* Posts by SirWired 1

92 posts • joined 24 May 2010

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Google's Big Hardware Bet: Is this what a sane business would do?

SirWired 1

I don't think this is a marketshare play

I think this is more a case of Google wanting to bring it's "Model Phone" development in-house as a way of demonstrating to OEMs of what Google is thinking as a basic Android platform. Yeah, they'll sell some phones themselves along the way, but that's not really the point.

That said, you have to wonder why, if this was such a great idea, they unloaded Moto to begin with.

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A storage giant wants to give you 46,763...

SirWired 1

Probably some government regulation

I have no doubt that if you ask Nutanix for pricing, the sales goon pulls up some internal website, selects the appropriate drop-downs, and out pops a price quote. But it would not surprise me if some government agency (or other large procurement organization) required published price lists in order to cut down on shenanigans with kickbacks.

It's probably easier to program the pricing system to produce this ridiculous document than it is to make the pricing system itself a publicly-available (and public-quality) service.

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Symbolic IO CEO cuffed by cops, vanishes from his storage startup

SirWired 1

So I guess somebody else will have to be brought up to speed on their B.S product claims?

I guess this means that some new guy will have to learn all their B.S. claims well, so he doesn't conflict with the utter nonsensical and mathematically impossible crap they've been telling the press so far.

(Short version: They claim they "aren't doing compression", but magically have a way to "reduce" the amount of space data takes up in a fashion that works on all data, including random data. (This is mathematically impossible; it's referred to as the "pigeonhole problem.") And because that didn't raise ENOUGH B.S. alarms, they also claim you can take the output and run it through the compression engine of your choice to further reduce it. (Because they claim it actually "hasn't been compressed" yet, it's just been [insert arm-waving gibberish here.]

ElReg did an interview with these guys, but instead of asking difficult questions about how they are apparently they can violate the laws of mathematics, the idiot of an interviewer asked what the blinky lights on top were for, and why the Magical Hardware Module plugged in the back instead of the front.

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GPS III satellites and ground station projects get even later as costs gently spiral

SirWired 1

Do you have any idea how GPS works?

"Broadly speaking, in Raytheon’s words, the ground system which collates signals from the satellites to deduce the user’s location is the 'brain of the entire GPS system'."

Raytheon didn't say anything like that (okay, the actual words in the quotation marks are correct, but that paraphrasing before that isn't.) The OCX system does not "collate signals from the satellites to deduce the user's location." An individual user's GPS receiver does that. This is kind of GPS 101 here...

The link to Raytheon does a pretty good job explaining what the OCX system is for; you might want to read it again, and pay attention this time. And Wikipedia can tell you all about GPS in general...

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I've got a verbal govt contract for Hyperloop, claims His Muskiness

SirWired 1

This. Boring hundreds of miles of tunnels through widely varying geology is not exactly an inexpensive or easy undertaking. (Even if he develops a magical tunnel-boring machine, you still have to truck away all that volume of dirt/rock you are boring through.)

There's a reason rail systems run on the surface whenever possible; bridges and tunnels are difficult, expensive, and maintenance-intensive.

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Ex-NASA bod on Gwyneth Paltrow site's 'healing' stickers: 'Wow. What a load of BS'

SirWired 1

Goop's always good for a laugh

"Our content is meant to highlight unique products and offerings, find open-minded alternatives."

More like "empty-minded alternatives"

I used to think Goop was some kind of ironic parody where Paltrow was plumbing the depths to which IQ's will sink when people read stuff endorsed by a celebrity. But in a world where Donald Trump can get elected president, I don't think that any more.

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Silk Road boss Ross Ulbricht denied bid for new trial

SirWired 1

The murder-for-hire was an aggrevating factor

Courts are allowed to take judicial notice of evidence of unsavory things about the defendant when deciding which of an allowed range of sentences will be imposed. You need not be convicted of a crime for evidence regarding it to be used in your sentencing.

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A switch with just 49 ns latency? What strange magic is this?

SirWired 1

Cut-through routing (where you don't wait for the whole thing to arrive before transmitting) has been used in switch products for years.

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FCC kills plan to allow phone calls on planes – good idea or terrible?

SirWired 1

Yes, this would be bad, but it shows what a hypocrite Pal is

I agree that I can think of few things more annoying than some blowhard marketroid yakking on the phone while I'm confined in a small metal tube hurtling above the ground.

But this also shows what a hypocrite Pal is; when it comes to being a lapdog for his corporate masters, nearly any regulation at all is too loose; he's all too willing to strip anything even vaguely resembling consumer protections. But when it comes to HIS precious hide being annoyed on an aircraft, he's willing to do whatever it takes.

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Symbolic IO CEO insists the IRIS i1 is more than a bunch of pretty lights

SirWired 1
WTF?

That interview was bizarre

He's claiming 95% reductions in memory usage and 75% reductions in CPU usage that are somehow universally applicable, and you are asking him about why the module plugs in from the rear? Why there's a *bleep*-ing window on top of the chassis?

What the hell is going on with you and this company? This is your fourth (at least!) article about these guys, and you have yet to, even once, dig into the most fantastical claims for their product.

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Symbolic IO reveals tech bound to give server old guard the willies

SirWired 1

RLL was just encoding, not compression

RLL (Run-length Limited) is just a data encoding scheme. HIgh-speed serial data storage and transmission don't work if you just dump your bits on your media... you run into a couple problems:

- Clock signals are never 100% accurate or synchronized. To get around this, all data receivers use something called a Phase-Locked Loop to "lock on" to the proper timing. But for this to work, it needs some volt transitions to detect. Encoding usually forces a certain minimum number of bit transitions onto the wire; without it, a string of all 0 or 1 would cause the loss of clock sync.

- The threshold for the receiver can drift. This is called "DC Offset". If there's a continuous stream of, say, 1's, the receiver will start to have problems telling the difference between 0 and 1. Encoding tries to nudge the number of 0's and 1's to be roughly even.

What RLL isn't is compression. Not even a bit. Under any circumstances. They merely allow data to be transmitted faster/stored more densely than might ordinarily be the case. (In this context, "storage density" means "can cram more physical bits on a given area of magnetic media"; it doesn't refer to compression.)

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SirWired 1

And again, how is this not compression?

Every time these guys get asked "how is this not just compression", all that comes back is a bunch of ridiculous arm-waving. 95% reduction in RAM usage? Seriously? This is at least the second time you have written about these guys, and STILL not prodded them for answers to these basic questions. I'm rather concerned that every single skeptical B.S. detector you have isn't on full-alert with these folks.

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Pure Silicon Valley: Medium asks $5 a month for absolutely nothing

SirWired 1

Yeah, overall their content is a bunch of circle-jerking

I read a blog (The Billfold) that happens to be hosted by Medium, but yeah, overall their content is awful. I figure either the lions-share of their most popular content consists of SV-types congratulating each other on how awesome they all are, or their engine for recommending content for me to read is awful.

On another note, I WOULD like to say the business model of "We lose money on every one we sell, but make up for it volume" applies here, but that actually requires selling something.

I thought the "eyeballs-only" so-called "business model" kinda died out with the 2000 .Com Bust... where did they find the VS's to invest in this?

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Cutting Hewlett-Packard Labs down to size

SirWired 1

Memristor, Photonics, and The Machine all MIA... shocker.

How many years have we been hearing about the Memristor, and seeing absolutely no progress towards actually shipping?

And I didn't know that HP Labs was even pursuing photonics, but Sun/Oracle has been promising those for a couple decades now, and has yet to deliver, so it doesn't surprise me that HP jumped on that particular vaporware bandwagon.

Don't get me started on The Machine; it always seemed like a bunch of nebulous crap criminally light on details as to exactly what it was, other than something to do with memory-mapped I/O, which is not exactly a new innovation.

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IBM: Yes, it's true. We leaned on researchers to censor exploit info

SirWired 1

Re: I don't see any "shaming" or "censoring" here...

They weren't calling for the report to be pulled entirely; anybody that cared to look could plainly see that the exploit existed.

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SirWired 1

I don't see any "shaming" or "censoring" here...

IBM's request was made informally, but it was polite, and not phrased as a demand or threat. Perhaps both you and the researcher are reading a little too much into it.

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Ted Cruz channels Senator McCarthy in wrongheaded internet power grab crusade

SirWired 1

There's some real questions, and they didn't get asked

There were some real questions that could have been asked of ICANN and the DoC about the transition, specifically persistent issues in ICANNs accountability.

Instead, it appears Cruz decided to hijack the hearing so he could well, do whatever it is he does.

Since not even his GOP brethren like him (dickish individual grandstanding is par for the course for him), and since nobody even asked the important questions on accountability, we can guess that there will be no rider preventing the contract handover, and it'll happen at the end of the month on schedule.

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Google's become an obsessive stalker and you can't get a restraining order

SirWired 1

Yes, you can view everything Google has on you; it's called Google Dashboard. They've had it for years. And Dashboard can also be used to tell Google to stop collecting things.

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SirWired 1

"What the FCC did this year, with little fanfare, was cripple telecoms companies and wireless networks from doing what Google and Facebook do. That’s a very odd decision. ... If behavioural advertising is so bad consumers need an opt-out, how come you can opt out of your ISP's profiling, but not Google’s. "

Really?

Then what do the steps here do?

http://lmgtfy.com/?q=google+targeted+ads+opt+out

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It actually will be Obama who decides whether to end US government oversight of the internet

SirWired 1

I don't see why it shouldn't be delayed (or stopped)

I find the arguments that it would be a good thing to see how well the very latest round of accountability reforms work before handing it over to be very persuasive. Previous rounds of reform have proven to be utterly ineffective, why should we believe that these will actually work?

And, in any case, what's the rush? Why is this happening at all? What problem is ending the DoC contract trying to solve? To my knowledge, the DoC/US Govt. in general, has done precisely nothing to interfere with ICANN/IANAs operations.

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Bad blood: US govt bans bio-test biz Theranos' CEO for two years

SirWired 1

Denial: It's not just a river in Egypt

It's astounding that they are continuing to act as if Medicare/Medicaid suspension, the closing of their largest lab, the disappearance of their largest source of customers, and the CEO being banned from the industry is no more than a minor setback. I guess since Holmes herself firmly has her hands on the reigns, and is apparently delusional, the luckless PR flack is just along for the ride.

News Flash: Nobody gives a $hit that you are allegedly overhauling the CA lab to meet the standards you should have met to begin with (had you actually hired people that knew what they were doing) when said overhauled lab will have pretty much zero customers. No insurance company would touch your lab with a ten-foot pole at this point, and no doctor would refer patients there. (And where would the patients go? All those Walgreens centers are gone.)

It would be one thing if they had a huge pool of cash with which to complete a promising technology, and then turn themselves into an IP licensing business. But given the HUGE liability from all those tests they had to throw out, I'd say any cash they have is already spoken for. And there's no evidence they have yet to reveal that the technology IS promising.

What I don't get is how she got all that money to begin with. I mean, she was hailed as some sort of visionary, despite there being no evidence that she had any actual product plan beyond a rhetorical question: "What if we could run a bazillion tests with a drop of blood?" Yes, that would be a wonderful thing, but at no point has she managed to demonstrate that she (or anybody she hired) had the least clue how to achieve it.

If I get my wife to dress up in black turtlenecks, have her enroll in a fancy school to drop out of, can she also get billions of dollars in funding by holding a press conference? "What if you could drive an SUV 100 miles on a single gallon of gas, and no batteries?"

What if? Indeed.

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InfiniBand-on-die MIA in Oracle's new 'Sonoma' Sparc S7 processor

SirWired 1

You know what else is MIA? The mythical optical interconnect Sun/Oracle dusts off every year or so for what, the last twenty years?

Maybe it'll ship at the same time MS's DB-based FS does.

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Big Pharma's trying to kill us, says man with literally millions to lose

SirWired 1

His conspiracy theory makes no sense

"He also cited mysterious forces in "the world of medical insurance" and "the people in government who are going to be very much affected by a really cheap, really effective, wonderful solution."

Errr... why on earth would insurance want Theranos shut down? If anything else, this would give them leverage to extract cheaper prices out of the incumbent providers, even if they had no interest in buying Theranos tests themselves. And if, in fact, Theranos COULD deliver cheaper tests, well, insurance companies are all about saving money on medical costs (leaves more room for profit.)

And "people in government"? What dog does the FDA have in that fight? If he has some evidence of links between the FDA and incumbent testing companies, he'd do well to present actual evidence instead of vague conspiracy theories.

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'Limitless enterprise storage'. Really? Digging deeper into Symbolic IO

SirWired 1

Re: Do your homework.

Nobody's expressing rank incredulity at the idea of a performance improvement; it's the hard-to-believe data reduction claims that are "not compression or deduplication, and are guaranteed" that are either impossible, or suffering from a bad game of Telephone from a clueless marketing hack.

If it isn't compression or dedupe, then what are we to make of the "data reduction" claims? You know, the ones where they both claim they can get "deterministic" results AND run the output through a compression scheme afterwards to get further reduction? (Given that they allege that the output is encrpyted, color me a deep shade of skeptical at the idea it can still be compressed afterwards; unless their "encryption" is ROT-13, you cannot effectively compression encrypted data. Certainly the patent reads like a generic description of compression/dedupe to me.

If anybody's going to be convinced, it's going to take a lot more than

Q: "How is this not compression/dedupe"?

A: "Well, yeah, it sounds like compression/dedupe but isn't."

Q: "But what is it then?"

A: "[Unexplained phrases that look a lot like technobabble] It's so amazing, you just wouldn't understand."

Compression scams that look a lot like this one are literally decades old in computing, and have likewise featured credulous testimonials by investors/beta testers that had been hoodwinked.

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SirWired 1

This smells very strongly of B.S.

"Data can be ingested from a local memory channel or any wire such as USB, Direct Wire, TCP/IP Packets, Fibre Channel, InfiniBand, iSCSI, etc."

Huh? I was not aware that "TCP/IP Packets" were a way to ingest anything. Somebody needs to go back and fill in the blanks on his OSI chart. And what's "Direct Wire"?

" The conversion process consists of primary data (D’ [prime]) that is dismantled into substrate components called “fractals” and processed into SbM (Symbolic Bit Markers). Unlike other technologies an advanced algorithm allows for substrate fluctuation."

This reeks of something a Star Trek scriptwriter would toss together. It appears to be word-salad that hints at data compression.

"One of the most compelling elements of Bit Marker technology is that it is lossless and does not require any additional overhead, unlike traditional compression schemes. The output of the conversion process is to store, transmit or both depending on use case. This entire conversion process does not require any delayed post-processing and happens in real-time for the end-user.

Symbolic IO refers to the ingestion conversion process as the “constitution” of data; whereas the data being stored or transported has been converted into this proprietary and unique language format and will remain in that state until a recall or read-back/read-request is received from the system. "

Errr... explain to me again, and please use smaller words, how this is different from Real-Time Compression?

Ahh... here it is (well, not really): "Symbolic IO’s patent is based on being a non-compressive algorithm. Compression is a non-deterministic algorithm that requires many CPU cycles and no guaranteed results. By reformatting binary we see consistent results that de-duplication and compression cannot achieve. There is nothing stopping either us or a customer from applying additional compression techniques to further reduce data, if that is the sole primary focus of the end-user, and they were willing to accept the performance penalties associated with standard compression."

BZZZZTTTT!!!! Wrong answer. If you claim you can reduce data size (with "guaranteed" results), for starters, that is, in fact, "compression" in any sense of the word. When you claim you can then further compress the data afterwards? That's the classic compression scam, with a lot of fancy words around it. There IS NO SUCH THING as "guaranteed" compression (this is not a difficult concept to understand or prove); you cannot ever compress random data. Claiming you can further compress it significantly afterwards using another algorithm is just icing on the B.S. cake (all but the lousiest compression algorithms produce data that cannot significantly be further compressed); again, this is classic compression-scam material.

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Bank in the UK? Plans afoot to make YOU liable for bank fraud

SirWired 1

Re: Huh? Consumers aren't liable for online fraud in the US

I won't deny that your specific example was a scam and illegal, but it is also entirely irrelevant to the topic at hand, which is liability for fraudulent online purchases.

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SirWired 1

Huh? Consumers aren't liable for online fraud in the US

"UK banks - unlike those in the US - routinely cover the costs of online fraud, at least in cases where customer negligence (such as sharing PIN codes or cards with third parties) is excluded."

What are you talking about? There is not a single US bank I'm aware of that charges consumers one penny in the case of fraudulent purchases. (Technically the law allows up to $50 in liability, but in practice precisely zero banks do this.)

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Your next server will be a box full of connected stuff, not a server

SirWired 1

Yeah, about those photonics-based chips

Sun (now Oracle) has been promising optical interconnect as being "just around the corner" for something like twenty years now. Still waiting...

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12,000 chopped: Intel finds its inner paranoid

SirWired 1

Minor correction needed

Robert Noyce did not win a Nobel Prize. At the time it was awarded to Jack Kilby (of Texas Instruments) Noyce had passed away. (If he had been alive at the time the prize was awarded, he probably WOULD have been a co-recipient...)

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Stagefright flaw still a nightmare: '850 million' Androids face hijack risk

SirWired 1

If you want Android get a Nexus

The god-awful state of Android security patching to me signals that you really should not consider any Android device but a Nexus. Or, I suppose, any manufacturer that sells unlocked devices (and therefore not dependent on carriers) and vows to roll out security patches quickly, and keep them coming for at least a couple of years.

This led me to just replace my 1st-gen Moto G with a Nexus (okay, this and the Google Fi fire-sale on the device.)

However, I don't know where this leaves the vast Android entry-level market. I don't know of a single entry-level phone at the moment where I would expect prompt and long-lasting patching.

Google really needs to fix this problem, or somebody else will come along who will.

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StorPool CEO: 'We do not need another storage product'

SirWired 1

I don't think customers actually care

Customers want storage, and they want it reliable, cheap, and flexible. I do not think a nebulous concept like "openness" is really on the priority list, because few customers want to deal with the inevitable integration and interop headaches that result from mix-n-match.

And there are all-flash arrays that don't feature SSD's at all! I know that IBM's flash boxes use boards stacked with flash chips, instead of the typical RAID'd SAS-attach SSD's. (And I'm sure other flash boxes do this too.)

And I love the yammering on about Mom 'n Apple Pie ideas of treating customers well... that sounds like an argument for sensible pricing, quality service and support, etc. I don't see how it ties into needing to deliver storage in a different fashion.

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Google to snatch control of Android updates from mobe makers – analyst

SirWired 1

Finally!

Forget the latest Android gew-gaws; it'll be nice for your Average Non-Nexus owner to FINALLY receive security updates in a timely fashion. (vs. the current state of affairs, when the phones get updated anywhere from months later to never.)

That said, I wonder how Google is going to handle a new patch breaking some sort of unique thing on a handset's hardware?

I also wonder if they are simply going to start blocking mapping obsolete phones to Google Accounts? You can STILL get brand-new, never-activated phones that are running Gingerbread. (These are not expensive phones, to be sure; they are giveaways for new pre-paid users, but they still do exist.)

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Public enemies: Azure, Amazon, Google, Oracle, OpenStack, SoftLayer will murder private IT

SirWired 1

Re: Centralisation/decentralisation Insourcing/outsourcing

I strongly suspect that what does move out of the cloud back into the DC will move into "private clouds", or "cloud-in-a-can" solutions that remove most of the complexity of traditional IT solutions.

A cloud-in-a-can requires sophisticated software. Hardware? Not so much.

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SirWired 1

Yeah, I've noticed that too

I've been an IT Infrastructure guy my entire nearly two-decade career. (Started out with tech support for LAN gear, shifted to 13 years in tech support for SAN gear, and now I'm a DR solutions architect.)

On a lark, I took a cheap AWS Architect course, and it totally dawned on me: My entire profession, IT infrastructure, is toast. Kaput. Kablooie. There are few reasons for anybody setting up a new IT shop to use the sort of environment I've spent nearly a couple of decades becoming a fairly well-paid expert on. The flexibility and ease-of-use the cloud provides means nobody has to pay somebody like me to make it all work. I'm really good at SAN design, remote mirroring, nitty-gritty protocol gnarliness, etc., and now there's no need for any of it.

And yes, it terrifies me. At this point, I'm learning as much as I can about cloud architecture as fast as I can, but I fear it may not be enough. (As in, I'll be able to find a new line of work, but it certainly won't pay as well as what I'm doing now, because I won't have the experience levels I have now on the new stuff.)

Now I know what the proverbial buggy-whip makers felt like.

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Axe to fall on staff at IBM's Global Technology Services 'this Friday'

SirWired 1

Well, Friday came and went

And just like EVERY previous prediction of some unfathomably huge percentage of the US workforce being let go in one day, it didn't happen. I'm pretty sure IBM would have a NEGATIVE number of people by now if all these predictions were true. I guess we can add Conrad the list with Cringely on it of the folks that either have REALLY bad sources or just make $hit up.

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Star Wars BB-8 toy in firmware update risk, say UK security bods

SirWired 1

I'm not real terrified...

I'm guessing that the number of hackers that are going to mount a mass MiTM attack on a cute toy (outside of a hacker convention) is pretty small.

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Mozilla: Five... Four... Three... Two... One... Thunderbirds are – gone

SirWired 1

While external open e-mail clients have a loyal userbase, most business users use Exchange, and most consumers have shifted over to webmail. It makes sense to direct resources away from a project that has lost it's userbase.

(I know I've been a loyal GMail user since it was released; I enjoy the convenience of having my e-mail everywhere without the limitations of IMAP, and I understand what Google is "charging" (privacy and accountability) and I'm willing to pay it.)

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IBM tries to dodge $1bn sueball for deal won with 'ethical transgressions'

SirWired 1

What kind of settlement would NOT preclude further litigation? What kind of a settlement would that be at all?

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How to waste two years and lose $415m: Cisco's now-dead Whiptail deal

SirWired 1

Re: Pankaj Patel, Satinder Sethi,,,,

"The names" tell us everything? Really? And what precisely would that "everything" include?

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Amazon enrages authors as it switches to 'pay-per-page' model

SirWired 1

What was happening was that a bunch of authors were gaming the system by turning out really short shovel-books, and depending on the fact that people weren't giving up on the books until after they had gone through the 10% minimum read to get a payout. (i.e. you publish a 50-page piece of junk, it only wastes like two minutes to go through five pages.)

Price-per-page is a lot more fair for everybody. If you, author, can't hold your reader's attention to read more of your longer book, write better books.

Given how the total payout remains the same, it's hard to argue that the new method is a worse way of splitting up the pool.

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Whee! IBM storage hardware revenues just keep sliding and sliding

SirWired 1

Keep in mind that for obscure reasons clear only to the IBM bureaucracy, SVC is classified as a "software" product that happens to be sold with some (relatively cheap) hardware. In an SVC order, most of the dollar value is in the software product.

This is contrast to, say, the DS8k or XIV, where the software licenses are explicitly H/W feature codes.

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WW2 German Enigma machine auctioned for record-breaking price

SirWired 1

Re: You're thinking of Lorenz

>> It's a common mistake, to think it's a common mistake, what is a "computer"; memory, stored programs etc. was defined by Turning way before we had the technology to do it.

All true, but this does not detract from the OP's point that the Bombe incorporates none of those principles, It was a straightforward electromechanical device that does not in any way resemble a general-purpose computer.

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Sony's well and truly 4Ked with skinny TVs and cheap cams

SirWired 1

"If only my gigantic pedastal or wall-mounted TV was as thin as my smartphone." - Said nobody ever.

While certainly there is some merit to a TV being, say, 20mm thick vs, 50mm thick, there reaches a point with vastly diminished returns.

About the only application I'm seeing for such a thin screen is actually embedding it in the drywall without having to carve out framing. But the number of people that are going to want to call a carpenter every time they need to fiddle with the cables on their TV is pretty small.

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Apple ebook price-fix settlement: Readers get $400m, lawyers $50m

SirWired 1

Mistake in story

Apple did not get sued over arranging to have e-books exclusively available on iBooks. This both didn't happen and wouldn't be illegal. What it DID do was coordinate discussions between publishers to fix pricing and contract terms (and not offer different terms to anybody else.) Since the different publishers are supposed to be competitors, this is highly illegal behavior.

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LightSquared backer sues FCC over spectrum shindy

SirWired 1

Enough beating this dead horse already, Harbinger!

Face it Hedge Fund barons, you thought you could push a stupid idea through by playing silly political games with your provisional license, and you lost, as you should have.

(For those late to the party, the FCC granted LightSqured a provisional license under the condition that they could demonstrate that their idea of using satellite spectrum for terrestrial communication would not cause interference on adjacent satellite bands. To the surprise of nobody, they couldn't. They then tried to get Congress and the media worked up over these guys getting the proverbial rug pulled out from underneath them. (Pretending that their original license was not, in fact provisional.) It didn't work.)

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DARPA hands IBM £3.4m to develop SELF DESTRUCTING CHIPS

SirWired 1

This sounds like an extension of the work they did to release the 4758 Cryptographic Coprocessor about 13 years ago. IIRC, those suckers had tamper, heat, cold, and x-ray sensors, any one of which would trigger a self-destruct mechanism.

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IBM's bailed out of the server market - will they dump Storwize next?

SirWired 1

Seriously?

Firstly, you are getting Storwise and the SVC overly conflated. The Storwise is a RAID array that happens to run SVC under the hood; it has nary an xSeries part in it at all. (Nor, for that matter, does XIV.)

Even the SVC, which does indeed run on xSeries hardware, is not coupled that tightly into xSeries. There are some parts of the hardware that are designed to run on the particular xSeries model for that generation SVC node, and of course the mgmt software talks to the mgmt software within the xSeries, but they could just as easily use an x86 box from anybody. Most of the price of an SVC install is in the capacity licenses; the hardware node is practically a rounding error in comparison.

On a practical basis, the decision to keep or dump xSeries doesn't have to be made for years; there's no reason for them to stop using the xSeries boxes any time soon; at worst, they'll see a minor H/W cost bump if Lenovo decided to increase the price over what xSeries was charging to supply the boxes.

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If your bosses tell you you're 'in it together', don't EVER believe them

SirWired 1

Heads I win, tails, you lose

What cheeses me off is the "Every CEO's a Winner" approach to compensation. In a really good year, the execs get great bonuses for producing profits (even if the company merely kept pace with the industry.) In a bad year the execs get bonuses for leading the company through such difficult times of trouble and toil.

They literally cannot make a decision that leads to a pay cut.

8
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Feedly coughs to cockup, KILLS Google+ login as users FLEE

SirWired 1

Give NewsBlur a spin...

Well, any disgruntled Google Reader refugees that now really aren't Feedly fans any more should give NewsBlur a try. It's a one-man shop (although it has been around for years, so it's not a new, green, dev either), and it's not bug-free, but uptime appears to be good, performance is fine, and it has some interesting features (along w/ Android and iOS apps), and the paid version is cheap.

It's not perfect, but when I was looking for new RSS readers, without NewsBlur I probably would have gone to tt-rss.

(Although I'll admit I never liked Feedly to begin with; I can appreciate what they were trying to accomplish with it, but just like the Metro GUI in Windows 8, it just ain't my thing. I really liked Google Reader and NewsBlur came the closest to replicating it while having performance that wasn't awful, and the multi-year track record was encouraging.)

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Brazil's anti-NSA prez urged to SNATCH keys to the internet from America

SirWired 1

Huh what?

Errr... the US Govt. does not own or maintain the DNS root servers. That function is performed by ICANN (Aa private organization) under a US Dept. of Commerce contract. And that contract is a zero-dollar contract (you can read it on the ICANN website if you like), so any lack of bill paying would cause precisely nothing to occur.

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