* Posts by Lars

3159 posts • joined 21 May 2007

Brit competition regulator will soon be able to seize rogue traders' domains – and even Amazon accounts

Lars Silver badge
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Re: Because the US is well known for respecting other countries' courts

.com is not US only, so we do not all know.

ALGOL 60 at 60: The greatest computer language you've never used and grandaddy of the programming family tree

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Pint

Re: It started my career move...

Hello steamnut,

So did I in 1968, what about you. I still have my diploma, happy days indeed.

And the girl, the one with the gorgeous legs I presume.

The end really is nigh – for 32-bit Windows 10 on new PCs

Lars Silver badge
Linux

Re: When will it be the year

"The year when m$ make a version of Office for linux".

Or when MS adopts linux for the kernel on Windows, as they could, rewriting Windows.

It's rather complicated, companies especially those with a modest IT department want a company to rely on.

With linux, who would that company be, IBM or Google or Ubuntu or who, and where is the money, and would companies pay for linux like they pay for Windows today.

Linux is so dominant today that indeed the desktop is the last wall standing, and so what.

Organisations, companies and individuals will have to take their own decisions, there is no big guy cashing in on linux on the desktop, and perhaps it's as good.

The linux on the desktop was after all something invented by some reporter a long time ago.

Lars Silver badge
Linux

Re: Linux

The year of Linux on the desktop is the year you put it on your desktop. For me that year was 1998, in short, every year is the year of Linux on the desktop.

Now there's nothing stopping the PATRIOT Act allowing the FBI to slurp web-browsing histories without a warrant

Lars Silver badge
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Re: Land of the free

Everything will depend on the vaccine(s), on when and how effective it is or they are.

If you're going to spend $3tn, what's another billion? Congress urged to inject taxpayer dollars into open anti-Huawei 5G radio tech

Lars Silver badge
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From buying Nokia and/or Ericsson to Open RAN, are we consumers really in such a hurry for 5G, we will after all pay for all of it.

C'Mon Nokia and Ericsson if you cannot be as cheap you have to be better.

Total Eclipse to depart: Open-source software foundation is hopping the pond to Europe

Lars Silver badge
Happy

Re: Bye bye

Yes indeed.

"advocating economic and social interventions to promote social justice within the framework of a liberal democratic polity and a capitalist-oriented mixed economy"

Some Americans have been fooled to believe the capitalism is missing. This is partly due to the two party system where everything is either or, if capitalism is part of the right then it must be absent in the left.

The English aren't much better babbling about Venezuela during each election like the pink twat in the WH.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ftpc4fwcDfk

Trump’s Best Words

Lars Silver badge
Happy

Re: Bye bye

Luckily more and more Americans have started to understand the difference between social security and socialist security, between a social person and a socialist person and between social behaviour and socialist behaviour.

Lars Silver badge
Happy

Re: A long time coming

All of Europe uses the decimal comma, and lots of other countries too, it's only the British who are the odd exception and the poor Americans who came to adopt it too. It's very much like with the metric system.

English-speaking countries took the comma to separate sequences of three digits.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Decimal_separator

PS. was that really that difficult to grasp.

Virgin Galactic takes another step towards blasting Richard Branson into space

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Re: Priorities?

I might agree with "no State aid for Virgin Atlantic" but travelling across the Atlantic did not end with the Titanic.

It has been 20 years since cybercrims woke up to social engineering with an intriguing little email titled 'ILOVEYOU'

Lars Silver badge
Happy

Or perhaps "The word fake news shows that far too many are still gullible.".

Latvian drone wrests control from human overlords and shuts down entire nation's skies

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Joke

A very light aircraft indeed of 26kg in aviation-standard units or not.

The ultimate 4-wheel-drive: How ESA's keeping XMM-Newton alive after 20 years and beyond

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Happy

Re: Collaboration is the word

"Italy gets most of the research contracts for the simple reason that they put in most of the money.".

It's not that simple.

If we talk about ESA the main contributors are the EU, France and Germany also you don't get any contracts if you have nothing to deliver. On the whole I think there is a tendency to underestimate the quality of Italy and its industry.

Lars Silver badge
Go

Collaboration is the word

With some surfing we find.

"Industrial involvement: The prime contractor was Dornier Satellitensysteme, part of Daimler Chrysler Aerospace (Friedrichshafen, Germany). They led an industrial consortium involving 46 companies from 14 European countries and one in the United States. Media Lario, Como, Italy, developed the X-ray Mirror Modules. About 1000 engineers and 150 scientists were involved in the creation of XMM-Newton.".

But also.

"Prior to June 2013, the SSC was operated by the University of Leicester, but operations were transferred due to a withdrawal of funding by the United Kingdom.".

"the XMM-Newton Survey Science Centre (SSC)"

We're in a timeline where Dettol maker has to beg folks not to inject cleaning fluid into their veins. Thanks, Trump

Lars Silver badge
Happy

Sad

That is, it's not sad that there is a limit to how long you can hide stupidity, and the more the chosen pink stable genius speaks the more difficult it has become for him to hide his stupidity.

The sad thing is that in a two party system it's so hard to vote for the assumed enemy party and against the idiot and many choose the party and the idiot instead.

To be honest, there is indeed a large third party too, the party of those who do not vote at all, a very good choice for those who do not want to vote nor for the idiot or the enemy party.

Are U sure it's all going a bit V-shaped, SAP? ERP giant goes own way, seems optimistic about third quarter bounce

Lars Silver badge
Happy

"What customers need is a steady course and a leadership team that announces things and then delivers them rather than having their internal discussions and tensions that ultimately culminate in certain departures like this,"

I agree, it's true in politics too but less common.

I am convinced SAP was hoping this dual system would produce from 1+1 more than 2, bur apparently it did not.

I am not actually that surprised it did not work, and while I am sure it's possible to find such a team I have never worked in such a company. (not that it proves anything) And when it doesn't work you skip it.

As for the "word", please stop this agony, and reveal it soon. Is it optimism, sells speak or is it all doom and doom, or mere fantasy.

SAP decides one head is better than two in a crisis, parts ways with co-CEO Jennifer Morgan

Lars Silver badge
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Re: Does this tell something about SAP cloud?

There is also a slight possibility that two persons held strongly conflicting opinions and one had to go.

Hana-hana-hana: No it's not your dad trying to start a motorboat... It's Northern Gas, renewing its SAP software

Lars Silver badge
Happy

Re: Slightly silly

Or perhaps there is a slight possibility that it's about SAP being a European German company and the world's third largest software and programming company, and not sold to India, China or the USA.

SAP was formed by five former engineers from IBM in 1972. SAP employs more than 100.000 people and has over 425,000 customers in over 180 countries.

And as a programmer I would claim the six hours to five min is not about the five min but about why it took six hours. It was most likely a batch program then, while now it is about a ongoing process between the wage periods and now they will be able to send the data to banks and employees in that 5 minutes and just on time. Nothing fishy here.

I wish SAP and customers all the best, why would I not.

As for Sod's Law why babbling about it, we all know that at times things go wrong and that will always be the case regardless of company, at least I know it.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SAP_SE

Lars Silver badge
Happy

Slightly silly

I find this article slightly silly. There is always a lock-in, had they gone with say Oracle it would be the same. Apparently there is a lock-in with Office too.

They make the best possible choice so why hope it will fail even if it is a British company.

RHEL pusher Paul Cormier appointed CEO to lead Red Hat into the IBM era

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Happy

I read this as good news for both red and blue.

Watch: Rare Second World War footage of Bletchley Park-linked MI6 intelligence heroes emerges, shared online

Lars Silver badge

Re: Soviet Army in Manchuria

I think Perer Kuznick and Oliver Stone get the logic behind the bombs right here.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RBDG2NeiZ6c

Microsoft's Bill Gates defrag is finally virtually complete: Billionaire quits board to double down on philanthropy

Lars Silver badge
Happy

A few kind words about Windows

There is no way to deny that Gates wasn't extremely efficient in building his relationship with OMS and Intel, but not a visionaire in anything IT related.

And when we look at the world today Windows is still mainly on the desktop while the rest of the world runs an a *nix* type of OS from embedded to supercomputers. And the reason to this is that Unix was hugely more sound from the very beginning.

In Finnish there is a "beautifully" visual way of explaining why and how something failed,

"kuin juosten kustu", and as Google translate won't help you much, kuin is as or like, juosten is running and kustu is pissing. A very visual kind explanation of Windows programming.

Sadly Gates did not go for Xenix although he was thinking about it.

Jobs on the other hand understood to go for BSD a *nix* based OS.

Lars Silver badge
Happy

"Like many robber barons of the past, Gates has devoted at least some of his mind-boggling wealth to philanthropy."

True but I would recommend Anand Giridharadas: "Winners Take All", for additional thoughtful views on that topic.

Like here:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FauQpni67go

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d_zt3kGW1NM

Also the book "Inside Intel" is interesting regarding both Gates, Windows and Intel.

Lars Silver badge
Happy

Re: 1-2-3

Points for remembering Visicalc, came on Apple II first and I was impressed indeed.

UK Defence Committee probe into national security threat of Huawei sure to uncover lots of new and original insights

Lars Silver badge
Happy

(Alcatel/Ericsson/Nokia/Siemens).

No Alcatel-Lucent is Nokia like that part of Siemens:

"On 3 November 2016, Nokia completed the acquisition of the company and it was merged into their Nokia Networks division. Bell Labs was still maintained as an independent subsidiary of Nokia.".

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alcatel-Lucent

It is 50 years since Blighty began a homegrown and all-too-brief foray into space

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Happy

Re: Ariane

"ESA is an intra-governmental organisation that is entirely separate from the EU."

I find that a bit silly to claim given the facts.

So lets look at the strength of the "voice" in ESA.

The main contributor is the EU from its budget and them we have members contributing.

France 26.9%

Germany 20.1%

Italy 13.7%

Spain 5.1%

Other EU states

together 13.3%

Non EU states

UK 9.5%

Switzerland 3.4%

Norway 1.8

Canada 0.6

Slovenia 0.1

Considering the size of the country the British contribution is not that stellar.

Apart from that ESA has its headquarters in Paris and the primary spaceport in Guiana.

And I am not all that convinced that your claim - "ESA management probably hopes that their non-EU members (like Britain) might save them from this fate" is shared by all that many.

Perhaps you should listen to Fintan O'Toole, "The Politics of Pain" to understand that some people find it quite plausible to cooperate and share resources, while some, perhaps due to historic nostalgia, find it harder.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hA08SXJ8mAY

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JvDAW5SjdaE

Lars Silver badge
Pint

Re: I think they did the right thing

@deadlockvictim

Yes still absolutely superb.

Lars Silver badge
Happy

Re: Ariane

@CliveS

Not all that separate from the EU.

Quoting the Wikipedia:

"EU and the European Space Agency

The political perspective of the European Union (EU) was to make ESA an agency of the EU by 2014,[79] although this date was not met. The EU is already the largest single donor to ESA's budget and non-ESA EU states are observers at ESA. ".

The legal basis for the EU/ESA co-operation is provided by a Framework Agreement which entered into force in May 2004. According to this agreement, the European Commission and ESA co-ordinate their actions through the Joint Secretariat, a small team of EC's administrators and ESA executive. The Member States of the two organisations meet at ministerial level in the Space Council, which is a concomitant meeting of the EU and ESA Councils, prepared by Member States representatives in the High-level Space Policy Group (HSPG).

ESA maintains a liaison office in Brussels to facilitate relations with the European institutions.

I have no doubt Britain will remain in ESA, but their status might change.

And as a "joke alert" a guy named Wernher von Braun was a bit of a pioneer in rockets here in Europe until he decided to emigrate to the USA.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/European_Space_Agency

Fancy that: Hacking airliner systems doesn't make them magically fall out of the sky

Lars Silver badge
Happy

"Airbus flight stick gets no force feedback whatsoever."

Why would a device with no physical connection give a force feedback, there is no wire in fly-by-wire as funny as it sounds, and that goes for Boeing too, unless they have added an artificial feedback which I doubt.

My joystick or my mouse have no force feedback either.

The guys with real nice force feedback was the Wright brothers and of course Boeing based on designs from the 50s but not the Dreamliner or any fighters since WW2.

Lars Silver badge
Coat

The voice recorder revealed he did ask for help and the captain came from having a nap to help, he understood what was happening but it was too late for nose down and speed up.

Instead of "stupid" I would suggest inexperienced and confused, sadly it was a very dark night.

Lars Silver badge
Joke

Re: Fees and charges

"the number of take-offs should always equal the number of landings"

They always do.

Maersk prepares to lay off the Maidenhead staffers who rescued it from NotPetya super-pwnage

Lars Silver badge
Happy

Re: They still haven't learnt

Perhaps we in IT expect a bit too much, like being treated like heroes fighting an act of God.

From the point of those outside of IT the NotPetya was an IT problem the IT department should have been able to prevent (like a fire in an engine room in a ship). The fact that the IT department then managed to correct the problem using lots of time and money, including probably pay for overtime is what you expect them to do. Feeling like heroes they can share together best they please.

In the 1970s there was this claim that companies tried their best to move IT department out of sight because we come and go with total disrespect of working hours, dress funny, speak funny and look funny.

And quite frankly, I am not that surprised about that.

Having studied IT in England I remember a teacher who tried to tell us howto behave looking for a job, two thing I can still remember he mentioned was, never smoke a pipe, do not use sandals.

I have a feeling we will have to share our heroism here among ourselves in the future too.

Surprise! Plans for a Brexit version of the EU's Galileo have been delayed

Lars Silver badge
Happy

Re: Good

"Having built the World's first commercial nuclear power station, we now have to buy them from the Chinese and the Americans. "

A few corrections.

"On June 27, 1954, the USSR's Obninsk Nuclear Power Plant, based on what would become the prototype of the RBMK reactor design, became the world's first nuclear power plant to generate electricity for a power grid, producing around 5 megawatts of electric power.[35]

On July 17, 1955 the BORAX III reactor, the prototype to later Boiling Water Reactors, became the first to generate electricity for an entire community, the town of Arco, Idaho.".

(for whatever "commercial" means).

The Americans have taken some time off regarding nuclear power stations.

The French have the technology together with Siemens for the turbines. The Chines cooperate with the French and are the guys who actually build stuff.

Apart from that there are the Russians who could deliver too if somebody wanted.

Lars Silver badge
Happy

Re: Good

Why build cars when the Americans build them, why bother with Airbus when there is Boeing.

The simple fact is that if we in Europe stop building and competing then we will fall behind in technology.

There is more on this topic on the internet including this on the Wikipedia:

"following its exit from the European Union (EU). As a result, Airbus plans to relocate work on the Ground Control Segment (GCS) from its Portsmouth premises to an EU state.".

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Galileo_(satellite_navigation)

I have no doubt that when the dust from brexit has settled the UK will have a new agreement regarding Galileo like some other non EU members, and smart Brits working with this project might find themselves working on the same project in an EU country non the worse off.

Nokia said to be considering sale or merger as profits tank

Lars Silver badge
Happy

nRe: Addicted to crapware

"Clutching at straws now.".

Well, yes and no, they employ +100.000 people world wide and the "networking" part is older than the cell phone.

The first modem I used in about 1972 was a Nokia modem. But it is indeed a brutal market.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nokia

Lars Silver badge
Joke

Re: I wonder

As I have said before it's sad there is no joke alert icon for anonymous.

The European Commission digital strategy wants to, er, take back control of citizens' data

Lars Silver badge
Happy

Re: Mobile Roaming

@I ain't Spartacus

Thanks for grasping that roaming unless it's not a local UK "problem" is about country to country relations and that local British law is just local if not recognised elsewhere.

What the EU managed to do was to persuade, with the force of 28 governments, cell phone companies to stop charging each other for roaming and thus also customers.

I am sure most people, including me, hope this will continue regarding the UK after Brexit too.

But this is all up in the air still together with Boris.

All countries write domestic laws, most of them are, even in the USA there are a hell of a lot of state specific laws too.

Then there are those pesky EU laws, laws that the 28 agreed upon together.

One such was that based on experts and boffins wrapping fish and chips in newspaper wasn't healthy for you.

I would however point out that there was never a law against eating or wiping ones arse in newspaper. And as having been a scout in my youth I can assure you it's not that good for the latter either.

But on the telly there was this Brexiter lady upset that the EU had destroyed the taste and feeling of fish and chips wrapped in newspaper.

Will brexit and Boris provide for her. Time will tell.

Lars Silver badge

Re: Mobile Roaming

So you pay roaming costs phoning within the UK then?

Lars Silver badge
Facepalm

Re: Mobile Roaming

"If you think free roaming is a vitally important policy, write to your MP and get it put into UK law.".

Sorry but that is rather hilarious if you think about it, and I know you did not.

What countries do you suggest your MP will enforce free roaming with when it's put into UK law.

Lars Silver badge
Happy

Re: No way.

Could it be that it costs as much to deliver 100 Mbps as say 20 Mbps.

Writing this doesn't require much any Mbps but for upgrading my linux laptops there is a difference. (Downloading my first linux at home 1998 took about 7 hours, when it didn't break halfway).

And I think it makes a difference say for hospitals sharing x-rays and stuff like that.

AMD takes a bite out of Intel's PC market share across Europe amid microprocessor shortages, rising Ryzen

Lars Silver badge
Happy

Re: David Dunning quote

"we could be idiots".

Indeed just look at POTUS, all you need is a rich father.

Lars Silver badge
Coat

Same question more than twenty years ago and still no answer, but who knows, perhaps it's all about graphics and that quadrant and the possibility, if supportive enough, to get the dot into the right upper corner.

'An issue of survival': Why Mozilla welcomes EU attempts to regulate the internet giants

Lars Silver badge
Thumb Up

Good EU, size matters.

Using Vivaldi now however.

How the US-China trade war is felt stateside: Xilinx trims workforce after lucrative Huawei sales pipe blocked

Lars Silver badge
Happy

Re: So who is actually happy?

"Finland's not in Scandinavia", nor is Denmark actually because Scandinavia is really the mountain range between Norway and Sweden and then again Finland was Sweden until 1809 when the Russians managed to grab the eastern part of Sweden, that is Finland.

The commander of the Swedish army then had his head chopped off in Stockholm for ending the era of Swedish power in the north.

Finland become a Grand Duchy of the Russian Empire, kept Swedish law and society as before. In 1918 when the Russians were preoccupied with their revolution Finland declared itself independent.

When people speak about Finland as Scandinavia they refer to culture and society for good reasons, but it's better to talk about the Nordic countries as that then also includes Iceland. And the Nordic Counsil is not called the Scandinavian Counsil

"The Nordic Council is the official body for formal inter-parliamentary co-operation among the Nordic countries. Formed in 1952, it has 87 representatives from Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden as well as from the autonomous areas of the Faroe Islands, Greenland, and the Åland Islands.".

Uncle Sam tells F-35B allies they'll have to fly the things a lot more if they want to help out around South China Sea

Lars Silver badge
Coat

Re: Superiority

"Therefore the US is scarier than Russia, amirite ?".

The problem with Russia is that they could just walk across the border again to a number of countries not too keen to see that happen.

Lars Silver badge
Happy

Re: !!!

"France wasn't happy with aspects of the program (not least of which being that they were not program leads, if most reports "in English" are to be believed).

Or the French got fed up with the British insisting of being the program leads.

eeny meeny miny moe

Lars Silver badge
Coat

Re: BAE

To add to that history.

"Marconi Electronic Systems, merged with British Aerospace to form BAE Systems. In 2006, extreme financial difficulties led to the collapse of the remaining company, with the bulk of the business acquired by the Swedish telecommunications company, Ericsson."

Lars Silver badge
Pint

Re: !!!

@Sandtitz

Mikä tahansa muu kelpaisi.

Lars Silver badge
Happy

I hope

Britain remembered to order the invisible model from Marillyn Lockheed.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dMADTs5x-LU

There's got to be Huawei we can defeat Chinese tech giant, thinks US attorney-general. Aha, let's buy stake in Ericsson and Nokia

Lars Silver badge
Happy

"Nokia is listed at NYSE."

Yes indeed and so is Ericsson, a lot easier than buying Greenland.

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