* Posts by John Lilburne

878 posts • joined 3 Dec 2009

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Chrome adblockalypse will 'accelerate Google-Facebook duopoly'

John Lilburne

Fortunately adblocker provides a whitelist of acceptable ads. These are mainly Google ones, take the whitelist and ad it to the blacklist.

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John Lilburne

To be fair, it was the shysters shilling for big tech that pushed for cannibalising paid content to build an online presence claiming that adverts would compensate for the loss. Despite the fact that online ads paid a 100th of the offline ads. So a publisher had to either increase its views by 100 times or increase the number of ads.

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John Lilburne

Bypass the middle man

Why not have a centralized system where people can pay to a central system? Each unique page accessed has some value transfered to the publisher. Someone registered with the system never sees ads. The publisher gets paid and the middle man, Google/Facebook, can fuck right off. Anonymize the accounts for privacy.

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Military techie mangled minicomputer under nose of scary sergeant

John Lilburne

Re: buttons

Not on the machines but we have security door release switches next to light switches. At least twice a day the lights would go out. Then they had sticky labels next to them saying "This is light switch" so the light would only go out twice a week. Now the switches are different with the security door release being a green blob. But which side of the door they are located on is random. Some times on the left, sometimes in the right, so as people walk down a flight of stairs they act like Robbie the Robot from Lost in Space as their arms flay about trying to locate the door release button. Haven't heard them crying DANGER WILL ROBINSON, DANGER yet, but that is sure to come.

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John Lilburne

Was one of them MACHINE DUCT PICTURE?

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John Lilburne

Re: At A Non e-mouse...

At my secondary school in the 1970s the 6th form common room had a kitchen, and hidden in one of the cupboards was an large isolation box, where ine could turn off power to the lights and wall sockets of most of the school blocks and to individual floors. The teaching staff never knew it was there and could never work out why 10 minutes into some boring Shakespeare play that they wanted a class to hear the power to the wall sockets went off in the English block, or why a planned French oral exam tended to suffer outages.

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Beware the looming Google Chrome HTTPS certificate apocalypse!

John Lilburne

Re: Well done Google....

So there's no harm done if wrong and potentially harmful information gets re-transmitted by a MITM attack,

It doesn't need a MITM attack for that, wikipedia already serves that function on the web.

https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=wikipedia+erroneous+facts

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John Lilburne

Re: @coolcity Well done Google....

Which middle aged lady has contacted a web host ...

There are a large number of people in that boat. It may be because something like blogger, or wordpress doesn't quite do what they want.

It could be a local plumber, tradesman, or photographer wanting to showcase their services. A simple page or two that is just giving some basic information and a contact page. Or it might be something more sophisticated.

Whatever the reason, they don't need a SSL cert and it is arrogant fuckwittedness, for Google and a bunch of Geek hangers on dictating to them that they need to rewrite their system for some bullshit fetish reason. What hosting platform they must use, etc

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John Lilburne

Re: @John Lilburne Well done Google....

A secure channel stops anyone injecting code into your website that is served to your readers.

I think the rest of us will take cognisance of that when Google stops distributing malware, viruses, trojans, and other nasties from its app store.

http://www.theregister.co.uk/2016/02/29/worlds_worst_android_play_store_attack_sends_millions_to_p0rn_sites/

https://www.cnet.com/news/google-removes-android-malware-downloaded-up-to-5-9m-times/

http://www.zdnet.com/article/phony-android-security-apps-in-google-play-store-found-distributing-malware-and-tracking-users/

and stops people using gmail as spam signup portals. When I banned signups from gmail on the company user forum, the spam postings dropped by 80%.

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John Lilburne

Re: Well done Google....

Who is enforcing anyone to pay and install crap?

Google isn't requiring everyone to install HTTPS certificates.

Perhaps not with this latest crap, but they are whining about rad markimg all non https sites, or at least that's the message I'm getting from my web host. Now I know that they are just trying to sell me shite, andI can probably use let's encrypt, but that is just something else taht needs installing, and maintaining.

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John Lilburne

Re: Class Libel Suit anyone ?

But I'd be wary of a business that DIDN'T want to pay the pittance that SSL certificates cost in order to secure their customer data.

Most websites aren't businesses, and don't store customer data. Fuck Google.

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John Lilburne

Re: PITA

Why should sysadmins do any work? Let the chrome browser disengage itself from the intertubes.

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John Lilburne

Re: Well done Google....

With the hosting company I use, it literally amounted to clicking a tick box.

Well good for you. But most people will have to pay, move their hosting site, or jump through hoops to get letsencypt to work.

For why? The majority of sites are informational blogs and such. Due to spammers (mostly from gmail), they don't have people signing up and posting comments, and they don't sell shite. So why the fuck do they need to pay for and install crap?

How are people in developing countries going to afford this shit?

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John Lilburne

Re: Class Libel Suit anyone ?

Nah! They've just broken the internet.

There will be so many warnings that people aren't going to take any notice and either move away from chrome or click straight through and add an exception. The same is going to happen with sites that don't have or need a SSL cert. Probably about 95% of all sites.

Why should people install or pay for something they don't need? If Google want all sites to have SSL then Google should pay for it.

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Electronic Frontier Foundation chap John Perry Barlow has died

John Lilburne

Before we all get wet eyed ...

JPB lyrics

So instead I've got a bottle and a girl who's just fourteen,

And a damn good case of the Mexicali Blues. Yeh!

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UK PM Theresa May orders review of online abuse laws in suffrage centenary speech

John Lilburne

Re: Bad Behaviour has Always Been There

Debate may be "coarsening" due to their own behaviour and examples.

Rarely though do they say to their opponent "Bitch I'm going to rape you until you are dead."

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Ever wondered why tech products fail so frequently? No, me neither

John Lilburne

Re: "cheap footwear"

both the £60 branded and £10 unbranded shoes were probably made by the same children

Most probably their siblings. The production system will be mostly the same but shadow system will lack the QC dept that the branded system has. So the £10 shoe may last as long as the £60 one, or maybe not.

What does happen though is that the branded version has a very small window before the counterfeits enter the market. In some case the counterfeits are out before the branded ones. This leads to ever increasing pressure to make the things obsolete, either by function or form to encourage consumer churn.

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John Lilburne

Re: Software testing?

The problem is perfectly outlined here:

"Evidently, they are my fault for not testing within the narrow confines of the script and can therefore be safely ignored."

QA tends to know how some functionality is supposed to be used, so they won't typically try to open a lock with a screwdriver. But apply the screwdriver to the lock and it will immediately bust apart.

At one point I'd take on a task of destructive testing some new code functionality I call it "Hammer & Smash" now most wouldn't use a negative, or zero tolerance but does the software accept one, and what happens afterwards? In other cases you'd apply the code to some situation that it was not designed for and watch it drive a 15000 rpm spindle into a ton of metal.

Not a realistic example come the cry. Perhaps, but given enough time I could produce a realistic example that invokes the same bug. There are situations that aren't being handled. Fecking fix em.

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Firefox to emit ‘occasional sponsored story’ in ads test

John Lilburne

Re: Bye Bye

A recent firefox update rendered a couple of the plugins that I've used for the last 10 years obsolete. So I went back to the 56 version of the browser and configured it never to download or update itself again. Version 56 does all that I want or need.

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John Lilburne

Exactly. How many centuries of FOSS development does it take to squander 500 million on security bug fixes?

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Google slaps mute button on stupid ads that nag you to buy stuff you just looked at

John Lilburne

Re: Does Google really not get it?

> So yeah, somewhere, somehow, there must be a lot of people clicking on ads.

Well if you stuff enough ads on a page chances are that someone will miss mouse or tap on it. Then HEY PRESTO you have a click.

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John Lilburne

Re: Nice PR

... and apparently for it to work you need to be logged into a Google account. So in order to kill tracker ads you need to be logged into account that tracks you anyway.

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RIP Ursula K Le Guin: The wizard of Earthsea

John Lilburne

Re: A good read?!

Daughter of Theodora Kroeber who wrote "ISHI In Two Worlds: A Biography of the last Wild Indian in North America"

https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B0042RV8OE/ref=dp-kindle-redirect?_encoding=UTF8&btkr=1

The Dispossessed being one of my favourite books alongside ISHI, and of course Bateson's Naven.

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Destroying the city to save the robocar

John Lilburne

Delivery Bots have to solve the Dalek problem

How do they get upstairs? Seriously how do they deliver to some apartment in the 10th floor of a block of flats? Don't many of the houses in San Francisco have a flight of steps up to the door? Not all entrances are at street level.

Additionally there are a number of trips that will involve these little beasts negotiating badly lit underpasses where they can be hijacked, and they won't be equipped with a sink plunger raygun.

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Your connection is not Brexit... we mean private: UK Tory party lets security cert expire

John Lilburne

Who cares? I got a panicy phone call from my webhost last month:

"Your website is compromised".

What are you talking about?

"Mumble, mumble, mumble."

Are you referring to lack of SSL cert?

"Yes, could be hacked, mumble, mumble, lose user log ins, mumble, mumble"

I don't fucking care, user logins are turned off, the site isn't selling anything. I'm the only one that has a login account. Now come back when there is actually a problem and not because you want to sell me some buggy SSL shite that I don't need.

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Nest's slick IoT burglar alarm catches crooks... while it eyes your wallet

John Lilburne

WTF with monthly charges. They only need to do something when the alarm triggers otherwise its money for doing fuck all. I installed our system 10+ years ago. It sounds an alarm and it rings me and 5 other numbers. I can arm, disarm and monitor it from my mobile. If the base unit is tampered with the outside siren is triggered, and the base unit has a battery backup.

IoT what a load of hype around bollocks.

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So you're 'agile', huh? I do not think it means what you think it means

John Lilburne

Re: Agile

I have 30+ developers working on an 25yo legacy app, split into 4 scrum teams, then there another 15-20 teams reusing part of our apps codebase. Now I know for certain that chunks of the code, written over the last 25 years, wasn't written to be used outside of the app. So if some outside team is reusing they will have had to refactor it, removing some of the dependencies on the app. That refactored code aint going back into the app's repository, they've cloned and modified it for their own purposes.

If I go and look at what other teams are putting back I see methods with comments that don't reflect what the code does, I see code that is redundant in its new form, that was necessary in its old form. With a bunch of teams self-organising to sling code into the their particular silo of the app in order to meet a sprint deadline the process of cargo cult programming takes on a life of its own.

I wrote some code a year ago and a couple of weeks later found a bug in it. Meanwhile I'd attended a sprint review of some other team that had reused the code. The demo should have triggered the bug, but it didn't they'd copied the code found the bug and fixed it in their specific app.

C'est la vie

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John Lilburne

Re: The main issue are those who turned it into a sort of religion...

One always suspects that they'll turn up with Thetan meters

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John Lilburne

Re: Agile

See none of the Agile twonks can actually say what is optimal. It is all hand waving and bluster. They didn't even know what issues we had with our old system, waxed on about no late nights or weekend working, when the 200 devies haven't done late nights or weekend working for over 20 years.

All the issues that we have Agile doesn't solve, it just gives us a bunch of extra shite. So instead of having 1 person work on something for 12 weeks we now have 4 people working on the same thing for 6 weeks. each of them finding the same issues and coding up a separate solution, each of them making changes which are incompatible with some other changes, all running about fixing up the fallout.

Then we have multiple teams finding an issue and solving it for their specific use case. Code gets copied from one place modified and siloed into another place, and all because they are running about with some false deadline being the end of sprint and the subsequent review.

And according to the Agile trainers we are meant to be fecking awesome, TWATS.

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OK Google: A stranger with stash of pirated films is spamming my Google Team Drive

John Lilburne

Hic shurely shum mishtake...

... Google and piracy on their property and not being able to do anything about it

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Facebook Messenger ... for who now? Zuck points his digital crack at ever younger kids

John Lilburne

90% of parents don't really understand it.

This is a common refrain which might have been true 20 years ago, but 90% of parents with 10 yo kids grew up with the internet. They know all about texting, messaging, whatsapp, and all the rest of the bullshit apps.

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John Lilburne

Back in the early 1980s a couple of my friends refused to have a TV. They kept getting visits from the TV licensing people who refused to believe that any one would NOT have a TV on purpose. That they could handle, but they eventually caved in when the school was asking the kids to discuss popular TV soap operas, and their 9 yo was having to support a football team that he'd never seen.

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Ex-cop who 'kept private copies of data' fingers Cabinet Office minister in pr0nz at work claims

John Lilburne

Re: The issue I have with this

"THE PARLIAMENT IS SOVEREIGN AND SHALL NOT BE BOUND."

Unless it is by Miss Whiplash and the fee of £1000 has been paid in advance.

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Mirror, mirror on the wall, who's the failest mobe of all?

John Lilburne

Re: Its not the day to day failure with apple stuff ...

Er back in September they managed to brick the iPod touch. You couldn't get back into it for several days (cos obviously they did it just before the weekend). That needed a factory reset, but that couldn't proceed cos the thing wouldn't boot back from the reset.

On the plus side the senior support team were good, and the lower level knew to escalate the issue quickly.

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John Lilburne

Its not the day to day failure with apple stuff ...

... that is the problem. It is the updates. When ever you get one of those you know that you'll probably need to set a day or two aside to get the thing back working properly afterwards.

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That 70s Show: Windows sprouts Sets and Timeline features

John Lilburne

Re: the 70's? *ANYTHING* but the 70's!

high school just a few years later, were instead bashing "80s music" (with a similarly narrow definition) and playing 70s rock on the quad during lunch.

I worked with one of those guys. I used to have a bunch of tapes in an unlocked cupboard, and he'd been surreptitiously taking a couple home to listen too. Eventually he started asking questions "Er when was this recorded?" 71, "when was this recorded?" 75. "When was this done?" 72. "What about X?" 72.

Lets just say that the decade started with "Bitches Brew" - now let the millennials top that.

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Want a new HDMI cable? No? Bad luck. You'll need one for HDMI 2.1

John Lilburne

the convenience of getting quickly where you need it instead of waiting.

Ha. I was in a PC World earlier in the week with about £100+ of stuff. One person on the checkout, couple of people in front of me. Checkout person was trying to find a till/card reader that worked. After 10 minutes I left the stuff on the counter and walked out.

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10 years of the Kindle and the curious incident of a dog in the day-time

John Lilburne

Most digitized books, especially those by Google, are atrocious when it comes to illustrations. They are indeed grey/black smudges lacking the detail of the originals. Mind you some of the hardcopy reprints of out-of-copyright books are equally atrocious. I recall a 'complete' Sherlock Holmes book where the illustrations were scanned with an over-the-top contrast. Comparing those illustrations with those in the original Strand Magazine was a revelation as to just how butchered some of these things can be.

That said I dislike e-books intensely they do not give me the same tactile feel. I can't quickly scan back through the pages to relocate something. Having read a book I can recall where in the book some information was, and whether it was on the right or left hand page or not. I cannot do that with an e-book. I mostly read non-fiction and like to jump about within the volume, again that is not convenient with e-readers.

So although we have a kindle it is mostly unused.

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'Gimme Gimme Gimme' Easter egg in man breaks automated tests at 00:30

John Lilburne

Unprofessional bollocks

All code has the potential to cause user issues. Adding unnecessary code is highly unprofessional.

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As Google clamps down, 'Droid developer warns 'breaking day' is coming

John Lilburne

Re: Congratulations!!!

'Making a crack down on ad fraud sound nefarious must have taken real effort.'

Except that if your device is known to be a prime target for fraud the marks will either avoid placing ads on the device, or demand a lower price per click to compensate for the 90% of fraudulent hits.

https://computer.howstuffworks.com/click-fraud.htm

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Google aims disrupto-tronic ray at intercoms. Yes, intercoms

John Lilburne

Re: Congratulations, Google

I'm sure that educating your offspring via loudspeaker is not at all going to make them feel like they're in bootcamp and you're the master sergeant (who likes their master sergeant in bootcamp ?).

But the Kids listen to their device. One could use this as a child minding service. Just have some pre-recorded messages which it barks out from time to time

Stop that.

Play nice.

Don't hit your [brother|sister].

Be quiet.

...

Leave the cat alone.

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Uber loses appeal against employment rights for workers

John Lilburne

Re: How far

Some 12 years ago my father was running a similar scheme where his workers were 'self -employed' but he directed where they went etc.HMRC were having none of it and declared that they were employees. If Uber get away with this then there are several £100 thousand the taxman owes me.

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Take off, ya hosers! Silicon Valley court says Google can safely ignore Canadian search ban

John Lilburne

Re: Simple really

Meanwhile a federal court has enjoined Google to remove search results for copyright infringing site SciHub:

https://torrentfreak.com/us-court-grants-isps-and-search-engine-blockade-of-sci-hub-171106

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Simon's Cat app rapped for random 'racy' advert

John Lilburne

Typical ...

... it ain't our fault guv its the algorithm, we just take the money, and BTW don't keep asking for any taxes.

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One-third of mobile users receive patchy to no indoor coverage

John Lilburne

Yep mobile reception is pants in the village. I can just about get a signal in one of the bedrooms.

The power company came out about 2 years ago to install a smart meter but abandoned the installation because they couldn't get a mobile signal. Why they need a mobile signal for monitoring energy usage is any one's guess.

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USB stick found in West London contained Heathrow security data

John Lilburne

Why would you give your data over to some cloudy thing. Doing so leaves you vulnerable to a having the cloudy thing shuttered at any time. Ask those that used Yahoo Photos, or a whole bunch of Google apps. Yeah use them as another form of backup but keep your data elsewhere and don't be dumb enough to expose yourself to the risks of being suckered into relying on some cloudy API

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HMRC boss defends shift to AWS, says they got 50% knocked off

John Lilburne

Re: Of course not

"Uncle (sic) Sam is indeed the top Big Brother these days. Google and Facebork are mere also rans."

Perhaps. But they do have the excuse of stopping bombers, organized crime, and other criminal activities. Whereas Google, facebook et al, slurp up your life firstly the better google up your bandwidth in order to try to sell you shit you don't need, and secondly to manipulate your opinions and dull your senses.

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National Audit Office: We'll be in a world of pain with '90s border tech post-Brexit

John Lilburne

Re: Brexit?

Upgrading the system will be the same, Tory EU idiocy or not, but the thing will be greatly worse as pre idiocy one could have relied on the systems within the EU to track thinks like Freight IMPORT/EXPORT.

Of course if one is simply concerned about counting those of a swarthy complexion then it might seem to be the same thing. Though why it would cost a £beeeellllllliiiion is anyones guess:

https://www.amazon.co.uk/tally-counter/s?ie=UTF8&page=1&rh=i%3Aaps%2Ck%3Atally%20counter

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Google's pay-to-play 'remedy' is warming Eurocrats' hearts

John Lilburne

What is the point of price comparison sites?

The sellers tend to compete amongst themselves such that the prices coalesce. Can't recall there being much of a price difference between resellers from any thing I've bought recently.

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BoJo, don't misuse stats then blurt disclaimers when you get rumbled

John Lilburne

The EU is just a slush fund for farmers.

Not quite true. It is a slush fund to mega agribusiness mainly located in the UK.

For years the EU have wanted to cap the amount paid per farmer rather than having it based on acreage. The UK has always opposed this as the UK farming industry is dominated by just a handful of companies that own most of the industry. IOW the UK government has been supporting a transfer of money to the mega rich.

https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2013/jul/01/farm-subsidies-blatant-transfer-of-cash-to-rich

This is why BREXIT will NOT result in a reduction of payout to Tory sponsors.

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