* Posts by BJC

17 posts • joined 23 Feb 2010

Naked Androids to rampage across Russia

BJC

Re: Potential Google response

> How could Google force OEMs not to sell Android phones in Russia?

I was suggesting that Google simply stop licensing Android to OEMs in Russia. I'm not sure whether ASOP is the same as the code Google licences to OEMs. I suspect it's quite different but I haven't looked and that may be confidential anyway. Russian OEMs would still be free to use any open source code but would it then be their responsibility to disentangle Google services?

0
0
BJC

Potential Google response

Rather than open Android devices for other search engines, might Google simply add terms and conditions to prevent distribution of Android in Russia? This way Google would be able to comply with the ruling while sticking with the mantra that all the apps are so closely tied into Android that removal is impossible. That might also help Google with the negotiations with other economic blocks, such as the EU. It might be worth sacraficing Russia for the sake of larger markets. Anyone know what the Russian marketplace looks like for these units? Would Google miss Russia?

If Google effectively withdrew from Russia, a grey market would likely develop to import Android units for those that really want them. If demand continued then it might eventually become unsustainable to stop them.

Note that it isn't important to determine whether Google _could_ separate the app integration from Android, just whether they are inclined to do so for this ruling.

1
0

Big data busts crypto: 'Sweet32' captures collisions in old ciphers

BJC

Yep, there's a transcription error from the original article and 2^20.1 got changed to "200.1" and 2^36.6 got changed to "236.6".

You are correct that 2^20.1 (1123835) would still be too low at 2000 requests per second for 25 minutes (3000000) but the original article did say "up to" 200 requests per second. I don't see anything to note whether 2000 requests per second could be sustained.

It would seem to be something that might have been better clarified in the original article and definitely better transcribed by The Reg.

7
0

This is how the EU's supreme court is stripping EU citizens of copyright protections

BJC

Is it re-publishing?

N.B. I am most decidedly NOT a lawyer.

I'm happy to comply with sensible copyright and republishing protected material is wrong. I want my material protected so I need to be prepared to respect the property of others.

OK, it's not about the actual link. It could be a nice descriptive link, a redirection link, a self-evidently broken link that's easy to fix, or even search expression text. The point is that the distribution of the "link" is making it available a different "public". I read this as making it available to a new audience. We might better describe making it available to a new audience as re-publishing.

If I post material on a public facing web site, under my control, I consider that publishing publicly. The technicalities of the web require that each visitor copies the material to their own clients systems to view the material. That would seem to have an implied acceptance by the author. However, if the visitor makes the files available on a different site that would seem to be re-publishing the material and I (as the author) might, reasonably, consider this a violation.

Now, what if I put files on a public facing web site and share a link privately with friends? This doesn't change the fact that it's available to anyone who stumbles upon it. If the link becomes known to others and is shared, that would reach a new audience (i.e. no longer just my friends). Of course, at any time I can add some authorisation method that restricts access. That is, the material is still under my control and I'm not guaranteeing that the link will reach the material at any given time.

So, for me sharing the link is fine because the material is still under the control of the author. However, sharing the material (i.e. re-publishing) is a violation.

Just my 2p.

1
0

Samsung's little black box will hot-wire your car to the internet. Eek!

BJC

Privacy already compromised

Folks are rightly concerned about privacy issues. However, in the EU, that's already been compromised by requiring eCall units to be fitted to new cars from 2018. See The Register.

Of course you could choose to believe that no agency will use this for other purposes. If the agencies don't bother you then perhaps this might - "The European Parliament itself admitted that it expects a whole host of commercial companies to have access to this data."

7
0

Dutch PGP-encrypted comms network ‘abused by crooks’ is busted

BJC

Why stop there?

Based on the number of BT telephone users and the number of criminals, it seems quite possible that the BT telephone network is being used for criminal purposes. OK, shut it down too. Of course, the same is true - probably more so - for the mobile networks so shut them down too. Actually, what about this interweb thingy, they're probably using that too. OK, shut it down.

N.B. I have no evidence to support that fact that these services are being used for illegal purposes. Right, lets monitor and capture all comms so that we can find out. Oh, we're already doing that...mmmmm.

Seems that this isn't so much as an idea but a government plan. :-(

11
0

Be afraid, Apple and Samsung: Huawei's IoT home looks cheaper and better

BJC

Security

Isn't a major issue with IoT always going to be security?

Let's be generous and assume that there are no known issues today for the "thing". Some issues are only evident when general technology moves on. For example, the system may be well designed and can't be cracked today but what about with the computing power available in 3 years, 5 years, or 10 years?

Who wants to spend time managing a "thing"? I'm not keen on the hassle involved in updating my computing devices (although I do) - it's a hidden cost of having the tech. That's worse for "things" that I expect to just be there and work. Even now, who wants to go round round the house checking that all network connected devices are running the latest firmware? TVs, PVRs, disc players, music streamer - do you check them all? Even if you do, does the latest update even patch the latest known vulnerabilities? Have you checked? For every connected device?

What happens if the solution requires different hardware? For example, perhaps the encryption is supported by a hardware module - what happens if the algorithm is found to be compromised? Will the vendor update the hardware of a 10 year old "thing"? What about if it's 5 years old? 2 years?

The whole point is that it's the Internet of *Things*. I tend to keep my "things" longer than I might keep my computing tech. A large installed base of ageing kit is a big support burden. That's likely to be complicated by the hardware being optimised to minimise production cost and further complicated with the design evolving over time as components are changed or eliminated. How long will updates keep being developed and issued? Supporting the ageing Windows XP is going to look simple in comparison.

Will every consumer be expected to become an IT specialist just to ensure that the "things" are all suitably connected and protected? Is that realistic? I don't think so.

2
0

Belgium to the rescue as UK consumers freeze after BST blunder

BJC

Universal world time

>> In America? Well you will work 14:00-22:00 and have lunch at 18:00. <<

Doesn't that just change the problem?

Consider you're reading and the subject has breakfast at "15:00". Is that early, normal, late? It wouldn't be possible to tell unless you find out where the character is. So, does the time become "15:00 90degW"? That wouldn't seem to be a simplifcation.

Similarly, if you were to schedule a business meeting between UK and US colleagues, it might still be necessary to know whether all parties are likely to be awake and at work.

At least with the current system, once the time conversion is done, I can easily determine if it's a normal business hour, or not.

Just my 2p.

1
0

Windows 10: The Microsoft rule-o-three holds, THIS time it's looking DECENT

BJC

Re: We will tell them it's free - Muuhahahha

Alternative translation:

You can upgrade, for free, from Windows 7, 8 or 8.1 within the first year of release. After those first 12 months, you need to pay to upgrade. Either way, once you're upgraded it's yours and you are supported. That is, it *doesn't* need license renewal - it is not a subscription.

Take at look at http://blogs.windows.com/bloggingwindows/2015/01/21/the-next-generation-of-windows-windows-10/. The key quote is "This is more than a one-time upgrade: once a Windows device is upgraded to Windows 10, we will continue to keep it current for the supported lifetime of the device – at no cost."

3
1

BT Infinity ‘working to fix problem’ after three days of outages

BJC

Re: Related...?

I had the same thing last night with the Parental Controls overlay, also for the first time. The site I was trying to get to was The Register! Frustratingly, clicking the options to ignore it didn't actually bring up the selected link (on The Register). Instead, I got stuck with an error.

The Parental Controls thing happened just after something else. I rebooted my PC. Following the restart, I got errors from the router telling me that it couldn't connect. I tried a couple of sites but it was adament. I then logged on to the router and all looked well. It worked fine after that. I don't know if it just cleared itself or if it was a result of logging on.

0
0

Royal Navy parks 470 double-decker buses on Queen Elizabeth

BJC
FAIL

Re: Geography...

If someone could also just pop Rosyth back down onto the Firth of Forth and away from Dundee, that'd be grand.

I hope that map wasn't generated by the on-board navigation system.

6
0

Watch this: The .NET ASync story

BJC
Unhappy

Painful audio

This is the second Tech Week video I thought looked interesting and was worth watching, based on the subject matter. Unfortunately, in both cases, the audio is so poor that it's completely distracting. Consequently, I didn't get far into either video.

I don't think it does The Register or QA Tech any good to link to such poor quality material. OTOH, I guess it was worth what I paid for it.

0
0

Dell orbits Linux a third time with revamped Sputnik notebooks

BJC
Happy

I'm in

I got the 2nd iteration of the XPS13, preinstalled with Ubuntu and it's one of the best buys I've made. It's a fantastic size, the screen is great.

As for Ubuntu, well it just works - no drama, no excitement. It's an OS - that's what it's supposed to do! I was a little miffed about the pricing - virtually the same with Windows or Ubuntu, which seemed unjust given the MS tax. However, the Windows option was through the "Home" channel while the Ubuntu option was through the "Work" channel, with better support (although I haven't needed any). However, I'm happy to pay for the Ubuntu pre-install if it's tweaked to fit the machine which it seems to be. Personally, I've drifted to a preference for GNU/Linux for home use, over the last few years, although I'm still firmly with Windows at work.

Searching around, as I did prior to purchase, there weren't many options for buying a decent spec laptop with GNU/Linux pre-installed, so I welcome Dell's efforts. Perhaps other vendors might take note so we can have a genuine choice of OS.

Anyway, I'd buy another in a heartbeat. Each to their own though.

4
0

Yahoo! Mail! offers! HTTPS! amid! account! hijack! spree!

BJC
FAIL

Not on BT Yahoo accounts

I've just checked my BT Yahoo account and I see no such option.

0
0

F1 2010

BJC
Thumb Up

And Revs...

I even remember Geoff Crammond's Revs for the BBC. I'm still amazed of the perception of the Snetterton Bomb Hole corner - it really felt like the steering went light on the exit. All that with only keyboard entry and low resolution display!

[I refuse to work out just how many years ago that was - just way too scary!]

2
0

Dell's order status website wobbles at knees

BJC

...or was it?

I was trying to determine the order status because I was trying to cancel the order.

During the order process, the estimated delivery was "3+ weeks". The order confirmation estimated delivery as 7th July - about 4.5 months! While technically correct, that's ridiculous! No point in hanging around, so I tried to cancel the order the next day.

Given recent experience, I have serious reservations about using Dell again. As was said before by someone with far more widom than I:

"The definition of stupidity is doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results." — Albert Einstein

Maybe it's time to recognise the obvious and give up on Dell.

Bruce

0
0

Forums

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2017