* Posts by Headley_Grange

224 posts • joined 24 Feb 2010

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Australia joins the 'decrypt it or we'll legislate' club

Headley_Grange

Re: @ bazza

Tiggity - I expect privacy and get it. The government can't see my bank account details - or the dodgy pics on my phone - without a warrant and they need just cause to get a warrant. Once they've put in the back door then all my details are there for everyone to see.

We all agree that privacy is good. We all agree that back doors are bad. Problem is that our current approach of "all my cat pictures have to remain encrypted for ever" is going to result in back doors and the result that my (and your) bank statements and dodgy pics will be all over the internet within 12 months.

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Headley_Grange

Re: @ bazza

Evil Auditor - The odd thing is that although your bank transactions are encrypted, the results are not, so at any time the government can get access to them via a warrant (assuming you're not banking offshore). And this is what the gov. wants - so as far as banking goes, everyone is happy.

So, the gov. can see my bank account, but can't see Whatsapp pics of my dinner/cat/explosive because we the people (apparently) think that it is really really important that no one except the desired recipient ever sees the cat pictures - ever. And this requirement to permanently encrypt pictures of my dinner and prevent the government seeing them is so important that I'm willing to risk the introduction of internet encryption back doors and put my banking at risk. Because...... because what?

If it's good enough for my banking details to be available in plain text somewhere then the same applies in spades to pictures of my cat. And there must be a way to do it without dicking about with back doors. So why don't we start offering solutions instead of simply crying "what about the children"?

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Headley_Grange

What about the children

I think that the almost universal cries of horror about this subject from the tech sector puts us firmly in the "what about the children" camp and it's not helpful.

I like encryption. My banking transactions are all encrypted. This is a good thing. But at any time the "government" can get details of the transactions with a suitable warrant because plain text records of the transactions are available somewhere. So, for most of the people (us) who are aghast at the concept of the government being able to "break" encryption, our most important data (banking stuff) is already available to the government while their less important information (whatsapp pictures of our dinner) is completely uncrackable.

If we, the tech sector, keep up this clamour to give better protection to stupid pictures of our dinner than to our financial details without offering solutions that might actually work for both sides then we're going to look daft and the govs will get their back doors.

Why are pictures of your dinner so much more important than your banking details that they need to be permanently encrypted everywhere for ever?

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Why aren't you being arbiters of truth? MPs scream at Facebook, YouTube, Twitter

Headley_Grange

Re: Truthiness

David - my understanding is that traditional media are classed as publishers so are responsible (mostly) for what they print and are therefore subject to libel laws, etc. Twitter, Facebook and the rest are not considered to be publishers, but something else (platforms, channels, etc.) and so have no responsibility for what appears on their sites. If you want to sue someone for libel it has to be the original poster.

I think that this is enshrined in US law. I'm less certain about UK law, but UK Gov could bugger their business model at a stroke by passing laws to classify them as publishers. The great British public wouldn't be happy, though.

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Forget cyber crims, it's time to start worrying about GPS jammers – UK.gov report

Headley_Grange

Re: FFS - Measure the risk first

Marcus: "Hide a few hundred of those around the country with a nice random 'twinkle' jamming sequence "

They'd be hard to hide putting out that sort of power. It doesn't matter how twinkly they are (trade off between stealth and jamming effectiveness) they'd be easy to find cos they have to put out a high power spectral density to get over the spread spectrum processing gain of the GPS front end

Critical military systems already have GPS aerials which can steer multiple nulls in their antenna pattern to counteract jammers and, depending on the platform, give a bearing for the jammer.

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Headley_Grange

Raynet

di di da da di di

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Look on the bright side, Pebble fans. At least your gizmo will work long enough for you to get beach body ready

Headley_Grange

Spec.

Here's an idea for discussion.

What about stuff having a set of key features and if the supplier takes any of these features away then they have to give customers their money back for a period of, say, 10 years. This could be enshrined in law so that contracts/EULAs can't get round it. For example, you buy a navigation device and one of the key features is traffic and camera alerts. After a few years the supplier stops supporting the traffic and camera alerts, but they have to give me my money back if I ask for it.

The good: users could see what they're guaranteed to get for the next 10 years. If you were looking for a GPS widget for hillwalking which can download 1:25,000 OS maps then any device that offered it but did not include it in the Key Features would be off the list.

The bad: For things out of the manufacturer's control there might have to be allowances. There could be a cost impact. If your cheap as chips widget and app relies on an iPhone feature that disappears then a software update might be too expensive so it would discourage companies from developing useful, cheap stuff. It would be a problem for phone manufacturers I guess.

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Headley_Grange

Re: Oddly enough...

Neil - electronics can be reliable. I've still got a Sinclair scientific calculator which works as well as as it did in 1977. The on/off switch was dodgy then and still is. My HP11c calculator might only be 30 years old, but it still works fine.

Of course, if either had relied on Sinclair or HP providing a service for them to work then they would both have been a bricked long ago.

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'The capacitors exploded, showering the lab in flaming confetti'

Headley_Grange

Re: All this talk of breadboards...

Vero funny.

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Brit transport pundit Christian Wolmar on why the driverless car is on a 'road to nowhere'

Headley_Grange

Urban vs Motorway

Cruise control is no good in the city, but it's bloody good on the motorway and I don't regret paying for the upgrade. Unless all your miles are in the city then as long as the autonomous vehicle still has manual controls then it's no different. I'll drive the car from my house to the motorway then engage autonomous mode, set the alarm for the end of the M7 and get my head down.

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Whizzes' lithium-iron-oxide battery 'octuples' capacity on the cheap

Headley_Grange

Re: Great News

Tempest - only if it's a 7320. They *were* good old days. The company issued them so we could pick up email and IT told me I'd look stupid when I asked them to enable the phone.

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Headley_Grange

Great News

This is great - it means that in the future my phone could last a week without a charge.

But, back in the real world, if it ever happens we'll just end up with even thinner phones because, apparently, that's what we want.

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French activists storm Paris Apple Store over EU tax dispute

Headley_Grange

Re: Vive la France

@Frank:

"These 'corporations' have a legal corporate presence in Europe and operate in Europe. They trade in Europe, engage in corporate activity and make a profit in Europe. I thought that European law would apply to anyone who did that."

They make a profit in Europe, but a lot of the costs associated with that profit (R&D, manufacturing) are in other countries. The tax system has to recognize that and that's where the problems of complexity, politics and places to hide come from.

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Ofcom proposes ways to stop BT undercutting broadband rivals

Headley_Grange

Re: If BT can lower their prices........

I remember nationalized BT. I remember the media frenzy when the range of phones was doubled by the introduction of the Trimphone. I remember most of the houses in my parents' street not having a phone because it was unaffordable. I remember it taking 3 months to get a phone installed in my first house - and then I remember only using it for essential stuff after 6PM because of the cost. Happy days.

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Firefox 57: Good news? It's nippy. Bad news? It'll also trash your add-ons

Headley_Grange

Freetards

detritus - you're right - whingeing about stuff that's free to the user is a bit much - but where's the alternative? I'd be happy to pay for a browser that did what I want if I knew it wouldn't change significantly every couple of years. Problem is that I haven't got such an option, so I'll feel free to whinge about it.

The 2nd problem is that even stuff I pay for changes and I have no option but to lump it. Tablets I spent a fortune on on 3 years ago are now not supported. Every OS or app update makes my PC/Tablet/Phone run slower, hotter or crapper. Features I used a lot disappear, while bugs are never fixed. IoT things I paid good money for only 18 months ago are now effectively bricked because the dev has binned the app. If Ford started taking the radios out of cars when they were servicing them then there would be an outcry, but the equivalent happens almost every day on my PC/tablet/phone - and often with stuff I've paid for.

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Headley_Grange

Re: Supporting legacy addons is not the real problem here

pip25 - have to agree with you. I've stuck with Firefox for ages because of a couple of add-ons that aren't available anywhere else. Once they're gone I'll dump Firefox and look for something else. I'm off to play with Pale Moon (HT) and spend the rest of the afternoon seeing what else is out there.

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Judge: You're getting an Apple data centre and you're going to like it

Headley_Grange

The badgers are sett against it.

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NHS could have 'fended off' WannaCry by taking 'simple steps' – report

Headley_Grange

Penalty Clauses

"And when a supplier fails to do what they claim to have done, there should be penalty clauses invoked to make sure they don't fail again"

Penalty clauses are unenforceable in English law.

Liquidated damages are allowed, provided that that the damages are a true reflection of the losses incurred. Liquidated damages are limited to the amount set out in the contract.

I think the NHS would struggle to contract for services if they tried to reflect the potential true costs of a major cock up in the liquidated damages. Some of the companies I have worked with simply add the liquidated damages to the contract price to ensure that they are covered, meaning that if the supplier performs well the customer, effectively, incurs the cost of their performing badly!

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Headley_Grange

Re: getting the queues down isn just some basic maths

"With a bit of better resource planning, getting the queues down isn't that hard, its just some basic maths."

The maths is easy, but the numbers that go into the maths are a tad more difficult to come by. It takes 7 to 15 years to train doctors and surgeons. It takes 3 to 10 years to train a nurse. How many hip operations will be needed in ten years' time? How many critical care beds and nurses will be needed ? How many social care beds, etc., etc.? We need those numbers, and all the other ones, together with they way we distribute them around the country, and some definitions for standard work. Then the maths is easy and we can start working today to feed the right number of trainees into Uni and building the hospitals to have the right capacity in the NHS in about 10 years time. As long as the spec. doesn't change.

Sure, you could manage the NHS like a production line or a project and I'm sure that a Friday night pubstorm could come up with the treatment equivalents of MRP, pull, flow, kanbans, buffers, scrums, sprints, EV, etc. (pick your buzz space). Maybe the hospital could hold a stock of healthy grans so that when they haven't got the capacity to treat yours they could just send you home with a healthy gran from the buffer stock :-)

Anyone really interested in this subject should try to get hold of "Transforming Health Care" by Charles Kenney.

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Headley_Grange

Easy Isn't It

In a similar vein, the NHS could improve the lives of thousands of people by doing their operation tomorrow instead of making them wait. All they have to do is operate on them.

Wow, who knew that making things better could be so easy.

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Interstellar space rock screams through Solar System

Headley_Grange

Under the Sun?

I'm not sure anything in our solar system could ever be considered *under* the sun

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Security pros' advice to consumers: 'We dunno, try 152 things'

Headley_Grange

Re: Don't open unexpected attachments

"It's like saying we delivered some coffee in the break room..."

It's more like saying that someone on the street asked you to take a parcel and leave it in the CEOs office and it's not your job to think about the safety or security implications. Employees are asked to be vigilant about tailgating and other suspicious behaviour, so it's not unreasonable to ask them to be vigilant about potential threats in mail messages.

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He's no good for you! Ofcom wants to give folk powers to dump subpar broadband contracts

Headley_Grange

Up to, or it's misleading.

How will this work? I accept that the providers are pretty loose when it comes to advertising and a clamp-down wouldn't go amiss, but unless they have almost infinite bandwidth to the local cabinet they can only ever make "up to" promises. A user might get 80Gbps at 3AM when the rest of the street is asleep, but when all the street has 4 users per house gaming and on Netflix the bandwidth is going to drop.

Me - I'm on 40-years-in-the-soft twisted pair and a 20-year-old BT Voyager. I get by on 7Mbps, but at 300 yards from the cabinet I consider myself lucky and don't fall for any marketing about upgrading. I won't get much more speed until I get FTTH.

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BYOD might be a hipster honeypot but it's rarely worth the extra hassle

Headley_Grange

Re: Just a stupid idea.

It depends, doesn't it?

In the case of phones, BYOD makes sense to a lot of employees. I don't want to have to carry two phones, two chargers, two cables, two cases, and potentially have to maintain 2 calendars, 2 ToDo lists, ....etc. with me when I'm out and about or away on business. You might have the luxury of a 9-to-5 job where you can turn off at hometime, but many of us can't or don't want to.

In the case of PCs, I agree with the sentiment that allowing outside access to my personal files would be a red line for me, but if a client insisted - and the rate was good - I'm sure I could manage it with separate accounts, permissions and partitions. I already have separate work and personal accounts on my PC just to avoid the risk of embarrassment when plugging into screens at client sites.

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Oracle promises ‘highly automated’ security in self-driving database

Headley_Grange

It's the end......

......of "Something for the Weekend".

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Another month, another malware outbreak in Google's Play Store

Headley_Grange

Re: Useless Google

Good idea about the sales - and I don't believe that a law would ever be passed. But if it were, even though the US won't extradite it would mean that the Google directors could never go to a country with a UK extradition treaty.

BTW Google has a UK MD - he'd be the one going to prison.

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Headley_Grange

Re: Useless Google

@Led - that's why I said "criminally liable". It wouldn't be about lawsuits, it would be about Google's directors going to prison.

I once worked for a UK company with a US parent and it had a US MD. A customer had just pointed out a safety problem with an installation. At an internal review the MD told the PM to tell them to pay for the changes or sod off and we'd see them in court. The PM told the MD that in the UK people could be held personally responsible for H&S problems and do jail time. The MD called in the company legal director - who told him the same thing and requested that the meeting be formally minuted to record the MD's instructions. The MD went white and told the PM to fix the problem and do it sharpish, whatever the cost.

What could Google do? - I don't know, but with virtually limitless funds and the the threat of using hairy soap for a couple of years I bet they'd find a way pretty quickly

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Headley_Grange

Re: Useless Google

@Ledswinger - another option might be for governments to make store owners criminally liable for malware in their stores.

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Apple's adoption of Qi signals the end of the wireless charging wars

Headley_Grange

Re: for once...

@Sarge - you mean like the way they standardized on 3.5mm jack plugs for sound? An actual pro-consumer move -- until they changed.

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Nest cracks out cheaper spin of its thermostat

Headley_Grange

Re: My v1 Nest paid for itself within a year.

@Borg.King - My *annual* gas bill (heating/hot water) in southern England is £350. You must live in a mansion or somewhere very cold.

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Headley_Grange

Re: It is worth it, you just have to try it...

@MrXavia - good point. A Nest thermostat, or any other IoT device which wants unfettered access to my network and the web will be of interest to me only when the company signs up to a set of Ts&Cs, enforceable in the UK, which guarantee support and security upgrades for at least ten years, reference an accepted (ISO, BS) security standard and agree to be audited regularly to make sure they meet it. They'll also have to guarantee that the app which controls it will continue to be supported for free on existing OSs until the OS is declared obsolete by the vendor and then migrated free to the next version (I'm thinking of the iOs 32-64 bit problem or Parallels on the Mac, which wants £40 every time the Mac OS rolls). They'll also have to guarantee that they won't suddenly decide that, once they've saturated the market, they won't switch users to a monthly subscription model to access their device.

Until then, I'm buggered if I'm spending anything buying a widget which can be, effectively, made unuseable because the company can't be bothered to update the product or the app or which can suddenly start costing me money because they change the funding model.

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British broadband is confusing and speeds are crap, says survey

Headley_Grange

Re: Webpages that crash

@Joe: you're right. Much like a bypass, the traffic will grow to fill the capacity. Newspaper pages run at 20-40MB if all the ads and scripts are allowed (I've seen 75MB on the Indy) for a data content (news) of a few hundred kB. Page size is set by papers' view of what readers will accept as load time, not their consideration for our bandwidth. If users had 1Gbps then the papers would just cram in more crap for the same load times.

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Energy firm slapped with £50k fine for making 1.5 million nuisance calls

Headley_Grange

Re: Spawn of Satan

Most people are so pissed off with cold calling that they just slam the phone down, and reporting is a pain in the neck, even if you know either the number or the company. How difficult would it be for BT to set up automatic reporting - just hit, say, 2868, during the call and it's automatically logged as a nuisance call. They should be able to do this even if the sender withholds their number, given that the call comes over their network.

BTW - I bought one of those call-blocking phones and I haven't had a cold call since.

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UK industry mouthpiece wants 'near-universal' broadband speeds of 30Mbps by 2020

Headley_Grange

Re: Use cases please?

I think that the problem is more of an "if you build it they will come" issue. Most of us managed to get by on 56k 20 years ago - including reading the news and looking at pretty pics on the NASA site. Bandwidth is like a bypass - it generates traffic till it's full. Some newspaper pages (Independent) are 40 - 60MB if you allow all the scripts and advertising through - for less than 100kB of useful information. Do you think that will get better or worse if they reliably have higher available bandwidth and can increase the crud without impacting load time.

So, yeah - in 10 years time when everyone in the street has installed mini-iMax 3D TVs people will be whingeing at the the poor decision to only provision for 30MB.

I'm stuffed cos I'm twisted pair back to the box, which is about 300 yards away, so my 5Mbps is pretty miraculous and won't change unless they dig the street up and install fibre.

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UK.gov cloud fave Amazon comes under fire for tax bill

Headley_Grange

Re: That's a 5.28% tax rate.

How do you get that rate?

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Headley_Grange

Worse than the Guardian

I'm boycotting Amazon because of the way they treat employees - IOW, I don't like them, but this is a crap report . At least the Gruaniad reported the facts. From yesterday's article in the Graun:

"The company received a tax credit of £1.3m from the UK authorities, which it will be able to deduct from future tax bills. Pre-tax profits halved from £48m in 2015 to £24m last year."

So the profit halved, and so did the tax.

Note also (Graun): " Amazon Europe, which is based in Luxembourg and aggregates the billions of pounds of sales the retailer makes from individual countries across the continent, reported a pre-tax profit of €59.6m last year. As a result the company, which clocked up €21.6bn in sales across Europe last year, had a tax bill of just €16.5m." So that's an approximate tax rate of about 27%

Finally - as one poster pointed out above - some of the reduced profits came from increased pay, benefits and bonuses to employees. Given that income tax is generally higher than corp tax then if any of those employees is UK based then the exchequer has probably got a good deal, even ignoring the VAT that the it will probably make from the increased disposable income.

Amazon's business model of making very small profit on a massive sales turnover will always result in low taxes - get over it. If you're going to get angry at Amazon then it should be for the way staff and contractors are treated; Amazon can afford to do better, they should do better and they will if their customers demand it.

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UK publishes Laws of Robotics for self-driving cars

Headley_Grange

Re: But but but...

@Smooth - is it a problem that the document is woolly? If UKGOV had tried to define anything (specs, protocols, etc) then it would have been slated for shackling industry, outdated after about 20 minutes and possibly also acted as a hacker's manual by helping to define attack vectors.

The woolliness might allow companies to wriggle out of stuff, but it's a feature certainly of English law; ALARP, best endeavours, the man on the Clapham omnibus etc. abound and in my experience companies take their legal responsibilities in these woolly areas just as seriously as in better defined ones. The supposedly tight, technical specs around emissions testing and compliance didn't prevent car companies trying to find ways around it and any eventual prosecutions in Europe will not simply be about not meeting the specs (which is sort of proven), but about proving an intent to defraud.

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Headley_Grange

Re: But but but...

@Big_D -- When you pay by credit card in a shop the communication link is secure but the information is available at the bank for when it's needed; e.g. to send you a statement. The government doesn't want to ban encrypted information links, it wants to make sure that the information is getatable at some place- either the user's phone or the supplier's servers.

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Google hit with record antitrust fine of €2.4bn by Europe

Headley_Grange

Re: Erm

"What you're not allowed to do is to use that monopoly (market dominance) in order to enter other markets. At which point it all becomes rather murky, as to what's being normally competitive and what's unfair competition."

The BBC has all but destroyed local newspapers and radio stations. They advertise only their own products on TV, radio and podcasts. They copy their competitor's products and compete with them (time slots) for no other reason than to disrupt their business (they get the same revenue whether they show a programme at 8 o'clock on Sunday evening or 3 o'clock on Thursday). I'm forced to pay for this, even if I never watch BBC.

I look forward to someone fining the BBC for these anti-competitive practices.

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Uber wants your top tips to mend its rotten image

Headley_Grange

Re: Tips

And always wear goggles when grinding.

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White-box security webcam scatters vulnerabilities through multiple OEMs

Headley_Grange

Re: Why, oh why?

"but why the fcuk do they always need to be connected to the Interwebs?"

The main reason for security cameras is that they would be pretty useless if the burglars ran off with the laptop or server that the cameras were recording on.

Another reason is upgrades. Many people aren't tech aware enough to do their own upgrades by downloading then uploading and installing. I had to do my NAS server a year or so ago and it was a stressful nightmare. A relative phones me every so often because the flash update on Firefox hasn't worked. The conversation always goes like.

"Open a Finder window".

"What's Finder? What do you mean a window?".

"Look on the thing that pops up on the bottom of the screen for a blue smiley face thing - probably on the left hand side".

"OK. Wait a minute while I close everything that's on the screen.".

"You don't need to do that - just open Finder".

"Hang on, I'm just closing everything that's on the screen".

etc. There's lots of "...look up at the very top right, then come down a bit - just next to the green dot....". They don't know what the following words mean: App, Folder, Return Key, Window, Finder, Side Bar, Column Header, Sort, Home Folder, Default, Settings, ............

They are not stupid; they are like the vast majority of home PC users who just use them to buy stuff on eBay and watch films and have no knowledge of what happens under the hood.

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BT considers scrapping 'gold-plated' pensions in bid to plug £14bn deficit

Headley_Grange

Re: Thank the Bank of England

@Ian45 - don't know why you're getting down voted because you're correct. Quantitative easing (BoE policy to keep inflation low) hits gilt returns. Pension funds tend to have big gilt investment because they are seen as safe. Pension fund forecast returns have plummeted because gilt returns have plummeted and therefore the forecast deficits in pension funds (dictated by actuarial rules) have grown. Note that these are not real deficits - they are forecast deficits based on predicted liabilities (how long people will live, inflation) and predicted values (gilt and other investment returns). At the moment, on average, both of these are going the wrong way.

From the FT last August : 'Over the past few years, falls in bond yields used to calculate liabilities have forced many defined benefit “final salary” pension schemes into deeper deficit — with total deficits reaching a new high of £935bn in the wake of the EU referendum, according to actuaries at Hymans Robertson.

“Any downward pressure on gilt yields will feed through in the form of an ever bigger black hole in final salary schemes,” said Tom McPhail, head of pensions research at fund manager Hargreaves Lansdown.

"'

https://www.ft.com/content/995523f6-58de-11e6-8d05-4eaa66292c32

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Headley_Grange

Re: BT, a pension scheme with a telecommunications provider attached to it

Companies didn't raid pension pots; they stopped paying in because they had to pay tax on the surplus. The link below is to an old story, but explains the bones of it, including

"So-called pension holidays created a savings nightmare, the most spectacular example of which was at the Royal Mail, where successive governments paid nothing at all into its pension scheme for 13 years and ended up with colossal shortfall. "

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/finance/personalfinance/pensions/10343130/Who-will-end-this-pension-scandal.html

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Uber found to be doing something awful? Yep, it's Tuesday

Headley_Grange

Unfathomably Popular?

@InNY: I don't like or use Uber, but "unfathomably popular"? Have you ever used a cab? In my town....

- no credit cards in half the cabs and the rest whack on a £3 or 5% charge (whichever's bigger),

- filthy, uncomfortable, knackered cabs, with no heating in the rear in winter,

- drivers who don't know where they are going,

- cabs that don't turn up on time - or at all,

- no cabs on the ranks late at night,

- cabs that add on the station pick-up charge no matter where they pick you up,

- no way to complain about any of the above which gets results nor any way to find out who the bad drivers/cabs are.

The state has regulated Hackneys since the late 1600s and mincabs since the 60s and in those 300 odd years they've done virtually nothing to improve customer service other than implement general legislation (smoking, seatbelts, disabled access, etc). Getting a cab today was no different from getting a cab in 1965 - until along came Uber. I don't use Uber, their "self employed" model is disingenuous at best and they don't pay their fair share of tax (IMHO) - but they filled a hole that needed filling and, practically, one that could have been addressed by the regulating authorities any time in the last 10 years.

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Microsoft to spooks: WannaCrypt was inevitable, quit hoarding

Headley_Grange

Re: Let's mention Microsoft's Policy of hoarding patches unless you pay up.

@Dan 55 - there's a fix for Win7 taking hours to decide which updates are required. I had the same problem but I can't remember the specifics of the fix. Google it; it requires you to download and run a specific update which you've skipped in the past.

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Victory! The smell of skunkworks in your office in the morning

Headley_Grange

Re: How do you handle the legal part of governnance?

I did some work for a UK-based company which was owned by a US company. The high-paid help were briefed on Sarbanes Oxley. Briefing message: "You are responsible for what happens here and if you sign off stuff which isn't fit for purpose then you'll be in the US, wearing orange and using hairy soap."

HPH response? They pushed down acceptance/approval to the lowest level possible, including just-graduated engineers, and instigated a process that resulted in it taking weeks to get anything signed off. None of the directors would approve anything without evidence to "prove" it was someone else's fault.

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Headley_Grange

PM "How long til it's finished?"

Eng. "Couple of weeks."

PM "How's it going?"

Eng. "OK."

PM "What's the spec. again?"

Eng. "8dB min."

PM "And what's the performance?"

Eng. "9.5 dB, but I know I can get get more. Just give me a couple of weeks."

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Headley_Grange

ETC

As a newby PM in the midst of "managing" a development project I was informed by the finance director that the engineering overhead had increased by 0.8% and so I needed to adjust my estimate to complete accordingly. I told him that it was pointless because the ETC accuracy was nowhere near 0.8% and the genuine look of astonishment on his face made me realize that me and the company weren't made to be.

Skunkworks? There was a group of 3 guys who spent most of their time inventing new ways to use conditional formatting on project reports; does that count?

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Uber sued by ex-Lyft driver tormented by app maker's 'Hell' spyware

Headley_Grange

Re: ...serious driver retention problem

JimC - all those years ago I thought I was a paperboy, but in reality I was a self-employed news delivery platform.

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