* Posts by Jan 0

773 posts • joined 14 Dec 2009

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Dyson to build electric car that doesn't suck

Jan 0

Re: You miserablists

> plaster dust will kill a Dyson motor

Well, yes, but why do you let it get in there? I've been Dysoning a _lot_ of plaster dust for over a year. (Living in a building site:) I need to keep washing the cyclone and primary filters regularly. but there's not a hint of plaster on the final filter (HEPA?) that keeps dust out of the turbine, motor and exhaust. I also know I'd rather breathe the exhaust from a Dyson, rather than a Henry or Titan.

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Smartphone SatNavs to get centimetre-perfect GNSS receivers in 2018

Jan 0

Re: GPS is bad at measuring height

I'm aware that some bicycle computers and satnavs have incorporated barometers for the last 20 years or so. They're obviously as crap as GPS for giving your true altitude, but they can measure your rate of climb or descent. A phone or vehicle satnav could also incorporate a barometer and calculate which tier of a road you are on.

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Seriously, friends. You suck at driving. Get a computer behind the wheel to save your life

Jan 0
Boffin

Re: @LeeE

> I live in the middle of Devon, when going through Dartmoor, how the feck is an auto car going to cope reversing up a hill on a road that is wide enough for one vehicle when an arctic [semi] is coming the other way??

I'd expect my autonomous vehicle to a). be much better than me at reversing and b). to have wirelessly negotiated with the artic before it was visible.

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Forget trigonometry, 'cos Babylonians did it better 3,700 years ago – by counting in base 60!

Jan 0
Windows

Re: We use base 10 for a reason

> There were 12 shillings (and 240 pennies in the pound)

Errm, we real oldies remember 12 pennies in a shilling and 20 shillings to the pound. Moreover, you could subdivide a pound into 960 farthings.

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Uh oh, scientists know how those diamonds got in Uranus, and they're telling everyone!

Jan 0

'high pressure can bond hydrogen and carbon atoms'?

Well, yes of course it can, but 'to create nanometre-wide "diamonds"'? When I last looked, there wasn't much hydrogen in a diamond. I think the scientists involved probably have a more nuanced explanation.

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Nokia's comeback is on: The flagship 8 emerges

Jan 0

Re: Same old, same old

Hey MyBackDoor, who is this "Should of Went geezer"? Are there aristocrats working at Nokia?

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Brit uni builds its own supercomputer from secondhand parts

Jan 0

Re: I keep dreaming of building a Pi HPC...

> Is 256 pi's enough ?

Certainly not, but dancing boards is an awesome improvement over the Connection Machine's 64K CPU LEDs!

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Arcade Fire releases album on USB fidget spinner for £79/$105

Jan 0
Coat

Re: Finite and Infinite

I'm not sure that zero is allowable as numerator or denominator in fractions. Fractions were a halting, but useful, attempt to bridge the gap between integers and real numbers. Saying that any arbitrary value is infinitely larger than zero, is true but, is not useful.

Percentages are the ratio of parts out of one hundred parts. Anyone using percentage values well above one hundred is just parading their innumeracy.

MyffyW was correct in this instance, although his reference to "1.79%"* in a recent post is as inappropriate as others who** talk of percentages of hundreds or more.

* I'd call this a bastard number! I think they meant a bit less than 2%.

** Yes, journalists, excluding some technical journalists, are worse at this than most El Reg Readers.

Dons down(vote-proof) coat and retires to see what mathematicians have to say.

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Quad goals: Western Digital clambers aboard the 4bits/cell wagon

Jan 0

Cheaper, multilayer, SLC would be nicer for me

I'd rather have the wear levelling and redundancy applied to a more reliable underlying technology.

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Slower US F-35A purchases piles $27bn onto total fighter jet bill

Jan 0

Re: Satellites would do just as good a job against surface ships

> Having said that, I'm sure they would get the signature eventually, so this is only a question of timing.

Errm, if I wanted to avoid this, I'd have onboard acoustic generators to disguise my "true signature". I'd generate a new signature when required to do battle and never reveal my true acoustic signature. Meanwhile, the buggers using non acoustic imaging techniques would never lose me.

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Dial S for SQLi: Now skiddies can order web attacks via text message

Jan 0

Wow, 21st Century Telegrams!

Do I need a BSA Bantam* to execute commands?

*The GPO should have invested in Gold Stars to ensure near instantaneous delivery.

Where's the "Shite bike in a pool of oil" icon when you need it?

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Brit unis bunged £16m in gov cash for 5G test

Jan 0

5G?

Is this 5G really the 4G that we were looking forward to, until LTE (3.5G) was foisted on us as "4G" instead?

Personally, I'd just like better coverage. How about using tall* aerials like they do in the third world?

* 100 - 200 m.

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Jaguar Land Rover ropes in Gorillaz to help it lure 5,000 'electronic wizards'

Jan 0

What should they call themselves?

Since this company has stopped making Land Rovers and, arguably, Jaguars, isn't it time it changed it's name? How's about:

TATACAR?

XJLR?

Squ?ggle (The company formerly known as ...)

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Google hit with record antitrust fine of €2.4bn by Europe

Jan 0

Simple

> If you were to invent a really great device that many people would benefit from, just how would you make people aware of it without some form of advertising?

You'd show it to your friends, who'd be so bowled over that they all buy one and show it to their friends...

A bit like the way that Marks and Spencer dominated the high streets of Great Britain in the 20th century without using advertising. (M&S do advertise nowadays, is it helping them now?)

Another example: I've never seen a advertisement for a "fidget spinner", but as soon as I'd seen one I went straight to a toy shop to buy one for my grandson. He was delighted, even though he wasn't aware of them until that moment.

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After blitzing FlexiSpy, hackers declare war on all stalkerware makers: 'We're coming for you'

Jan 0

Ethical Cracking,

why wouldn't you?

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Apple wets its pants over Swatch ad tagline

Jan 0

Re: pesky 'muricans

> I find it hard to read some of the articles written in American English, the sentences don't flow like they used to in English English.

That's probably because "Americans" seem to be highly confused about prepositions. You know, those little `"joining words" like "to", "on" and "in". They appear to know when a preposition is needed in a sentence, but then choose one at random.

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The beast is back: Reborn ekranoplan heads for the Arctic

Jan 0

Re: In the Antipodes

If Australians call lobsters crayfish, what's their name for crayfish?

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NASA's atom-chiller ready to fly to the ISS

Jan 0

Laser cooling comes first?

Errm, isn't there some conventional heat pumping to get the rig into the micro K range first?

Laser cooling second?

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The future of storage is ATOMIC: IBM boffins stash 1 bit on 1 atom

Jan 0

Still a long way off the "Nudged Quantum"*

*From one if the few interesting Asimov Stories. (He's ok as long as he doesn't have to do characterisation).

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Iconic Land Rover Defender may make a comeback by 2019

Jan 0

Re: Which market segment will they go for?

So how does the magic switch in a Range Rover increase the very modest gap between the differential casing and the roa^H^H^Hrock between the ruts? Does it instantly increase the diameter of the wheels?

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Jan 0

Re: Which market segment will they go for?

How can the Range Rover compete?

Whenever I find myself behind a Range Rover I marvel at how little ground clearance they have. Even if they had more ground clearance, their wheelbase is still too long. If you drive a Range River over a mound, what's to stop it getting stuck on the top? How can you beat SWB and high ground clearance? (Ok a decent winch comes in handy:).

I think that applying modern engineering to an Early English Perpendicular 80" Landrover could produce an unbeatable compact modern off road vehicle. Otherwise i guess it's time to grin and bear the cost, size and parking problems of a Unimog.

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'At least I can walk away with my dignity' – Streetmap founder after Google lawsuit loss

Jan 0

Re: @Dr. Syntax ... @druck Not as good

> The OS maps are not as accurate as those acquired by driving the roads... repeatedly.

Google accurate? Only in parts. That's precisely the reason why they dont show useful features like pedestrian or cycling footbridges, legal cut throughs in closed roads and all those little alleys that a pedestrian can use. Most of it's collected in Streetview and satellite images, but it's not applied to Maps.

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Jan 0

Re: Disgustingly Evil

@Steve K

Useful maps, are drawn clearly, roads get exaggerated widths which are easier to comprehend, colours are used to convey additional information, legends are rendered in highly legible typefaces. I'm not saying that Streetmap was perfect, clearly the interface was a lash up, but the actual map was better than Google's. Neither was a patch on the kind of maps that OS, IGN produce and many programs are able to display maps based on OSM (Openfietsmap and the like) with far more information and clarity than Google maps. I'm just someone who doesn't appreciate getting lost, I hope that someone with cartographic expertise will step in and explain better why Google maps are so weedy. Is it because people in the USA aren't exposed to the sort of maps that Europeans take for granted?

Dammit, I want tracks and paths clearly differentiated. I want to see rights of way, land boundaries, terrain.

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Jan 0

Disgustingly Evil

I'm truly sorry for Kate Sutton, for everyone who helped make Strreetmap work for us and for all of us users who could have had access to better maps. To heap insult on upon their nefarious behaviour, Google still hasn't learned how to create useful maps!

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Jun-OH-NO! NASA's Jupiter probe in busted helium-valve drama

Jan 0
Windows

Re: Well, crap....

@druck

Speak for yourself sunshine. When I write 10^12 I mean a billion, not one thousand million (10^9). Don't change usage. Australia is still the largest island in the world and London stops well before Croydon.

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Baby supernova spotted, just three hours old and a real cutie

Jan 0

Re: Cool!

Yeah, but cool is hot innit?

Gazillions even in Réaumur? Innit?

Meanwhile, yes let's have a meanwhile, Anders Celsius is appalled that you don't make those gazillions negative!

Whatever, "we are stardust", more power to the supernovae, means more people.

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UK website data insecurity worries: Users in bits over car break-up emails

Jan 0
Pint

Re: I've just had an email from partsgateway:

Me too. Same wording as yours. I too use a partsgateway@<mydomain>.<tld'> Style address. They may be behind with their software, but they're the first company to have informed me quickly, so I'll give their IT guy a beer.

Contrast this with another company I recently contacted because their unique address was being spammed. They admitted to a breach three years ago and gave me a £30 voucher as a very late apology! Nice, but I won't be trusting them with real money in future.

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Vinyl, filofaxes – why not us too, pleads Nokia

Jan 0
Go

External antenna! (Aerial)

I see the 3310 has a socket for an external antenna. That would be extremely useful in a home with external insulation using foil wrapped foam and steel mesh tracking. Bring it on!

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Munich may dump Linux for Windows

Jan 0

Re: Highly suspcious of cost argument.

> There is a reason why MS is the biggest software company in the world.

Marketing

MARKETING

'Nuff said?

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NASA bakes Venus-proof electronics

Jan 0

Roofing silicon?

Do you mean those magic roof panels that generate electricity?

If not, what the hell is roofing silicon? Can the Mekon cross it on his flying chair?

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RAF pilot sent jet into 4,000ft plummet by playing with camera, court martial hears

Jan 0

Re: On the ground

Well, they'd overidden the rev limiter and as my upvoters (proper Land Rover drivers?) know, Champs had notoriously fragile driveshafts. They wouldn't like autobahns at high speed any more than shingle beaches.

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Jan 0

Re: On the ground

Errm, wouldn't a drive shaft have broken before they finished the game?

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Who's behind the Kodi TV streaming stick crackdown?

Jan 0

I thinks it's wonderful

that these major league criminals are being locked away with the thousands of investment bankers responsible for our wrecked econo..... Oh, wait.

Let's try again. Would the Spotify model allow me too watch Indonesian films in the UK? When is globalisation going to hit these streaming services?

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Hacker: I made 160,000 printers spew out ASCII art around the world

Jan 0

Re: Adequate Pernicious Toerags.

Perhaps that's because you're a towrag?

Icon needed: "Gotcha"

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Google mistakes the entire NHS for massive cyber-attacking botnet

Jan 0

Re: re: Unless it's the patients using google translate to understand the foreign staff?

Rob in W Cumbria wrote:

> I have known people who've had to translate between Glaswegian and Cockney before now!

Ah, mystery solved? After living in the East End of London for nearly four decades, I've often wondered where all the Cockneys went. I haven't heard any Cockney, or Yiddish for that matter, in the last 20 years. Round here it's all either Estuary, Public School, Nth language or completely not English. I thought some Cockneys might have migrated to Spain, but West Cumbria is interesting. Do Cockneys, like the Dutch, long to see mountains?

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Euro space agency's Galileo satellites stricken by mystery clock failures

Jan 0
Headmaster

What times we live in.

I'm surprised that a journalist on an erstwhile techie website thinks we need to have the MASER acronym explained to us!

MASERs aren't new, just a little bit older than LASERs.

Back in the day we spelled it M.A.S.E.R. and I think the New York Times and Washington Post still hold with that style.

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AWS, you crack us up. Rebrands Westminster 'Webminster'

Jan 0

Small mercy

At least this was done by locals, otherwise it would've read "Webminister".

Proud to be a Limey.

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Is! Yahoo! dead?! Why! web! biz! will! rename! to! Altaba! – the! truth!

Jan 0
Coffee/keyboard

Re: JCEYUIJOKVBYHUJIOK.com

It could be simpler than that. I think they just glanced at a minion's keyboard and read Alt-Tab-A.

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FM now stands for 'fleeting mortality' in Norway

Jan 0
Pint

Re: DAB+

@Ogi

Thanks for that thought. That's a nice way for me to save my Quad FM2 & 3s from landfill.

Somebody should start manufacturing suitably camouflaged devices.

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A year in infosec: Bears, botnets, breaches ... and elections

Jan 0

What's so wrong about a private email server?

I know that the great unwashed will think that nothing could be safer than a government email server, but I'd guess that most ElRegistas would choose a personal email server over a government one. I may not like Hilary Clinton, but she appears to be shrewd when it comes to computer security. ("If a job's worth doing, do it yourself".)

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Kingpin in $1m global bank malware ring gets five years in chokey

Jan 0

Those eyes!

Which drug makes your eyelids as red as your lips? What's he on?

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Japanese robot space maid will incinerate Earth's dead satellites

Jan 0
Boffin

Re: Eddies in the wire

Hmm, "more years ago than I care to mention" permanent magnets were puny things. Now, today, if I can just prise this neodymium magnet off this steel table, let me show you how quickly it falls through this vertical copper pipe.

Non caveat: Try this at home with your kids.

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Going underground: The Royal Mail's great London train squeeze

Jan 0
Pint

Re: Some fabulous pictures...

Somewhere... I have some nice pictures that I took on a tour organised via Usenet in the 1990s. I can't remember the name of the organiser, just that it was probably done via uk.misc. What impressed me were the stacks of wheel pairs on massive axles, nicely ground and finished with red paint. The miniature trains made you think that we'd stumbled on a aliensubterranean civilisation. A long owed beer for whichever kind and industrious soul organised our free visit. I'm so glad that I saw this before it became a relic.

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Give BAE a kicking and flog off new UK warships, says review

Jan 0

You are Lewis Page AICMFP!

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Congrats America, you can now safely slag off who you like online

Jan 0

Re: Oh wow

Yoda you are and pounds five mine I claim.

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Mozilla hackers audit cURL file transfer toolkit, give it a tick for security

Jan 0

Many thanks guys!

Those 20 days must be some of the most useful work days of 2016. Excepting those in medical, other life preserving professions and educators. I know there are other people who've done something useful for the human race, but my thoughts are just overwhelmed by the outrageous waste of most human talent.

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Space crap: Flap, zap or strap? $30k from NASA for your pooper scooper

Jan 0
Boffin

Shit happens: It would only delay the problem.

If all your nourishment is liquid you will still defaecate, at a lower rate, to eliminate dead cells from your intestine and bile. That would still be true even if all your food and water intake was intravenous.

Nonetheless, your suggestion might make an anal pl^H^Htampon viable for 6 days.

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Debian putting everything on the /usr

Jan 0

Re: I don't like change

There is also good reason for /sbin to contain statically linked executables so that you can fix your system when the libraries have gone awol.

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Here's how the missile-free Royal Navy can sink enemy ships after 2018

Jan 0
Coat

Truly Splendid!

Local joineries and engineering workshops could churn these out by the thousand, funded by a whip 'round at local workplaces. They could take off* from the nearest road, although hundreds of small agricultural businesses seem to have their animal sheds dotted around what look suspiciously like runways.

*to land on our aircraft carriers.

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Race for wireless VR headset heats up

Jan 0

Still "ten years away"?

Display resolution, colour fidelity, weight, comfort and power requirements are alll unsatisfactory. The only sensory input that could be satisfactory with current technology is acoustic. Touch and acceleration aren't being addressed at all with headsets.

For a first person view in a storyline or game, a better approach (which wouldn't make much money for a hardware and software manufacturer:) might be to do some serious research into lucid dreaming. Could psychologists find techniques to make lucid dreaming very easy for everyone. Could lucid dreamers be led by external cues so that a plot could be followed without having to learn it first? If so could you also cue arbitrary incidents for real time gaming? Are there any trick cyclists reading this thread who'd care to comment?

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