* Posts by Dr. Mouse

1747 posts • joined 22 May 2007

UK's education system blamed for IT jobs going to non-Brits

Dr. Mouse

What's more pertinent is the fact that engineering and computing degrees are difficult and the prospects are entering an industry which is being decimated by bean counters who believe that those in IT just click buttons and whose jobs can be done by someone with loads of dubious qualifications from another country.

In a recent meeting with a client, I had to explain the difference between a software developer/programmer and a software engineer. They hadn't a clue (they were business types), and I found it difficult to put it into words, but my analogy seemed to work:

- The programmer is the builder, operating to someone else's technical designs to erect* the building.

- The software engineer is the civil engineer, who takes pretty pictures from an architect and makes them into a functioning, structurally sound design. He must consider effects on and from the surroundings, possible extreme conditions, and a variety of other data to ensure the building will be safe.

Actually, often the software engineer will also be the builder and the architect, but the analogy still stands in principal.

* Tee hee

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Dr. Mouse

Re: Engineer

In Germany Engineer is a job title on a par with Solicitor or Doctor in terms of respect

This is definitely true, but it is also true (as other comments have mentioned) that here, in England, non-Engineers have been given job titles of Engineer (e.g. Sanitation Engineer, aka the bog cleaner). On the continent, and especially in Germany, an Engineer is pretty much a regulated job title (if not legally, by professional consensus at least), and you must actually be an Engineer to be called an Engineer. They would never even consider calling the people we often call engineers such.

I heard that, not long ago, a survey was done in this country asking who was the most famous engineer they knew of. The most popular answer was Kevin Webster, the character from Coronation Street who is a car mechanic.

Part of the reason, I believe, is actually (strange as it sounds) down to spelling. Engineer conjours up images of engine, dirty things which make noise and break down (especially if you go back to steam engines etc). This leads to thoughts of a mechanic.

In Germany, the word is Ingenieur, which betrays it's roots in the word "Ingenious". This brings to mind thoughts of people coming up with clever new methods of accomplishing a task, which is fundamentally what engineering is. The situation is, I believe, the same in much of Europe, and the simple substitution of an "I" with an "E" is, at least, part of the reason for the denigration of Engineers in this country.

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Google Research opens machine intelligence base in Zurich

Dr. Mouse

nothing has changed since the Schrems court ruling

This is true. Data is still being shipped in bulk to a country with incredibly weak data protection laws for those who are not local citizens (if any) and noone is doing anything about it.

Oh, you meant in Switzerland...

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Lester Haines: RIP

Dr. Mouse
Pint

RIP

Raising this to you -->

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UberEats into food delivery with new app launch in London

Dr. Mouse

Not a bad idea...

I'm sure there are times when taxis are sat idle. Allowing them to be used for instant delivery doesn't sound like a bad idea to me.

I think, were it me, I would expand this idea to include other goods. Need a new CPU? Order it from a local shop using UberDelivery and it turns up much quicker than ordering using normal delivery services, and you don't have to leave your desk/house and battle traffic.

It could even be combined with taxi services, the parcel being in the boot while a meatbag is dropped off somewhere en route.

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This is how the EU's supreme court is stripping EU citizens of copyright protections

Dr. Mouse

Re: I don't fully understand...

Someone you know tells you they want to kill their wife [etc]

The first, yes, I expect I would go down for aiding and abetting or something.

The second, if they asked for the contact details of a person without describing why, I would not expect to have committed a crime.

The third, again, I would not expect to have committed a crime.

I am not actually intending to argue that any of these actions are legal or illegal, I was more asking for clarification. The arguments put forth in the article do not add up, to me. I'm against piracy, but I'm also against governments bringing in nonsensical laws.

Another example: I know the guy at the end of the street is selling weed. Someone asks me where they can get weed, and I give them his details. Have I committed a crime there?

Or, I know the guy is selling weed, and someone asks me for his contact details (without telling me why). Have I committed a crime?

If it turns out that knowledge of why I'm giving details is required in the above cases (e.g. I would be committing a crime if I was asked where they could get weed, but not if they just asked for his details) then the same should apply online. If I linked to a website providing pirated materials, but which also provided non-pirated materials, and I was linking without reference to the pirated materials, then I would not expect that I have committed a crime.

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Dr. Mouse

Re: Hyperlink

a Hyperlink is more akin to saying "I know where you can get a copy of that DVD, here, let me fetch one for you".

I disagree.

A hyperlink to a site which contains pirated material, I am providing directions to the stall where the guy is selling DVDs. The person still has to follow the directions (it's known as following a hyperlink for a reason).

If I hyperlink to the actual material, I am providing directions to the stall and the precise location of that DVD at the stall.

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Dr. Mouse

Re: I don't fully understand...

Someone puts family images on flickr marked as private viewable only by family, so the pages are protected. However, some one gets the links to those images and puts them on a website that is viewable to all. The hyperlinks are to images that the uploader never intended to be public. In fact the hyperlink is no more than a skeleton key to the contents of someone's locked cupboard.

That's an even worse analogy. If this is possible, it's more like you are hiding the images around a public place, then putting a map to those images in a locked box accessible only to family members. It doesn't stop someone accidentally finding those pictures, making their own map and putting it somewhere public, or a family member photocopying the map and giving it to someone.

If the images are actually secure, they are in the locked box and only the family members are able to get at them. Of course, it wouldn't stop those family members copying the images and putting them somewhere public but, without that, noone without the key can get at them even if the know where they are.

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Dr. Mouse

Re: I don't fully understand...

Your argument (possibly made more in hope than expectation) is "Not illegal. Because internet."

Actually, no, that is not my argument. In fact, I explicitly related it to a non-internet situation I felt was similar.

OK, let's take 2 more analogies:

1) I know of a person who has almost every film ever made on DVD, who will copy them for you on demand. When people ask me about potential sources of pirate DVDs, I give them this guy's contact details.

2) I know of a website where one can download almost any film. When someone asks me where they should download pirate material, I tell them the address of this site.

Am I guilty of copyright infringement in either of these 2 cases? Because these are the closest real-world analogies I can think of, and come extremely close to hyperlinking, yet I would be surprised if I had violated copyright myself.

I will actually turn it around: Your own argument is that it's illegal "because internet".

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Dr. Mouse

I don't fully understand...

A hyperlink is purely a direction towards material. How can hyperlinking to content which is in violation of copyright itself be a violation of copyright?

Take this to another level. I learn of a guy in the local market who is selling dodgy DVD copies of a particular film. While at the pub, I hear someone saying they are looking for that film, and I tell him about the guy in the market. Am I violating copyright?

Personally, I would say no. I have just given someone information about where to find something they were looking for. If that person chooses to buy said DVD, he and the seller would be violating IP law, but I do not believe I should be held responsible for that violation.

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Wales gives anti-vaping Blockleiters a Big Red Panic Button

Dr. Mouse

Re: Strange Sign

I don't understand those who don't want them regulated at all.

They should be regulated, but they already are. There are all sorts of regulations which require the manufacturers not to supply harmful products. What people are objecting to is the heavy-handed, innovation-stifling insanity of the TPD (itself a misnomer as e-cigs are not a tobacco product by any reasonable definition of the word).

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Dr. Mouse

Re: Strange Sign

That's hardly reasonable at all, actually that's deliberately putting non-smokers in harm's way.

And for no good reason. There have been a lot of studies recently into vaping, and none (that I have seen) have shown any potential harm from "second-hand vaping". In fact, none have shown any harm from first hand vaping, except when the device is used improperly*.

* Basically continuing to heat the wick when dry, burning the wick and producing carcinogenic compounds. However, it takes very little knowledge of the device and very little skill to avoid this happening.

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Dr. Mouse

"trigger a PA message that reminds smokers that it is a smoke free site and asks them to extinguish their cigarette"

Which I would ignore, were I vaping. I am not smoking, and have no cigarette (or anything else burning) to extinguish. Case closed.

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Let's play: 'IT values or hipster folk band?'

Dr. Mouse

Re: Sponsored article

Or the inevitable* horror stories or general piss take about experiences with them.

* I say this not because I have had bad experience, but because most large-enough IT suppliers would find a large group of people on here who would rip them to shreds with stories of their incompetence.

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Tinder bans under-18s: Moral panic averted

Dr. Mouse

Re: Why is 18 improbably old?

I knew such "most suited couple" where everything were perfect for the wealthy husband and his housewife until they divorce.

I am certainly not talking about a stepford couple. These argue, disagree, etc. However, they are both there for each other in the difficult times, resolve their differences, laugh and joke with each other, and generally just "fit". They are also amazing parents for their 4-year-old daughter. In all areas, they balance each other out and compliment each other.

This is my definition of "suited", not a couple who never argue and always smile.

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Dr. Mouse

Re: Why is 18 improbably old?

"I know of no-one who has regretted waiting"

I'm another who regretted waiting. It built up sex in my head until it seemed one of the most important things in the world, which then caused problems in later relationships.

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Dr. Mouse

Re: Why is 18 improbably old?

That's why the legislation should limit not only the age of consent for minors but for adults too.

The most suited couple I know have a 15 year age difference. Neither is "abusing" the other. You think this relationship should be banned, and the wonderful family they have created should never have existed?

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Dr. Mouse

Re: Why is 18 improbably old?

"Sex isn't something that is required for life to continue"

PEDANT ALERT!

I think you'll find it is*, the human race would die out if noone had sex.

* Although strictly speaking, it could be replaced by some form of artificial insemination or IVF procedure, but that's nowhere near as fun!

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Developer waits two years for management to define project

Dr. Mouse

Re: Management...

they then start demanding to know where all the features that they never asked for were...

I was discussing this with a client the other day. Basically, this one normally comes down to mismatched assumptions between the client and the consultant.

Take accountancy. If I was contracted to write accountancy software, the accountants will know the subject matter and will have used various software in the past. Therefore many of the features they need will seem trivial to them: They are included in every software package they have used before, to the point they don't even think of them as features. They just expect them to be present.

However, I am not an accountant. I know the very basics from GCSE Business Studies, but that's it. If a feature is not on the spec, I will not know that it is needed. If it is left out, the accountants will scream that it is needed, and is so obviously required that they didn't even think about it.

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EU referendum frenzy bazookas online voter registration. It's another #GovtDigiShambles

Dr. Mouse

Re: How come....

In my experience, the tech guy says 5, the IT manager agrees, but the MD or bean counters say "That's too expensive, we'll manage with 2"

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Our CompSci exam was full of 'typos', admits Scottish exam board

Dr. Mouse

Re: By design?

"good preparation for the world of work"

You said it! However, at least in the big wide world you can ask questions to determine the required information. In an exam, you are stuck with what's written.

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Belgian brewery lays 3.2km beer pipeline

Dr. Mouse

However, this is because part of the brewing process involves boiling the water, not because the beer contains alcohol.

It is also because an infection will often turn the beer, and this causes a noticable change in taste. Therefore the drinker (or, if they are doing it right, the publican) will know, on first sip, that the beer should not be drunk.

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Dr. Mouse

"I have it on good authority that they're going to strap abrasive pads to a cat and push it through using a really long flexible pole."

Having attempted to use a cat for cleaning purposes before, I can attest that it is not the best idea in the world (no matter how fun it sounds!)

Although, I did have a cat who enjoyed being pushed around at the end of a mop, until I soaked the end of it and he got drenched. He didn't like it anymore after that, or me...

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Model's horrific rape case may limit crucial online free speech law

Dr. Mouse

Re: law enforcement?

"Neither Flanders nor Callum posted information on the website, but they used it to contact models for "auditions.""

There's a flaw in your suggestion.

There's also a flaw in Model Mayhem's site setup, in allowing access for unregistered viewers to rather sensitive personal information.

This was my thought, too.

I'm not sure exactly how the site works. It sounds like the equivalent of classifieds in a newspaper: The model posts an advert of themselves, including contact details, and potential clients contact the models outside the site. If this is the case, I'm not sure I believe the site should be held liable. I would expect the site to inform the police if they have reason to suspect people are misusing the site for criminal purposes, but they don't control the communication and, sadly, it's up to the models to be careful and accept the risk of meeting a stranger alone. I'm not blaming the model, but neither do I think the site is to blame in those circumstances.

If the site provides the means of communication (web form or some such), and had been warned about these guys, then there is a stronger case. If this communication still didn't require registration, it's likely that all they could have done is inform the police, still, but there is a stronger link.

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GNU cryptocurrency aims at 'the mainstream economy not the black market'

Dr. Mouse

Good idea

This can only be described as a good idea, IMHO. It's basically electronic cash.

However, as always, the devil will be in the detail. If the implementation is good, and adoption is good (from banks, merchants and consumers), it could be revolutionary. If not, it's just another interesting project. I'll be keeping an eye on it...

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UK Home Office is creating mega database by stitching together ALL its gov records

Dr. Mouse

Modus Operandi

This does not surprise me one bit, it's how the govt works.

Govt plans "one database to rule them all", runs it through the regular channels, it gets defeated.

What are they to do next? Give up on it, because the electorate don't want it? Nah, let's call it something else and try to push it in through the back door*!

This sort of thing seems to happen more and more. The people want privacy in the IPB? OK, we'll add the word "privacy" to the title of a section, that'll appease them without changing anything.

* Fnar fnar!

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Universe's shock rapidly expanding waistline may squash Einstein flat

Dr. Mouse

Obligatory xkcd

https://xkcd.com/1489/

"Of these four forces, there's one we don't really understand."

"Is it the weak force or the strong--"

"It's gravity."

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Brexit? Cutting the old-school ties would do more for Brit tech world

Dr. Mouse

Re: Vote to Keep Europe British

Accusations of mindless conformity are, however, wide of the mark. Britons, for whatever reason, don't like to be told what to do.

However, our reactions tend to be more understated than other countries, and often passive-aggressive. Look at a recent protest of bikers against something (I really can't remember what, maybe fuel prices or something...) - They took to the motorway, formed up accross it, and drove slowly. In a country like, say, France, there would have been outright demonstrations, blockades etc. We just react differently, often in a more subtle way, which to an outsider looks like acceptance.

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Dr. Mouse

I'll be honest, I'm a lazy b*****d, and the amount of work involved in applying to Oxford or Cambridge put me off.

However, you cannot deny the following.

* The application process is intense.

* It is also quite different to applying to any other UK university.

* You are more likely to have teachers who graduated Oxbridge in a private school than a state school.

* Those who have graduated Oxbridge are more likely to understand the application process, and will be more helpful to those applying.

This does, intrinsically, give those who had a private education a greater chance of gaining entry to Oxbridge.

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Dr. Mouse

Re: Another remainer...

Let that last one sink in. Like the Anonymous Coward before me said: rise up. Not against the EU, its time will come, but against our own piss pot career politicians who are only in it to make a few quid for themselves and only care about you once every 5 years.

HERE HERE!!

My personal view about the EU referendum is that it's being used as a distraction by our government, to let it push through unpopular legislation while everyone is slinging mud.

Let's be quite frank about this, BOTH sides are just mud slinging, name calling, and spreading FUD. In order to find any facts, I have had to ignore what the politicians and media are saying and do my own research. For anyone to come to an informed decision, this is what must be done, yet I find VERY few people who have done this. They trot out quotes from politicians who are on their side, and "facts" which support their view (which are normally nothing of the sort). They raise confirmation bias to an art form, and end up in blazing rows where NEITHER side are right, both both are utterly convinced they are. It's practically religious in nature!

In the interests of full disclosure, I am a Remainer, but only marginally. I believe that there are pros and cons of staying and leaving, but on balance staying just edges out leaving. That said, I doubt much would change in either event, looking at both my own life and the bigger picture, when the dust settles.

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One ad-free day: Three UK to block adverts across network in June

Dr. Mouse

Re: move will "revolutionise" mobile advertising

There is one site I use, F1Fanatic, which offers an ad free option. It costs £1/month and I'm happy to pay. Indeed, I'd be happy to pay the same for El Reg. It's a small price to pay to support a site I regularly visit without putting up with irritating adverts!

Although much more than that and I'd probably balk...

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Dr. Mouse

Re: move will "revolutionise" mobile advertising

"Keep it simple, a static image, some text and a hyperlink to a product page, no tracking."

I agree, I do not block such ads either.

The Register has incurred my wrath on this with their "change the whole page" ads. You know, the ones which change the colours and put adverts in the "wasted" side areas, exactly the area I tend to click to bring focus back to a web page or to allow me to scroll. Before that started happening, I had this site whitelisted, and now I don't even know if they still use them.

If adverts are non-intrusive to how you use the site, preferably text only or non-invasive images, and clearly labelled as adverts, people don't mind. When they are shoved in your face or interfere with the content you are there to see, they start looking for ways to block.

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Bearded Baron Shugs hired by Gov.uk to get down with the kids

Dr. Mouse

Re: apprenticeships

"the implied contractual part of getting paid shit wages for several years is permanent employment afterwards"

I disagree with this.

The point of an apprenticeship is that you get an education in the trade, learning both through studying and working. However, I do not believe that there should be a guaranteed job at that company afterwards: If they want to pay for your training then get rid of you, that is their prerogative. As long as they do provide the training that is required to do the job, preferably along with recognised, transferable qualifications, they have fulfilled their part of the bargain.

Most companies couldn't guarantee anyone a job for 5 years (probably not even 1 year), even their most experienced and skilled employee. Circumstances change quickly in business.

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Dr. Mouse

Re: apprenticeships

My own brother did an apprenticeship as a mechanic, and he's doing pretty well for himself.

However, I agree that there are many who use apprentices and interns as cheap (or free) labour, instead of teaching them the skills they will need to progress. This practice should be stopped. Any employer found to be doing this should be forced to pay full wages* to their "apprentices", back dated and applied to previous apprentices, as well as a hefty fine and being publicly named and shamed. Its exploitation of young people trying to do the right thing and get a good start in a trade/career, and exploitation of labour laws.

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Irish data cops kick Max Schrems' latest Facebook complaint up to EU Court

Dr. Mouse

"And we are not going to tell you what they are until we have to use them, to drag this process out as long as possible"

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Hooves in spaaace: Goat Simulator goes galactic

Dr. Mouse

How did I not know about this game?!

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Don't tell the Cabinet Office: HMRC is building its own online ID system

Dr. Mouse

Re: Holy crap

Exactly what I though: Use Verify to Authenticate an individual, and it's own internal system to Authorise that individual to do something.

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Oculus backtracks on open software promise

Dr. Mouse

Re: Come on guys

If I say I'll paint your house for a tenner, and you agree (and turn down other offers to do it), then I turn up and say "oh, I meant a grand" would you shrug and say "oh well" and give me the cash? Would you fuck.

I would suggest another analogy.

The landlord of a pub approaches a painter and decorator and asks them to decorate the pub. In return, he will supply the guy, at cost, with beer to take home and use in his own home bar. As soon as the work is complete, the landlord changes his mind. The decorator has done all that work, and has nothing to show for it.

I believe anyone who has worked, for free, on software on the promise that the platform would be open, should consider a class action lawsuit. It would be an interesting case, as IMHO Luckey's previous promise could be interpreted as a verbal contract...

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The ‘Vaping Crackdown’ starts today. This is what you need to know

Dr. Mouse

Re: Next time you're in France...

Most vaping stores can sell you anything you like and because we are in the EU (for now at least) they'll even post it to you.

IIRC, that's also in the TPD: There are tight restrictions on cross-border sales of e-cigs and related products.

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Dr. Mouse

Re: So the bar is now much higher for e-cig makers

"It's like banning hard hats on building sites until you can prove they don't cause scalp disease."

While also restricting the weight of said hats, the materials they are made from, banning advertising of them, restricting the number of hard hats you can have on a building site at a time and the number you can order at a time, stopping you from buying them from outside the country, and generally trying to make like as difficult for manufacturers, retailers and consumers as possible.

E-cig portions of the TPD are possibly one of the most insane peices of legislation I have ever seen:

"Here's something which will make millions of people healthier and better off."

"Lets force bunch of nonsensical rules on them to kill them off."

"Great idea, our friends in the tobacco and pharmaceutical industries will be really happy with us for that! They've been loosing loads of money thanks to these devices."

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Queen’s Speech: Digital Bill to tackle radicalisation, pirates

Dr. Mouse

Re: nobody goes after the small fry

That would only be justified for a major crime, such as one that carried a 10year sentence

That is a scary possibility which I hadn't thought of...

Fortunately such laws would only be used against major criminals, or terrorists.

This was my thought on the issue. Unless it is actually written into the law, saying "we will only use this for serious offences" holds no water for me. The same has been said about multiple laws recently (since the New York attacks). However, because it has never been written into the law to limit their use, police/CPS/councils will use them where they can. This is either bad planning by the lawmakers, or (more likely) intentional, planned feature creep.

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FBI director claims that videoing police is causing crime uptick

Dr. Mouse

Re: Boo hoo

Part of a cop's job is to judge the situation. If they consider the situation warrants it, a gun can be drawn.

However, it seems that many American chips consider it their first option, and point a gun at a suspect as a matter of course. This is unacceptable. Shooting a suspect should always be a last resort, and if there is another way to deal with it, they should use that.

While I don't have all the facts, I have heard that the cops shoot a lot of suspects in the USA, many of which could have been apprehended and tried (albeit with a potential increased risk to the police officer involved). Some of these suspects will have been either innocent or guilty of something with a much lesser sentence than death.

The cops have a dangerous job, granted, and police deaths are unacceptable. They still need to respond in a proportionate manner, as the death of a suspect is also unacceptable except where the cops life or the lives of bystanders is at immediate risk, and there is no other option.

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Dr. Mouse

Re: Boo hoo

There is no reason any officer should have to compete in hand-to-hand combat before escalating their response. There is no point during a fight at which the action stops while he picks his next weapon. An officer who loses consciousness loses control of their weapons and may very well die as a result. Their only option is to stop the threat NOW. You can critique it all you want when it is over. Anyone attacking a police officer should expect to be shot. That's just common sense. And yes, by a real gun, not a tazer or baton. Those frequently have no effect and by the time you know it hasn't worked it can be too late.

I completely disagree.

A police officer should always offer a proportionate response to a situation.Weapons of any kind should only be drawn when the officer feels there is an imminent danger to their own person or others. They should only be used in the last resort to protect their own lives or the lives of others. The chosen weapon should be proportionate to the circumstances, and the use of that weapon proportionate.

An unarmed man is acting in a threatening and violent manner. Is it appropriate to draw a weapon? Probably, although the officer should first use words to try to calm the situation.

Is it appropriate to draw a gun, if they have a taser or baton at their disposal? Probably not, and here is my reasoning. If the gun is drawn as a threat (a legitimate tactic, as many would back down from the threat of being shot), and the suspect escalates (attacks, or threatens to attack), there is only one escalation available to the cop: shoot him. Someone skilled with a gun may be able to shoot the leg or arm, intending to injure and incapacitate the suspect, but even that could kill them. If, instead, a baton or taser had been drawn, it is easier to non-lethally incapacitate the suspect, and there is still the option of drawing a firearm (albeit with more difficulty).

Police in America seem far too quick to draw their gun. There are many occasions where a suspect was killed when they could have been incapacitated and/or apprehended. To say "Anyone attacking a police officer should expect to be shot" shows a complete lack of thought. What if the person was mentally ill, suffering some kind of break down? Do they deserve to be shot, or should they be apprehended?

Accepting that the cops may shoot anyone who attacks (or looks likely to attack) them makes them judge, jury and executioner. If the suspect is, instead, caught and tried, the criminal justice system can determine an appropriate action (which is unlikely to be "shoot them in he chest and let them die horribly").

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Dr. Mouse

Re: Here's the thing...

Do think you guys into the US need to look into why your police need to be so heavily armed

There's a simple reason: Cops in the US must be heavily armed because the population are heavily armed (or at least, are allowed to be, can easily be and often the criminal elements, who they need to deal with, are).

For the rest, I agree that, in general, police officers join the force to help people (or as the US cops say "Protect and Serve"). There is the odd bad apple who joins because they are power-hungry sociopaths with no other route to the power they crave, but I believe they are the exception.

In reality, though, there are some who are corrupted by that power. While in uniform/on duty, the cops should be held to a higher standard than the general population. They should be shining examples of how one should follow the law, among other things.

As a trivial example, my brother was once overtaken by a marked police car exceeding the speed limit (by a large margin, around 40 in a 30 zone) without blues and twos. He accelerated and kept pace with the cop. After a short while, the cop noticed him and slowed to less than the speed limit, encouraging my brother to pass him. Instead, he maintained a safe gap and matched speeds. The cop then proceeded to accelerate and slow down several times to try to force my brother to pass, which he didn't.

Eventually the cop put his lights on and signaled my brother to pull over. "Do you know what speed you were doing?" he asked. "Same speed as you, officer," my brother replied. After a brief argument, including "I'm not sure exactly what speed I was doing, but I was doing the same as you, and as an officer of the law you wouldn't have been breaking the law, would you?" he was issued with a ticket.

Luckily for my brother, we knew a high-ranking officer in the area. He tore up the ticket, gave the cop involved an official warning, and busted him down to beat work. However, both my brother and the officer involved should really have been prosecuted for speeding. In reality, this was another police cover up.

There are many more examples I could cite, but it all comes down to the fact that the police should always be held to a higher standard. They should never be speeding or breaking other traffic laws (except in an emergency, indicated by blues and twos), they should never be corrupt, never violate privacy laws, never violate a suspect's rights etc. They should be whiter than white. When something bad happens, it should not be covered up, but exposed and "cleaned" in public.

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Dr. Mouse

Re: Nothing to hide : Nothing to fear

@veti

Please don't use this argument.

"Nothing to hide, nothing to fear" is a bullshit argument that should be opposed, not adopted.

It was fairly obvious to me that he was taking the mick with that comment. The cops/law enforcement/politicians use it all the time, so he was turning it around on them.

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How to make a fortune in space? Start with one here on Earth…

Dr. Mouse

Just like F1

How do you make a small fortune in space?

Start with a large fortune!

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Lauri Love: 'Britain's FBI' loses court attempt to evade decryption laws

Dr. Mouse

Re: Good spot

Ah, OK, that makes sense now.

I was tempted to use the "spotted a mistake" method, but given how confusing legalese can be, I wasn't sure it actually was a mistake!

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Dr. Mouse

"[S]pecialized in gaining authorized access to protected computers"

Am I the only one who is confused by this? If he gained "authorized access", he was allowed to do so, surely. He was authorized to do so, therefore it is not illegal.

Either this is a misprint, the charges don't make sense, or the legalese used twists the meaning of the words to make them unintelligible.

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Debian farewells Pentium

Dr. Mouse

Re: Perhaps opportune

"older chips that are hot and thirsty"

About 5 years ago, I decided to get a real server to replace my aging repurposed desktop based server. Being on a very limited budget, and not having as much understanding as I should have, I bought an old ProLiant based on the P4-generation Xeon for about £100.

I realised this was a mistake soon after. While the management features were great, the system burned leccy, made enough noise to keep me awake, and needed the window open in summer or it overheated. It was replaced by another desktop-based unit quite quickly.

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Watch it again: SpaceX's boomerang rocket lands on robo-sea-barge

Dr. Mouse
Joke

Re: Wait, what?

"Are you all sure this isn't another NASA moon landing hoax?"

I'm absolutely certain it isn't. It doesn't look remotely like the moon!

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