyPage
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Stop

“We will ensure customers do not lose out as a result of this issue.”

has this weasel statement *ever* been followed up ?

After the 2010 RBS outage I recall quite a few examples being mentioned where house sales had fallen through because funds were inaccessible (one idly wonders if conveyancing contracts now factor in "if your bank goes titsup" clauses).

So how far will this statement go ?

Is there a market for an insurance policy which will make funds available to cover a serious bank outage ?

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Library web filtering removes info access for vulnerable, says shushing collective

JimmyPage
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FAIL

For some reason, I thought of Blackadder ...

J: Ah, I see you've underlined a few (takes dictionary, reads): `bloomers';

`bottom'; `burp'; (turns a page) `fart'; `fiddle'; `fornicate'?

G: Well...

J: Sir! I hope you're not using the first English dictionary to look up

rude words!

E: I wouldn't be too hopeful; that's what all the other ones will be

used for.

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Security bod watches heart data flow from her pacemaker to doctor via ... er, SMS? 3G? Email?

JimmyPage
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"Homeland"

of course, this is no news to anyone who saw season 2 of Homeland ... 3 years ago.

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Windows 10 won't come to old WinPhones until some time in early 2016

JimmyPage
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Why would you need 2 x of the same SIMs?

1 voice, 1 data

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JimmyPage
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Blatant plug

Got one of these babies a couple of weeks ago - at £35 (Black Friday) it seemed worth a punt. Shoved 2xgiffgaff SIMs in it, and have been mightily impressed. Combined phone *and* portable WiFi hotspot. What more could you want.

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Windows for Warships? Not on our new aircraft carriers, says MoD

JimmyPage
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Joke

Ah joke wallpaper ...

(old enough to remember the site www.jokewallpaper.com - aliased as www.coporateexcellence.com, in case your boss was monitoring your surfing)

Not as good as the joke BSOD screensaver I used to run ...

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New gear needed to capture net connection records, say ISPs

JimmyPage
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FAIL

TalkTalk already does it

Hardly an advert.

Of course enquiring minds might want to know why TalkTalk was not present at the committee meeting mentioned in the article to present evidence or whether they presented any in the first place.

maybe because there's very little Talk Talk can teach anybody ?

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Kids' TV show Rainbow in homosexual agenda shocker

JimmyPage
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FAIL

Surprised to read this far

and no mention of Captain Pugwash with the oft-repeated urban legend of Seaman Staines and Master Bates ?

E2A: In a typical example of Sods law someone else posted about CP whilst I was typing.

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How to solve a Rubik's Cube in five seconds

JimmyPage
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Ah, happy memories ...

back in 1981, buying David Singmasters bible to solving the cube.

And then understanding it. Aged 14. Made some extra pocket money explaining it ...

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Plusnet ignores GCHQ, spits out plaintext passwords to customers

JimmyPage
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FAIL

Why isn't there an RFC

for password storage and handling ?

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IOCCO: Police 'reckless' for using terrorism powers on journo sources

JimmyPage
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Or, to summarise in 5 words.

If they can, they will.

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Homebrew crypto in Telegram hangout app full of holes, say security pros

JimmyPage
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FAIL

Deja Vu ???

Aren't there some numpty jihadists enjoying state-sponsored B&B after deciding to cook-up their own encryption on the basis that "infidel technology" was bound to be compromised. Thus proving paranoia does erode rational thought.

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Brit filmmaker plans 10hr+ Paint Drying epic

JimmyPage
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Stop

Maybe the *cinemas* should pay

after all, the film having a BBFC certificate is protecting *them* from prosecution,

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JimmyPage
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I've Kickstarted twice this year

£50 total, to keep the video versions of the (IMHO) mainly excellent "Richard Herrings Leicester Square Theatre Podcasts" coming (The one with Johnny Vegas was worth it alone !).

Pluses: Unedited, and no book/film/TV show plugging. Oh, and no BBFC involvement. And free on ther internet.

Minuses: Occasional low-energy guests.

At least I know where my money went. £50 for getting on for 50 hours of when-it-works ****ing brilliant comedy sounds a bargain.

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EU's Paris terror response includes 'virtual currencies' crimp

JimmyPage
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Unhappy

Re: Hawala uses an honour system

Something I suspect western banking systems may struggle to understand.

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JimmyPage
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Black Helicopters

Re:Congratulations to our fore-sighted government for preventing such a risk in Britain.

You jest, but actually I suspect this is a real thing.

I live in Birmingham, and in the past few weeks, mysterious "roadworks" have cropped up - coned off carriageways with **** all work going on. When combined with *real* works the overall effect is to make the flow of traffic through the city "sticky". It's not gridlock, but careful inspection reveals there are now several pinch points where cars are forced into single lanes. Something an operation to detain a suspect vehicle would find invaluable. The fact Birmingham (like all major cities) is ringed with non-speed ANPR cameras may be a factor.

Likewise, overt summer, when there were murmurs of mass social unrest, a few people noticed that the net effect of all the rail system *and* trunk road maintenance was to prevent rapid mass rapid movement of people.

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Remember Windows 1.0? It's been 30 years (and you're officially old)

JimmyPage
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Greatest thing about Windows 3.11

was that you could install it, zip up C:\WINDOWS and mess around installing shit, nuke C:\WINDOWS, and replace with the zip file.

Rinse and repeat.

Made our installs rock-solid. Unlike some rival vendors, who learned the hard way ....

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GCHQ goes all Cool Dad and tags the streets of Shoreditch with job ads

JimmyPage
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FAIL

Can I work from home ?

No.

So they're already recruiting from a shrinking pool. Because civil service working practices trump catching terrorists.

Makes you wonder how real the "war on terror" is, doesn't it ?

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How to build a city fit for 50℃ heatwaves

JimmyPage
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Moving whole cities

... something the ancient Egyptians did many times, as the course of the Nile changed nover centuries ...

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TalkTalk offers customer £30.20 'final settlement' after crims nick £3,500

JimmyPage
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Stop

This needs a high court precedent set

a data breach of this magnitude should be considered a priori evidence of the failure of the company to adhere to it's own data protection policy, and therefore a breach of contract.

Can we have a Judge Dredd icon ? (And maybe, following Private Eyes example, a "Judge Dreadful" icon for numpty judgements ?)

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Music lovers move to block Phil Collins' rebirth

JimmyPage
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Re: Turn It On Again

A song in 5/4 IIRC. Phil Collins is one of the few drummers who can understand time signatures (well, Genesis were built on weird time changes).

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Met makes fourth TalkTalk arrest, this time a London teen

JimmyPage
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Boffin

like @Alister

I have my doubts the people arrested so far are the actual perpetrators. In fact the more 16 year olds arrested, the less likely it is. Quite aside from Finks Fifth Law, I refuse to believe 4 16 year olds could organise their homework diaries, let alone a "sophisticated cyber attack" (c).

Given how all this has played out, it's entirely possible the entire reason for the hack was to create enough media noise such that phone and email phishing attempts briefly became easier with no actual need to use the accessed data (and thus risk capture).

When news of a "ransom" was mentioned, I turned my thoughts as to how to extract money from such a situation without ever being caught. Obviously a straight transaction of bitcoin is ultimately identifiable. However, then I wondered, what if the perpetrator legitimately accumulated a stash of bitcoins over time. Undertakes hack. Ransom demand is that the victim simply buys £1,000,000 of bitcoins. I'm not economist, but the spike in demand should heft the value of my *already bought* bitcoins enough that I make a profit. Not the £1,000,000 paid out, but a substantial amount.

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Hi, um, hello, US tech giants. Mind, um, mind adding backdoors to that crypto? – UK govt

JimmyPage
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FAIL

What I would do (hell, it may even be happening)

Rather than (moronically) sending each other emails, I suspect terrorists, criminals (and spies) who have an aversion to being caught would simply:

1) Identify a *public* channel for communication(s). Maybe a couple of binary newsgroups

2) post in one an NZB of a media file (don't worry if it doesn't work. Thanks to the media providers dark war on copying, corrupted media files aren't significant) which while not encrypted, has your encrypted message hidden inside it.

3) The actual intended recipient of the file will not be immediately apparent

4) The recipient replies the same way. If the channel is *initially* secured, it can be used to switch newsgroups/posting handles at will.

5) Notice how nothing in the UK governments land-grab of data could (a) prevent (b) identify this.

To be honest, I wouldn't even bother encrypting the source message. There's so much shite spouted online anyway, there's no way you could determine anything in isolation.

But then if I were a "terrorist" and my aim was to kill, hurt and maim as many innocent people as possible with my own survival being unnecessary, there's plenty of things I could do RIGHT NOW that could take a dozen or so souls out without really trying. The lack of such incidents leads me to wonder quite how "threatening" the "terrorist threat" is ?

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Google snaps Dutch woman completely taking the piss

JimmyPage
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Is that the van Buren supernova I see ...

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JimmyPage
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Boffin

I believe the phrase you are looking for is

"laminar flow" ?

One of the reasons aerators are fitted to modern taps - to prevent the stream of water acting like a solid (and bouncing back into your face).

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Rosetta probe delivers jaw-to-the-floor find: Molecular oxygen

JimmyPage
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Boffin

One vaguely wonders

if comets have been spraying the Earth with ozone forever ? Yet (another) example of how the universe interacts.

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VXers eyeing 'undetectable' codeless code-injection technique

JimmyPage
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WTF?

er ... am I right in thinking

"codelessn code" is another way of saying that instead of writing the code yourself, you direct code other people have written to do your dirty work, by crafting a config for it ?

e.g. rm *.* -rf in a script ?

News ?

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Ring Chime: Needy wireless doorbell or $30 bling t'ing?

JimmyPage
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Main problem round here

is no-one uses the ****ing doorbell. *If* you're lucky, you might hear the mouse fart they call a knock.

When we actually got to ask our postie why he never rang the bell he didn't say "what bell" (which would have been understandable). No, he just said "I don't know if it works or not."

He's a moron. He's part of a league of morons.

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'Safe Harbor': People in Europe 'can get quite litigious about this'

JimmyPage
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Beat me to it ..

Time for a new icon ... pot and kettle perhaps ?

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Online VAT fraud: Calls for government crackdown grow louder

JimmyPage
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Mushroom

The logical conclusion, (of course)

is an endpoint where all taxes are equivalent. No one loses, no one wins.

Of course, as the EU so clearly demonstrates, where there is monetary union, can political union be far behind.

Of course, if there are people who don't want this, then it needs to be considered how people *oppose* political unions ---------------->

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JimmyPage
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Of course, they could just pass a law

requiring*eBay* (et al) to collect the VAT.

Although as someone who used to receive C&Es (now HMRC) quarterly billet-doux with such groundbreaking decisions about what was and was not exempt (bear in mind the pasty tax uses mean ambient temperature as a threshold) I would pity eBay.

Presumably eBays *fees* include VAT ?

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Apollo 15 commander's lunar timepiece goes under the hammer

JimmyPage
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Mushroom

Moon hoax FFS

AS Mythbusters pointed out (every 30 seconds) in their episode *busting* the hoax myths.

"THE MOON IS NOT THE EARTH"

and anyone who looks at the photos and then points out "light doesn't do that" is correct.

On Earth.

On the Moon (as shown) things are different. Lack of atmosphere for a start. It's indisputable the Apollo pictures were taken in a vacuum.

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JimmyPage
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Re: Urban Myth

No cite ?

I'll show you mine, if you show me yours :)

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JimmyPage
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Tip of the hat to old school

*Omega explains: "When NASA chose this watch, they requested a hesalite crystal, which, unlike a sapphire crystal, does not break into tiny fragments on impact. This feature is very important for astronauts, as the tiny fragments of a broken sapphire crystal would pose a danger in a zero-gravity environment."

Now *that* is preparation,. *That* is properly scoping out a project. And *that* is proper specification.

Like the reason they didn't use pencils (Russian gags aside) was because of the danger of graphite floating into electrical circuits. *That's* why the Apollo pens cost so much.

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US Treasury: How did ISIS get your trucks? Toyota: ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

JimmyPage
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Holmes

Not really sure it takes Sherlock Holmes.

They were bought by one of the countries that would like ISIS to triumph.

Saudi Arabia ?

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Safe Harbour ruled INVALID: Facebook 'n' pals' data slurp at risk

JimmyPage
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Mushroom

So, the US *was* wrong

the sheer nerve of the US trying to explain *our* laws to us.

Next year, Teresa May explains to the US congress how they don't really get the US constitution.

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US tries one last time to sway EU court on data-slurping deal

JimmyPage
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Headmaster

OT, (but hopefully of interest)

Is there a word - possibly from another language - to describe the situation of the "inferior" in a relationship presuming to lecture the "superior" ?

In this case, the US explaining to the EU that the EU understanding of EU law is flawed ?

Or (as happened a year ago) Alex Salmond explaining to the Bank Of England how the Bank of England didn't understand British monetary policy ?

There must be a word. There must

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Hash-tag CompSci: FBI grooms pre-weed teens

JimmyPage
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FAIL

War on Terror meets War on Drugs

pass the popcorn ....

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Solar panel spammer hit by UK’s biggest ever nuisance calls fine

JimmyPage
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Re: Dump the landline ...

Sorry I have no advice.

We managed to buy a house in one of the most topsy-turvey places in Britain.

Technically, we live in a city. But are 5 minutes walks from a "shire" with beautiful countryside all around.

We're 2 minutes from a motorway.

We're a "deprived area" (no stamp duty, thanks to Gordon Brown) yet are cabled up to the max. My standard 60MBps pure-cable connection is better than *any* of our directors (so they tell me). And I am a minutes walk from a highly-ranked UK university (although not so highly ranked they reply to my emails).

Mobile coverage is 100% for every network - probably due to the proliferation of masts on tower blocks within line of sight.

And a 10 minute drive from the newest hospital in the UK.

Yet house prices here are sub-normal. Currently. A couple of country-dwelling friends have commented that they would pay more for a property with decent broadband.

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JimmyPage
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Dump the landline ...

3 months ago, for various reasons, we had to pull the phone out of the wall. Since then the world hasn't ended. We have already ensured that any communications are email/twitter/ Hospitals and doctors seem to be able to call the mobile.

Bottom line, is 3 months without a landline, and not a single cold call. Probably not what Virgin Media will want to hear when I next call them up "to quit".

Presumably the fact that you still have to pay for a mobile call means they are much less prone to spamming ?

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