* Posts by John Lilburne

930 posts • joined 3 Dec 2009

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Google listens to New Zealand just long enough to ignore it

John Lilburne
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You are on to something there. When a French ISP blocked Google ads, Google whined that it was costing them $millions a week.

https://www.telegraph.co.uk/technology/internet/9781425/Advertisers-angered-as-French-ISP-rolls-out-ad-blocking-software.html

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Zuckerberg gets a night off: Much-hyped Euro grilling was all smoke, absolutely no heat

John Lilburne
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Re: Pub Fight

Just chuck Zuck down an oubliette, and tell Trump that Russia was all Zuck's fault. Job done.

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Hitler 'is dead' declares French prof who gazed at dictator's nashers

John Lilburne
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Re: Still I don't understand why Russian doesn't allow full tests.

Both of them need to keep Alex Jones frothing at nothing at all.

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US Congress mulls expanding copyright yet again – to 144 years

John Lilburne
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Re: how long before...

OK this is how stupid the EFF and Doctrow are being about this. Without the classics act the copyright protection is not one single Federal statute but is based on State by State protection and some of States do indeed have perpetual copyright terms. The EFF and Doctrow should careful that they don't get what they ask for.

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John Lilburne
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Re: RIAA factoid #17: the Missing Mozarts

Of the top of my head both Schubert and Handel made a shed load of money from copyright.

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John Lilburne
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Re: Crony Capitalism at it's best

"I'm reminded of a lyric from David Bowie's Life on Mars:"

I'm reminded that Bowie's estate can now claim license for each time Spotify et al stream that song. Odd that had he recorded it in 1972 they would have been no issues. But hey lets have the EFF etc tell us why a song recorded in on 01/01/1972 get a Federal copyright but one recorded on 31/12/1971 doesn't.

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John Lilburne
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"Curiously, 14 years is also what some (modern) économistes have found to be the ideal copyright duration..."

The LOTR was published in 1955 a film version was produced some 56 years later and 38 years after JRRT's death. Accordingly it should have just been a freebie to Hollywood?

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Android devs prepare to hit pause on ads amid Google GDPR chaos

John Lilburne
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Re: Consent

"Hang on, that can't be right as it is the opposite of how Google are selling their services....I'm so confused"

Just because that can do X doesn't mean that X is effective. It used to be that tobacco companies advertised their products as good for your throat etc, one wonders why it is that tech companies don't have to prove their claims?

https://www.vice.com/en_uk/article/kzpajy/12-slightly-unbelievable-adverts-for-booze-and-cigarettes

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Govts should police... Google's algorithms, says News Corp chief

John Lilburne
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Google brings nothing to this table ...

All of your examples posit something different replacing the old. Google does not bring anything different to the table its the same people generating the content, the content is the same all that is happening here is that Google devalues what monetary value that content had.

Devalue it enough and you end up with click bait, fake news, uninformed tripe, and regurgitate pulp music, films, and novels.

Oh ...!

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John Lilburne
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Re: Google gives stuff for free!?!?

Incorrect News Corp had a business long before the founders of Google were conceived. Similarly writers, film companies, musicians, and photographers had a business long before the parents of the Google founders went through puberty, and should Google and its like disappear overnight all of those groups will still have a business. This is not a symbiotic relationship it is a parasitic one.

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John Lilburne
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Google gives stuff for free!?!?

"since they give away free stuff (often other people's stuff) for free - then the consumer always wins."

Just what percentage of the IP that Google gives away is Google's to give away compared to that of other people?

As far as I can see if it wasn't for exploiting other people's IP Google wouldn't have a business at all.

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Shining lasers at planes in the UK could now get you up to 5 years in jail

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Southend Airport tests drone detection system

John Lilburne
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“We do not have any outstanding issues ..."

But, but, but ... isn't Southend-on-Sea chav centrral.

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Make masses carry their mobes, suggests wig in not-at-all-creepy speech

John Lilburne
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Doesn't matter

It will be extensible. Your partner, friend, child will have it on and it doesn't take much to intuit that if A is at location X then B will almost certainly be there too. Besides you all have a habit of signing into FB with A is at X with B and C.

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Cisco cancels all YouTube ads, then conceals cancellation

John Lilburne
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Re: priorities

Ah but some biz don't want to have their ads on a page with videos showing how to mainline heroine, or cut someone's head off, or which are the best anti-black/jew/homosexual chants de jour.

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Sueballs flying over Facebook's Android app data slurping

John Lilburne
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Android is eminently pwnable ...

... then it seems.

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Password re-use is dangerous, right? So what about stopping it with password-sharing?

John Lilburne
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Re: A site might know if two visitors to that site have the same password

"The algorithm for password salting should include the username in the hashing process"

I would have thought that the time that the user created the account would be used then "user same login, same password" would be different across multiple sites and uname:pword-hash would be useless to hackers without the third part of the puzzle.

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Firefox to feature sponsored content as of next week

John Lilburne
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Re: Really?

Quarter of a $billion a year in software development. WTF it is a browser its not as if the problem is unknown and its not as if they are starting from scratch each year, and they happen to have a bunch of freetards contributing to it. Then a another $60 million of typists.

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John Lilburne
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Re: Not buying it - This is a badly timed Slippery Slope

Didn't they get $300 million a year from Google back in 2012 in order to be the default search engine?

https://www.zdnet.com/article/google-paying-mozilla-300-million-per-year-for-search-deal/

Then yahoo were paying them $300 million for the last three years, and now we are back with Google again.

https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2017-11-14/google-pays-to-put-search-engine-back-on-firefox-browser-in-u-s

Can someone explain how it is that they've blown through $1.5 billion?

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if dev == woman then dont_be(asshole): Stack Overflow tries again to be more friendly to non-male non-pasty coders

John Lilburne
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Re: "Mansplaining"

"received a response that begun by explaining how to use a ratchet wrench."

That sounds exactly like StackOverflow. Either that or there is someone answering the question that they wished you had asked, or whining that the question was already asked back in 2008.

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Audiophiles have really taken to the warm digital tone of streaming music

John Lilburne
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I have to admit that streaming and downloading is more practical.

I have a handful of downloaded albums and I always have the thought that I'm missing something or other. But then I do mostly have works which benefit from liner notes etc. An English translation of some Mande lyrics tends to be helpful.

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UK consumer help bloke Martin Lewis is suing Facebook over fake ads

John Lilburne
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Re: 15 year olds and advertising

Under 18s can purchase food, clothes and property, both of which are a form of contract. The under 18 may at some point repudiate some contracts, but not those entered into for basics such as food and clothes. However, having repudiated the contract they cannot then retain the benefits of the contract.

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John Lilburne
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The Royal Mail accepts items and delivers them given the correct postage. It doesn't examine the contents. FB would like you to believe that it similarly accepts money for an advert and doesn't examine the content. Yet it examines all other content that goes through its site and further targets user based on the advert's content. A question to ask is how many adverts for semtex, or explicit porn are distributed on FB and if they can keep those things off grannies FB page they can keep all sorts of stuff off too.

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Apple's magical quality engineering strikes again: You may want to hold off that macOS High Sierra update...

John Lilburne
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Re: Apple Update Time

XP was the OS that they mostly screwed over. In fact what usually went wrong was the iPod driver. Why they would want to update a working driver with a copy of itself is any one's guss. But after an install iTunes could never access the iPod nano, and the driver reported being screwed. So long as you re-installed iTunes before anything else was reloaded onto a new build one was OK, but 6+ months later an iTunes update would screw the driver again. When borked I had a number of Apple support people try to fix the issue all to no avail. After the last cycle I turned off apple updates. The screw up doesn't happen on win10, but they did manage to fuxor the iPod touch with an iOS update last September, something about the update looking for data on a non-existent/badly configured apple server.

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John Lilburne
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Re: Apple Update Time

Apple updates are like a box of chocolate covered turds.

iTunes updates caused me to reinstall windows on 4 occasions. Last autumn they bricked the iPod touch for 4 days. Every other iTunes update screws up the last.fm plugin.

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Tech bribes: What's the WORST one you've ever been offered?

John Lilburne
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Re: First of all, I don't accept bribes. Ever. Personal policy.

I'm not above rubies and emeralds.

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Facebook faces foe formation in facial fingering fight

John Lilburne
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Re: There are news Facebook would like to activate face recognition in Europe...

On flickr user A's ability to tag user B in a photo is controlled by user B. Been like that for years and years.

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Cambridge Analytica's ex-CEO decides not to front UK Parliamentary Committee again

John Lilburne
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Re: Can they summons Zuck?

"Haven't they learned a lesson that WE the People don't want this shit. "

There are numerous people and organisations that scan all photos uploaded to FB doing facial recognition and the Niqab won't help because they can also use gait recognition now too.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dNZrq2iK87k

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John Lilburne
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Re: Still waiting....

Doesn't need to be Russian per se. Authoritarian right (or left) wing fucktards stick together.

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'Dear Mr F*ckingjoking': UK PM Theresa May's mass marketing missive misses mark

John Lilburne
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Re: Dear valued donor...

"Hard to image that a party volunteer would be so childish, even if unpaid."

Boris and Mogg spring to mind.

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UK.gov expected to quit controversial harvesting of schoolchildren's nationality data

John Lilburne
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Re: But....

And besides there is a Google app for that anyway.

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COPPA load of this FTC complaint: YouTube accused of collecting children's data

John Lilburne
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Re: B, but... I also watch my little poney!

Bronies, doncha just luv em.

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John Lilburne
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Re: Heaven Forbid

"how do they know wether they are under 13?"

By deduction and common sense. Someone that is watching primarily toy and cartoon vids is more likely to be a child than a 30s something. It doesn't take AI or any advanced algorithms to work that out.

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Furious gunwoman opens fire at YouTube HQ, three people shot

John Lilburne
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Re: Of all places

"What will is finding the root cause and fixing that."

Well in situations like this it is either a pissed off spouse, or an out-of-sorts employee. A third option given that it is YT would be someone aggrieved about the abysmal rates per video stream.

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Mac fans' eyes mist over: Someone's re-created HyperCard

John Lilburne
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Re: That reminds me...

"I may be wrong, but I think a Windows analogue also showed up, called ToolBook."

Apparently they were all based on an AtariST program called Zoomracks.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zoomracks

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Parents blame brats' slipping school grades on crap internet speeds

John Lilburne
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Until the last 18mths I had internet speeds of approx 4Mbit. At times it could be 1.5Mb and at good times 5Mbit. This was plenty enough for accessing credibility impaired sites like wikipedia and you could listen to some YT video, it might take you a long, long time to download some ripped blu-ray film but they shouldn't be doing that anyway.

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Zucker for history: What I learnt about Facebook 600 years ago

John Lilburne
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Re: Good article

"English Protestantism started because Henry VIII wanted to get he leg over Anne Boleyn."

Oh it started long before that with the Lollards, and we now know that H8 could have got his leg over Boleyn if he'd sent the Vatican a couple of cart loads of choirboys.

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Cambridge Analytica CEO suspended – and that's not even the worst news for them today

John Lilburne
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Re: Shame.

Classifying other people as non-human is a slippery slope towards fascism and the final solution.

Think it through.

I did and it isn't the same. With regards to the holocaust that was perpetrated against people who could not help being Jewish, Slavic, Gypsy, Homosexual, or having a genetic illness.

In the cases here we have a group of people that choose to be utter bellends, and lying bastards.

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Mozilla wants to seduce BOFHs with button-down Firefox

John Lilburne
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Re: Put it out of its misery

Same thing here. I went back to v56 and set the option to never update again. I can't be arsed to screw about finding some different system that works, and why should I. FF nags at me about being out-of-date from time to time but fuck it.

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Former Google X bloke's startup unveils 'self flying' electric air taxi

John Lilburne
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Re: Waaah!

I want Page, et al to be flying in them all the time. What could possibly go wrong?

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Tech giants should take the rap for enabling fake news, boffins tell EU

John Lilburne
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Re: Too big

'I've never seen an example where they just go out and use that as an argument.'

Perhaps not directly, but they get their astroturfers and shills, such as the EFF and Public Knowledge to make the claim that anything that affects their balance sheet will BREAK TEH INNERTUBES. In fact they use the same bot and useful idiots techniques as the Russians. Example SOPA and that recent thing regarding sexual exploitation FOSTA which they claimed would BREAK TEH INNERTUBES but apparently hasn't.

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John Lilburne
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It is because the world is full of ignorant twats

Once upon a time we got emails from friends, relatives, and acquaintances warning us about some nonsense or other. It is why scopes was created so that we could point them to the fact that some ill little girl did not want postcards, that having a system32 directory did not mean you have a very bad virus, and that Dihydrogen Monoxide was parody:

http://www.dhmo.org/facts.html

All of that bullshit has now transferred from email to facebook, and our penchant for passing on the weird remains undiminished.

Note: The gubmint is not spraying poison trails from aircraft, there are no secret cities buried under the Mojave Dessert, and Boris is not going to be putting an extra £350 million a week into the NHS.

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Tim Berners-Lee says regulation of the web may be needed

John Lilburne
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We might be able to fix them, but removing their ability to hide behind immunities like the DMCA, and the Communications Decency Act. Frankly a company that is pulling in $billions a year from the exploitation of these acts doesn't deserve the immunity.

The immunities were put in place to protect a nascent web, so allow startups and small forums to be protected from the actions of malignant others on their systems, but at a certain level of user activity those immunities should cease and those running the systems need to take responsibility, and be held liable if they don't fix problems that occur on their web properties.

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John Lilburne
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Too true.

20+ years ago the web had a load of interesting sites, containing quality information. Since then it has become 'democratized' to the extent that it is easy to post a 140+ characters, or ctr-C ctrl-V some one else's image, music, or video to Facigoo. What hasn't happened is a simplification of creating and managing your own content site.

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123 Reg suffers deja vu: Websites restored from August 2017 backups amid storage meltdown

John Lilburne
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Re: Well

It depends is the corruption due to some fuck up at their end?

My webhost upgraded/moved my website to a new server and in the process only copied over a tenth of a perfectly good database. Now whilst I did have an up-to-date backup, I wasn't going to tell them that. Let them sweat and find the original that they should have backed up before embarking on move stuff about. Took them about a day.

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John Lilburne
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The web is ephemeral ...

Any data on it has the lifespan of a spooged on wad of tissues. Get over it.

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We need baby Googles, say search specialists… and one surprising VC

John Lilburne
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Re: It rubs the Monopoly on it's skin, or else it gets the antitrust again...

Youtube - constantly declaring war on it's own creators but still nothing else comes close to as good. Vimeo? No chance.

The issue here is that the internet is a winner takes all machine. Once certain level of take-up is present on one platform the rest tend to fold as all their users migrate. Once that happens you have a monopoly and any new entrants are unable to compete. Niche startups get swallowed by the big players.

Who wins the game is completely random. I don't recall in the early 2000s that Google was any better than any of the other search engines, I do recall that a bunch of nerds and geeks declared it was so, but I never saw any empirical evidence to backup the claims.

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Use of HTTPS among top sites is growing, but weirdly so is deprecated HTTP public key pinning

John Lilburne
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Because then attackers

"because then attackers can no longer identify high-value targets based on the fact that they use encryption."

Why should the rest of us effectively pay either for SSL certs, or in the time spent installing and keeping it up to date, just to help the banks, amazon, google et al? Let them secure their own stuff. too often we end up subsidizing large corps. Fuck em one and all.

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John Lilburne
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"It's also about ensuring ..."

And for most websites it doesn't matter one bit. No one is going to put up a spoof website of say diptera.info, britishbugs.org.uk, or tolweb.org. There are millions of websites like those, none of which need SSL certs.

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John Lilburne
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Re: I only just noticed...

"Holy crap - when did that happen?"

Pretty recent, I think, within the last year. Some one in accounts got suckered by a Google FUD.

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