* Posts by Matt Bryant

9889 posts • joined 21 May 2007

Briton admits to router hack that DDoSed Deutsche Telekom

Matt Bryant
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Re: Bob Dole (TM) Re: No specialiat training...

Why is that bit important to say? I'd wager the majority of keyboard hammering eejits that think they are great programmers had little to no formal training...

FTFY

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Q. What's today's top language? A. Python... no, wait, Java... no, C

Matt Bryant
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Re: 45RPM

"....Pascal...." ah, yes, that was a fun starter language, but most learning establishments seem to have just treated it as an intro to Modula 2 and/or C, and never as a viable language in its own right.

I like intro'ing kids to code with HTML, especially as they all use websites every day, and you show them structuring and files calls etc. with quick and easy results. From there it's easy to get them into a backend in C or whatever language you like.

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Matt Bryant
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Re: COBOL FTW

During the Y2K bonanza/hysteria, I was amazed at the amount of COBOL code that was expensively edited to get round the Y2K issue, rather than rewritten in a more modern language. Seeing as the majority of those COBOL coders from 2000 are dead from old age, any young whippersnapper with COBOL in their skill set will probably make serious dough when the next Y2K-like issue arrives and all that code needs to be edited again.

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Matt Bryant
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Re: Phil O'Sophical Re: I suspect there are quite a few Java devs out there

".... but they write C programs." Yeah, guilty! Nowadays I write code once in a blue moon, but it's usually C code morphed into whatever wrapper is required.

One strange practice I commonly run into is customers that have picked the coding language for a problem long before they have determined even what the problem is. I try to at least steer the project to a thorough pseudo-coding before going to language selection. Agilistas really hate that, they seem to think it insults their skills.

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UK.gov embraces Oracle's cloud: Pragmatism or defeatism?

Matt Bryant
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Meh

Re: AC Re: Cloud costs

"....Monitoring your kit on the cloud, for example, is a bloody doddle because it's all built in...." Well, yes and no. Because the Snoreacle Cloud is proprietary only, you get the monitoring that Snoreacle want to give you, and that may not actually be the best tool for the job. The other problem is you no longer control the monitoring tool, Snoreacle do, so you cannot change the monitoring configuration whenever you like, and you also lose some visibility of actual root causes (such as when Snoreacle don't want to admit that your applications have been dead for the last five days because they had to re-silver a ZFS partition).

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Not that scary or that hard: Two decades of VLANS

Matt Bryant
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Re: DHCP is you friend.

".....Assuming that the clients actually take the IP address and correctly use it, it works quite well...." Ah, yes, but one of the great selling myths the VLAN peddlers push is that VLANs are "more flexible" and you can "reconfigure on the fly". The reality is you usually set up your VLANs and then don't change anything for years.

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Matt Bryant
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Re: Sixtysix Re: VLANS save money...

".....I fin it surprising how many network admins still can't get their heads around VLANs....." The admins you have to watch out for are the ones that thinking converting a relatively simple network into a mess of VLANs will somehow protect their jobs....

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Luxembourg passes first EU space mining law. One can possess the Spice

Matt Bryant
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Happy

LMAO!

The real question is whether the EU will survive long enough to be around when space travel and space mining are regular occurrences.

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Jodie Who-ttaker? The Doctor is in

Matt Bryant
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Facepalm

Doctor choice pretty irrelevant.

What will damn or not the new Doctor will be the quality of the scripts - too much PCness will kill the show quicker than a Doctor in a skirt.

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Oracle CEO Mark Hurd scoops up $17.4m from 350,000 share sales

Matt Bryant
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WTF?

WTF?

"....five-bed, eight-bath condo...." Whaaaaaat?!? One for each day of the week and a second bath every Sunday? Does she have a serious water fetish?

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BOFH: That's right. Turn it off. Turn it on

Matt Bryant
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Re: Daniel Gould Re: The power of suggestion

"It's amazing and so close to the truth!" And very dangerous to demonstrate! A friend did something similar - a fake change warning - and ended up having to go to management to ask for overtime money for his help desk team. During that meeting he had to field questions from a senior manager over how to back out the non-existent change. It turned out senior management were just as prone to falling for the hoax as ordinary lusers, only they had the scary power to end your career if they ever found out!

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Tech industry thumps Trump's rump over decision to leave Paris climate agreement

Matt Bryant
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Re: John R. Macdonald Re: Trumpy the clown

".....Since 1978, satellites have monitored sea ice growth and retreat, and they have detected an overall decline in Arctic sea ice....." Yes, but that is stating a scientific fact to try and substantiate an unproven conclusion - there is zero proof that the warming causing the ice to melt is not simply the natural cycle of warming the planet has been undergoing for thousands of years, nor any concrete proof that man's activities have done anything to cause or even accellerate said global warming. Hint - go read up on causality. On the evidence presented to date, the "AGW-caused-by-us" schpiel is like saying a car moves therefore I must have telekinetic powers, because I really want to believe I have telekinetic powers, when in reality it is the car's engine and transmission doing the work and telekinesis is just a crackpot fantasy.

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Matt Bryant
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Re: strum Re: Stick to business

".....Everyday science is about consensus...." Yeah, but it doesn't always mean that consensus is correct. For example, it doesn't help the Global Warming alarmists that one of their most hyperventilating "experts", NASA's James Hansen, spent the early '70s insisting the World was "doomed" by an imminent new ice age. ROFL!

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Matt Bryant
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FAIL

Re: strum Re: Stick to business

".....No-one building a plane/rocket/artillery shell sets out to re-test Newton or Einstein. Instead, he/she relies on consensus amongst those who have studied those theories....." Sorry, but that is a complete load of cobblers. There are many examples in recent history where the scientific consensus has said a development is "impossible", only for empirical testing to show the development is actually not just possible but overturns scientific convention. There are also plenty of cases where designs built to conventional rules have failed at the test stage because developments have out-stripped the old science. One example is the relative failure of early supersonic aircraft, such as the Convair F-102 interceptor, which would not fly at the Mach speeds predicted by their designers using conventional scientific rules. It took the (re)discovery of the "area rule" of aerodynamics - by Richard Whitcomb at NACA, through wind-tunnel experimentation - to provide the redesign guidance that finally allowed the F-102 to be successful. It is still true today that those developing new planes, rockets and shells do a LOT of testing as that is THE ONLY real way to show actual performance and reliability.

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Matt Bryant
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Re: Down not accross Re: cripple your own economy

"....how is that going?" Those of us that can read the news have already seen it starting to happen, as shown by Ford's decision to scrap a new plant in Mexico and instead expand production in Michigan:

http://www.bbc.com/news/business-38497898

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Matt Bryant
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Re: frank ly Re: Trumpy the clown

".....so worldwide coastal flooding will be fine as well." Do you mean the flooding that would take 6000 years at even the most dire predicted rate of sea level rise?

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Matt Bryant
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Re: cripple your own economy

".....Like it or not, a *lot* of the world's generation capacity will run on coal for decades to come Trump or no Trump....." Too true, and in fact made worse by Merkel, not Trump. When Merkel needed to shaft the Greens in a previous election, she used the hysteria around the tsunami hit on a Japanese nuke station as an excuse to close Germany's nuke stations. The blatent piece of non-scientific vote-buying worked, but then the Germans were left with a shortfall in electricity production. To fill the gap, Merkel quietly authorized an increase in the highly environmentally unfriendly open-cast mining of brown coal, the most polluting kind, for use in coal-fired electricity stations.

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Dell's losses widen in first post-EMC quarter, but nobody's worried

Matt Bryant
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Component prices?

Strange, but I seem to remember the Dell of old was very good at predicting how prices in components market were going to move. Maybe a skill lost with retirements.

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NSA leaker bust gets weirder: Senator claims hacking is wider than leak revealed

Matt Bryant
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Liberals - read, try to understand.

"....We do not believe there was any interference in actual voting machines or the final tally,” senator Warner said, adding “I do not believe they got into changing actual voting outcomes....."

Yup, even the Dems are finally starting to backpedal on Shrillary's silly claims that "Putin stole my election".

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First-day-on-the-job dev: I accidentally nuked production database, was instantly fired

Matt Bryant
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Re: LeeE Re: So....restore from backup

".....This was a cockup waiting to happen." First rule of process design - always assume at least one user will do something wrong if you give him/her the means to do so, do not assume they will be able to over-ride the impulse to follow an incorrect direction. The management were responsible for the process documentation, therefore, IMHO, they were responsible for the failure.

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IBM: ALL travel must be approved now, and shut up about the copter

Matt Bryant
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Re: AC Re: >>>Next copter hire will result in IBMers having to pay to park....

"....don't give them ideas." Looks like someone needs to, they seem to think that simply refusing the travel claims will stop them circling the drain.

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Enterprise patching... is patchy, survey finds

Matt Bryant
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Re: Locky Re: 31%?

"....That many people accidently clicked the upgrade now button...." Whilst the article highlights the problem in big organizations like healthcare, my own experience is that the problem is worse in smaller companies where IT policies and updates are subject to personal whim rather than professional process. In such companies, where many IT "professionals" have the same sniffy attitude to updating Windows as you displayed, there is also a similarly blinkered approach to security patching. Just last year I was at a small software company that wants to work with Wall Street financial houses, they considered themselves very avant garde, only I had to tell them my customer was declining the opportunity to work with them because my review of their practices showed it to be close to "head in sand". These guys included an MIT grad whom insisted Windows 10 was "no more secure than XP" and MS updates were there "just to keep Windows users living in fear"! Hipster snarks will not keep hackers out of your data.

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BA CEO blames messaging and networks for grounding

Matt Bryant
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Re: TkH11 Re: messaging

".....he was eluding to network switches going down....." Ahem, not wanting to point fingers, of course - perish the thought! - but, knowing some of the "solution providers" involved in the designs of BA systems, has anyone asked CISCO for a quote about the resilience of their core switches in "power surge" situations?

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Silk Road boss Ross Ulbricht denied bid for new trial

Matt Bryant
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Good.

Nuff said.

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After stiffing us with Trump, Weiner 'fesses to underage cock shot rot

Matt Bryant
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WTF?

"After stiffing us with Trump...."

Whilst the continued fails of Mr Weiner do make good comedy, I would suggest the person ultimately to blame for Trump is Hillary Clinton. In letting Hillary dominate and dictate to the Democrat Party, the Dem leadership managed to snatch defeat from the jaws of electoral victory.

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IBM CEO Ginni flouts £75 travel crackdown, rides Big Blue chopper

Matt Bryant
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Happy

Not the worst travel expense I can think of.

To be fair to the Ginster, I have heard stories of far worse CEO chopper trips. My fave was when Carly Fiorina was touring hp's offices worldwide, IIRC to an office in France. On being told that the lawn in front of the office was too small for Carly's preferred method of travel - executive helicopter - she demanded the trees by the lawn be chopped down to make more room. The cost of the lumberjacks went on her travel expenses, which some friends at hp found extra annoying seeing as the event happened right after Carly had sent out a memo telling those at the coalface to cut back their travel expenses!

Another fun tale is of the CEO at a leading U.K. integrator (no names cos he's still in the business), who threw a tantrum when he found out the executive chopper was painted red when the corporate colours were blue and grey. A replacement chopper was hired at a cost of £33,000 for the CEO to make one flight of less than a hundred miles.

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Agile consultant behind UK's disastrous Common Platform Programme steps down

Matt Bryant
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Re: AC Re: AC Agile and government do not mix

"Who produces the reports?...." That depends on how savvy the customer is. If they are smart they will have one of their staff included in the team to make sure what is reported actually matches real progress.

"....Unless they're receiving actual functionality that they can use and test themselves, they're taking on trust that your progress reports are true." LOL, it's called a court case. As it was once put to me by an experienced PM, lying to the customer is bad, but giving them written evidence of your lie that could be used in court, well that's just downright stupid. The Government has lots of lawyers, time and money to pursue those that are stupid. Any consultant worth his money will make sure any report doesn't put a rope round his own neck by falsifying results. Consultants not worth their money....?

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Matt Bryant
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Re: AC Re: Management Repeat after me

No, not Agile. Means does plan?

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Matt Bryant
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Re: Aristotles Re: It's odd...

"....After all, who would bid on a government tender without understanding those requirements right?...." Er, no. In consulting sales this is called a "Never Ending Story" - a project that, if negotiated around flexible milestones on time and materials terms, will deliver far more revenue than a "deliver X that meets set requirements A through Z for a fixed fee". Remember, consultancies are out to make money, and if a customer will continue to hand over cash for virtually zero progress then the consultancies will take it. Some Never Ending Story projects will keep consultancies paid for years after a properly scoped and managed project would have completed, and the ironic bit is the customer's will end up perpetuating the whole deal because they won't want to own up to failure.

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Matt Bryant
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Re: AC Re: Agile and government do not mix

"....With waterfall, the customer's taking your word for it that everything is on course...." Male bovine genetalia. With proper waterfall you get a comprehensive reporting system that keeps the customer well-informed. What happens is this - the customer produces a wish-list of airy-fairy nonsense as a requirements doc; the experienced waterfallists say "no, doesn't pass the feasibility study, go away and map out your requirements properly if you want the project to succeed", but the hipsters say "hey, no probs, we'll just go agile (and make it up as we go along)"; management ignore the waterfallists and accept the pipe dream that agile can solve everything; project fails; management finally bite the bullet, tank the hipsters, and ask the experienced waterfallists to try and rescue something from the wreckage. Seen it in government projects plenty of times.

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US Air Force networks F-15 and F-22 fighters – in flight!

Matt Bryant
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Re: "That's a huge pod. In a day when cellphones are a couple of ounces, why is that so big?"

Or it's a combined fuel and electronics pod.

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Michael Dell? More like Michael in-Dell-nial: No public cloud, no future

Matt Bryant
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Facepalm

Dell "needs" a public cloud?

Maybe MD is just smart enough to realize trying to force his way into the already over-crowded and cut-throat cloud market would just be a massive drain on resource and money? There's still plenty of money to be made out of on-prem, and probably will be for a long time yet.

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Not auf wiedersehen – yet! The Berlin scene tempting Brexit tech

Matt Bryant
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Meh

Re: Voland's right hand Re: There are more levels than that

".....Stockholm...." Er, no! Just check out the Scandinavian winters for a good reason why not to.

"....Dublin...." Much better option than Berlin on just about every point, plus the fact it's a lot closer so you can just pop back to Blighty for a visit without it being a major journey. The one problem is Ireland is one of the PIGS, and will suffer when the wheels fall off the EU wagon. Indeed, Germany only currently has a booming economy because the EU allows it to dominate the PIGS and the rest of Southern Europe. What will cause Germany future problems is when the PIGS and the rest of Southern Europe stop buying German export goods. Just look at how acutely the Germans reacted to the Greek mess to understand how the whole German banking system and economy depend on there being a supine EU for Germany to sell to.

Personally, Barcelona tops the list. Berlin wouldn't even be on it.

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US surveillance court declined less than 2 per cent of applications

Matt Bryant
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FAIL

Re: Dave 15 Re: The land of the ....?

Can't decide whether you're just a poor troll or actually baaaahlieve what you posted. I mean, it's just silliness from start to finish, but then agan plenty of UK Labour members did vote for Jeremy Corbyn.....

For a start, if you had actually read anything about George Orwell, you would know that Animal Farm and 1984 were written after Orwell witnessed the vicious nature of Communusm firsthand, when the Russian NKVD and Spanish Communists spied on and then massacred their allies, Orwell's friends and fellow Anarchists and Socialiats, during the Spanish Civil War. So, when Yank-haters like yourself blather on about Orwell during your Pootie-kissing posts, it simply displays your ignorance.

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Matt Bryant
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Facepalm

Re: AC Re: Reality check

The real clue is in the number of applications, 1,752 - with the US population standing at about 350 million it is immediately obvious that the NSA is not "spying on us all" as certain posters here really want to baaaaaaaahlieve.

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AWS v Oracle: Mark Hurd schooled on how to run a public cloud that people actually use

Matt Bryant
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FAIL

Re: AC Re: AWS infrastructure Boss is Ex-Car mechanic..

".....No one that’s serious about Database performance will run on a virtualized environment....." And therein lies one of Oracle's biggest problems - they are convinced they are still fighting the Big Iron Database War of a decade ago. The vast majority of cloud customers are not mega corporations, indeed one of the highlights of how cloud has developed is that it really developed from the SMB market. Little web-based software shops in particular, seizing on the cost-savings of using cloud-hosted services so they didn't have to pay for in-house systems and maintenance. Those type of companies were very happy to go with virtualised environments, and the absolute screaming end of database performance was way down the list of their requirements compared to availability, low cost and low latency. AWS cornered the market because they met those requirements for the SMBs whilst having the stretch capability to also provide more performant solutions for the corporations as they moved in after the SMBs. Since Oracle has always had an awful time selling their high-priced software to the SMB market they have always been poorly positioned for the general cloud market that AWS has dominated.

Oracle really needs to clean out all the old management dross like Hurd and Fowler with their blinkered view of the market and get a real cloud CEO.

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Oracle patches Solaris 10 hole exploited by NSA spyware tool – and 298 other security bugs

Matt Bryant
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Big Brother

Hmmmmm

So a set of old vulns, including one so old even Oracle had patched it by 2012. Makes you wonder what other vulns the NSA boys and girls have found since..

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Security co-operation unlikely to change post Brexit, despite threats

Matt Bryant
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FAIL

Re: @wolfetone

".....where did Saddam get his Anthrax and Hawk fighter jets from? China?...." Saddam never had Hawk jets. The majority of his chemical weapons material came from Germany, and the majority of his rocket technology came from China via Pakistan and North Korea.

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BOFH: The Boss, the floppy and the work 'experience'

Matt Bryant
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Happy

Not all interns are bad.

On one occasion (well, one of many), one of our sales-grunts got a little too eager and sold a customer four weeks of consultancy for a bit of code. The two interns assigned managed the task, including testing, in a week! Our shameless salesgrunt then ordered them to spend the remaining time "fine-tuning" it by adding in unnecessary loops, error checks and subroutines, till it was an unwieldy mess of about twelve times the number of lines as were actually needed.

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Good Guy Comcast: We're not going to sell your data, trust us

Matt Bryant
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Re: Kevin Re: I read this as...

Agreed, IMHO the only reason stopping Comcast from selling their customers' browsing data is the incompetence of their IT staff.

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HPE starts 'SimpliVity-fying' products, eyes hyperconverged buyers

Matt Bryant
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Meh

Article a bit short?

Where's the analysis, the discussion about the possible market and what the competition have or are bringing to market?

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Force employees to take DNA tests for bosses? We've got a new law to make that happen, beam House Republicans

Matt Bryant
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FAIL

Re: ST Re: Adrian 4 extreme

"....you also have the choice not to drive a car....." You also have the choice not to work, or not to work for a company that has genetic testing as part of their healthcare requirement.

"....Do we really have to re-litigate this argument about the difference between commodity insurance - i.e. vehicle insurance - and health insurance?....." Yes, because so far you haven't argued anything, just bleated another emotional appeal.

".....This sudden need for coercing employees into handing over their genome is nothing more than excessive greed disguised as an actuarial optimisation exercise....." And you proved that.... Oh - surprise - you didn't prove that at all, just regurgitated that preformed conclusion.

"....These companies are some of the major donors paying for the GOP's re-election campaigns....." IIRC, not only did Shrillary and her party receive far more in donations from US companies and fat cats, her shadowy Clinton Foundation has an even bigger take from foreign "donors".

".....They get a nice fascist law on the books in return..." And their is your sociology-political failing exposed - you can't see past the "Big Bad Capitalists" bullshit.

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Matt Bryant
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Facepalm

Re: Rob D. Re: Adrian 4 extreme

"....Health insurance companies have pretty good statistics regarding the chances of, say, five people in a population of a hundred developing cancer....." Yes, they do. They also have excellent genetic research that allows them to remove the guesswork and provide a far more precise estimation of an individual's risk. Statistically, I can predict a certain number of apples I buy from the supermarket are going to be bruised - examining the apples prior to purchase allows me to exclude the bruised ones if I wish to do so (I may prefer bruised apples). Estimations based on examination of a group are always going to be more exact and preferred than having to take statistical norms.

"....So the cost of providing health care for that population is statistically predictable...." But why should an employer be forced to use inaccurate figures based on general population statistics when they are only concerned with a small subset of the population? For example, if I was an employer hiring recent graduates, it is unlikely to include many people over forty, at which age the statistical occurrence of cancer increases markedly, so why should I have to pay extra to insure my grads as if one-in-two were over forty (median age in the US population is 37.8, IIRC)? It is an unnecessary cost. As an employer it is not my responsibility to cater for the healthcare of the general population (I pay taxes and the company pays corporate taxes to cover welfare anyway), but it is my responsibility to provide the best healthcare deal for my employees and my company, especially if those savings can be applied to other investments such as employing more people. I know the majority of posters here desperately want to baaaaaaaaahlieve that the savings would go into fat cat bonuses but that's not always the case.

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Matt Bryant
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Facepalm

Re: Unicornpiss Re: @GATTACA

".....And if employers are prohibited against discriminating based on the results (hopefully), then why collect it at all?" Ah, yet again it seems the average El Reg poster falls for the emotional, "Big Bad Business" response, probably due to a failure to understand how risk assessment and the cost of covering risk impacts businesses. In the US, when a company takes on an employee and gives them healthcare insurance, they buy that insurance from another company. The cost of that insurance purchase is based on several factors, the most important being the relative risk of the insured party. How much medical info they have on the insured party allows them to make an accurate risk assessment, otherwise they have to assume a worst case and the insurance cost is higher. The higher the overall insurance cost for all employees, the less people the company can afford to hire.

Think of it as if you owned a nice, new, reliable, safe and secure family car, but when you went to insure it the car insurance company said it had to be insured as if it were a classic Ferrari because the law said they were not allowed to ask you about your car, and there is a statistical likelihood that it could be a classic Ferrari. Sure, it's great news if you do own a Ferrari as the rest of us are subsidising you, but not so great for the vast majority of us. Suddenly, the cost of car insurance becomes a dominant factor it how many cars you can afford to buy, or whether you can even afford to buy one at all.

And before the SJWs start the predictable whining about "discrimination against disabled people", history shows companies have been willing to take on that added risk and cost when those disabled people have the required skills. But having to ensure all employees as if they might have the same genetic predisposition to certain diseases as a minority of employees is actually discrimination against the majority. The SJWs can downvote as they please, it probably satisfies their desire for emotion over reason, but it doesn't change the facts.

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Official: America auto-scanned visitors' social media profiles. Also: It didn't work properly

Matt Bryant
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Happy

Ah, the presumptions!

I always get a laugh out of how some of the paranoid posters here seem to assume the NSA, FBI and other Yank TLAs are populated by uniform, evil fascists, who just also happen to be top-line programmers! Don't you ever stop to think that it's kinda hard to be one and the other at the same time? Here's a clue for you lot - the majority of the people building these systems are geeks just like you, only a lot less paranoid. They are capable of independent thought and conscience, as shown by the extreme examples of Snowden and whomever leaked the CIA's malware goodies to Wikileaks.

Unwrap the tinfoil and take a deep breath.

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WikiLeaks promises to supply CIA's hacking tool code to vendors

Matt Bryant
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FAIL

Re: AC Re: Palpy @palpy: corraboration from a legit news source --

"....There was, as the Republicans were desperate to find something to stop Hillary from winning....." Firstly, the Republicans didn't need to, as Shrillary shot herself in both feet with wonderfully stupid comments like "We are going to put a lot of coal miners and coal companies out of business" - those miners and their families didn't buy her hogwash about replacing their lost jobs with ones in mythical "clean energy" industries. Sure, such crap went down well in hippyville California, but just sounded like more East Coast elitism and waffle to ordinary workers. Secondly, the so-called investigation was run under Obambi's pet, Loretta Lynch, a Democrat appointee. We'll probably never know what she and Bill Clinton had a cosy chat about at their secret airport meeting, but it was no surprise the Obama administration found nothing wrong with the Clinton Foundation, or Clinton's lying about secret material on her email server.

".....check out how much donor money Trump was pocketing during his election campaign....." LOL, let me know when that imaginary figure matches the hundreds of millions from "donations" to the Clinton Foundation from foreigners trying to curry favour with Clinton whilst she was Sec of State.

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Matt Bryant
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Facepalm

Re: Palpy Re: @palpy: corraboration from a legit news source --

".....The Justice Department can request a FISA warrant....." Strangely, when Obambi and chums were in the Whitehouse, and Obambi's pet, Lynch, was at the DoJ, there doesn't appear to have been the same eagerness to investigate the Clinton Foundation and their ties to foreign governments, oligarchs and the like.....

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Spy satellite scientist sent down for a year for stowing secrets at home

Matt Bryant
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Screams deal.

A year and a day? I'm guessing his lawyer made a deal and supplied info on the recipients (likely the Chinese) of the stolen data.

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Volkswagen pleads guilty to three Dieselgate criminal charges

Matt Bryant
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Go

Popcorn time!

Well, after that admission, and seeing as VW sell their vehicles with the cheat technology in all states in the US, this seems to open them up to the biggest class action lawsuit ever! 350 million US citizens (plus legal residents) can sue VW for increasing the risk of them developing lung cancer due to the emissions of those vehicles. The VW management knowingly let the emissions breach the limits whilst also knowing the possible effects on health, therefore it seems a pretty open-and-shut case. I hope they all get individually sued AND given hard jail time, it might make other manufacturers think twice about cheating environmental limits again.

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Germany to roll out €100bn gigabit internet network

Matt Bryant
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Happy

Re: Pen-y-gors Re: Government Investment

They best get it in the budget before Brexit leaves German taxpayers paying even more for the next Greek bailout.

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