* Posts by DryBones

432 posts • joined 7 Feb 2010

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Amadeus booking software outages smack airports across world

DryBones
Devil

Rock Me, Amadeus.

\m/

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Google sued by Gab over Play Store booting

DryBones

Re: Is Marc SERIOUS?

Seems a little like the question, "Do you trust the police?". OMG, some of them are bad, we must abolish the entire concept IMMEDIATELY! Er, no. You work on it, find the problems and work to fix them.

One of the bigger issues is that apps are being allowed to download and execute code that can be changed arbitrarily, allowing payloads to be snuck into apps that are not themselves malicious. So yeah, Google needs to chop that off hard, and maybe look at ways to better vet individual developers who are allowed to do that, at least in terms of being able to nail them to the wall if it's abused.

Also, isn't like 90% of the Android malware in China from third-party stores?

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DryBones

Re: Just a suggestion

To plagiarize another of my posts, they should call it Gorm. "Talk more, Gorm less."

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Credit reference agencies faulted for poor patching

DryBones

Re: If Experian failed to patch...

Needs to be harder to recover / transfer the assets after folding the business.

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US government sued by 11 pissed-off travellers over computer searches

DryBones

Re: Hang on a moment

You need to remember to make your sarcasm further from the gormless zeal of those you parody.

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D-Link router riddled with 0-day flaws

DryBones
Trollface

It's time for you to go update the Shame On Me file...

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Google rushes to curb Oreo's massive appetite for your 4G mobile data

DryBones

Re: You can see how they'd miss this

Gotta love it.

Vaguely related, anyone with Oreo on theirs now and Android Auto, can you tell me if they fixed the phone not recognizing the car, or not? I'm on a 6P with the beta, and I have to go in to Developer Options, mode switch the USB connection (to camera only, or charge only, or whatever, and back to where it was) before it would talk to... well anything plugged into the USB. And it forgets again every time the phone reboots. No idea if they actually implemented a fix or not.

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Stand up who HASN'T been hit in the Equifax mega-hack – whoa, whoa, sit down everyone

DryBones

Re: New kind of social security numbers?

It's a joke about useless advice.

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Please, pleeeease let me ban Kaspersky Lab from US govt PCs – senator

DryBones

Re: She is right

Hi! You're currently tripping my Bullshit Meter (tm).

Cite sources or be ridiculed.

Random blogs, Breitbart, InfoWars, etc are an instant fail.

"Because Russia!" is an instant fail.

Gun control, abortion, and now Russia, politicians need to pipe down about things for which they have no understanding. If DC fell silent as a result, nothing of value would be lost.

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Big Tech fumes over Prez Trump's decision to deport a million kids

DryBones

Re: ...because we are a nation of laws

I imagine he meant he couldn't make it stick, and that seems to be true. So now Congress has 6 months to pull their finger out. It may take them 5 to figure out which finger it is.

Rewrite history? That's being done all the time, you know.

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Stealth, lightweight Android breaks cover

DryBones

Re: Faecebook

Think you mean 8.0.

And as far as I can see Google are clamping down on bad code behavior from app developers, which is a win in my book.

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Microsoft sets the date for Fall Creators Update

DryBones

Re: Maxing out the CPU

Me, for one. I have a compact desktop system built for gaming, or anything else that might stress the laptop unduly. Games from Steam, the occasional other location, never Origin because they do not share their toys and are not lightweight. Haven't had a need to "wring out every last bit of performance", and generally speaking the only problems are the silly "exclusives" and cack-handed console ports.

Upgrade when desired, get the best bang for the buck. Use the same controllers the consoles have, and more besides. Consoles are PCs anyway, just ones built with proprietary form factors just like laptops are and desktops used to be. They just aren't good at much besides gaming.

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Prejudiced humans = prejudiced algorithms, and it's not an easy fix

DryBones

I'm going to half-disagree. Stereotypes are generalizations. Prejudices are judgements made about the value of those things stereotyped.

Black/white

iOS/Android fans

Engineers/Managers

Christians/Muslims

Chocolate/Strawberry ice cream...

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Tech firms take down WireX Android botnet

DryBones

Re: Android owners!

Yes, because the ones dumb enough to blithely download random shite will be dumb enough to pay $1000+ for a shiny piece of tat. Oh, hang on a minute...

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NSA ramps up PR campaign to keep its mass spying powers

DryBones

Re: Google

Congratulations on passing the Anti-Turing Test.

You are scotitian and I want my £5.

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Nasty firmware update butchers Samsung smart TVs so bad, they have to be repaired

DryBones

Re: A blessing in disguise

Sony Bravia X850. Screen by Sony, because they know how to make screens. OS by Google, because they have an entire division that just focuses on the OS.

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Sorry, but those huge walls of terms and conditions you never read are legally binding

DryBones

The judge seems to have gone through his thought process wrongly.

1) How long is this contract, if printed out? 50 pages at 12pt font.

2) How long will this take to read? Several hours.

3) Is it possible for the average layperson to encompass and understand? No, not without a solicitor, perhaps not even then.

4) Is it reasonable to expect the average layperson to spend several boring hours of their time and spend the money to retain and employ a solicitor every time a company's terms and conditions change? No.

What we need is a site, or clearinghouse or something where we can subscribe, maybe pay 5 or 10 or whatever a month, to go and get a plain language, single page bulleted summary of these things, because no company seems to want to spend the time to do that. And there are so many of them out there that we'd spend most of our time driving ourselves to suicide reading and trying to understand them.

Or, you know, one could make the common sense ruling that "If it isn't something that a reasonable layperson can be expected to read and understand, it is not legally enforceable." Have your longass contract if you want, but include the Cliff Notes: Legalese version.

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DryBones

Re: I don't have a life...*

Briefly tried to find a website with unending random text generation as you scrolled, failed. Still, this should be Eye of Argon hilarious.

http://randomtextgenerator.com/

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Cloudflare: We dumped Daily Stormer not because they're Nazis but because they said we love Nazis

DryBones

Rubbish.

Daily Stormer claimed CloudFlare agreed with their beliefs, which is why they were shielding them. Thus was the right to refuse service to anyone invoked.

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APT-style attack against over 4,000 infrastructure firms blamed on lone Nigerian 20-something

DryBones

Re: Unskilled?

Nah.

He's not clever, they're just thick.

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Drone-maker DJI's Go app contains naughty Javascript hot-patching framework

DryBones

Except Apple have said nothing about this, and it was all users making note of such, so pretty much equivalent to the Play Store? Has it been kicked out of the Apple Store yet?

This sort of hot patching is like malware vector #1.

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Creepy backdoor found in NetSarang server management software

DryBones

Yup, by all means, don't use Kaspersky in the US government. Mmm-hmm.

Dips.

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Revealed: The naughty tricks used by web ads to bypass blockers

DryBones

Dear Guy That Makes This Stuff,

If the waiter brought you a steak with a steaming pile of shit on the side, would you smile and eat it all?

Please take a step back, look rationally at what you are pushing and how, and think about "If I do this this way, will it piss off the viewer and actually create negative impression of what I am advertising?" Ads in periodicals work because they do not leap off the page, sing and shout, or attempt to give you rabies.

Have you no decency? (Clean) up your game.

An Engineer

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Hey America! Your internet is going to be so much better this January

DryBones

Re: The answer should be Yes and Yes

No, no. broadband is cable/coax delivered internet. DSL is phone-based internet. And FiOS is fiber optics.

They might all have at times been called "high speed internet access", but the DSL that most have "access" to is clinging to that as a fig leaf. And it's like a fat mall cop running in the Olympics. When cell connection speeds have been trying to rival cable-based broadband links (mostly in vain due to DOCIS 3.0), it's very obvious that POTS links have long since topped out, and are being easily both out-sprinted and out-marathoned (DSL is really limited in its run length) by fiber and coax connections.

Cell service will be acceptable as having 'access to high speed internet' when their quota is 200 gigabytes, not 2.

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Intel Pumageddon: Broadband chip bug haunts Chipzilla's past, present and future

DryBones

Re: Waiting for the cable operator

*checks list, pats SB6121*

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70% of Windows 10 users are totally happy with our big telemetry slurp, beams Microsoft

DryBones

Re: (Not so) optional

Actually, you've missed the biggest gawper, too.

In order to comment/give feedback, you are required to have full telemetry on. Windows 10 will not allow you to give any kind of feedback unless it is on, full stop. I occasionally turn it on, just so they can track my keystrokes as I tell them they are pushy, nosy, and rude. And then turn it off again.

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Watch this nanochip reprogram cells to fix damaged body tissue

DryBones

I have witnessed rocket surgery.

It involved a drill.

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No chips for you! Toshiba takes flash off the menu for WDC

DryBones

The analogy I'm envisioning is WD is an airline passenger having a tantrum about having priority boarding... And Toshiba is saying the cabin door is already closed and the aircraft is pushing away from the gate.

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It took DEF CON hackers minutes to pwn these US voting machines

DryBones

Re: @DougS - Rewriting history

The Affordable Care Act's blueprint was Republican. Numerous hearings were held on it, numerous amendments were offered, debated, accepted, and variously horse-traded over. And then the Republicans decided they wouldn't have any of it. And no, I do not have a registered party affiliation, because I believe they're both utter fools in different areas that make me want to assign them portions of the job of governance wherein they haven't got their heads in their bottoms.

It seems like lately there is a severe lack of willingness to discuss things in a levelheaded fashion. It's all "must have vengeance" and intentionally twisting or ignoring what was said and putting words in others mouths, deflections and every bit of ill-behavior that's possible. Obviously someone will take insult at anything, but it's all very tribal. All the more for the fact that concepts such as dignity and mature behavior seem so easily cast aside in favor of "winning", to the point that those of us watching from a distance have no idea just how any reasonable person could call the things being boasted over "wins".

It's like being proud of having stolen a roll of quarters when you jumped into raw sewage to escape.

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Sweden leaked every car owners' details last year, then tried to hush it up

DryBones
Holmes

Re: "as much value as a truckload of dead rats in a tampon factory"

There isn't any. That's the point.

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Amazon squares up to Walmart over boycott calls: Talk sh!t, get hit

DryBones
Holmes

Re: Wal-Mart has a long history of anti-competitive tactics.

My goodness. While you're at it, make sure they force Apple to spin out their iPod business, Tesla to break off the model S business...

It's their products and their business, and you seem to have the apparently deluded impression that Amazon would be operating at a loss if not for their cloud business. Off you go, then.

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AES-256 keys sniffed in seconds using €200 of kit a few inches away

DryBones
Trollface

If it can be reversed, it can be Rockforded!

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Soldiers bust massive click-farm that used 500k SIM cards, 100s of mobes to big up web tat

DryBones

347,000 Sim Cards...

I'm just trying to imagine you you bloody organize them, that's got to be like a cubic foot of cards... Shake as needed for randomness?

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You're all too skeptical of super-duper self-driving cars, apparently

DryBones

Re: "Industry must find ways to show the technology is safe and reliable"

Well, mostly because saying it is and proving it is are two different things, and one needs to get it widely seen in order to change perception. AKA, how will the average Joe down at the coffee shop know that things are well sorted now if he doesn't read GIzmodo?

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Pizza proffer punctures privacy protection, prompts pals' perfidy

DryBones
FAIL

Re: Garbage tests = garbage results

Exactly. Fundamentally flawed study, didn't ask whether someone would give up their OWN information. If this is protected information they've all fallen afoul of the DPA, because neither the person asked nor the asker was the owner of the address.

This is exactly how TrueCaller operates. Suck your friends' contact list dry and pretend that means they have permission to have all those people's that data. Er, no. That's beyond needing a lawyering and straight to needing a rogering.

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Human-free robo-cars on Washington streets after governor said the software is 'foolproof'

DryBones

Re: right of way

Cool. People have been getting injured and/or killed by improper interaction with machines for decades, why should you be an exception?

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First-day-on-the-job dev: I accidentally nuked production database, was instantly fired

DryBones
Coffee/keyboard

Re: Production versus Test

I think this is the first actual, physical manifestation of a cock-up that I have heard of.

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Why Uber threw top engineer Levandowski under self-driving bus

DryBones
Holmes

Just wait...

Well, maybe things will get better once it becomes a criminal matter. Then?

Search warrant his stuff, turn the place upside down, cart off and analyze anything that can store data. You know, standard operating procedure. No more faffing about with having the employer compel the employee. It's rubbish, if it's all but certain that he stole it, then warrant it and seize it.

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Sweaty fitness bands fall behind as Apple Watch outpaces sales

DryBones

Re: Apple LEADS the way again

Catchy tagline.

Apple: Our tat isn't crap.

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AI vuln-hunter bots have seen things you people wouldn't believe

DryBones
WTF?

Re: Let's be realistic

I am not sure if this is an AI bot, a non-English speaker that has a thing for neurology, or just a Brit that has one is the worst cases of textual diarrhea that I have ever seen, but 90% of that was totally irrelevant piss-taking.

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GitLab.com melts down after wrong directory deleted, backups fail

DryBones

So I'm having....

a lot of schadenfreude right now. All of that boils down to one single sentence:

Nobody ever test-restored a backup.

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Uber pays hacker US$9,000 for partner firm's bug

DryBones
IT Angle

Re: Crashplan

So, migrating to what, exactly? I always seem to see advice to stop using something without a replacement offered. Sounds vaguely political, but it's not very useful (sorry for being redundant).

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Chevy Bolt electric car came alive, reversed into my workbench, says stunned bloke

DryBones

@Lee D

So, do you drive a manual, or an automatic? I'm under the impression that manuals don't have the "Don't go anywhere even if started" park detent that automatics do, and thus the parking brake is mandatory. It's as commonly called the "emergency brake" as it uses a secondary cabled system to actuate the brakes and not the power assist, so can serve in an emergency if the normal assist fails. For automatic transmissions, the parking / emergency brake is useful for not getting stuck in the park detent if on a hill, or reinforcing it on said hill just in case.

If said prat hit hard enough to break the parking pawl so it can roll, it's most certainly not the owner's fault for not having the parking brake engaged also, it's the prat that hit them and damaged the car, pushing it onward and the like.

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DryBones

Automatics have a higher MPG rating than manuals now, probably because they can fit more gears. Also rather reliable, and as fast if not faster than most at shifting.

Most Americans do drive automatics. I drive one because I don't want to faff with the gearbox, and the extra pedal, and rev matching, and getting clutch cables replaced (I have a friend with an earlier model Subaru that stretches them like they were taffy). Nothing in the cupholders, phone in pocket, I just want to spend the attention instead on making sure nobody manages to run into me. That is my choice, hopefully you can shrug about it the way I do those that want a manual.

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CIA boss: Make America (a) great (big database of surveillance on citizens, foreigners) again!

DryBones

Re: Huh! @Mystic Megabyte

That's a flaw of the system, wherein insurers and hospitals want their profits and so they keep playing an escalating bargaining game of raising prices and having them limited or pushed back again. Want $2000? Charge $4000. Insurance cuts it back to $2000, maybe makes the patient pay a chunk, and raises their premiums because of "the rising cost of health care".

I know someone that was charged $500 for 3 Aspirin and a shot of insulin, after having been made to send same home because it wasn't the hospital's stuff.

If the Republicans really want to control the cost of healthcare, they need to institute the Department of Calling Bullshit on Medical Charges. We need to cut the cost of medical school, we need to cut the cost / pay of the people it turns out, and bring certain professions back down out of the nosebleed section in terms of cost and compensation.

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Smart guns are a neat idea on paper. They'll never survive reality

DryBones

Re: technology probably isn't the answer here

Finally, sense. I wonder what the reliability is noted to be. Even if it's 5 9's, you multiply that by the number of guns, and the number of times that each one is going to be touched... Yeah, statistics start looking a lot uglier when your personal model fails to work on 3 separate occasions that are solely down to the electronics.

It's a little like the Internet of Tat, making stuff smart that doesn't need to be or shouldn't try to be. I don't need someone in Russia to be able to turn my kettle on.

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DryBones

Re: Doomed to failure

Identifying the target takes place before you draw, otherwise why are you drawing? 1.5 seconds? With a little practice you go from grasp to 2 aimed shots in that time. I've done it, and I'm slow.

Also, kindly refrain from trying to dictate what I am able to buy. I may CONSIDER such when it has been standard issue for the police for 2 years AND it has not gone over like a microcosm of "Superiority".

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Anti-smut law dubs PCs, phones 'pornographic vendor machines', demands internet filters

DryBones

Re: Move along, there's nothing to see.....

Well get him his pills, then!

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Don't panic, friends, but the Chinese navy just nicked one of America's underwater drones

DryBones

Re: Unmanned vessel

Of course it did. In fact from maps I've seen, it was outside even the outlandish nine dash line the Chinese think is all they need to flout international treaties they're signatories to. Their reasoning is it might be used against them.

By that reasoning, I see nothing wrong with the USN nicking a Chinese sonar buoy or two...

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Hull surfers cut off by router attack

DryBones
Pint

Re: The root cause...

Well, there is prior form for LulzSec and LizardSquad and the like to DDoS the XBL and Sony servers out of existence. Maybe they'll go for Steam and some of the other nice things that people would want to be enjoying over the Christmas break too... And then get back to holding infrastructures hostage.

Beer in anticipation of the inevitable "Mistakes were made".

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