* Posts by LDS

4587 posts • joined 28 Feb 2010

But how does our ransomware make you feel?

LDS
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"Time criticality"

Quite common among all fraudster. It's important to avoid the victim could reason calmly. Even vacuum cleaner sellers use that...

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Alphabay shutdown: Bad boys, bad boys, what you gonna do? Not use your Hotmail...

LDS
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"If he was so easy to identify...."

It's easy to read it after the fact. Putting together all the pieces *before* should have been not so easy. Also you become a real target when your "operations" get bigger.

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Microsoft finally allows hosted desktops on multi-tenant hardware

LDS
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Re: Conesuming need

Remember you're a "consumer", no longer a "customer" or a "client"...

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This is why old Windows Phones won't run PC apps

LDS
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You cant run ancient 16bit or DOS software on x64

Just because AMD dropped the Virtual 8086 mode when the CPU is in 64 bit mode when it designed x86 64 bit extensions. It's not a Microsoft decision. You can still run DOS in a VM, without the CPU support running real mode applications while in protected mode is not so easy, trapping direct accesses to memory, I/O and interrupts is an issue.

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HMS Frigatey Mcfrigateface given her official name

LDS
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"eems silly to call them frigates, given they're over 6,000 tonnes"

The old WWII categorization is no longer valid today. Actual destroyers are as large as WWII "heavy cruisers" - and the difference between "destroyers" and "cruisers" becomes more and more blurred, between, for example, Arleigh-Burke "destroyers" and Ticonderoga "cruisers" the difference is very little, actually the former are more heavily armed, although shorter than the latter, and displacement is very similar.

With most expensive programs cut, larger ships were the first to suffer.

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LDS
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Joke

"and so far we've got Howe, Hood, Anson"

Beware of any malware named "Bismarck"....

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LDS
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Re: Towns again....

Just remember the "strange" Courageous class ships (which included the Glorious) were nicknamed "Spurious", "Curious" and "Outrageous" beecause of, ehm, their "disruptive design"... (before they were transformed into air carriers).

Old jokers were far better at finding funny names....

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LDS
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Joke

Re: Type numbers?

Roll a couple of dice. If the number was already used, roll them again.

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LDS
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Re: Nice

Ask the people who will keep a job and be paid to build it...

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.. ..-. / -.-- --- ..- / -.-. .- -. / .-. . .- -.. / - .... .. ... then a US Navy fondleslab just put you out of a job

LDS
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"on't survive whatever kills a ruggedized tablet computer."

A dead battery? A ransomware?

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LDS
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"are the seamen equipped with oars?"

If the boat is small enough, yes. If oars can't move it, they are quite useless, I'd say. Anyway, I guess the engines and other mechanical system (i.e. the helm) still have a lot of manual overrides if the automatic control systems get damaged - a ship dead in the water is a dead ship...

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Disneyland to become wretched hive of scum and villainy

LDS
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Facepalm

Re: The important question

In Florida and California do you really need to go to a Star Wars theme park to see a woman in a small bikini??? Some people really need to turn off the PC and TV, and give a look to the world outside....

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Security robot falls into pond after failing to spot stairs or water

LDS
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Re: Your thinking about it wrong...

This is a case for Susan Calvin...

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Russia launches non-TERRIFYING satellite that focuses Sun's solar rays onto Earth

LDS
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Surely it will drive mad many astrophotographers...

.... when it will enter the frame during a long exposure....

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Another Brexit cliff edge: UK.gov warned over data flows to EU

LDS
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"what was their response..."

Your alternative facts? UK was offered highly advantageous conditions no other member had or has.

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LDS
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Re: "have the same influence in the future as in the past"

Don't know in other countries, but in Italy it's "to have the wife drunk and the barrel full" (which today may sound quite sexist).

I'm sure UK and EU will need an agreement about data transfer, but it's hard to believe UK will have the same influence as in the past. Especially since data regulations may be seen also as a way to have businesses move inside EU.

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LDS
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"have the same influence in the future as in the past"

Have the cake and eat it? I can't see how UK could have an active role in EDPB - if it will be an EU body reserved to member states and the Commission.

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Three Microsoft Outlook patches unpatched, users left to DIY

LDS
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Re: "any automatic technique for removing the patches"

I gave a look to my WSUS and can't find the updates approved, nor I have them installed, so I can't try. Probably they weren't approved before they got retired.

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LDS
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"any automatic technique for removing the patches"

If the patches were delivered using WSUS, they can be removed using WSUS as well. If you let you "big fleet" get updates directly from MS, you'll need some scripts delivered through AD to remove them. If your "big fleet" is also without AD, you'll need to get back to Windows 101.

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Radiohead hides ZX Spectrum proggie in OK Computer re-release

LDS
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Re: C90 cassette, as that medium was the dominant way? No!

I usually used C-46 or C-60 cassettes for albums, depending on the albums length, many fit on the former (the original LP capacity was 23m per side). C-90 only for dual LP albums, cassettes I could play on a smaller hi-fi system in my room which had not an LP player.

Saw very little reason to have two different albums on the same cassette but for car or walkman use, where it saved space. Otherwise, smaller cassettes meant less wear.

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LDS
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Joke

Only a British would use a ZX spectrum for music...

... .instead of the much superior audio output of a C64....

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Juicero does to its staff what your hands can do to its overpriced juice sacks

LDS
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Re: Let me bring you up to speed.

They wanted to be the Nespresso of fruit juice, but it looks they compared coffee to oranges...

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Funnily enough, charging ££££s for trashy bling-phones wasn't a great idea

LDS
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Since phones became all screen that meant less opportunities for personalization. No room for diamonds buttons and the like. The back cover offers less opportunities. Difficult to build a business on bling phones today.

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LDS
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Devil

Re: Android?

Right, you're not rich and stylish enough if you can't afford an iThing. The Internet says so.

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Kerberos bypass, login theft bug slain by Microsoft, Linux slingers

LDS
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"It's a statistical thing."

If, and only if, open access to the code meant more eyeballs - which probably is not happening for several reasons. The fact code is open access doesn't mean more and more people will read it. They could, but do they do it, really? How many get asleep, or spend time on a beach or the garden reading Kerberos code? Even most open source developers are more interested in developing new code, than reviewing old one.

You need to have specific reasons to look at code *and* spotting bugs, especially when they're not obvious. And you also need specific skills when the code and underlying requirements are complex and not so obvious. So, statistically, how many good and competent eyeballs happen to look at open source code?

Sure, sometime you may stumble upon a bug while perusing some code, but it happen less than many thinks. Most vulnerabilities today are found with different approaches, i.e. fuzzing. Reading code and understand its behaviour fully when it is executed, maybe with unexpected inputs, is not so easy.

Sure, having the code to check exactly what happens *after* helps - but Windows code is accessible - you just need to be approved. And reliable security researches have that access.

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LDS
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Re: Open Source is necessary, but not sufficient

Sorry, access to the code is a necessary condition. No need for the "access" to be open to everybody, and the right to reuse the code whatever you like.

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LDS
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And what with would you replace it?

Also, Kerberos is in no way tied to SMB - SMB can use it just it can use any other authentication/authorization protocols - and it uses it only in an Active Directory domain because Kerberos is the protocol used by AD. Remove the domain, and SMB falls back to NTLM.

Any time you're going to use SSO in an AD domain (and not only) you're going to use Kerberos, although probably through an higher level API like GSSAPI.

Anyway, authentication/authorization may look a "simple problem", but building a strong and reliable protocol and implement it is not.

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What did OVH learn from 24-hour outage? Water and servers do not mix

LDS
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Re: Ah, that explains it!

French spam probably decreased also....

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Dial S for SQLi: Now skiddies can order web attacks via text message

LDS
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Re: Katyusha

Unguided rockets may make less noise than an equivalent large gun when fired and can "saturate" the target area firing many rockets quickly, which may make the target "panic", hard to emulate with older guns (newer ones have a far higher rate of fire). The sound they make on arrival may be also a bonus (like some dive bombers had devices to produce a shrieking sound).

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PC sales still slumping, but more slowly than feared

LDS
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Re: How much influence did Microsoft have in this?

A person I know is going to replace her desktop PC, eventually, after almost ten years. She bought a new, larger monitor a few years ago, but is replacing the PC only now because it started to fault.

She does invoicing and other tasks for her father business.

The truth is more and more people now replace PCs when they break, not because a new model offer needed features or run needed software an old model can't.

Offloading tasks to the cloud also means less need to increase local procesisng power.

On the server side, while cloud companies may be buying a lot of servers, it also means less servers sold to business - and I guess the cloud companies are far better in exploiting each server than the average business - but even the latter will use virtualization to coalesce workloads on fewer ones.

The industry must adapt to much longer replacement cycles. Or increase planned obsolescence <G>.

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The life and times of Surface, Microsoft's odds-defying fondleslab

LDS
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Windows 10 interface on both Surface and phones is far worse than the 8 one. Again, they tried to force the same interface, just the other way round this time, with a strange hybrid with tiles inside the menu, and a taskbar that is far less usable in tablet mode than swiping from the left side.

The hamburger menu in the upper left corner is quite a stupid idea from a usability perspective. It's where Windows 2.0 system menu was, but probably was the wrong place even then - that's why we got a "close" icon on the left side, instead of having to click the system menu twice. The right lower corner ellipses was better thought, as swiping from the bottom (I don't hold a tablet from the upper side).

Office has been redesigned too to be touch friendly - don't know what version you're using but 2013 and 2016 are designed for touch too - but they still lack a "touch first" interface in tablet mode.

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LDS
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The device is very nice - the issue was and is pointy haired bosses who believe there should be the same UI regardless of the human interface devices used.

There's no way a touch UI can be the same of a keyboard and mouse one. "Metro" works well when you use a Surface in tablet mode, but gets in the way when you use it in laptop mode. OS and applications should become smart enough to change UI depending on the mode, and it wouldn't be very difficult to achieve it.

For example Outlook could switch to a simpler, touch oriented interface when in tablet mode and you're simply reading emails (and maybe just writing a quick response), and switch to the more complex "desktop" one when a keyboard has been attached to write more complex emails. I understand it requires more code, but that's the only right way.

The stubbornness of designers and executives on inflicting the same UI on users regardless of the context is hard to understand.

Oh well, even web sites became just a waste of screen space since designers decided to force mobes oriented ones on every user, with just big images and no information...

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LDS
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Frankly, I miss a 10.6" Surface

The Surface 2 Pro can be easily packed into a lot of photo bags which don't accept a 12" one. In the field, and when traveling, the size is much more comfortable, and the screen is not really "too small" unless you need to work on large spreadsheets... it was the perfect replacement, and much more powerful, for netbooks, something you can always carry around.

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Dell gives world its first wireless-charging laptop if you buy $580 extra kit

LDS
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Re: Regardless of the price, the idea is good

An today, most trains used for long travels have power plugs available (airplanes as well).

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Hackers able to turbo-charge DJI drones way beyond what's legal

LDS
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"who has EXACTLEY the same right as you to use airspace?"

Yes, but not the same airspace at the same time, because that's just stupid and dangerous. And like many other situations - the "vehicle" that has less maneuverability usually has right of way - and there are also separation rules because of that.

The selfish idiots are those who believe the whole world is just there for their own entertainment only (usually just because they have money to spare), and other people have to comply with that, because they have no rights - while flying has always been a very cooperative environment exactly because of the risks involved.

The issue with drones is a computer flies them, so any dumbass can use one, safely on the ground, putting people in the air at risk. As I already wrote, there should be explosive in the controller that blows up if the drone crashes. Just to level the field...

Anyway, when you will be hit by a car, remember it has the same right as you to use the ground space...

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LDS
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"drones with GPS dont need"

Because GPS gives you the position, height, sizes of every possible obstacle within your path, right? The real world is a bit more complex than any simulation on a computer.

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LDS
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"possible or practical to design cars smart enough to pre-empt evil/stupid drivers."

Actually, it's what car manufacturers are implementing now. The problem was not "mass surveillance", when cars were introduced there was no technology that could make them "smart". We have it only now.

Just like many devices were once designed just to perform their primary task, without any safety protection. In my childhood, I saw many people without fingers - or worse - getting goods from my grandfather hardware and tools store - most of them blue collars workers using tools and machinery that were quite dangerous. And sometimes existing safety protection were disabled because "they got in the way". Until they lost a finger, an eye, a hand, or an arm...

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LDS
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"leading people to being unable to fly where they SHOULD be able to fly"

Most of the DJI restrictions can be easily lifted by the user - they are just there to ensure you can't fly unintentionally inside a zone that have safety, security or other concerns. You have to unblock them explicitly - so you can't say later "I didn't know I couldn't fly there freely".

There are of course some zones where flying is highly restricted and that cannot be easily unblocked.

Otherwise saying "responsibility for safely and legally operating a multicopter should lie with the operator/pilot" means the operator/pilot needs a license, to ensure he/she is aware of all the relevant rules, and any active restriction - a license that could be revoked from people who don't abide to the rules.

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LDS
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"I think at least one of the Mars rovers"

Even if so, how many have access to a Mars rover? There's a difference between the code you deploy on the devices you no longer control, and what you deploy on devices you fully control, and which outside the reach of the users.

With this kind of devices - including IoT - if safety checks can be easily bypassed, things may get dangerous.

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LDS
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Re: "It's a bit silly to leave debug code in production apps"

This is an issue with some languages which doesn't allow to remove code from releases easily because they lack a mechanism to allow for it, like "ifdef" or the like (and, of course, interpreted languages where the source code is deployed). Using "if" statements still lets hacked code to execute debug code.

Debug code is also different from tracing code. The former may give access to functionalities that may be dangerous when used outside a test environment. The latter will just collect enough information to pinpoint bugs origins quickly.

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Multics resurrected: Proto-Unix now runs on Raspberry Pi or x86

LDS
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Re: Multics Hardware security

Memory pages were required in the 386 because you can't really believe to implement virtual memory at the segment level when segment maximum size went from 64K to 4G (and physical memory was quite limited back then).

That said, segments and pages can work together - just manage virtual memory using pages, and manage software security with segments, but OS designers were still unaware of the security implications, and threw away segments because of the performance issues (exactly because of the security checks performed).

Then came AMD and removed segment support altogether.

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LDS
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Often, mainframes came with source code. It was sold with the hardware, was very tied to the hardware, there were no mainframe clones on sale, and very few could build one (and have the space to host and run it). Licensee were well known, and giving access to code could wasn't a big issue, and customer may have needed to personalize it. Also, big money was made selling the hardware, not the software.

Illegal copies of software and IP became a much bigger issue later, with the advent of minis and personal PCs, ISV (software only companies), more competition, and off-the-shelf software. Now money was made selling software, not the hardware.

It's no surprise the FOSS movement was born in universities among people used to have access to the OS and application code on mainframes.

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'My dream job at Oracle left me homeless!' – A techie's relocation horror tale

LDS
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Re: I am more than a little confused.

Correct. Especially if he needs specific treatment for a chronic disease, he should have got the proper information about obtaining it in another EU country before moving.

See for example http://europa.eu/youreurope/citizens/work/unemployment-and-benefits/country-coverage/index_en.htm

Moving to a new job in different country, with a probation period, without a backup plan, no saved money, it's quite a big risk IMHO.

Then, why the biggest database vendor, owner of one of the most expensive ERP software can't pay an employee who just worked part of the month is beyond my understanding...

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LHC finds a new and very charming particle: the Xicc++ baryon

LDS
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Re: Awe

Actually, some appreciate the virtue of old Cognac...

https://www.quantamagazine.org/supersymmetry-bet-settled-with-cognac-20160822/

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LDS
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"are there any 2 or 3 quark particles that are not predicted?"

If so, the Standard Model would suffer a blow - and new models would be needed to explain those particles.

Anyway, the electromagnetic charge is not the only limit, there are other "exclusion" requirement regarding the quantum states (see Pauli exclusion principle).

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LDS
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"how do they know to look for these things if they don't know they exist?"

Sometimes they know they probably exist, and how they should look: "something the researchers say is predicted by the Standard Model and has been sought for many years" (caps mine, as it should be).

Sometimes your data show something unexpected - and you get busy understanding why.

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Microsoft hits Alt-F4 on 3,000 global sales staff

LDS
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"Windows was a copy of Mac"

Just like the Mac was a copy of Xerox Alto? Like Lotus 1-2-3 was a copy of Visicalc? WordPerfect came after WordStar.

Copying is a pretty common standard in any industry. Just you need to be able to copy well.

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LDS
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Hopefully making room for some internal QA staffers?

No, I guess they're looking for WannaCry and NotPetya developers to write the next Windows 10 installer...

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Google ships WannaCrypt for Android, disguised as Samba app

LDS
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"but the newer versions aren't really any better either"

They are built exactly to eliminate the cruft accumulated by SMB1. That doesn't mean there won't be bugs, but under many aspects they are better. Up to the point Apple selected SMB as their default file sharing protocol - not NFS, which has its design flaws and issues as well.

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LDS
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Re: Already fixed

That fix doesn't explain why the app refused to connect to SMB2 servers - even if SMB1 is enabled, clients should try the latest versions first, and then fallback to the oldest versions.

The configuration fix just disables SMB1 client side, not allowing to fallback to anything below SMB2.

With which version of Samba Android ships? The apps looks just a wrapper over the underlying OS Samba code.

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