* Posts by Lars

2487 posts • joined 21 May 2007

Huawei missed memo that PC's dead – so here are three new notebooks

Lars
Silver badge
Linux

Re: Why the 15in screen cop out?

Secure boot on Linux is no problem, just do a search on it, and the first thing I would do if I bought one would be to put Linux on it. A multi boot perhaps but I doubt it as I skipped them years ago.

Too expensive, well it would be nice not to pay anything for the Windows if you decide to dump it but I don't really care about that.

0
1

After stiffing us with Trump, Weiner 'fesses to underage cock shot rot

Lars
Silver badge
Happy

No response

"Anthony Weiner's cock shots may be responsible for Donald Trump becoming president of the United States". This claim must annoy Farage immensely.

9
2

Blighty's buying another 17 F-35s, confirms the American government

Lars
Silver badge
Coat

Re: Appeal to armchair strategists

I guess May is out to persuade the Chinese to accept a free trade agreement pronto.

7
0
Lars
Silver badge
Coat

Re: How many changes

The U.S. military uses metric measurements extensively to ensure interoperability with allied forces, particularly NATO Standardization Agreements (STANAG). Ground forces have measured distances in "klicks", slang for kilometers, since 1918...........

5
0

US judges say you can Google Google, but you can't google Google

Lars
Silver badge
Coat

About Aspirin as a Trademark

From the Wiki:

"Trademark

Due to allowing the use of "Aspirin" for years by other manufacturing chemists, despite the trademark-infringing nature of the use, and its own failure to use the name for its own product when it began selling direct, Bayer lost its trademark in the United States in 1918, affirmed by court appeal in 1921.[155] Today, aspirin is a generic word in Australia, France, India, Ireland, New Zealand, Pakistan, Jamaica, Colombia, the Philippines, South Africa, Ghana, the United Kingdom and the United States.[156] Aspirin, with a capital "A", remains a registered trademark of Bayer in Germany, Canada, Mexico, and in over 80 other countries, where the trademark is owned by Bayer, using acetylsalicylic acid in all markets, but using different packaging and physical aspects for each".

3
0

MP3 'died' and nobody noticed: Key patents expire on golden oldie tech

Lars
Silver badge
Happy

@Lomax, I was wondering about that sentence too, but I think Andrew Orlowski claims that Nokia "saw change coming, but reacted badly", that is, too late and then the board made a stupid decision. I do agree.

0
0
Lars
Silver badge
Happy

Re: Fail ship has arrived

"the patent on Aspirin expired". No no no, Aspirin is a trademark and has not expired.

If in doubt, try acetylsalicylic acid.

PS. one could compare Aspirin to Gillette and Hoover and why not Trumpism if you see what I mean.

1
0

HPE Labs manufactures monster memory Machine system

Lars
Silver badge
Linux

All about the number of bits and hardware like this.

Current 64bit Linux kernel has limit to 64TB of physical RAM and 128TB of virtual memory (see RHEL limits and Debian port). Current x86_64 CPUs (ie. what we have in the PC) has (virtual) address limit 2^48=256TB because of how the address register in the CPU use all the bits (upper bits are used for page flags like ReadOnly, Writable, ExecuteDisable, PagedToDisc etc in the pagetable), but the specification allows to switch to true 64bit address mode reaching the maximum at 2^64=16EB (Exa Bytes). However, the motherboard and CPU die does not have so many pins to deliver all 48 bits of the memory address to the RAM chip through the address bus, so the limit for physical RAM is lower (and depends on manufacturer), but the virtual address space could by nature reach more than the amount of RAM one could have on the motherboard up to virtual memory limit mentioned above.

They receive the 160 TB (40x4) like this:

Each of the 40 nodes consists of two connected boards: a Fabric Attached Memory Board and a compute board. Each Fabric-Attached Memory board consists of four Memory Fabric Controllers, with 4TB of memory per node, and Fabric-Attached Memory. Each compute board consists of a node processor System-on-a-Chip, almost three terabytes per second of aggregate bandwidth, and a local fabric switch.

https://community.hpe.com/t5/Behind-the-scenes-Labs/Making-the-mission-to-Mars-compute/ba-p/6964700#.WRsY4GgrJPY

2
0

Volvo is letting Android 'take over underlying car software' – report

Lars
Silver badge
Coat

According to theverge

"But Android will now also control basic functions like heating and cooling, seat position, or opening and closing the windows. (It won’t go as far as controlling critical safety systems like brakes, though, according to Google.) ".

0
0

DeX Station: Samsung's Windows-killer is ready for prime time

Lars
Silver badge
Linux

Re: Linux

"Android is a mobile operating system developed by Google, based on the Linux kernel and designed primarily for touchscreen mobile devices such as smartphones and tablets."

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Android_(operating_system)

1
0

NASA nixes Trump's moonshot plan

Lars
Silver badge
Mushroom

Re: What's the problem

"This is why USA bought a lot of USSR 1950s developed rocket engines".

A lot more interesting than that:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=84ukJb64Gy8

1
0

Fancy a relaxed boozy holiday? Keep well away from Great Britain

Lars
Silver badge
Happy

Re: Fucking stupid stuff

@Pompous Git, Just something you said about Fiskars, a year ago?.

0
0
Lars
Silver badge
Happy

Re: Fucking stupid stuff

Hello Pompous Git.

Too much or not enough, that is the question. Your case might not prove that much in some other population or even in your village. But it's indeed fine when people take an active interest of their internal "engine oils". The next question is, of course, who to trust.

As for salt, it's certainly easier to add it to your hearts delight than trying to delete it. Be your own policeman.

Here up in the north we tend to have a lack of D-vitamin (not that it's a vitamin) but I would oppose any attempts to add a lot to food. I am more for information and regular tests, and I take my test and my pill.

PS. Pompous Git, the scissors are good too. Take care.

PPS. For sure nobody claimed no salt was the way to go.

1
0
Lars
Silver badge
Coat

Fucking stupid stuff

About the EPICENTER.

"EPICENTERNTER, the European Policy Information Center, is an independent initiative of six leading think tanks from across the European Union".

It does not represent the EU in anyway, a "leading think tanks" what ever that means.

I feel I will vividly defend both the UK and Finland on this.

How the hell will excessive use of salt and sugar pushed by food manufacturers increase anybodies freedom.

Too much salt is not good for you and I wonder why it has been so difficult to persuade manufacturers to use less. Is it all about preserving food for longer. Salt was successfully used in wooden ships to keep them sound.

Sugar, if adding sugar to milk, like in the USA, is about freedom then keep it and the obesity.

How the hell does this relate to "everyday relaxation activities".

Tobacco, oh well, look at a "much alike" me in that age here at: 32:50

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vpijOSSlZCI

Those were the days, If we managed to find some old ladies expressing their informed views then the moment was perfect.

I am happy my kids and grand kids don't smoke. As a kid walking to school we used to stop by a shop and buy one, and on good days even several fags for the day, that was allowed then.

If my nanny state tries to make it more difficult then I am all for it.

Alcohol, well here I come again.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z2XeVs4wqdE

The Nordic countries joined the USA in greatly increasing the use of everyday relaxation activities by laws meant not to. Very nice times I have been told.

Finland has still not fully recovered. It's like one Finnish president said - "it's not the speed, it's the direction that matters".

I have, at times, found that thought reassuring searching for home under the influence.

Anyway if you are looking for the best no-nanny vacation, try say Mogadishu.

3
2

UK General Election 2017: How EU law will hit British politicians' Facebook fight

Lars
Silver badge
Coat

Re: Appealing to the individual voter?

@veti, with no pretensions to solve any problems, a few thoughts.

Politics has much become a sort of a beauty contest. The Bitch against the Tiredman or what ever.

But if you think about it it's about a group of people against another group of people. Many groups of people hopefully.

What group of people do you then feel, think, represent your look at life, at the society.

It's all up to you. I may not advice you for inserting more power, as it may not be a good idea.

0
0
Lars
Silver badge
Happy

Re: Appealing to the individual voter?

"need to get to a point where the candidates for election say what they believe in".

On Monday or Tuesday.

What surprised me before the referendum was how some sites simply rejected my comments when against "leave". As I was hardly the only one the result was of course that all comments repeated the same lies.

Linked this on Politico some time ago and it was quickly deleted.

Too disturbing?.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ekZCpIVBjoo

1
0

European Investment Bank tosses €25m to MariaDB

Lars
Silver badge
Happy

@Len, are you mixed up with "bought" and "forked", if it's open source it can be forked. Bought or not is outside my knowledge.

0
0

Italian F-35 facility rolls out its first STOVL stealth fighter

Lars
Silver badge
Happy

Re: Fiat

They seem to have been able to fix Chrysler fairly well. Came to think of it, I would not claim to be an architect because my grandfather was one, is that an illusion that comes being born English.

Also referring to some other comments. Long ago I listened to some stuff Nick Clegg said, and I apparently liked, and then I had to read up about him on the Wiki.

I found this, and was surprised for two reasons. First, it's obvious some Brits would not like it at all, and secondly because it's so fucking true.

"all nations have a cross to bear, and none more so than Germany with its memories of Nazism. But the British cross is more insidious still. A misplaced sense of superiority, sustained by delusions of grandeur and a tenacious obsession with the last war, is much harder to shake off".

Shake it off.

6
1

Team Macron praised for feeding phishing spies duff info

Lars
Silver badge
Happy

Nice

Europe has not gone completely bonkers, and shame on those Brits who were hoping for Le Pen to win.

I suppose the prospect of a shared catastrophe was what made her so desirable.

13
2

Amazing new boffinry breakthrough: Robots are eating our brains

Lars
Silver badge
Thumb Up

All you need is a hammer

I find this video quite fun, perhaps one should spend a few days doing that after every two months behind the keyboard.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yE8A6uMYXmw

And then there is the more modern version.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tEF2erBBVZ4

1
0

China's first large passenger jet makes maiden flight

Lars
Silver badge
Thumb Down

Re: Roewe IS Rover

"As for Chinese air safety".

According to "The world's safest airlines in 2016 (JACDEC rankings)".

Hainan Airlines was the third safest airline, ahead of both Western airlines and Emirates. Perhaps you are just a bit afraid of foreigners, the unknown.

PS. Wings and cabins twist, like ships or they break. (and the cabin was not Chinese).

4
0
Lars
Silver badge
Happy

Grow up Nifty.

Nobody want's to punish you, it's just that you can't have your cake and eat it too.

As for Airbus, yes they are worried about the "no deal", moving the wing manufacturing is an obstruction and costly but will happen if the economics demand it.

4
1
Lars
Silver badge
Happy

I would be stupid

I would be just stupid to underestimate the Chinese, they are supported by a growing huge home market (not 1b but 1.4b) and every C919 they build will be as many off other manufacturers books.

The nine years is not bad at all, the Dreamliner was announced in 2003 with its first flight in 2009 and introduction in 2011.

The number of companies involved in building it is quite interesting too.

"Subcontracted assemblies included wing manufacture (Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Japan, central wing box)[38] horizontal stabilizers (Alenia Aeronautica, Italy; Korea Aerospace Industries, South Korea);[39] fuselage sections (Global Aeronautica, Italy; Boeing, North Charleston, US; Kawasaki Heavy Industries, Japan; Spirit AeroSystems, Wichita, US; Korean Air, South Korea);[40][41][42] passenger doors (Latécoère, France); cargo doors, access doors, and crew escape door (Saab AB, Sweden); software development (HCL Enterprise India);[43] floor beams (TAL Manufacturing Solutions Limited, India);[44][45] wiring (Labinal, France);[46] wing-tips, flap support fairings, wheel well bulkhead, and longerons (Korean Air, South Korea);[47] landing gear (Messier-Bugatti-Dowty, UK/France);[48][49] and power distribution and management systems, air conditioning packs (Hamilton Sundstrand, Connecticut, US)".

(Talk about US built)

And I would claim the next sentence is a bit silly, of course they will feel pressure, eventually.

"But the wider aviation industry won't feel competitive pressure, as the C919 includes parts from many established aviation companies, including CFM's Leap engines".

3
0

Can you spout digital bollocks? London is hiring a Chief Digital Officer

Lars
Silver badge

At least Sadiq Khan stopped that hopeless Garden Bridge project that the idiotic Boris wasted millions on.

0
0

'I feel violated': Engineer who pointed out traffic signals flaw fined for 'unlicensed engineering'

Lars
Silver badge
Happy

Re: Bureaucracy

"Soviet bureaucracy was a lot easier". Well perhaps, you give them something and in return they give you something. See the problem, what a topic, I think we all know when it starts to smell with or without gifts.

And I think that as soon as we start this "they are all like that" and "those are all like this" then we are speaking a lot of "this" and "that", generally rubbish.

5
8
Lars
Silver badge
Happy

Re: Casey Jones (1863–1900)

@ Charles 9

To be more precise.

The word engineer (from the Latin ingeniator[3]) is derived from the Latin words ingeniare ("to contrive, devise") and ingenium ("cleverness").

It then entered English through the French word "ingénieur".

2
0

Irish Stripe techie denied entry to US – for having wrong stamp in passport

Lars
Silver badge
Happy

@ VanguardG

Your message is apparently a strong support for the UN, lets hope the current administration feels that way too. But I must add that regarding New York, I would guess the USA would have been "slightly" against having it placed in say London, Paris, Montreal, or Moscow, in short anywhere but in the USA.

It's a bit like with financing NATO. Had, for instance, Germany and the UK suggested that they want to pay, say half of it, the USA would never have accepted such silliness weakening their position.

Vise men claim that understanding the past helps you to speak less shit about the present.

I prefer a simpler explanation, say windmills turning in the wind. Married men who suddenly think they made the wrong decision (I have met some). And as a personal experience, I have sometimes found that with more money in my pocket I tend to go for the Whisky, while then again, with less I just take a beer or I just go home.

Keep up your support.

1
0
Lars
Silver badge
Happy

Re: I don't feel bad

Why would a passport be valid if it is has expired, a drivers licence, a bank account?.

0
0

UK drops in World Press Freedom Index following surveillance and anti-espionage threats

Lars
Silver badge

Re: And then I look at the Daily Heil

A toothlessness of the consumer too who pays for the Daily Heil.

0
0

Dark times for OmniOS – an Oracle-free open-source Solaris project

Lars
Silver badge

Re: same death as OpenSolaris?

Spot on ST.

0
0
Lars
Silver badge
Happy

Re: It was designed to fail

"Linux has spent years ripping off features from Solaris and illumos". If there is still something worth copying from Solaris or any other OS then it will be copied. That is how every industry works and should work. With copying I also mean "learning from". More people are today involved in developing Linux than in any other *nix* system. In the top500 super computer list you find only about 10 other *nix* systems, the rest is Linux.

1
0
Lars
Silver badge
Happy

Re: It was designed to fail

@ Phil O'Sophical

Thanks for that information, I thought it was something like that, did not want to write "tilted". Annoying because it was always unclear who did it and why. For some reason silly stuff like that stays in your memory.

A similarly silly "shutdown" I remember is when we as a team were sold to an other company, software and all. In my room I had a PC and a SCO Unix tower on the floor, used by me and some other people. And then I had some minor hardware related problem and decided to find out about the technical department in that company (a large one). In comes a young girl, points to the Unix box, and I nodded. She then switches it off just like that.

I look at her rather perplexed and tell her that it's not the way to shutdown Unix and that there are a few more users and some databases running too. She says, sorry I thought it was Windows. Silly memories indeed.

PS. How long will people have religious feelings about the different shells and flavours of *nix", not to mention languages. They are tools, invented by us, like our Gods. I used what ever I was payed to use but at home it's Linux.

0
0
Lars
Silver badge
Happy

Re: It was designed to fail

I much agree but the + in (10+ years ago) is almost 10 too. Oracle stated its support for Linux in 98, and bought Sun in 2010. We used Sun for software development among other *nix* systems for more than 10 years but never had a single Sun customer and it was expensive. The only odd thing with Sun Solaris was that if you switched off the console the whole system shutdown. (the Lego Sun hardware)

1
0

The brave British boat men hoping to poke Larry Ellison's lads in the eye

Lars
Silver badge
Happy

Re: Small correction...

The famous "there is no second".

0
0
Lars
Silver badge
Pirate

Re: Being a yachtie myself...

Same here. The cup was interesting as long as it was about R12 yachts. A fairly restricted rule for the yacht which meant the quality of the crew become more important.

The cup has in a way come full time round from very rich "playboys" like Lipton (I can never win) to guys like Ellison. No need to call it a sport. I think there is still a J class around somewhere, very impressive especially below deck.

1
0

A very Canadian approach: How net neutrality rules reflect a country's true nature

Lars
Silver badge
Happy

Re: Indeed

@ Hollerithevo

If your comment was for me, then please, I am not mixed up in that respect. Only some of the English can at times be a bit mixed up like here:

"That might be, but consider that Great Britain still has a number of countries under its commonwealth".

https://forums.theregister.co.uk/forum/1/2017/03/22/rockall_peak_blasted_off_navy_expedition/

What I have come to understand is that there are clear similarities between countries in the north like Finland, Sweden, Denmark, Norway, Iceland, Scotland, Canada and parts of northern Germany and Holland and even in the non Russian part of Estonia. The similarities are in the attitude towards social security, health care, education and democracy.

I would claim that one of the main "feelings" among the Brexit voters was what I have described as a "post empire trauma" and some seem to refer to as "rule the waves".

The Scots don't suffer that disease in that extent at all.

And I find this vid quite revealing too with some straight forward words by one who has recovered.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NiY5RPXyEfU

.

2
1
Lars
Silver badge
Happy

Indeed

Canada is to the USA much like Scotland to England as clearly shown in the Brexit vote. Just more decent, more sensible and much like the northern part of Europe, nothing new there, just common sense.

7
7

Swamp-draining Trump pushes ex-AT&T lobbyist to oversee AT&T mega-merger

Lars
Silver badge
Coat

Re: Moving goalposts

I think you got something very wrong in "Mexico will simply slap tariffs on their exports to us". Also if things are getting madder with Trump than during Obama you cannot claim things were as mad during the Obama administration.

4
0

Nokia plans comeback on back of virtual reality

Lars
Silver badge
Coat

About Nokia Technologies

Nokia Technologies is indeed a very very small part of Nokia. This about them:

"Nokia Technologies develops advanced consumer and professional technology products in digital health and digital media. We are 800+ strong with locations in Beijing, China; Espoo, Tampere and Oulu in Finland; London, United Kingdom; Paris, France; Munich, Germany and four locations in the United States: Los Angeles, CA, San Francisco, CA, Boston, MA, and our headquarters in Sunnyvale, CA."

And some recent news:

" Nokia partners with Lucasfilm to deliver an immersive behind-the-scenes VR experience of Star Wars: The Last Jedi".

2
0
Lars
Silver badge
Go

Re: Suicidal?

Nokia will not risk its network business, this is probably about using patents and technology they already have. And I would hate to see companies stop trying just because of companies like Apple and Facebook. After all Nokia did not stop Jobs from trying either.

2
0

Cuffing Assange a 'priority' for the USA says attorney-general

Lars
Silver badge
Happy

Re: Administrations go after leakers

"Global Warming, and despite a number of people denying it". Lets add Sessins and some fun to it like here, at 11:39

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TK0R_06zOOY

0
0

Would you believe it? The Museum of Failure contains quite a few pieces of technology

Lars
Silver badge
Coat

Re: Sweden

Not that it matters but it's Vasa like in http://www.vasamuseet.se/en

3
0

Drunk user blow-dried laptop after dog lifted its leg over the keyboard

Lars
Silver badge
Thumb Up

Good on you ElReg

With more than one hundred comments, indeed, dog piss is more interesting than the "logic" behind Brexit.

In defence of cats and dogs I have to add this. First of all I must admit that I would trust a dog more than a 3 year old to wake me up in the night if the house was on fire. Not so sure about cats though as a woman I knew died with her cat and all, but then again we don't know if the cat tried it's best or not.

My "knowledge" regarding cats is due to the fact that my wife had a cattery for ten years. What I would like to point out is that when they piss on your laptop it's not because they want piss you they just want to mark that space for themselves in that way, in lack of better alternatives.

For the commentard who wrote about his dog shitting on the floor I would suggest that, perhaps, the dog has a message for him. Which reminds me of a woman who become the proud owner of one of our very special cats. She eventually found out that the cat refused to use the litter box unless it was dry clean and void of shit. And then she had three of them keeping at least one nice and clean all the time. And the cat nodded to her and said - you do flush the toilet before using it too, don't you.

1
0
Lars
Silver badge
Happy

Re: Good on Jim

I don't agree, he could have easily saved the HD. And once again - beware of cats, they love to lay down on the warm keyboard and they seem to like the sound too. And now that I think about it, why have I newer tried to use my insurance.

5
2

PACK YOUR BAGS! Boffins spot Earth-size planet most likeliest yet to harbor alien life

Lars
Silver badge
Pint

Re: Gravity well problem

And I would feel awfully heavy and unable to move.

0
0

Oh snap! UK Prime Minister Theresa May calls June election

Lars
Silver badge
Happy

Re: Crooks caught in a RAT* trap?

"to show the EU we really don't care what they think:".

Why would they, they define the rules now. Look at the bright side, the more cool and intelligent part is in charge now and soon the unelected bureaucrats will take over and everybody will cool down.

Believe it or not, and isn't it funny, any country would survive half a year without even one politician but not even one week without its unelected bureaucrats.

I sometimes wonder if you Brits ever actually understood that old superb program "Yes Minister". Look again, who is up in the clouds and who is in charge. The damned truth is that there is only one profession where absolutely no qualifications are required and the unelected bureaucrats are not in that group. Hard as it is to understand, I have survived, regardless of the fact that my dentist is unelected too.

2
1
Lars
Silver badge
Happy

Re: Who to choose?

"Labours core vote (the working poor) was the bit of the country voting most heavily in favour of Brexit".

You seem to believe they are all too dump to realize they have been conned. While there might be both winners and losers with a Brexit the working poor will not belong to the winners.

1
1
Lars
Silver badge
Happy

The brexit party is over

The hot air is escaping the balloon. I think May has come to understand that the enthusiasm for a hard brexit is diminishing. And as always it's about the next election so she has decided there is more hot air in the balloon now than in 2020. And then there is, of course, the question if she was lying when she was against Brexit or has she been lying to you since the referendum. Politics. This time dear Brits vote using what you have between your ears and stop listening to the talking arseholes.

There is only one way to deal with the EU, take part, make it better, stop whining, it's a work in progress.

PS. nobody is going to steal the pound, Turkey is not joining the EU against your will, you will do well as long as you use your head for thinking, and you can restrict the number of immigrants just by using the EU laws available like some other EU countries do.

5
3

In case you had forgotten, broadband body warns of risks Brexit poses to sector

Lars
Silver badge
Happy

Re: Here's What!

"And I suspect that that is exactly what will happen." Exactly, and any all British "regs and policies" are totally worthless in the rest of the world for British export. Importing to higher or lower standards is all you can change. and still a trade agreement might not allow that either. The woman who says she "wants a trade agreement" will have to wake up and learn to understand the meaning of the word "agree".

PS. I don't much agree with the "by outsourcing many things to EU level" there was quite some competition for those agencies, bodies and institutions and I have no doubt the Brits shed a large amount of tears, like other EU countries.

1
1

Boeing 737 turns 50

Lars
Silver badge
Happy

Re: Clever design

Joe Sutter must have copied this then, such a new and clever design.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Messerschmitt_Me_262

(I have a feeling I have seen props on the wings too)

2
0

Forums

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2017