* Posts by heyrick

3470 posts • joined 20 Dec 2009

YouTube fight gets dirty: Kids urged to pester parents over Article 13

heyrick
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Re: "Intellectual property is a "right" only insofar as the law says it is"

"If you rely on the generosity of the masses to fund art voluntarily, which a giant mega-corporation are already profiting from, I don't get the feeling many people would want to pay for it."

I think the difficulty here must surely be "define art". There are as many genres of music on YouTube as there are paintings and artistic movements; yet the two big stars as far as I can see is a young kid that gets paid silly money to "review toys" and some weird offensive gamer with a nonsense name.

As for worthy art on YouTube, well, start here and then realise how little of things like that exist on YouTube...and in real life too...

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heyrick
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Re: Isn't it bad?

"this is about money, money and more money"

As is the idea that you can't rip a CD you bought, you should buy a download to put on a phone or other digital media player.

As is likely everything a politician votes in favour of (thanks to "lobbying").

As is....... You see where this is going, right?

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heyrick
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Re: Isn't it bad?

"You've assumed there's no technical solution when there is"

There very definitely is, but it's availability seems to be for a select few.

A few years ago I made a video review of OSMC on a Pi. I played a cat video recorded on my phone, and to demonstrate streaming I had a still frame of a scene from the trailer (on YouTube) of Kick Ass 2. This was not video, or sound, it was a single frame. Viewed through an LCD monitor, recorded with a phone.

It got rejected on upload due to "that" copyrighted material.

So, they can scan pretty damn effectively when they want to...

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Marriott's Starwood hotels mega-hack: Half a BILLION guests' deets exposed over 4 years

heyrick
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Re: Card numbers

Reply to my reply to add that I wanted to geoblock my card to only work on this continent. The website says to go to the branch. The staff at the branch had ZERO idea, and suggested something entirely different. Duh.

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heyrick
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Re: Card numbers

Probably too much bother to implement widely. Some banks offer it, most don't seem to...

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Blighty: We spent £1bn on Galileo and all we got was this lousy T-shirt

heyrick
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Make England Great Again!

And Wales? And Scotland? And Northern Ireland? Two of which, I should add, democratically voted to stay IN the EU.

Britain is more than just England, FFS.

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heyrick
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Re: Well, who'd have thought it?

"If you love the EU so much bugger off and live there .."

I have, and people like you are fucking it up.

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Washington Post offers invalid cookie consent under EU rules – ICO

heyrick
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Another American country that doesn't give a damn...

https://m.mcdonalds.fr/cookies

You'll need to understand French to read it, but essentially "visiting our site sets cookies and third party stuff will do likewise". I would imagine the UK version would be similar.

Firefox tells me it blocked AB Tasty, Commander (something), Doubleclick (twice), Google Analytics, and Weborama.

Informed consent my ass...

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Japanese cyber security minister 'doesn't know what a USB stick is'

heyrick
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You missed a great soundbite at the end...

The Guardian article ends with a very good demonstration of this guy's competence:

When Renho asked him how much funding the central government would contribute to the 2020 Olympics and Paralympics, he responded: “1,500 yen”, which works out at just over $13, some way below the actual sum of 150 billion yen.

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Has science gone too far? Now boffins dream of shining gigantic laser pointer into space to get aliens' attention

heyrick
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Re: "The first contact ... could be confirmed over several years"

"We'd be able to SEE if Trappist is was inhabited."

There, fixed it.

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heyrick
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Re: This seems quite irresponsible

"Science can provide a lot of benefits but there appears to be no ethical or moral view on some of the work."

Genetic modification of human embryos comes to mind here...

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heyrick
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Giant laser attached to a telescope blasting into space...

Am I the only person on earth that has watched a movie called "Howard The Duck"? It starts off as exactly this...

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Cathay Pacific hack: Personal data of up to 9.4 million airline passengers laid bare

heyrick
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Why is all this data being retained?

Once the flight has landed, they need only remember your name, nationality, and year of birth in case some agency or other wants to know if "person" was on the flight. Everything else should be discarded - particularly if it is sensitive information such as government issued identity numbers and other unchangeable metrics like date of birth...

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Have you ever, ever felt like this? Have strange things happened? Is high-speed data going round the twist?

heyrick
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Re: Is it someones job at El Reg just to work on punny headlines?

As a guilty pleasure, I got the whole lot on DVD. I guess I know what I'll be watching tonight...

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SQLite creator crucified after code of conduct warns devs to love God, and not kill, commit adultery, steal, curse...

heyrick
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Never mind all this God stuff

I object to the "Be not drowsy".

What exactly are you supposed to be after pulling an all nighter because a project "nearing completion" is going to be demonstrated to clients tomorrow and the twatty management bod only bothers to mention this in passing as he's putting on his coat at the end of the day.

Other words come to mind - livid and homicidal for instance - but I'd settle for status equals drowsy and a gallon of tea and a pack of Garibaldi...

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Roughly 30 years after its birth at UK's Acorn Computers, RISC OS 5 is going open source

heyrick
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the best-ever source-code editor StrongEd

You know Zap's better, right? :-)

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So, about that Google tax on Android makers in the EU – report pegs it at up to $40 per phone

heyrick
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Re: Fail to be outraged

"Things that still need looking at by regulators"

The idea of installing an update with a single "Accept" option for a huge 40-screenful licence. And no "I disagree" option without rendering your device useless (hello Apple, I'm looking at you).

The idea of requiring you to accept data slurp in order to use built in functionality of your device. I understand WiFi mobile calling needs GPS to have a location in case you call the emergency services. What I don't understand is why this location is being sent to Google (as the pop up notification says).

There should be "no, I don't agree" options that don't render primary functionality useless.

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Samsung’s flexible phone: Expect an expensive, half-bendy clamshell

heyrick
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Re: Can't imagine this will last long

"Couldn't you say the same thing about laptop designs"

No, because in the laptops I've poked around inside, it's a fairly thick bundle of regular wires with plastic wrapping holding them together - a bundle only marginally thinner than an average modern phone...

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heyrick
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Can't imagine this will last long

Folding parts wear. It's basic mechanics. Folding ribbons in a restricted space (Bluetooth headphones) last literally months before failure (about on par with wired headphone jacks then), and even things designed for movement (printer heads, scanner platens, Psion 3a) eventually wear out. And how many conductors are we talking? Four four headphones, maybe a dozen or two for scanners and printers? It's a long way from a bendy screen.

Just imagine how many times a day a person will fold and unfold their phone. Multiply by days. I'm sure it would give the user bragging rights for cutting edge technologies, but let's be honest here, I think you'd be lucky to have any still working by the end of the two year guarantee period.

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Scanning an Exchange server for a virus that spreads via email? What could go wrong?

heyrick
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Re: Still baffled

Read the licence blurb?

Eight years ago a company demonstrated how many people bother reading all that rubbish: https://www.geek.com/games/gamestation-eula-collects-7500-souls-from-unsuspecting-customers-1194091/

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heyrick
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Re: Still baffled

"what MS subsequently did would leave their users wide open to attack"

You mean like how the created user profile for users on a home installation of XP had admin rights by default, and how the restricted user profile was so restricted it was near useless for many (you couldn't even change the time FFS). There was, I believe, a tool to tweak what rights users had, in the enterprise version...

It was pretty much a wide open door back then, just marginally less open than Win32 machines.

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heyrick
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Re: There is a little bit of me

especially if the default actions is "delete"

He must have been really new to virus scanning. People with experience know that there are such things as false positives which are more often than not important documents and critical Windows DLLs... as such the only sensible action is to quarantine suspect files to ensure you aren't about to nuke something important, and if it needs to go (of it's a real virus and not a "this code looks odd" heuristic), you know what to replace from the installation media before the machine gets itself into a bluescreen-at-boot state.

Never ever give an antivirus program the ability to automatically delete stuff...

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Does Google make hardware just so nobody buys it?

heyrick
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One should check links on a computer not logged into anything

Link for "Veblen good". Some Oxford University thing.

You do not currently have access to this article.

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The Obama-era cyber détente with China was nice, wasn't it? Yeah well it's obviously over now

heyrick
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"Primarily they're focused on stealing intellectual property... in order to counteract in part the trade tariffs we're putting into place on them."

That's an interesting comment to make given that the West has been busy handing over IP for years since it's cheaper to get stuff made there (and pretend to care about the workers).

Maybe the rise isn't to do with IP but simply because China doesn't consider America and friends to be their friends any more.

As for server logs - undesirable attempts from China are pretty regular. Always have been. Now would somebody care to explain the rise in the same sort of portscan nonsense from Israel? Are we expected to be too stupid to realise both sides are at it?

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Payment-card-skimming Magecart strikes again: Zero out of five for infecting e-retail sites

heyrick
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Shopper approved?

"a small portion of our customers that use the Shopper Approved seal on their website"

What this says to me, more than anything, is to avoid any sites with a "shopper approved" seal. It's one thing auditing an online shopping process and saying "we approve", it's an entirely different thing doing so and in the process requiring that shop to run their scripts that are not only unnecessary but exist purely for siphoning off data - maybe the original aim was to collect usage stats and such, but clearly Crims have shown exactly what can be done with a little bit of extra code.

Shopper Approved and any site using it now go on the mental blacklist... (this shopper does not approve)

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Oracle? On my server? I must have been hacked! *Penny drops* Oh sh-

heyrick
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Re: 1200 baud down, 75 baud up

"Morse code is mostly 2's and 5's - the whitespace is as important as the tones, and comes in two lengths too, giving four symbols overall."

Ah, so now I know where they got the idea for the interleaved two of five barcode!

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heyrick
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Re: 1200 baud down, 75 baud up

"You had zeros? We had to use the letter "O".

You had the letter "O"? We had to use brackets "()".

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heyrick
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Re: 128K of ISDN

1200/75? Luxury.

My first modem, I don't know what the rated speed was (somewhere between 300 and 2400), but with an acoustic coupler to the shitty carbon granule handsets and the equally shitty phone lines full of crackle and pop, and predating most error correction niceties, it was usual to see Xmodem continually resending the same block. Think a gigabyte transferred in order to receive a 20K file. Maybe not but that's what it felt like. Oh and no auto resume so if the transfer failed, you began right back at the beginning.

It was pretty normal to pick up the handset and beat the crap out of the desk with it prior to using it. Apparently shaking up the granules inside improved their shitty frequency response so you stood a slim chance that the modem might deign your connection worthy.

Now I live at the end of an insanely long bit of twisted pair and can squeeze ~4 megabit down it in the middle of a hurricaneMichael Fish says we don't get hurricanes but when a neighbour's roof blows off it's a bloody hurricane... At any rate, you haven't done comms until you've done an acoustic modem.

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MIMEsweeper maker loses UK High Court patent fight over 15-year-old bulletin board post

heyrick
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Re: Utter shite

"Careful with admissions like that... you might get sued."

I wrote something similar (unpack the bits of an email, remove unwanted content, rebuild the email) back in the late '90s in BASIC! These were the days when it was common to see stuff like hotchick.jpg.exe (which would usefully appear on Windows as hotchick.jpg if the user had for extensions set to be hidden). Simplest approach was to simply whitelist accepted filetypes and throw away everything else.

Either the legal argument was spectacularly badly made, or this is a judge that would struggle with anything more complicated than a light switch...

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Robot Operating System gets the Microsoft treatment

heyrick
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Re: Doomed

"We are so doomed..."

Not at all. Just do something unexpected like run towards the robot singing The Chicken Song, and it will turn blue and stop responding.

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Facebook: Up to 90 million addicts' accounts slurped by hackers, no thanks to crappy code

heyrick
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Re: GDPR violation?

"If only there were some sort of regulation of these rapacious corporations here in America!"

Corporations manipulatelobby democracypoliticians to ensure that such a thing won't happen.

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heyrick
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Re: They've had so many cockups, this is not news.

"the quicker the site is shut down the better off humanity will be"

While morally I agree with you, if Facebook and its ilk get shut down, that means certain people at work will need to start working. Those of us that do actual work tolerate these immovable obstacles staring at social media because then they leave us the hell alone...

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Sneaky phone apps just about obey the law, still have no trouble guzzling your data, says Which?

heyrick
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Don't expect anything useful to happen

Great stinking advert pusher creates a mobile ecosystem in which it's practically impossible to opt out of all of this rubbish.

Is anybody surprised?

Do you remember the good old days when Google used to give its search results a "how long this took" with a stripped down front page just so it could be notably faster than AltaVista. Look how much dangling dollar signs changed all of that.

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Linux kernel's 'seat warmer' drops 4.19-rc5 with – wow – little drama

heyrick
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"The threatened "killswitch revolt", in which programmers withdraw their licence for the kernel to use their code"

Given that it's GPL if it's in the kernel, they could surely only withdraw licence for future versions, rather than retrospectively removing the right to use current versions?

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Remember when Apple's FaceTime stopped working years ago? Yeah, that was deliberate

heyrick
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Re: Give and Take

"My Samsung Galaxy S5 [...] never so much as received a single update."

Hmm, clearly there are still differences in support, maybe as a carrier or by country? I thought the updates these days came directly from Samsung?

My S5 Mini received a small update when I got it, shortly after a full OS update to bring it to Android 6. Then it had two more security updates.

This is about the same story as my S7 which I think started with Android 6, updated to 7, and is now on 8 (I believe the last major update this phone will get) with various patches and fixes along the way; though I've noticed that my older phones (the ones still stuck on Android 2.something) seem to require full OS reflash to update, while the newer phones can perform incremental patches, plus a number of the usual apps can be updated via "an app store".

This last point is perhaps the biggest change from my experience with Apple. Safari cannot be updated, email cannot be updated, etc. But on my S7, Samsung might have stuck their branding all over the bundled apps, but there are updates available in the Galaxy Store for a number of them. Right now the email client, file explorer, and stock browser have updates pending. The browser I'll update soon (I use Firefox so it's not important) and the others... I'll update if I notice any bugs. Given updates often take away as many features as they add, I'm not of the mindset of updating just because there's an update. And certainly not without making a copy of the previous app's APK so I can rollback if necessary.

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heyrick
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Re: Give and Take

"Additionally, Android phones receive support for up to 3 years. NOT one or two updates as you claim."

Unless something has changed remarkably in the last year or so, the level of support offered clearly depends upon the phone type (cheap vs flagship) and the phone manufacturer. I've been an Android user for a long time, and my Samsung phones are the only ones I've ever had that have received any updates at all.

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Spent your week box-ticking? It can't be as bad as the folk at this firm

heyrick
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Re: re:We woo on the contract pitch and rape on the service changes

Early '90s. A smallish company held their business database on a DOS program called, I think, "SNIP". They wanted to go to a Windows based system, and to transfer their data to a more modern package - namely Access.

The old guy who wrote SNIP, in something like VisualBasic 1, wanted £££ for an add-on to export the data into a format that might work with other stuff.

Ender me and my Acorn A5000. A bit of soldering bodged together and the A5000 hooked to the PC's parallel port. It pretended to be a printer. I received the data (telling SNIP to print it's database) and upon a Form Feed, I would parse the data (in BASIC) and spit out a CSV file to the serial port where it was fed into another PC in realtime...

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Revealed: The billionaire baron who’ll ride Elon’s thrusting erection to the Moon and back

heyrick
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SpaceX is known for blowing past its deadlines

They're also known for crowd pleasing explosions.

Come on, admit it, the reason you watch SpaceX broadcasts is for the part where it blows up, right?

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Check out this link! It's not like it'll crash your iPhone or anything (Hint: Of course it will)

heyrick
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Re: Here's an evil thought...

Didn't people do that with BBC Micros back in the eighties?

10 *FX something to disable Escape

20 PRINT "rude message here"

30 GOTO 20

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heyrick
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Re: And here's the reason it's not good there are are so few browser engines

"So you'd rather there were a dozen browser engines"

I'd rather there was more than ONE, because in my time using an older iOS release, I found Safari to be quite crashy. No worries, there's always Dolphin. Oh wait, it crashes in exactly the same way on the same things.

At least on Android, stuff that messed up the stock browser (including that hideous bodging of text sizes) could be dealt with by installing Firefox...

It's called choice. Too much choice may not be good, but no choice at all is worse.

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Sysadmin misses out on paycheck after student test runs amok

heyrick
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Some ensemble or supporting characters sometimes just stand out

Dominic Santini

Arya Stark

Hit Girl

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Euro bureaucrats tie up .eu in red tape to stop Brexit Brits snatching back their web domains

heyrick
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"That's why I'm glad I voted for Brexit"

I'm seeing an increasing number of comments with the subject text within, and I can't help but wonder - how many are actually coming from UK IP addresses?

Yes, the .eu rules are a bit petty, but are not so different to what the UK requires with a .uk or France wants with a .fr. Some sort of connection to justify the use of the domain suffix.

So, if that's your good example of why you decided to ditch the entire EU...

...are Brits really that stupid, or are those messages coming from...elsewhere?

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UK.gov finally adds Galileo and Copernicus to the Brexit divorce bill

heyrick
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EU-based businesses, of course, can carry on snuffling around the trough of Euros

And so could the UK industry if the government wasn't so hell bent on screwing up the country...

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A boss pinching pennies may have cost his firm many, many pounds

heyrick
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Re: Imagine...

"Imagine all that on 10Mb/s HUBS"

HUBS? You're living in luxury there.

Mid '90s. College network. Everything, and I mean everything, wired in daisy-chain 10-base-2. Morning startups would often kill the network. The machines booted entirely off the network. Everything starting up Windows 3.11. They weren't smart enough to stagger switch-ons. And this isn't counting nefarious teenagers breaking the chain by unplugging one of the BNC connectors...

Of course, this is discussing the times the network actually worked and the server didn't fall over. Which it did, about a third of the time.

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Canny Brits are nuking the phone bundle

heyrick
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Re: I wonder...

Downvoted because my S7 shipped with Android 6. It's now running 7, and there's a message that's been pestering me for a few weeks now that there's a new (8?) update available should I free up a gig and a half of storage. I've been avoiding the update as I'm dreading Android 8 having even more stupid white and stupid flat UI design than 7 introduced.

Of course, of all my various Android phones, Samsung is actually the only manufacturer that bothered to offer any updates at all, but half of this is probably the crappy design of earlier versions of Android that had everybody needing to get involved. Your cheap phone may have had three updates, but if your carrier couldn't be bothered...

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heyrick
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Re: France only

"Why are the UK results not included in the chart ?"

Brexit?

(sorry, couldn't resist ☺️)

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heyrick
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Re: Customers are (slightly) more savvy and the technology isn't moving as quickly

"It's also got to a point where it's more than good enough for the average users needs:"

This.

My contact renewal is next February and, frankly, I have no bloody idea. My current phone has a quad HD resolution in 5 inches (it's a pleasing size), a load of storage, a many megapixel camera (I forget how many) that takes fantastic night photos. The back camera can record UHD, the front can record QHD, and the camera app can record both at the same time (one being an insert into the frame of the other). It's a quad core processor with four extra baby cores for when 64 bit ARM times four just ain't good enough. It has a headphone socket. ;-)

Point is, this device does pretty much everything I want. In the past I saw a need to upgrade. Something quicker, something better. Something that can play FullHD HEVC without having a nervous breakdown. There was a reason. There was always a reason.

There isn't now.

Um.

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heyrick
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Re: Punished if you buy phone from elsewhere

"if I was out of my unlimited miunutes"

Am I the only one having difficulty parsing this? How can you be out of "unlimited minutes"? If they can run out, they're not unlimited.

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heyrick
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Re: I never quite understood why one would get a bundle

As a person on a contract... It was important to me to have my landline and internet provided by the same company that owns the phone lines. I've personally seen months of delays as "cheap provider" and telco argue over whose responsibility it is to deal with problems. Since I live in the back of beyond, I need to be able to depend upon sanity, not madness. That puts the overall price up, but a few years back when a hurricane (sorry Mr Fish, I mean storm) knocked out the line with tree shaped objects, it was fixed and working again in a few days. No argument, just in the queue.

Now the bundle is for landline, internet, and a mobile. It comes in two options. The one with a phone, which costs ~€15 more than the one without. The with-phone contact allowed me to get a Samsung S7 for €100 and upon proof of activation, Samsung refunded me €100. In other words, for €15/month over 24 months, I get a shiny new phone way out of my normal budget. It's a great phone. My new best friend (but that's 'cos I'm sad and boring but anyway...).

I suppose it might make financial sense if you have the money to spend on a phone and only need a cheap SIM for it. Not all of us have the option. That's why I'd never, ever, buy an Apple phone. No hate for the fruit, I just cannot justify a lump sum of how much?! for...a phone. There are so many things of much greater importance that would come first if I had that kind of money lying around.

It must be a strange country you live in where they still bother to SIMlock the things. My phone was mine the moment I signed the contract. I can break the contract at any time but I would need to pay a penalty. So telco doesn't lose. I could quite easily drop in a different SIM and use it. Telco won't care, all national calls are free with my contact (to and from mobile) so by using another SIM it's probably me losing out. When roaming, within Europe it's 3GB of data and 3h of calls per year as standard. From then on, I think it goes to normal call charge as roaming costs aren't a "thing" any more. Oh, and the landline - for what it's worth - offers free calls to most countries that aren't known for terrorist activities. I could phone you, a friend in Scotland, Langley VA, and Japan. The call charges? Zero. Nothing. It's been actual years since I've paid anything to the telco over the usual monthly cost.

You're right that the phone is "yours" and breakages aren't covered. That's why I took out a small additional insurance plan. A few extra euros a month, I'm covered for two "issues" a year. Given the price of a new S7 (less now then it was then, what with newer models existing), it made sense. It would take about three seconds for it to slip out of my hand in the locker room and tumble to its untimely "krshhhh" on the concrete floor. Thankfully this hasn't happened, but if it did...

All of this adds up to an amount that can be justified on a monthly basis. Sure it's higher than other options, but it's the one that offers the most peace of mind for the lowest outlay at any given time. Plus a new phone every two years, and usually somebody (this time Samsung, last time telco) refunds all or most of any given initial purchase fee. It's crazy, they ought to just sell it for less, but hey, that's how these things work...

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People's confidence in orgs holding personal data is... on the rise?

heyrick
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29% don't know the GDPR and 16% appear to not even know it exists... That's over a third (getting close to a half).

Surely this demonstrates that the usually inept ICO is actually far more useless then we thought?

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