* Posts by A Non e-mouse

1746 posts • joined 30 Jan 2010

Another day, another Spectre fix slowdown: What to expect if you heart ZFS

A Non e-mouse
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Re: Ubuntu patches?

Haven't VMWare pulled their patches?

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Heathrow's air traffic radio set for shiny digital upgrade from Northrop

A Non e-mouse
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Unhappy

@Hans Neeson-Bumpsadese Re: They should be as secure as ...

I think it's only pedants like you & I that understand the difference between internet & Internet.

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A Non e-mouse
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Re: intelligible ATC

My dad used to work in ATC. He could understand human speech in the most unintelligible form. Unfortunately, working for decades with a headset destroyed his hearing and he's almost stone deaf. But in a quiet room, he can still understand garbled human speech.

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A Non e-mouse
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Re: They should be as secure as ...

Just because it's running TCP/IP doesn't mean it's connected to the Internet....

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'No evidence' UK.gov has done much to break up IT outsourcing

A Non e-mouse
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Mushroom

Re: Why outsource

For small organisations the inside knowledge of how the organisation works and where the staircase with the hidden server is can be more valuable than some twat with a shiny suit and an MBA

In my bitter experience, the clue is in the name: CONsultant, CONtractor....

Either I'm an IT $DEITY, or all the consultants I've come across have been charlatans who only exist to write reports to placate senior management and know naff all about real-world IT. They only know what they read in vendor sales brochures. (Which, as those of us who work at the coal face of IT know, are works of fiction)

(There may be skillful, honest & hardworking contractors & consultants - I just haven't come across any yet)

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A Non e-mouse
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Mushroom

Why outsource

If you're a small(er) body (public or private sector) I can see the appeal for outsourcing: You don't need to invest in a (lot) of IT staff to cover a whole host of technologies.

But for the larger bodies, why outsource? It's going to cost an arm and a leg in lawyers fees to negotiate & manage a contract. Surely that could be better spent within the body concerned?

Oh - I know why: It's so government mandarins can get cushy jobs once they've awarded the contract.

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Why did top Home Office civil servant lobby Ofcom for obscure kit ban?

A Non e-mouse
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GSM Gateway Usage

GSM gateways are devices that were used to let people make cheap overseas phone calls, back when calls abroad cost tens of pennies per minute to make.

Not quite: GSM Gateways were widely used when it cost 15ppm (& upwards) to call a UK mobile from a landline, but 4ppm to call mobile to mobile.

Many companies used them as a way to save a lot of money on UK mobile calls. The operators disliked gateways as they claimed the gateways hogged cell capacity preventing normal mobiles from making & receiving calls.

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ITU aims to to keep the radio on with new satellite regulation fees

A Non e-mouse
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WTF?

1,000 Satellites?!?

Flat fee for a set maximum number [...] of 1,000 satellites

WTF? Why on Earth (Or in Space!) would you need 1,000 satellites in one orbit?

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Audio tweaked just 0.1% to fool speech recognition engines

A Non e-mouse
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Terminator

Siri too

Siri on my iPhone suffers from the same problem. I've heard its bong registering it's heard the magic "Hey Siri" command when nothing like "Hey Siri" was said by anyone/thing in the audible vicinity. Yet it doesn't always acknowledge when I say "Hey Siri".

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Least realistic New Year’s resolution ever: Fix Facebook in 365 days

A Non e-mouse
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Re: Facebook is a reflection of society...

Here's a thing - why do you have to wait two weeks for the damn thing to be removed?

To be fair to FB (I feel guilty for writing that), as they replicate your data across various servers - some which don't keep their discs spun up all the time, it may take a while to go across all the servers and find & delete all your data. They may even actually over-write your old data to prevent recovery.

Of course, they could just be hoping you decide to cancel your deletion and remain connected to the collective

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A Non e-mouse
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Re: Facebook is a reflection of society...

but I'm now viewed by a lot of my friends/family as "the weird one" because I choose not to regularly spunk up my details of what I had for dinner last night for all to see.

Not weird, but sane and free-thinking.

Welcome to the club.

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Microsoft offloads networking to FPGA-powered NICs

A Non e-mouse
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Re: Killer NIC

I think it just did some kind of QoS/prioritization on network traffic leaving your PC so gaming traffic was prioritized over, say, BitTorrent.

Unless you've got fibre to your home, I don't think CPUs have much problem keeping up with domestic 'net connections.

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A Non e-mouse
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Black Helicopters

Re: Hmmm... programmable?

And certain thee & four letter government agencies too

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Woo-yay, Meltdown CPU fixes are here. Now, Spectre flaws will haunt tech industry for years

A Non e-mouse
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"which is built with security first and foremost"

It is a nice mantra but it will not stop products being insecure.

You can't fully protect against all security issues as you don't know all the possible ways your product could be insecure.

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A Non e-mouse
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Speculative execution is a good idea: It's a way to keep the CPU busy with (hopefully) useful work whilst it waits for RAM to catch up. The issue is the way it's implemented.

Switching off speculative execution (if it's possible) will kill CPU performance. Some of the reports say that current CPUs can execute several hundred instructions whilst waiting for a single memory access request to main memory. That's a lot of lost CPU performance if you switch off speculative execution.

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A Non e-mouse
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@ Tinslave_the_Barelegged

You're missing the point. Unless someone's tested Loongson or PowerPC you don't know if they're vulnerable or not. So far, I've only seen reports on Intel, AMD & ARM processors. That does NOT mean the others are not vulnerable.

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A Non e-mouse
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Has anyone actually tested Sparc processors for these vulnerabilities? And what about PowerPC or MIPS? Or a myriad of now obsolete CPUs that have speculative execution?

Personally, I'm going to stick to my old faithful Z80

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Meltdown, Spectre: The password theft bugs at the heart of Intel CPUs

A Non e-mouse
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Intel CEO

And just before Christmas, who sold most of their stock in Intel? Intel's CEO.

www.fool.com/investing/2017/12/19/intels-ceo-just-sold-a-lot-of-stock.aspx

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We translated Intel's crap attempt to spin its way out of CPU security bug PR nightmare

A Non e-mouse
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Re: Mixed signals on CPU's

It goes a long way back. If the CPU has:

* a Memory Management Unit

* a memory cache

* a branch predictor

* Supervisor & User modes

It's highly likely to be affected. (and the last one might not even be required)

All of those features have been in CPUs for many, many years.

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A Non e-mouse
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Late to the party

Translation: We were gonna say something next week, but those bastards at The Register blew the lid on it early

The speculation had started before Christmas. El Reg was certainly not the first to blow the lid on this.

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UK security chief: How 'bout a tax for tech firms that are 'uncooperative' on terror content?

A Non e-mouse
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Re: Costing or saving?

The government think that Google/Zuck/etc al are Spectre and they're waiting for "C" to come along and sign them up instantly.

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A Non e-mouse
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Tax Laws

..especially given that various governments are already embroiled in battles to get the businesses to pay what they still owe.

If the companies are breaking tax laws, then they should haul them before the courts. The problem is that the companies are not breaking any laws. They just happen to be using laws not in the manner intended when the laws were written.

If governments want these businesses to pay more tax, they have to change the tax rules.

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UK.gov needs help getting folk to splurge on full fibre and 5G

A Non e-mouse
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Flame

Er, how about keeping BT's grubby hands out of Openreach's bank account and giving Openreach a free hand to invest in the network?

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HMS Queen Elizabeth has sprung a leak and everyone's all a-tizzy

A Non e-mouse
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WTF?

Though defence commentators are, rather predictably, shouting about this being a non-story – and to a point it is an expected defect – it is very much a matter of public concern

Bollocks. It's a new ship, of new design, and there are some snags and the make will fix them. As the El Reg article says, isn't this the point of things like sea trials? TBH - I'd be very suspicious if there weren't any snags.

And why did El Reg spend most of the article being all calm, and then throw in that provocative statement. I expected better of El Reg.

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Seagate's lightbulb moment: Make read-write heads operate independently

A Non e-mouse
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Holmes

Whodathought it - large individual drives suck at random I/O performance.

I seem to recall this being brought up when 1GB drives were first coming to market: An array of lots of smaller drives has better performance than the same sized array with fewer drives.

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Liberating SSH from Logjam leftovers

A Non e-mouse
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Cisco

Cisco need to step up to the plate here: Some of their IOS kit either only works with 1024 bit SSH keys and others have weird bugs if you don't use 2048 SSH keys.

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Facebook confesses: Facebook is bad for you

A Non e-mouse
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Sounds a bit like the excuse a playground bully uses: “But Sir, they made me hit them.”

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A Non e-mouse
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My other half was encouraged to sign up to FB by the kids after they’d left home a few years ago. She doesn’t spend much time on it, but the amount of videos, ads & dross she has to scroll past. And then the anxiety of “Do I acceppt X’s friend request?”

I don’t want a FB (orTwitter) account myself, but companies (especially small ones) are moving to only have FB or Twitter contact methods. *sigh*

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Voda customers given green light by Ofcom to ditch contracts

A Non e-mouse
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And make sure you get them to unlock your phone (Assuming you bought the phone under the contract)

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A Non e-mouse
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Re: Penalty?

RTFA

Providers have to give customers 30 days to exit their contract if they make "material changes" to the T&Cs.

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IETF protects privacy and helps net neutrality with DNS over HTTPS

A Non e-mouse
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@Lysenko Re: Now this would be a great idea...

The reason public key cryptography was invented was to remove the burden of distributing one-time pads.

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A Non e-mouse
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Re: @the d-rat (non e-mouse)

Now tell us how you propose to scale that to serve a few billion devices.

That's a very valid question (And I'd be interested in the answer) but it wasn't the question that was asked ;-)

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A Non e-mouse
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Re: Chickens and eggs?

What's wrong with

https://8.8.8.8/dns?q=www.theregister.co.uk

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A Non e-mouse
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Re: Now this would be a great idea...

TLS is to complex to be implemented without security critical bugs, so in the end this may enable all kinds of attacks.

ALL cryptography is complex*. There are so many ways to get it wrong in lots of non-obvious ways. That's why the mantra is: Don't ever try and invent or write your own implementation as you're almost guaranteed to get it wrong.

*Except double-ROT13

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Former ZX Spectrum reboot project man departs

A Non e-mouse
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The entire Retro Computers Limited story is a stain on the legacy of Sir Clive Sinclair and the joy that his computer products brought to millions over the years

I owned a Spectrum with an Interface 1 and a microdrive. Getting that lot to work reliably was not a joy. I think it took many months and numerous replacements of all three items to get a working combination.

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Lights, camera, 802.11ax-ion!

A Non e-mouse
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That's why there was these new ethernet standards.

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A Non e-mouse
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That's a fine combination for business, as it promises the chance to serve users with fewer access points than are required today

I doubt it. At our place (and I suspect many others) the issue that jacks up the number of APs is signal propagation. We have locations where we have an AP per room or two (which may only have one or two people per room) to get decent coverage. All this fancy high speed tech won't help the signal propagation - in fact it'll probably hinder the propagation even more.

The places that will benefit are more likely to be large, high density communal areas. (e.g. Canteens, lecture theatres, etc)

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Intel to slap hardware lock on Management Engine code to thwart downgrade attacks

A Non e-mouse
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Optional

Intel could, of course, listen to the market and sell versions of its chips without ME. But that would result in a lower kick-back from the three letter agencies.

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Millions of moaners vindicated: Man flu is 'a thing', says researcher, and big TVs are cure

A Non e-mouse
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Re: Man Flu - banter OK but no balance

Effectively forcing people to work when ill, particularly in direct public facing roles, has huge consequences for all of society.

My partner used to be a teacher and whenever they had a hint of an illness (cold, stomach bug, etc), they were forced to not go into work for at least 48 hours to prevent it spreading around the school.

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A Non e-mouse
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Re: Man Flu - banter OK but no balance

It men soldiering on through man flu, or women trying not to spread their germs around the office?

As a boss, if someone has a cold/flu/whatever, I'd rather they not come into the office. One person off ill is inconvenient. Half a dozen staff off a few days later with the same infection is much worse.

Men may think they're being brave coming into the office when ill, but they're not doing anyone any favors.

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RSA coughs to critical-rated bug in its authentication SDK

A Non e-mouse
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Big Brother

How much did the NSA pay RSA to put those bugs features in, I wonder...

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US politicos wake up to danger of black-box algorithms shaping all corners of American life

A Non e-mouse
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Not just credit scores...

Isn’t America (in)famous for letting computers decide a convict’s jail sentence, rather than a judge?

https://www.propublica.org/article/machine-bias-risk-assessments-in-criminal-sentencing

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A Non e-mouse
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I once was applying to rent a flat. The letting agent said I had a bad credit score and was dubious about lettig the flat to me. The reason I had a bad credit score?

I’d never had a credit card or personnal loan.

It seems that not having borrowed money can be fatal to your credit score!

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Today in non-depressing news: Boffins build biggest quantum sims

A Non e-mouse
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Re: If they put enough of them together to acheive a critical mass ...

Don't forget the cup of tea!

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Elon Musk says he's not Satoshi Nakamoto and is pretty rubbish at Bitcoin

A Non e-mouse
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Re: Gawd/ess.

Er, no. Someone accused Musk of something. Musk denied it. End of.

If you want to blame anyone, blame the press for making a story out of nothing.

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ML fails: Loyalty prediction? Not really. And bonus prediction? Oh dear

A Non e-mouse
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I didn't used to mind taking part in these surveys for the account managers of our main suppliers. Then they slowly started leaning on me and said I needed to give them a 9 or 10 otherwise they were in trouble. Having read the article, I can understand why.

I strongly dislike being told what answer to give for a question so I now decline to take part. My guess is that many of their other customers are taking the same line and they're getting fewer and fewer responses, making it harder and harder for them to achieve their target score. (Which in turn puts more and more people off and....)

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Another way to avoid eye contact: 4G on the Tube expected 'in 2019'

A Non e-mouse
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Re: Will it work everywhere?

More important - will it work for everyone.

RTFA

..we will require any bidder to allow access to all operators

So providing your mobile device supports 4G, the answer is a simple: Yes.

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A Non e-mouse
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Re: Pfft...

I'd rather they figured out how to fit air-con.

Installing air con equipment on tube trains isn't too hard. The difficult part is working out what to do with all the heat. On the deep level tube lines there aren't easy ways to remove the heat from the tunnels because they're so darn far from the outside world.

As a starter for ten, try these links:

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AT&T wants to bin 100,000 routers, replace them with white boxes

A Non e-mouse
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@Jellied Eel Re: Speed Vs Stability

So now a core router is something that can connect to a bunch of 100Gbps [ethernet] interfaces and run a pile of routing instances. A smart CTO might be looking at the cost/features/performance of a 'cloud' VM platform and then looking at the cost of a core Cisco or Juniper, and wondering why one is so much more expensive than the other. Especially as the VM platform is likely to be more expandable...

Simple: Hardware offload. Sure, you could put a couple of 100Gb/s ethernet cards in a standard server chassis (Haven't seen any blurb on cloud VMs with 100Gb/s interfaces). But could you actually move traffic at 100Gb/s between them? There are various articles out there about how Linux is struggling to support a full 10Gb/s traffic flow, let alone a 100Gb/s flow.

Then add in another 50 or 100 network cards/ports, all at 100Gb/s, and route traffic between them at wire speed.

That's why you pay Cisco, Juniper, et al a lot of money: For the hardware to move lots of traffic very quickly. Have you seen the amount of silicon on router line cards? It's not there just for looks!

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As Google clamps down, 'Droid developer warns 'breaking day' is coming

A Non e-mouse
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@Vince

And I guess you won't be getting iOS devices either then, since you have to use the Apple Push Notification service as far as I know for everything like this.

I've heard that Apple are clamping down quite hard on apps that try and do their own background polling. Apple were due to pull some APIs in iOS 11.0, but there was so much backlash that they've delayed the removal of those APIs until early middle next year (Not 12.0 but a 11.x point release so I've heard) If you're not using Apple's push notification service by then, your app will stop working.

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