* Posts by Lars

2980 posts • joined 21 May 2007

SCISYS sidesteps Brexit: Proposes Irish listing to keep EU space work rolling in

Lars
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Re: Well that's weird....

Hello Justthefacts, weird you didn't do some more "fact cheking". And who is this "the EU claims" chap, any link to him you could provide.

There is more or less what you need on the Wiki: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/European_Space_Agency

Including this.

"EU and the European Space Agency

The political perspective of the European Union (EU) was to make ESA an agency of the EU by 2014,[69] although this date was not met. The EU is already the largest single donor to ESA's budget and non-ESA EU states are observers at ESA".

On Canada.

Since 1 January 1979, Canada has had the special status of a Cooperating State within ESA. By virtue of this accord, the Canadian Space Agency takes part in ESA's deliberative bodies and decision-making and also in ESA's programmes and activities. Canadian firms can bid for and receive contracts to work on programmes. The accord has a provision ensuring a fair industrial return to Canada.[37] The most recent Cooperation Agreement was signed on 2010-12-15 with a term extending to 2020.[38][39] For 2014, Canada's annual assessed contribution to the ESA general budget was €6,059,449 (CAD$8,559,050).[40] For 2017, Canada has increased its annual contribution to €21,600,000 (CAD$30,000,000).".

I would assume the UK will eventually apply for something similar.

And there is of course https://www.esa.int/ESA

I would suggest you read before you write, I have found it very useful to do it, and at times I have not, which has annoyed me a lot.

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Shortages, price rises, recession: Tech industry preps for hard Brexit

Lars
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Some Brexit fun

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nh0ac5HUpDU

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iRAU6hODSck

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aWqiGQyAj1I

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UK space comes to an 'understanding' with Australia as Brexit looms

Lars
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Re: RE: Mooseman

"The NI doesnt want a border, the UK doesnt want a border, ROI dont want a border.... who's left?".

Only the reality.

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Re: RE: Mooseman

@Wellboot

Try "brexit truth" instead then, it's as interesting.

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Lars
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Re: They should talk to Canada and India next

Canada already takes part in ESA.

"Canada

Since 1 January 1979, Canada has had the special status of a Cooperating State within ESA. By virtue of this accord, the Canadian Space Agency takes part in ESA's deliberative bodies and decision-making and also in ESA's programmes and activities. Canadian firms can bid for and receive contracts to work on programmes. The accord has a provision ensuring a fair industrial return to Canada.[37] The most recent Cooperation Agreement was signed on 2010-12-15 with a term extending to 2020.[38][39] For 2014, Canada's annual assessed contribution to the ESA general budget was €6,059,449 (CAD$8,559,050).[40] For 2017, Canada has increased its annual contribution to €21,600,000 (CAD$30,000,000)".

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/European_Space_Agency#Canada

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Lars
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Re: RE: Mooseman

Britain is world leading in overseas territories.

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Lars
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Re: RE: Mooseman

"The UK can unilaterally decide not to enforce a border or implement our side as we wish".

Only if you are prepared to break that international agreement you have signed.

I would suggest you would enter "brexit lies" into your browser and remember how it all started.

Some suggestions:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EBxWiRz6A9E

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LTt8XafbA60

.......

Enjoy.

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Lars
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Re: Tigra 07

"Plus, the majority of what we get back is agricultural subsidies and regional aid".

That is a silly comment, the pork mentioned earlier is all about "that only EU members are allowed big lumps of Galileo pork", pork for British industry.

A lot of the money put into Galileo has ended up in Britain.

The pork comes from being a EU member. Ten other net contributing countries seem to understand it.

How so many Brits fell for the snake oil salesmen is still beyond me, (but then I look at your cabinet, and I listen to the Eton boys).

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UK should set its own tax on tech giants if international deal isn't reached – Chancellor

Lars
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Re: A thought experiment

"For everything. there's a Python Sketch".

A slight but very sad correction, it's not "there is" but "there was". And how you would need them now.

Still they were able to foresee both the frogs, moggs and borises of today. What they could have made out of them. Some have apparently taken some time off and one has escaped across the pond, well fed and slightly embarrassed about the old country, sad.

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Re: A thought experiment

@ djstardust

I very much agree, but I have to add that I use a Nokia N90 and I have a working Communicator too.

Did Hammond have any views about the tax heavens.

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Volkswagen links arms with Microsoft for data-slurping cloud on Azure

Lars
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Re: Peace and quiet

"How will they fix the issue of there being say 4 people".

Not a family guy are you.

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Trump's axing of cyber czar role has left gaping holes in US defence

Lars
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The sad thing is

That it's difficult to know if it's better there is no new cybersecurity czar than one elected by Trump.

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While the UN laughed at Trump, hackers chortled at the UN's lousy web application security

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@Teiwaz

Easy there Brit, I have a sad feeling you have, with your own two party system, looking at the direction of travel*, been able to mess up Britain more than Trump has in the USA.

What a modest guy he has become, did not reveal Mexico will pay for the wall, or has he suddenly become generous too.

To be a bit serious, he did not address the UN, but his own home front. He probably expected the audience to be quiet or applaud out of politeness, (like on Question Time).

Regarding Americans, you cannot laugh him out, you have to vote him out. or he will amuse you for about six more years, remember he is also the fittest President in American history. and he is the biggest up there and down there (she is fake news).

* does that expression make people sound very educated.

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Amid Trump-China tariff tiff, Cisco kit prices to resellers soar up to 25%

Lars
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"China's leader just changed the rules to stay on idefinitely...".

That impressed Trump a lot. I wonder why...

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Brexit campaigner AggregateIQ challenges UK's first GDPR notice

Lars
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Re: So this is punishment for supporting Brexit

@Walter Bishop

To prevent paranoia I suggest you understand the crime was the same even if it was to support remain and Clinton.

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Lars
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Re: "how are the ICO going to enforce the GDPR against a Canadian company?"

"they haven't a hope in hell."-

The EU did fine Microsoft and there are many similar cases. perhaps those agreements exist.

But as I am not an expert perhaps I have all the right answers.

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Never mind Brexit. UK must fling more £billions at nuke subs, say MPs

Lars
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"A gendarmerie or gendarmery is a military component with jurisdiction in civil law enforcement. In France and some Francophone nations, the gendarmerie is a branch of the armed forces responsible for internal security in parts of the territory (primarily in rural areas and small towns in the case of France) with additional duties as a military police for the armed forces".

Do you claim that the cost of the military police is not included in British defence spending?. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gendarmerie

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Lars
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The GDP for France was $2,836,000,000,00 2017 est. and if the 57,8 is also 2017 then it's 2.0% while the GDP for the UK was $2,914,000,000,000 2017 est. and with the $47.2 the % would be 1.6.

SIPRI has a table regarding the NATO 2% here from 2016.

https://www.sipri.org/sites/default/files/Media-backgrounder-current-military-spending-vs-NATO-2-per-cent.pdf

The World Factbook:

Military expenditures:

France 2.26% of GDP (2016)

The UK 2.2% of GDP (2016)

Go figure, however, more or less all EU countries spend money on the military, and quite a lot together.

A former Polish defence minister, Radoslaw Sikorski has some points about it here.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pI54yarKz_o&t=561s

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Tech to solve post-Brexit customs woes doesn't exist yet, peers say

Lars
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Re: Majority of trade already outside of EU

Not really, it's more like 50/50.

Try this about "The gold export illusion".

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ldEGd0ghNhg

PS. All EU countries trade as much as they can with the rest of the world, as they should.

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Re: "there's a transition period after March"

"- Norway have a special customs relationship with Sweden".

Well, they have a land boarder with Sweden, the customs agreement is with the EU. The boarder is not an open boarder, apart from that, to quote:

"After the 1994 referendum, Norway maintained its membership in the European Economic Area (EEA), an arrangement granting the country access to the internal market of the Union, on the condition that Norway implements the Union's pieces of legislation which are deemed relevant (of which there were approximately seven thousand by 2010)[147] Successive Norwegian governments have, since 1994, requested participation in parts of the EU's co-operation that go beyond the provisions of the EEA agreement. Non-voting participation by Norway has been granted in, for instance, the Union's Common Security and Defence Policy, the Schengen Agreement, and the European Defence Agency, as well as 19 separate programmes.".

And they pay for the privilege.

There is however a very simple, fast and economical solution to the NI boarder problem, to add a new slogan to the silly mix - "stop scratching blood out of your nose".

PS. Surpassing Germany and France, good luck with that, nothing wrong with trying.

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Apple hands €14.3bn in back taxes to reluctant Ireland

Lars
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"Can't be 4.8M in the Republic ..Maybe on the entire island, no?"

No, but 5,011,102 (July 2017 est.) according to:

https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-world-factbook/geos/ei.html

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As the Irish government denied any wrongdoing from the very start I assume they will stick to it and let the case proceed, reluctant or not. Some smiling in the corridors, who knows.

And they like Apple to stay, no doubt.

A nice sum of money but one has to compare it to something to understand it, say to the Budget:

revenues: $85.41 billion (2017).

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The Reg chats with Voyager Imaging Team member Dr Garry E Hunt

Lars
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One Brit and eight Americans

looking at the picture and the names of "The Voyager Imaging Team" and just a while ago at the "The migration advisory committee report" in Britain about education:

"Education

There is no evidence that parents’ choice is reduced by the migrant population.

Children with English as a second language perform better than native English speakers."

In that picture we have Carl Sagan, parents from now Ukraine, no introduction needed and Verner Suomi, parents from Finland, called the father of "satellite meteorology.".

And there is Larry Soderblom a very Scandinavian (Söderblom), no info on his background.

As there obviously are no native Americans, all the remaining guys have a background from probably Europe.

What made America great, at least then, is the influx of people from all around the world and that goes for Britain too. But people tend to forget it.

.

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Lars
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"Perhaps they did have politicians."

I believe we got both politicians and priests from very early on.

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UK.gov isn't ready for no-deal Brexit – and 'secrecy' means businesses won't be either

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@AC

"Despite selective animosities Eire and the UK ought to be on the same side, and operating as coupled economic bloc".

Some "big brother" attitude there, "come save our arse with the boarder".

The Irish know they gain from membership with the EU and they are no longer as dependent on the UK as before. The biggest export country is the USA to day.

Brexit do create problems, all the same, as most of their exports go via the UK, and they might have to think again, supporting local ports perhaps or ship directly to Rotterdam or similar. No Brexit dividend there.

The "persona non gratis in Brussels" is nonsense. it's like claiming the UK is persona non gratis (to use your phrase) in Brussels because of some relation to tax-havens. I believe the UK government was as keen as the rest of the EU to tackle that problem.

Perhaps, indeed there is some truth in claiming the only Brexit dividend, and for the very few architects behind Brexit, has something to do with the tax-havens.,

PS. grata, while gratis fits your comment well.

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Re: Hmm

"Article 50 which is unstoppable".

No it's not, it's quite clear, and has been pointed out that the 27 would accept it. Too much time and money has already been spent around the EU on this idiotic folly. All based on feelings, lies, not facts.

And by the way, no union likes to lose members, some Brits would not like too lose Scotland either, remember the Scottish referendum - "stronger together".

How mean and awful is a yacht club if they ask you to pull your yacht out of the marina and pay your debt in the bar and restaurant before leaving.

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Euro bureaucrats tie up .eu in red tape to stop Brexit Brits snatching back their web domains

Lars
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Re: C'mon Kieren

"both sides come along their lists of what they would like".

No it's not like that, if you negotiate a trade deal with say Brazil you say what you want but you cannot force it. Negotiating with 27 countries who can all stop "your what you want" is even harder and the problem is not the EU but the red lines put up by May. But you are still negotiating so we shall see.

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Re: Official language(s)

The official language of the EU is, as Herman Van Rompuy put it, bad English. And then there are all the translations. English has become the second or third language in Europe, mainly because of the USA. It will not change and is out of British control, of course, Brexit or no Brexit.

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Re: Thank you, Boris …

"Britain and Germany are the only countries that give the money and obey the rules".

Not true at all, eleven countries are net contributors. Ten can count, and know it's worth it. One is perhaps in the process of grasping it too.

Some simple googling could have prevented you from writing rubbish, then again perhaps not.

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Lars
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C'mon Kieren

"Brexit, and the European Commission's aggressive response to it, "

The EU has been straight forward and consistent from the very beginning regarding what is possible and what is not.

The EU will not fall flat on its back confronted with ridiculous and unrealistic demands from a bunch of people who live in cuckoo land and believe in unicorns.

Should the EU some day decide to use Article 50 for the original purpose and kick out a member state that stopped behaving like a democratic country. Then perhaps some people might be able to claim the Commission to be aggressive.

The EU has shown an immense patience with a Government who doesn't know up from down and a bunch of idiots and clowns running around Europe huffing and puffing.

I believe more and more Brits have started to realize the whole idiocy was based on lies and dumb slogans.

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Volkswagen faces fresh Dieselgate lawsuit in Germany – report

Lars
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Re: Fraud or fraud and hypocrisy.

@ Voyna i Mor

While the case is not about insider trading we find this on the Wiki:

"While the United States is generally viewed as making the most serious efforts to enforce its insider trading laws,[4] the broader scope of the European model legislation provides a stricter framework against illegal insider trading.[5][6] In the European Union and the United Kingdom all trading on non-public information is, under the rubric of market abuse, subject at a minimum to civil penalties and to possible criminal penalties as well.".

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Dear America: Want secure elections? Stick to pen and paper for ballots, experts urge

Lars
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Re: PENCIL and paper

"That's why the ballot boxes are sealed-up and effectively guarded by a collection of typically honest Poll Workers.

Once you've cast your ballot, it's extremely safe.".

That is, so far so good, and all depends on the honest Poll Workers.

There are some good vids about how the ballot boxes are treated in Russia with less honest, if perhaps typical, Poll Workers.

If the whole system is corrupt there is no solution anyway, pen or pencil or what ever.

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Re: Still won't fix the US'ans broken "Electorial college" system

To fix that you have to fix the two-party system first, same in the UK, good luck with that.

The funny thing. looking at it from outside, is that we all sneer at the one-party systems, but at the same time both Brits and Americans want that one party of their love the run the country and the government to the end of time. Just look at the mess in both countries.

I would hate that to happen in Finland regardless of party. It's as stupid and non-functional as having only one ISP or brand of cheese. Also elect the President directly by the people.

And yes, pen and pencil, ink. I would suggest that for Estonia too.

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European nations told to sort out 'digital tax' on tech giants by end of year

Lars
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Re: taxation vs economic activity

@ bombastic bob

I think you should have added to your comment that the state/country need tax money to provide affordable education and health care, for roads and bridges and more. Have a listen* to this by John Oliver, as the saying goes socialism is for big business and the rich while capitalism is for the rest of the population.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xcwJt4bcnXs

* slightly reluctantly as I don't much care for his voice, but the team behind him doing the research is good.

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Google is 20, Chrome is 10, and Microsoft would rather ignore the Nokia deal's 5th birthday

Lars
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"Their phones definitely don't smell Nokia, but rather of some China factory product ...".

No it's Foxconn and quite a few phones smell Foxconn.

But about HMD, according to the Wiki:

"HMD Global Oy, branded as HMD, is a Finnish mobile phone company, made up of the mobile phone business that Nokia had sold to Microsoft in 2014, then bought back in 2016. HMD Oy (limited company) began marketing smartphones and feature phones under the Nokia brand on 1 December 2016." ......

"HMD is headquartered in Espoo, Finland,opposite Nokia's head office, and the company is largely run by former Nokia executives.[10] The first CEO was Arto Nummela, a Nokia veteran for 17 years, until July 2017 when President Florian Seiche took over as CEO.[11] Manufacturing is outsourced to Foxconn.[12][13][14] Nokia has no investment in HMD but remains a partner, setting mandatory requirements and providing patents and technologies, in return for royalty payments." ......

Headquarters

HMD are based at the Nokia Campus in Karaportti in Espoo, Finland, opposite Nokia Corporation's headquarters. HMD's other main offices are located in London, England; Noida, India and Dubai, UAE."

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HMD_Global

As for who owns the company try this link (in Finnish) :

https://www.tekniikkatalous.fi/talous_uutiset/kuka-omistaa-nokia-puhelimia-myyvan-hmd-globalin-nyt-se-tiedetaan-kun-talouselama-sai-yhtion-omistajaluettelon-6728053

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UK-based Veritas appliance support is being killed off

Lars
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Re: O.M.G

"having to speak the a Mumbai".

?.

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Lyon for speed, San Francisco for money, Amsterdam for fun: the best cities to be a techie

Lars
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Re: Any Reg readers living in Amsterdam right now?

"However, most Dutch people learn a bit of English in school. (this should change after Brexit)".

There is no such problem. Firstly Britain lost control of the language a long time. basically to the USA, nothing wrong or reparable with that. Secondly there is no "hate" towards Britain or the language because of Brexit (or not). Just surprise and disgust at the low quality in the rhetoric around that topic, and the low quality of the people, high up, driving it.

Personally I am not that surprised that people don't know much about the EU and are easily fooled. but what surprises me much more is how little Brits know about Britain and what makes it "tick".

Never have so many known so little about their own country.

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Lars
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Re: in Amsterdam no one needs a car.

"not all Dutchmen look exactly like the guy in the picture".

Well, not all Brits look (or speak) like Boris and JRM either.

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UK getting ready to go it alone on Galileo

Lars
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Re: All a bit unnecessary?

"These are our negotiations". Well you intend to leave the EU, the EU is not kicking you out. And now you are negotiation on you future relations with the EU. How hard is it to understand that the EU will decide what is possible and what is not for the EU.

Britain seemed to be proud of being able to opt out of Galileo to later opt in (proudly!), and now some Brits seem to be upset because they cannot opt in to Galileo just like that when first opting out of the EU.

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Re: Gaileo was willy waving

@ I ain't Spartacus

You might have missed that not so long ago France and Germany agreed to build the next gen fighter together. Too lazy to provide a link or two.

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Re: Is their hardware history better or worse than their software history?

"transistor etc etc".

Julius Edgar Lilienfeld* patented a field-effect transistor in 1926[1] but it was not possible to actually construct a working device at that time. The first practically implemented device was a point-contact transistor invented in 1947 by American physicists John Bardeen, Walter Brattain, and William Shockley....

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Transistor

*a Jewish Austro-Hungarian-born German-American physicist and electronic engineer, credited with the first patents on the field-effect transistor (FET) (1925) and electrolytic capacitor (1931). Because of his failure to publish articles in learned journals and because high-purity semiconductor materials were not available yet, his FET patent never achieved fame, causing confusion for later inventors.

Also read about the Jump Jet.

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Voting machine maker vows to step up security, Fortnite bribes players to do 2FA – and more

Lars
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So easy

Just return to paper and pencil (ink) and try to avoid internet connected paper and pencil. opinion by a guy who spent 35 as a programmer and who will never trust anything else, sad as it is. And please Americans, no punch cards either.

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You want how much?! Israel opts not to renew its Office 365 vows

Lars
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Re: M'kay....

US taxpayers will pay for it, the dollars will return home but into MS pockets, but that does not change the fact that one shouldn't, as a MS customer. question the amount of money demanded.

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It's a phone with a peel, but you'll have to wait a bit more for retro Nokia

Lars
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What still annoys me

is that phones went from "one hand" devices to "both hand" devices, consequently I would like to operate it with one hand even without looking at it. Still right now I use a 15 year old Nokia but it's a clam cell bastard you open the wrong way every second time and sometimes you end the call by accident. And yes I know there is stuff you can (or could) push into your ear but I don't want any of that either.

(As for internet on a not so smart phone/screen, Opera mini is quite good.)

Well nothing is perfect.

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Nokia scores a $3.5bn deal to inflict 5G on T-Mobile customers

Lars
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Re: New is always good!

"And oh here's your 4GB data cap". The data cap has nothing to do with 4G or 5G.

Good for Nokia no doubt, and it's good there is some competition between not that many providers.

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How much do you think Cisco's paying erstwhile Brit PM David Cameron?

Lars
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Re: JFGI...

"What's he going to tell CIO's?".

Perhaps, never forget the first law of betting - "never bet for more than you can afford to lose".

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British Airways' latest Total Inability To Support Upwardness of Planes* caused by Amadeus system outage

Lars
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Re: Eh? Amadeus Best known for

The Wiki has this on the "Altéa Departure Control, a departure control system software package".

"In 2000, Amadeus was awarded the development of two new operational applications for British Airways and Qantas: the inventory management and the departure control systems.[36] These products were outside of the core expertise domain of Amadeus and were built with the expertise of the airlines. "

Also about Amadeus:

"Amadeus CRS is the largest GDS provider in the worldwide travel and tourism industry, with an estimated market share of 37% in 2009.[29] As of December 2010, over 90,000 travel agencies worldwide use the Amadeus system and 58,000 airline sales offices use it as their internal sales and reservations system. Amadeus gives access to bookable content from 435 airlines (including 60 low cost carriers), 29 car rental companies (representing 36,000 car rental locations), 51 cruise lines and ferry operators, 280 hotel chains and 87,000 hotels, 200 tour operators, 103 rail operators and 116 travel insurance companies."

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amadeus_IT_Group#cite_note-36

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Trump wants to work with Russia on infosec. Security experts: lol no

Lars
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Re: Tee hee. Trump is to Putin as --

@ FrozenShamrock

Perhaps you could elaborate a bit about this "only country":

"The only NATO country to invoke the mutual defense part of the NATO treaty is the US".

Using https://en.wikisource.org/wiki/North_Atlantic_Treaty#Article_5

I get this:

"Article 5

The Parties agree that an armed attack against one or more of them in Europe or North America shall be considered an attack against them all and consequently they agree that, if such an armed attack occurs, each of them, in exercise of the right of individual or collective self-defence recognised by Article 51 of the Charter of the United Nations, will assist the Party or Parties so attacked by taking forthwith, individually and in concert with the other Parties, such action as it deems necessary, including the use of armed force, to restore and maintain the security of the North Atlantic area.

Any such armed attack and all measures taken as a result thereof shall immediately be reported to the Security Council. Such measures shall be terminated when the Security Council has taken the measures necessary to restore and maintain international peace and security. "

I agree very much with "we are now led by a loud-mouthed, crude, semi-literate bully".

As for NATO I don't think they are all that unhappy internally. Trump is a bypassing disturbance they have to cope with for the time being.

The amount of money spent on defence in Europe is actually quite "impressive" but that topic is for somebody else to write about.

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