* Posts by LDS

5647 posts • joined 28 Feb 2010

Time to party like it's 2005! Palm is coming BAAAA-ACK

LDS
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"Well they did go to Windows Mobile first"

Because they rest on laurels for far too long with PalmOS - which, remember, did run on a 68000, not ARM. When the landscape changed, they were caught with their pants down, and had to find a solution quickly. Back then, also, Windows Mobile/CE was a better enterprise solution, with more applications, and before the iPhone made the smartphone sexy just because it was from Apple, they were mostly business devices, they were not stylish enough to be status-symbols.

Sure, having two different product lines with two different incompatible OS was a very bad move, and it was a symptom of bad management. They had not a good roadmap for PalmOS evolution, and switching to a wholly new incompatible OS is always very risky - especially when good alternatives exist. They also wasted resources in the Foleo.

Anyway, when they started I believe there was no way to go with something like WebOS, the hardware required didn't exist yet.

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LDS
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"this obsession with the camera"

They no longer have any other differentiating technology - from most other perspective phones are more or less the same. To justify price you have the material used, maybe the screen res, and the camera. There are enough selfie-obsessed people to make extracting more money from them easy enough.

Then you get people who can't shoot landscape - last week a truck carrying gas exploded and blew up a bridge on an highway here, and those shooting the scene only recorded ugly portrait videos - lot of ground before, lot of sky above, and microscopic subject. Maybe a good AI could shout "turn the phone horizontally, moron!"

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LDS
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The mistake of a non compatible OS....

PalmOS had the first very large 'app stores'. Nokia and Sony Ericsson could not compete, and Nokia was still thinking 'telephone first', and was creating ugly devices.

When they switched to WebOS (a stupid name also, giving the impression things run on the web and you needed an always on connection when they were still expensive), your PalmOS apps didn't work anymore. It was a lot of work for developers to port them to a wholly new OS.

With alternatives emerging, developers often looked elsewhere. Years later, Microsoft made the same mistake a couple of times.

Anyway, a Palm running Android is just for nostalgics, though.

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Ex-VMware veep loses attempt to throw out his own $1.5m legal win

LDS
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AFAIK non-compete agreement are forbidden in California. That's why Jobs, Schmidt & C made an illegal agreement not to look for each others engineers. The whistleblower then was Palm CEO, but IIRC it was settled out of court before the class action started.

Thereby, my take is his lawyer behaviour, albeit unethical (but is there anything ethical in the lawyer profession?) was not illegal. He should have complained much earlier. Did he think she would have helped him from the other side? How naive, if so...

Anyway, a quite disgusting situation, including the lawyers fees....

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Wondering what to do with that $2,300 burning a hole in your pocket?

LDS
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If Tim Cook says decent AR goggles aren't possible yet

Apple bought multitouch technology buying a smaller company. Breakthroughs not always happen in big R&D centres. And not always need billions and a lot of PR to be developed...

My take is one day someone will buy some company which has developed the right tech without much fanfare.

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LDS
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Apple 1....

I think if Wozniak had had a billion or so and whole engineering teams, he would have built a better prototype...

Also, I'm sure Magic Leap has expensively designed frames for versions 2 and 3 - all they need to show investors. The hardware can wait...

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Facebook insists it has 'no plans' to exploit your personal banking info for ads – just as we have 'no plans' to trust it

LDS
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Big Brother

The only people that look to be taking this on are the Germans and possibly Vestager

Don't worry. Vestager will be soon out.

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LDS
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I doubt that Facebook itself could derive my identity

Directly maybe not, but indirectly maybe yes - the infamous 'shadow profiles' they can build using information other people have on you and share with FB and others. Unluckily, I doubt very little they do,

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Game over for Google: Fortnite snubs Play Store, keeps its 30%, sparks security fears

LDS
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Re: I can't blame Epic for doing this...

It's no surprise that larger companies selling more expensive software, and which already have the infrastructure to sell and distribute their software, won't pay the 30% fee as long as they can - it's only OK for smaller developers selling cheap apps who have not the resources.

That's one reason, for example, why repackaging applications for the Windows Store will fail - why should you give others a so large cut of your revenues, when you don't need their services?

They will found other ways, like installing "free apps" that do nothing and get enabled if you pay a subscription outside the store mechanism.

While store might increase security a little - but we've seen lot of bad apps getting into anyway, they can't peruse each line of code - they're also a big anti-competition system. I would prefer vetted development company and signed applications, so bad ones can be stopped expiring the signatures.

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Blast from the past: Boffins find the fastest exploding non-supernova star

LDS
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Re: Astronomical Events in UK

Use a remote controlled telescope. Just your log cabin needs to be safe enough for the equipment there....

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LDS
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Happy

Re: Astronomical Events in UK

I think cloud doesn't matter, the Carina constellation is not visible from Northern Europe.

The fact it was observed using "Gemini South telescope, the Blanco telescope, and the Magellan Telescope" was a clue...

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Amazon, ditch us? But they can't do without us – Oracle

LDS
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Devil

Re: The other side

Oh my, no! They would be the only books you have to pay for each page read, and the cover, indexes and images will be licensed separately. You will be bound to buy any new edition published.

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LDS
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"mindset into a more cloud based one and stop gouging"

Isn't the cloud a business model designed to gouge customers better?

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LDS
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Maybe it's what is needed to force Larry to review his business model.

Oracle for a long time lived on the idea replacing its database for high-end, mission critical solutions was very hard and difficult, so he could set the prices, and customers were forced to accept and pay.

The landscape has been changing, and Larry may start to see red soon.... and I think pissing off your better customers may not be the best way to make business, even when they become a competitor in some areas.

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Build your own NASA space rover: Here are the DIY JPL blueprints

LDS
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Re: Optional...

No, but the blueprints among "optional tools" have a "laser cutter". Don't know if you can mount the laser head on the rover, after cutting the pieces... although you may need to increase the battery size a little.

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LDS
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Re: Space rover

You reminded me about the "Big Bang Theory" episode where Wolowitz uses a copy of the Mars Rover to inaugurate a baseball match... it could be a long way to work...

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LDS
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Joke

Re: The table with the specs...

All the design is made using imperial units and tools instead of metric ones. It's just a cunning way to stop those pesky strangers to attempt to build one...

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Irish Supremes make shock decision to hear Facebook's appeal in Schrems II

LDS
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" I thought that kind of blackmailworthy dirt collection was reserved..."

Maybe once - when they only had the capabilities to collect those data.

But today? How much Facebook, Google & C. know about people? Up to the point that the intelligence services want those data as well.

And not only that - by promoting or demoting contents as they please, they can change your "public image". And with even less oversight than government services.

I was joking, but this kind of operation is not beyond their capabilities.

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LDS
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Joke

It wasn't a brown one. It was a blue one with a Facebook logo on it. Inside it, all the judge Internet habits, and a note saying that Facebook "cares about its users privacy"....

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LDS
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After Cambridge Analytica...

... do Facebook realize int can turn against it?

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The End for Fin7: Feds cuff suspected super-crooks after $$$m stolen from 15m+ credit cards

LDS
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Re: The USA ...

It's the US definition of "contamination" that troubles us...

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Riddle me this: TypeScript's latest data type is literally unknown

LDS
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Re: shit code in C# every day

He's partially right that C# derived in some ways from J++, especially because Anders Hejlsberg is behind both of them, and TypeScript as well -, and obviously some ideas have been recycled when MS lost against Sun about its "Java" implementation.

That's the reason why there could be also some Pascal-ish echoes in his later works.

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Now that's a dodgy Giza: Eggheads claim Great Pyramid can focus electromagnetic waves

LDS
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"building material with the properties of an ordinary limestone is evenly distributed"

Inside the pyramid aren't there big blocks of granite? AFAIK the inner structure of the pyramid is far from being well known, but dismantling it and then putting it together again (using all the king's horses and all the king's men, of course).

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The internet's very own Muslim ban continues: DNS overlord insists it can freeze dot-words

LDS
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"being used in ways the imams can't control"

I guess that's not the problem - a Turkish company proposed it, and I'm sure no abuses like yours would be ever allowed, or heads will fall (figuratively, at least).

Try with .catholic, which is managed by the Vatican.

The issue other Muslim countries are afraid of is Turkey, and thereby its version of Islam, would try to use it for their own aims, maybe trying to keep out everyone who's not aligned with them.

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LDS
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"shouldn't some of those be subdomains of"

All of them

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LDS
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Mushroom

Re: "We want more money"

I'm afraid in this case some envelopes could be, ehm, "very energetic".... --->

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LDS
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"Who gets control of it"

How US centric - although in the US you have religions and sects for any taste and inclinations - what about the various Orthodox churches? Do you believe Russia would have nothing to say about it? And do you believe Catholics would leave others take control of it, even if they already have their own, when they developed the "credo" to assert they are the only good ones? And the list is still not exhaustive, I'm afraid.

Any religion old enough will incur in the same issues, I'm afraid...

ICANN created a minefield with the new TLDs... and something will explode (figuratively, I hope) under their assess...

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Think tank calls for post-Brexit national ID cards: The kids have phones so what's the difference?

LDS
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"Israel should stop murdering Palestinians"

"Murdering" imply a strong negative judgment, and taking one side.

There are two groups, those believing Israel is always right, and the other believing Palestinians are always right.

Than there are those who can see the faults on both sides.

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Microsoft devises new way of making you feel old: Windows NT is 25

LDS
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"It is a shame he didn't bring the VMS/DCL command syntax with him"

Maybe it would have been ended in a court for copyright infringements or worse?

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LDS
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Commonly known as "the triumph of marketing over technology"

No. It was another example of how much applications availability matters - people need and use applications, not operating systems.

Windows 3.x - which was also cheaper - soon got many applications, while OS/2 didn't.

IBM was too slow and clumsy at filling that gap, even after it bought Lotus, and its development tools were also inferior (VisualAge, anybody?)

Also for a while, especially before Warp, IBM was still dreaming to use OS/2 to promote its own hardware at expenses of clones, while Windows supported whatever you liked. Often, you didn't find drivers for non IBM hardware.

OS/2 was probably a triumph of *bad marketing" from IBM, together an ill-conceived strategy, they didn't own the PC market, and failed to understand it.

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LDS
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"ah, no 16-bit system"

Only in 64 bit versions. And just because AMD removed the Virtual 86 mode from the CPU when in 64 bit mode. So you'll need to use some kind of emulation or virtualization.

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LDS
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"OS/2 Warp"

Warp came on a CD too I got it that way - although IIRC it required still five-six floppy to boot before it could read the CD. But IIRC update packs, or whatever they were called, came on many floppy only - or I was never able to get them on CDs.

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Make Facebook, Twitter, Google et al liable for daft garbage netizens post online – US Senator

LDS
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Re: I wonder...

Would you sell a gun, poison, etc. to someone who is advertising explicitly is going to commit an homicide, or even suicide?

Unlike other goods, the intent of media is usually clear, and verifiable.

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LDS
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Re: Hmmm

What I don't understand especially is why they are not liable for "paid for" contents.

I may understand that unpaid contents are only under the responsibility of the user uploading it - as long as there are no money (or other remuneration) involved.

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Sorry, Neil Armstrong. Boffins say you may not have been first life-form to set foot on the Moon

LDS
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Devil

Re: Probably a Troll

I just wonder where he found a rib in the Adam bacterium to create the Eve one... although, the legend is about something akin to a form of mitosis...

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FBI boss: We went to the Moon, so why can't we have crypto backdoors? – and more this week

LDS
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Re: Man on the sun

Maybe he meant the Sun has no solid surface so you can't really put a man of the Sun, even if you can survive the heat and radiations, and be able to decelerate enough in such gravity well. It's not a matter of technological innovations.

Anyway, to get to the Moon US needed a not so small number of 'available' German scientists and engineers... instead of dreaming about backdoors, it would be smarter to stop to piss off long time allies and collaborate efficiently in fighting crime.

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Is it OK if we call $53bn-a-quarter Amazon the Bit Barns and Ignoble?

LDS
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Big Brother

Re: JeffTopia?

I think it's a world where Alexa-like devices tell customers and workers what to do...

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LDS
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'not content with that transaction the consumer electronics companies want to monetize you further'

Well, Facebook is starting to be hit by privacy concerns... let's wait for the others.

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Sysadmin trained his offshore replacements, sat back, watched ex-employer's world burn

LDS
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"If may save them personnel costs in the short term, but it cost them more in the long term"

It's fine. Executives will rake their bonuses because they "streamlined the business, and reduced costs", and will be easier to hide those costs in the balance sheets. They also have easy scapegoats in the outsourced people. Rarely they will be made accountable for the issues, which will mostly fell on underlings.

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You can take off the shades, squinting Outlook.com users. It has gone dark. Very dark

LDS
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"White paper is cheap"

White paper is more expensive to create. It needs a bleach process, especially paper made from wood pulp, where many components would give it a brownish tint. Also, any amount of lignin left in the process will make it brownish with time (like newspapers, which use a low-quality, cheap paper).

I don't remember if "rag" paper (made from cotton and the like) is whiter without much additional processing. Some photo papers add OBA agents to make the paper look whiter.

Don't know about inks, but I'm not sure black inks are cheaper than other colors, especially in the past.

Also, reading dark papers in darker conditions is worse than white ones, because far less light is reflected and that mean your eyes may switch to low light, low resolution receptors....

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LDS
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Re: Not a good idea for me.

There's also another reason: the pupil is no longer able to get as large as when you're young. Moreover, when the pupil is narrower, it helps with many eyesight issue. That's why I always hated dark themes, they are much harder to read.

Most monitors are too bright at the default settings. Mines are calibrated for photo editing, and the brightness is set to far lower values, compatible with ambient light, greatly reducing eye strain.

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If you're serious about securing IoT gadgets, may as well start here

LDS
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Re: Good idea in principle

If you don't trust the device security, you won't trust their RADIUS, EAP, etc. security as well. It's just more data sent and stored outside your local network.

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Core blimey! Apple macOS update lifts boot from MacBook Pro neck

LDS
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"The work has since been out-sourced to GPUs"

Not all workloads can be off-loaded to the GPU.

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Some Things just aren't meant to be (on Internet of Things networks). But we can work around that

LDS
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"'m looking forward to the call when I help her set up her subnets"

Just like some routers have built-in "guest" networks, it wouldn't be difficult to add some pre-configured subnets and VLANs without requiring the user to have a good knowledge of what they are and how to configure them, and add an interface to add the required ACLs in a simple way, again with some pre-configured ones (i.e. "HTTPs traffic only"). Add on top of it DHCP/DNS automatic management, so you can also see which devices are registered, and with which names.

Call them "networks", "segments," "zones" or whatever you like, to help the user with simpler names.

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LDS
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Re: I had to laugh

Yes, the problem with many home and small office (and even some medium sized) networks is they employ networking devices which were designed for very simple networks, a few connected PCs and nothing more. Just look at how many "unmanaged" switches are on sales, and APs with VLAN and other advanced features are harder to find and more expensive.

Now the ever increasing number of connected devices would need to adopt more sophisticated designs - but the devices don't support them, and the design/configuration is much harder, and usually beyond the knowledge of most non IT people. It could be simplified by management software for less demanding environments, but no one cares...

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From toothbrushes to coffee makers to computers: Europe fines Asus, Pioneer, Philips for rigging prices of kit

LDS
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"The EU is a bit bipolar when it come to fixing of prices."

You're conflating two very different issues. And especially since companies have some protection from gray market products, they should not be allowed to try to fix prices.

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LDS
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Devil

"Said audiophile must have the hearing ability to make a bat jealous."

It's the empty echo chamber between the ears that makes such kind of audiophiles so sensitive...

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LDS
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Re: ?WTF?

Canon is know for its MAP (minimum advertised price) policies, for example, to discourage resellers to make "special offers" outside its own ones.

It's a way to protect revenues by not allowing buyers to "get used" to lower prices, and, for example, making new product look "too expensive" when they are usually introduced with higher margins that will let them be discounted later when the novelty has gone and they are close to be replaced.

You usually need to be among the market leaders to attempt those policies.

Still, MAP is not MSRP, which is an attempt to fix the minimum retail prices. You can still sell at lower prices, but can't advertise them.

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Insecure web still too prevalent: Boffins unveil HSTS wall of shame

LDS
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"it'll be noticed by others."

No, if I were a government agency and I'm doing MITM for specific targets, I wouldn't do a blank replacement of certs for everybody - I would specifically target only the "people of interest" - exactly to avoid easy spotting.

Again, how many do check the chain of trust of a certificate? Pinning could help, but it has its disadvantages, and Chrome removed it, while MS never used it. And if badly implemented, it's still vulnerable:

https://www.schneier.com/blog/archives/2017/12/security_vulner_10.html

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Intel Xeon workhorses boot evil maids out of the hotel: USB-based spying thwarted by fix

LDS
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Facepalm

"the failure on Intels side is to expose the debug interface"

Should they add a "debug port"?

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