* Posts by 0laf

1015 posts • joined 25 Nov 2009

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Flight Simulator's DRM fighter nosedives into Chrome's cache

0laf
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Headmaster

Re: The first virus EVER was a DRM tool.

IBM PC virus, yes.

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0laf
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FAIL

Lol

"We're really sorry you spotted the password snaffling malware in our product. But be reassured were weren't hacked at all we really really meant to do it. Mmmmkay".

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Microsoft ends notifications for Win-Phone 7.5 and 8.0

0laf
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Thumb Down

Still got my 920. It was a great phone. I must remember to switch it on to update while I still can.

MS half arsedness killed it, the OS was very good, the Nokia made devices were very solid.

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Opportunity knocked? Rover survives Martian winter, may not survive budget cuts

0laf
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I would have thought (naive I know) that since it cost such a colossal amoutd of money to get the rover to Mars best value would be to use the damn things as long as possible.

Every day this thing lasts (and does useful science) must present a massive cost saving over sending another robot to do a similar task.

Even if it is mostly done doing useful science again I'd have thought that even staying switched on as no more than a martial weather station it could presents pretty good value as a PR stunt.

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BBC presenter loses appeal, must pay £420k in IR35 crackdown

0laf
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Friend of mine is a tax specialist account and and a straight one. He can tell many tales of former customers and friends of his own who left his business to go to other accountants that told them what they wanted to hear i.e. they they don't have to pay tax, that they can get cars for free etc etc all the accountancy myths. Almost like an accountancy version of a 419.

Several of these people/businesses are now in sequestration after audit by HMRC and will be bankrupted.

It's almost like the accountancy version of a 419.

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Not cool, dude: Brit web host Hotchilli Internet freezes itself for good

0laf
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Mushroom

Re: Closed to serve you better

In fairness there are quite a few companies that could improve their customer service by imploding

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World+dog ignores Rubin's Wonderdroid

0laf
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Funny that

A new phone appears that is not very innovative, cheap, expensive, faster or bigger/smaller than anything else in the incredibly over saturated mobile phone market and it get a universal "meh!".

Whodathunkit.

Shockaroony.

But I'd really like to get the guy that sold this to the venture capitalists and extracted millions out of them. That guy has some skillz.

That's some real "ice to the Eskimos" selling there.

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Brit regulator pats self on back over nuisance call reduction: It's just 4 billion now!

0laf
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Indeed an old school colleague of mine was sacked and threatened with arrest for failing to deliver junk mail.

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0laf
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Re: The landline is now a liability

My folks have BT Call Protect.

They're very pleased with it. It's probably the only bit of praise I've heard directed at BT. Ever.

They got a lot of nuisance calls and now none.

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0laf
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FAIL

Re: The landline is now a liability

I only have a land line to get broadband. If I could drop it I would but on investigation I can't, not yet anyway.

After Cock-wombles Plusnet took six weeks to turn on the phone line, and after they had issued me with no less than six new numbers in those weeks the very first call I got (FSM's honest truth) was "We understand you've been in an accident".

And since then I'd suggest that very nearly 100% of calls have been either accident claims scams, green-deal or PPI. The the rest have been wrong numbers bar 2 calls from my Mum.

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NASA budget shock: Climate studies? GTFO. We're making the Moon great again, says Trump

0laf
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Boffin

There is probably more chance Elon Musk will achieve all these things than NASA. They are projects that are all longer than one or two election cycles so they are doomed to be cancelled change or otherwise interfered with by politicians at least once in the project lifetime.

But sad really.

On the surface, back to the moon and on to Mars sounds good.

The end of the ISS is maybe inevitable. I don't know if it's getting towards the end of it's life anyway.

Would be nice if they could build a large habitat with a life of maybe 50 or 100yr. That's maybe not even possible.

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Secret weekend office bonk came within inch of killing sysadmin

0laf
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Re: Near death experience ?

Wasn't there some poor chap that walked through door that had no walkway on the other side and fell into a vat of boiling something or other?

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UK data watchdog whacks £300k fine on biz that made 9 million nuisance calls

0laf
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Trollface

Getting to the point now where you just have to ignore any number that starts 0203

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So you accidentally told a million people they are going to die: What next? Your essential guide...

0laf
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Childcatcher

They should have just treated it as an extreme test. If it caused panic and people didn't run to the shelters then the planning has failed and but the test was successful.

Clearly that sort of testing is high risk but it produces the best data to refine the response plans.

Someone who creeps around with Teflon shoulder pads might have said something like that.

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Bring the people 'beautiful' electric car charging points, calls former transport minister

0laf
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New development near my office will have EV charging points for every house. Don't know the detail of where they will be or to what standard but they'll have them.

I do wonder what the capacity of the local grid is to support them if every house was to actually use them.

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F-35 flight tests are being delayed by onboard software snafus

0laf
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High drama in development.

Followed by

Initially absolutely crap

And eventually

Actually quite good

Does seem to be the way of military equipment. Even the venerable M16 wasn't very good to start with.

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0laf
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Please wait...We're getting Windows for Warplanes ready for you....we've got some great new features for you.....70%...71%....65%

Error 0XG-4450XGX

BANG!

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Dodgy parking firms to be denied access to Brit driver database

0laf
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Trollface

Lol. Try Perth. Now they're going to fine you if you park your car and cross the road to go for a piss.

https://www.eveningtelegraph.co.uk/fp/motorists-hit-100-fines-tayside-car-park-due-bizarre-terms/

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You can't ignore Spectre. Look, it's pressing its nose against your screen

0laf
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Sounds like they're left with insurance as a mitigation.

Who has started selling spectre insurance then?

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PC not dead, Apple single-handedly propping up mobe market, says Gartner

0laf
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Windows

Do they only count complete systems as "PC sales"?

i.e I've just spent the best part of a grand on components to rebuild my PC.

Is that a PC sale?

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Wanna design a chip that talks to silly-fast GDDR6? You'll have to talk to Rambus, too

0laf
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Gimp

Bloody hell I'd forgotten all about Rambus and RDRAM. Flashback to 2000

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What is.GDPR? Survey suggests smaller firms living under rocks as EU privacy regs loom

0laf
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Angel

Re: Reminds me of PCI Compliance

No he'd be right. They don't need to retain that data to provide the service he has contracted them for so in fact they would not be permitted to retain it in the first place without consent.

And that consent must be informed and freely given and just as easy to remove as to give.

For the consumer and the citizen the GDPR is a very good thing indeed.

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0laf
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FAIL

GDPAhhh

GDPR is the pork barrel and the W2k bug of today.

Honest truth is that if you have been acting reasonably under the DPA (or European equivalents) you will probably manage just fine under GDPR. Ok you've got a bit of work to do but you're not likely to get dragged out into the street and shot by your regional ICO.

If you've been playing fast and loose with data taking the £500k fine as an operational risk then you're probably deep in the shit and best start digging hard.

This is possibly why I've heard of some banks paying mad money for consultants to do GDPR work.

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S for Security is Google owner Alphabet's new favorite letter

0laf
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So Google owns Virus Total.

And this was a good idea because....

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It's 2018 and… wow, you're still using Firefox? All right then, patch these horrid bugs

0laf
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Trollface

Why the Snark?

Sorry I quite like FF and I found the v57+ to be fast and stable. Much better than the non-quantum versions.

Previously I had to switch to Edge to use my online banking. For some reason bank sites are the biggest PITA for me in browsers.

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Is the writing on the wall for on-premises IT? This survey seems to say so

0laf
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Pirate

What's stopping them? Greed mostly

We think about it we really do, but suppliers seem to look at the change to SAAS as an opportunity to price gouge horrifically and making keeping things on site look cheap.

Stack of money icon needed.

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Take a bow, TalkTalk, Post Office, Vodafone! You win most-whinged-about telcos award

0laf
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Is there anyone that isn't shite and doesn't cost a fortune?

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Why did I buy a gadget I know I'll never use?

0laf
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Re: Professional hoarding

I have a strong longing for a landrover defender despite knowing them to be pretty crap.

I fear getting one would simply feed my addiction to gathering odd tools and widgets and add odd car parts to it.

Saying that I've a washing machine, fridge and tumble drying in me garage, just in case. I need to get them to a charitable concern

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0laf
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I still have and regularly use the Texas scientific calculator I used at school in the early 90s. It's at least 25yr old.

Until the last house move I also had boxes of Pentium II processors, some mobos and assorted bits. In my parents loft I have a P1 200MHz MMx with a Voodoo 1 card I bought in 1996.

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0laf
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Sprouts...

Par boiled then roasted with pancetta and Parmigiano.

It's wrong to work in IT in any way and not gather a wide collection of shite that might, one day, be needed.

We've all got stories of needing that one weird cable and just so happening to still have it. I like having old gadgets around, especially PDAs for some reason.

TBH I'd still use a b/w LCD Palm / Psion as a calendar if the software would still work.

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Don't panic... but our fragile world is drifting away from the Sun

0laf
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Boffin

I was thinking more about orbital insertions (oo'er). They send a probe to Saturn, it takes 5yr to get there and the planet is a couple of meters further away than they thought.

I guess they deal with tolerances of kilometres not meters.

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0laf
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Boffin

Is this big enough that NASA needs to take it into account went sending it's more distant probes?

Oh, bloody hell a proper question, I feel a bit weak.

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PPI-pusher makes 75 MEEELLION nuisance calls, lands £350k fine

0laf
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Re: there's a silver lining

My parents have just moved to BT and are very pleased with the call blocking options

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0laf
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Mushroom

If they would kindly give the "I believe you've been in an accident" lot a kick in the bollocks I'd appreciate that.

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Destroying the city to save the robocar

0laf
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Angel

Re: Obviously the solution is....

I had a thought that started out silly - "ha, no you want automated Segways"

Then got serious.

Automated wheelchairs. Person who can't control a chair but could control an adapted app could set a destination, "Take me to Argos / the pharmacy / Waypoint 3/ somewhere accessible for lunch". Chair has all the automated car mcguffery but can also go in pedestrian areas and can use your big company AI to take the client where they need to go.

Could update 'things' in shops too, "Mr Smith will arrive in 5min, he'll need some help to pack his prescription", "here is Mr Smith food order".

One of my less stupid ideas I think.

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Private submarine builder charged with murder of journalist

0laf
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Wow so the court didn't believe that she banged her head before dismembering herself and hopping overboard.

He's a nasty piece of work and hopefully he won't walk the streets again.

We're lucky he just wasn't very bright, but I wouldn't be shocked to find out he has a bad record of events of which this is just the culmination.

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Childcare is a pain in the bum and so is HMRC's buggy subsidies site

0laf
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The 'Child free' brigade often forget they'll need a supply of young workers to wipe their arses in their dotage

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0laf
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FAIL

Digitally transformed

Welcome to digital. Where you need to use your finger to dial a number to go on the phone to fix a problem with the badly designed, probably never maintained website.

But don't worry and don't bother complaining. The Contractor who was employed to deliver the site no longer works for us so you can't ask for him to be sacked. But no one else who know anything about it works here now either.

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Users clutch refilled Box boxen after 'empty' folder panic

0laf
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Facepalm

But it's in the Cloud so it must be safe. The salesdroid told the director who told the manager and he told me.

Nothing ever goes wrong so why would I ever need a backup or worry about an SLA or a contract or any of that nonsense. Or data protection, or hacking or...

It's not like clouds are gaseous ethereal structures is it?

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Why did top Home Office civil servant lobby Ofcom for obscure kit ban?

0laf
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AKA "The Dilbert Principle".

"The Dilbert principle refers to a 1990s theory by Dilbert cartoonist Scott Adams stating that companies tend to systematically promote their least-competent employees to management (generally middle management), in order to limit the amount of damage they are capable of doing."

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'Mummy, what's felching?' Tot gets smut served by Android app

0laf
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Unhappy

Googe gif search nastiness

Other unpleasant weirdness..

Just yesterday following a conversation with my significant other about coffee I put the word "cortado" into the Google GBoard gif search on my iPhone.

I was expecting gifs relating to a short milky coffee.

Instead I got fairly graphic gifs of people cutting their arms/wrists/legs and other forms of self harming.

After 30min of searching I found some sort of feedback to report this behaviour.

Checking now it's still doing it (not that I thought Google would do anything after my message). The only idea I came up with is that "cortado" means 'cut' in Portuguese.

But why a UK English phone brings up wrist slitting instead of coffee I don't know.

A normal google image search doesn't show anything like this.

I'd be interested if anyone else sees behaviour on GBoard this or if it's just my phone that is fucked up.

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US shoppers abandon PC makers in hour of need

0laf
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Boffin

The need for most people is gone or going. The PC was the gate to the printer but now QR tickets on phone are now being widely accepted so you don't need the printer and if you don't need the printer you don't need the PC wired to it.

A PC on/under a desk with a big monitor and a full sized keyboard is still the best device to do work on. But for a lot of people they're not doing heavy number crunching 'work' they're doing a bit of typing and devices are coming which will allow them to use the big screen and keyboard without the big box.

Continuum could have been a winner there if MS wasn't so fucking awful at being innovative as opposed to selling licenses for slightly updated version of the same shit for the last 20yr.

Gamers will still like a big box, tinkerers like me will still like a big box, but we're a shrinking minority.

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Think tank: Never mind WannaCry, update NHS IT systems for RoboDoc

0laf
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Facepalm

Facepalm

Typical C-level / vendor response. Never minds the basics look at the shiny.

I think the NHS needs to get its shit together on its IT foundations before getting hot and wet over bleeding edge AI and robotics. Or it'll probably end up as a literal bleeding edge when the AI isn't patched and they have to pay some Russians 3 bitcoins to decrypt it.

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Heart of darkness: Inside the Osówka underground city

0laf
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Re: Maybe one day we will also visit Cold War underground facilities

Secret Bunker in Fife - http://www.secretbunker.co.uk/

Not on the scale of this but worth a visit if you're in the area and just a short drive from Crail to get something nice at the Lobster Hut at the harbour.

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Brit transport pundit Christian Wolmar on why the driverless car is on a 'road to nowhere'

0laf
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Holmes

I think, that the problem with driverless cars will always be liability.

If I as the driver will always have to be liable for the actions the car takes, and therefore will always have to be alert, sober and able to take control then really what's the point. As it's been demonstrated if I'm observing the car drive and not driving I'll quickly lose concentration to the point of not being able to take over at short notice even if I'm not asleep.

Until I can pass liability to the manufacturer and at that point climb into the back of the car blind drunk and go to sleep after slurring "home James" then I struggle to see how this can be used practically.

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Cortana. Whatever happened to world domination?

0laf
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Facepalm

MS likes to kill its kids doesn't it.

WinPho8 was actually pretty good at what it did, but MS couldn't quite be bothered to put the effort in to compete so it died.

Now Cortana, admittedly I pretty much hate all of these assistants but at least Cortana would read out my texts in the car by shouting at her. Siri won't.

Then there was Zune

How many abortive projects has MS had over the years? They must have pissed billions up the wall.

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Cabinet reshuffle leaves UK digital policy and GDS rudderless. And now the news...

0laf
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Whenever anyone tries to use 'digital' in that way I do like to raise the middle finger and ask them if this is what they meant.

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1980s sci-fi movies: The thrill of being not quite terrified on mum's floral sofa

0laf
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Re: CGI is killing sci-fi

I dunno, I can enjoy a film that's just for kids if it's done well. I really enjoy the Despicable Me films. I seem to be in a minority that really liked the 3rd one but maybe I'm just the right age to get all the 80s references right down to the wallpaper.

But I also enjoyed the Cars and Planes films. Those were made for 6yr old boys with no concession to adults (except Cars 2 it sucked).

My son was bored at Last Jedi. I liked the last two Disney SW films. The Force Awakens was just a homage for Ep4 but that was ok because it was done pretty well. Rogue One I really enjoyed, I think it's one of the better SW films ever made, up there with Empire. Last Jedi was just disappointing, it was a beautiful film with a terrible story.

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0laf
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Angel

Re: CGI is killing sci-fi

I remember Mathilda May in that rather than Patrick Stewart

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MPs sceptical of plan for IT to save the day after UK quits customs union

0laf
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Blah blah blah leverage cloud

Blah blah digital services

Blah blah blah transformational government

Blah blah E-commerce solution

Blah Big data AI informatics

There all done, Minister feel all better now.

Shiny electric magic make everything nice now, Brexit go bye bye

I'll take my €5 million in non-consecutive notes thanks

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