* Posts by Notas Badoff

797 posts • joined 27 Oct 2009

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Soyuz later! Russia might exit satellite launch business

Notas Badoff
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At those prices...

For those prices there has got to be a market for "eternal repose" for billionaires. What a hook!

"Look down on everyone, for eternity, for only $62 million."

And for only $90 million, "You *can* take it with you."

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You're a govt official. You accidentally slap personal info on the web. Quick, blame a kid!

Notas Badoff
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Govt publishes unpublic public documents! Details at <random> o'clock.

Someone said "Give me a script I can run to upload the latest PDF to the site." Script says here you go, the next consecutive number was '1242'. What, you demand complicated interactions with public servants and 32 hex digit UUIDs? Hahaha.

The core point here is, when is a document *published* ? If I stick a magazine on the shelf at the corner drug store, is it not published and available to all comers?

Crap, now I'm nervous I downloaded all those IETF RFCs in sequence.

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What most people think it looks like when you change router's admin password, apparently

Notas Badoff
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Re: FUD

"...or have compromised a machine already on the network."

Only every PC that connects to the web and allows Javascript execution! You obviously have no idea how capable of network activity browser Javascript is.

You are uninformed. Oh, strange, that's the topic, isn't it?

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B-Ark passengers to control most IT spend from 2019 onwards

Notas Badoff
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Re: Not quite correct.

Ha ha, you kill me. Here, have some leaves.

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They're back! 'Feds only' encryption backdoors prepped in US by Dems

Notas Badoff
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Re: As I've said before...

I ask only this. If you wish to continue insisting there is a workable backdoor, then we get to insist on writing "There is no workable backdoor" on your tombstone. If at that point you want to continue debating the matter, we'll be waiting for you...

(Required disclaimer for this age: no, I'm not suggesting killing them. I'm suggesting every legislator should be forcibly memorialized on their eventual tombstone by reference to their stupidest act of public legislation. No grand statue is going to hide the message "We the people regret electing this idiot".)

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Do(ug)h! Half-baked security at Panera Bread spills customer data

Notas Badoff
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99% off all orders for the next month!

Enter coupon code TANSTAAFL when ordering.

After a month of all that bread and lettuce leaving for free, the next shareholders meeting would be hot and steaming.

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Need a needle in an artery? Move over, doc, there's an app for that

Notas Badoff
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Re: Not in a month...

I believe you and you have my sympathy.

Doctors, GPs, are not all as prepared as we'd like for life as actually lived by patients. You'd like to split the difference between a new one that knows everything but hasn't seen much, and an older one that has seen everything but unfortunately no longer knows everything current.

When one hand and arm were going completely numb one afternoon, I took a shower and went to hospital. ER doctor takes a look, and says "well, we know you weren't bitten by a rattlesnake - no holes", but with no other helpful diagnosis. (Was actually an extreme reaction to stinging nettle I figured later, after repetition)

Separately, it took 7.5 years for a simple metabolic problem to be diagnosed because it presented so similar to something else, and those tests were negative. Finally I showed up with a letter comparing in two columns two different disorders, showing how much they could resemble one another. "Oh, we have a test for that one!" Four days after receiving the ensuing Rx I'm the person I was eight years before.

Investigate. Research. Be interested in your own health. You may be the only one who is.

BTW: My appt with the dermatologist is on Thursday. Life's "go away!" stuff doesn't go away by itself.

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Uber self-driving car death riddle: Was LIDAR blind spot to blame?

Notas Badoff
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Illuminating or not?

"Uber fiercely denied it had any of Wamyo's LIDAR technology in its self-driving cars ..."

Oh I think we can see that.

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Tantalising Tabby's Star teases watchers with big dimming event

Notas Badoff
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I love Science best when there's one person saying ...

"Hey, have you guys seen anything like this before?", and more and more people get roped in saying ???!?!?!!! The simple question "how do you explain this?" is actually the nicest gift you can give to your colleagues.

Like Hanny's Voorwerp. "Hey, guys, what's that green cloud thingy just hanging out in space, 700 million light years away?" (tee hee)

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NASA fungus problem puts theory of 'Martian mushrooms' on toast

Notas Badoff
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Um, nope

"And not just any funguses, but some species capable of producing amino acids that are usually considered to be extra-terrestrial when found in meteorites."

Not stated.

"The presence of fungi in NASA curation facilities is particularly interesting since some fungal species are able to produce amino acids like Aib (α-aminoisobutryic acid) and Iva (Isovaline) that are often considered to be extra-terrestrial when identified in meteorites."

That is, there are fungal species on earth that can produce weird amino acids normally thought only produced extra-terrestrially. A very general statement.

"Most of the identified fungal isolates belonged to the genus Penecillium. At least one member of this genus has been able to produce Aib in the lab."

I've seen people dressed in purple do really weird things, and you're wearing purple, so...

"The fungi cultivated from the laminar flow bench in this study are currently being analyzed for the presence and enantiomeric ratios of a broad suite of amino acids commonly found in meteorites, including Aib and Iva, to determine whether they could be possible sources of these compounds."

In other words, we have not yet seen extra-terrestrial-like amino acids from the fungi found. They may find such, and that is correctly disturbing and worth consideration if never imagined possible by previous researchers.

This was a "hey, look at this!" first note paper. Consider this indication of hurriedness:

<quote>

"Half of the sample was set aside to determine free amino acids content, whereas the other have was acid vapor hydrolyzed (6N HCl) for 3 hours at 150 °C to measure total amino acids (free and protein-bound)."

</quote>

To have and half not, right?

Oh well, count down to "Extra-terrestrial fungi from meteorites hidden in NASA labs for 20 years!" 5, 4, 3, ...

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Seagate's HAMR to drop in 2020: Multi-actuator disk drives on the way

Notas Badoff
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Collocated data

I like your previous article's quotes from Seagate:

"Half the drive's recording heads will operate together as a unit, while the other half will operate independently as a separate unit,",

and

"The host computer can treat a single Dual Actuator drive as if it were two separate drives,"

And so what you've got is one disk enclosure, and one interface, but effectively two independently operated drives. Not two independent read/write arms accessing the same entire disk. To access a particular set of data, you are still waiting on the queue of commands for a single arm. Ho hum.

We've got to look for something like the additional word 'parallel' to get the nirvana of "times N" access to one set of data. Though duplication of data using RAID may help? Oh, that's reads only.

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Programming languages can be hard to grasp for non-English speakers. Step forward, Bato: A Ruby port for Filipinos

Notas Badoff
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But it's symbols all the way down! (in code)

At what point do the 'words' - the keywords - just become symbols? Quite early. If you want to use 'kung_hindi' instead of 'else', okay with me. But then, leaving as-is, and as is most commercially valuable, is better.

Now variable naming and commentary is very language-specific, and depends greatly on your target audience. Decoding variable names in German Fortran was 'fun', but speed developed. The comments were very hard, as compressed <any>language becomes elliptical and telegraphic. (What are the 3 most important words out of a full sentence description?)

And that's where the problem will be hardest. You can already find code/projects on Github where the comments are largely in <local>language, even if the variable names are 'conventional' Latin script. Nicht wahr? Shi zhen de!

Dreadful balkanisation if local language ports become popular, with some success in small markets. But converging on the best/worst case 'globish' is a fairly high bar for many. What language do you want to use to sell yourself in comments is key here.

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Salesforce saddles itself with MuleSoft for $6.5bn

Notas Badoff
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I took affright

'scarifying' : "I do not think it means what you think it means."

I _have_ been scarified by saddles, and am scared of ideas, but I think you simply want to be terrifically >>terrifying<<.

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The Great China Tech Panic is just posh xenophobia

Notas Badoff
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They smiled at you and and won your heart...

and, similarly to Bush meeting with Putin, you looked into their souls but you saw mere veniality. Which is what you expected. Shallow techies, everywhere!

Remember the genesis of the US tech industry? The military needed better, smaller, faster, and sooner, and was willing to pay for it. (ex. article) The Cold War then add-on Space Race superheated science, technology and precision manufacturing in the US. There was a tremendous push for working products at high specifications. (and alas, not benign ones)

You are pointing to the lack of *Walkmans* as certain evidence that the Chinese tech industry is not really doing anything advanced, nor is capable of doing so. But how long did it take for the advances fostered by the Western military to diffuse out to the public arena? You are benchmarking by widgets visible now. That is certainly short-sighted.

The fear does not come from worry about 7-day battery life or 7G invented and owned by Chinese companies. The fear comes from the longevity and determination of the CPC, and their Putin-like concentration only on what benefits China, powered by a soon-to-be better than US-level economy.

Oh, and those millions of STEM graduates. Given a big enough number, even a very small percentage of real movers comes to more than the US and EU combined, yearly, and increasing.

The Chinese government does not care about consumer products. Those just naturally fall out of the process as by-products of centrally commanded technological advances. And those will keep the masses happy and content.

It is the other products of the military industrial complex "with Chinese characteristics" that you should be looking for, fearfully. (and alas, not benign ones)

It's 80 years later and Beijing is the new center of gravity for the future 大东亚共荣圈

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Doctor finds physical changes to astronaut's eyes after ISS stint

Notas Badoff
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Some can, most can't

I thought about it the other day and started counting how many different reasons disqualify me going up into the black. I get above seven different physical/medical reasons.

Even if free and easy transport were suddenly available, I'd have to stay and volunteer to neaten up and turn out the lights. Or... maybe like Pierson's Puppeteers we could just move the planet? All hail Larry Niven!

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Russia stares admiringly at itself, flexes internet muscles

Notas Badoff
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Are you in or are you out?

I wonder if the senior management of Kaspersky have strongly caught the fitness craze and are now taking frequent random walks through city parks and trails, just chatting together, y'kno?

Surely that bug hunting security firm has a bug out plan for their own security!

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Stock trader gets two years in prison for pumping up with Fitbit

Notas Badoff
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The power to cloud men's minds

Some people are just more susceptible.

There was a SF short story about a nebula that just happens to drift into the Solar System, and the composition of the cloud just happens to dramatically lower human intelligence. As the lights begin to go out, the last few bright sparks try to determine just how big is the cloud, thus how long the dark ages will be. They fail...

Not "The Black Cloud". And not "The Shadow". I just don't know why I can't bring the title to mind... er...

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HPE to cut technician jobs as field work outsourced to Unisys

Notas Badoff
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Three-legged stool, and then more chopping?

Can we start a meme of theorising how many legs these companies are sitting on? It seems several start out with five or six legs under their stools, then get into a habit of whittling away and then chopping legs out from under themselves. Then they are surprised when dropping that unneeded third leg and they fall over.

How many legs for IBM? How many for HPE?

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I'll bee back: Boffin's bionic bug Band-Aid after real ones all die

Notas Badoff
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So we're talking...

humba's to neaten up the fields?

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Oh honey! Oxfordshire abuzz with reports of a MEEELLION bees stolen

Notas Badoff
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Pint

Bees with ...

Everybody was so intrigued with "sharks with lasers!" I think bees with tasers give one Napoleonic visions. Want to suppress unruly protestors? "Eek, it's a be-ZzzZz!" Who needs armies, with dispatchable Bee-nadoes? Just think how nice the Kremlin would be turned into an apiary. Want to keep everything monitored? Send out the drones. Keep the population happy with Miellent yellow. Humm-ha-ha-ha!

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IBM gives Services staff until 2019 to get agile

Notas Badoff
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Re: agility

"Certified Scram Masters"

This! . . . . ^ ^ ^ ^

What a wonderful way to characterize your previous employers. It says you know what it should have been, what it wasn't, and how happy you'll be to work with clued people.

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Cisco NFV controller is a bit too elastic: It has an empty password bug

Notas Badoff
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Re: Big Cisco Fan here (generally, but don't shoot me)

A long time ago a friend showed us their clever way to message between terminals using mainframe OS memory (it was also a demo of a clever hack found by accident). The friend let us test it out. I sat down, hit the space key and just sat on it.

First the program seized up. Cue irritation. Then their face showed absolute horror and they bolted for the computer room door. After all, it was OS memory I was overwriting with spaces, given the unchecked buffer limits.

"You need idiots to defeat idiots"™ The next govt IT employment push?

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Cali cops' Clue caper: Apple technicans, in an iPhone repair lab, with the 1,600 silent 911 calls

Notas Badoff
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You don't want to see us again

Had a manual phone long ago with some kind of "shoulder rest" plastic thingy attached to handset. It rather unbalanced the phone in its cradle. That base unit also had an emergency services dial button. Jiggle base, handset falls over, and easily hitting 'emergency' button.

'bout the third time the police came out for a look-see around the whole flat, they indicated they didn't want to see that phone again. Call to action? "You don't want to see us again, do you?"

Maybe just park a few several police cars and a swat unit around the repair center for days as needed for "quick response" to every incident logged? Getting shut down for a while each time will cause intense cooperation quickly.

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Google reveals Edge bug that Microsoft has had trouble fixing

Notas Badoff
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They are pushing...

Microsoft towards the ever-green model of browser releases. As much as people may not like the rainforest model of daily afternoon releases, it does offer hope that the vendor is _trying_ to keep up.

I wish I could remember which software, but I recently saw an instance where the developer/company simply said "we can't work with browsers that are updated only rarely" and identified only Chrome and Firefox as actually cooperating with the ecosystem.

They specifically called out Edge and Safari as always last year's news. Later on, the developers relented and worked extra to provide Safari workarounds. Maybe bribery works?

But given Microsoft's past misdeeds, miscommunications and plain stonewalling on browsers, is using the 'lash' really unwarranted?

(BTW: individuals like @awbjs and associated others at MS are great, yet somehow only infrared shines through the dusty nebula that is Microsoft)

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Oi! Verizon leaked my fiancée's nude pix to her ex-coworker, says bloke

Notas Badoff
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Re: former coworker

Well, you're maybe half right...

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A computer file system shouldn't lose data, right? Tell that to Apple

Notas Badoff
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Re: A former Microsoft boss defends Apple

Then given the source, perhaps the implicit statement was

"...In any absolute sense the quality of Mac/iOS [and associated hardware] are at quality levels our industry has just not seen before at Microsoft."

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Should AI get to choose a topping in a two pizza team?

Notas Badoff
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FTFY

You had put the comma in the wrong place.

"Given that 70 per cent of features are not delivering any actual value to their organisation by using AI, businesses can ..."

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Apple Macs, iThings, smart watches choke on tiny Indian delicacy

Notas Badoff
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Compose yourself

Key to this is that this isn't just one Unicode character, but a composed character. As the article says

The symbol represents a combination of Telugu letters and signs, specifically the letter "ja," the sign "virama," the letter "nya," a zero-width non-joiner and the vowel sign "aa."

Dumped as UTF-16 that's 0x0c1c 0x0c4d 0x0c1e 0x200c 0x0c3e

So on-the-fly the font compositor has to figure out how to smash all these individual parts together into something that appears to be the one 'character' జ్ఞ‌ా . So stick the main part on the left, stick another part up top right, one more part swimming underneath, and the final part trailing behind on the right side, but the ZWNJ says keep it together with the first three smashed together pieces. on-the-fly!

Now people like Behdad Esfahbod work on opensource like harfbuzz and pango that gets used by world plus dog, but 'world' doesn't always keep up-to-date with fixes. Nor necessarily use the APIs correctly. I'm not surprised there are combinations as yet untested within some applications by some vendors.

Crashes on complex character compositions? Sure! Heck, entire countries meltdown using plain ASCII characters like T I B E T !

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Due to Oracle being Oracle, Eclipse holds poll to rename Java EE (No, it won't be Java McJava Face)

Notas Badoff
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In a galaxy far, far away (sufficiently to get away from Oracle's shadow)

Name it Jawa. Then the whole language becomes JawaEEz. And thus the community is revealed as "small hooded creatures with glowing eyes".

Some of the brightest people are scarfed up into those lumbering crawlers and then are never seen again, at least, not in unbroken form.

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US states accused of skimming cash from 911 emergency call dosh

Notas Badoff
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Re: The strongest force in the universe

I've often wondered, is the Great Attractor composed of cash or politicians? I know each is strongly attracted by the other.

Fortunately there is the Shapley attractor along the way to get politicians into trouble, otherwise we'd be stuck with them forever.

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BT backs down from charging millions in phone book listing fees

Notas Badoff
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Not so fast

Heck, I'm still trying to figure out this conjunction: "six years' worth of back bills" and "We proactively contacted the communications providers affected to advise them of the issue, ..."

If "six years" is 'proactive' I guess BT do have another scale of time they call 'effective'.

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Tech giants' payouts go to everyone but affected citizens. US Supremes now urged to sort it out

Notas Badoff
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Worst case

The same Supreme Court that came up with Citizens United (corporations are people) will decide that lawyers are people, and so give the money to that suffering class.

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A Hughes failure: Flat Earther rocketeer can't get it up yet again

Notas Badoff
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Re: Free ride available

And.... you'll even put him in the driver's seat and let him steer?

(too cruel, too cruel)

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Ballmer once yelled: Developers, developers! Today it would be: Docs! Support! Certificates!

Notas Badoff
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Re: OMG, Monkey Boy

"About two decades ago ..." I gave up on Microsoft as outreach program after outreach program was withdrawn or put behind a steep paywall. For quite some time I had _gushed_ about the various ways Microsoft _enabled_ developers.

By the time of "Developers! Developers!", with a wry smile what I heard them say was "Come back! Come back!"

I've kept my "Dr. GUI" t-shirt to remind myself that when companies turn to navel-gazing, they see only short-term dollar signs, and starve the feet and legs. Time to walk away.

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Eggheads: Cities, don't woo rich Amazon with sweetheart HQ deals

Notas Badoff
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Re: How do they get away with it?

Well see, that's the problem with people who think they know history. They know only recent history that (they think) proves their point. If you know even a little history but with breadth of time, we're just repeating ourselves.

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To hack Australia and learn its secrets, buy second-hand furniture

Notas Badoff
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ElReg: so educational

"White-anting is an Australian term for the process of internal erosion of a foundation. It is often used in reference to groups such as political parties or organisations where information from group insiders is 'leaked' or used to undermine the goals of the group. The Macquarie Dictionary says the verb "to white-ant" means "to subvert or undermine from within".

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Dell sell-off saga gets weird: Subsidiary VMware may buy parent in 'reverse merger'

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"Reverse merger"

Flash! Florida to buy out Spain in a reverse merger. Says future much brighter in Florida, coastlines much better, and the water is really something! Rumors of long-life product lines that will bring global interest to Florida abound. Chairman Miguel Delgato quotes CTO de León as guaranteeing performance will last forever and UPS is unneeded!

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Intel alerted Chinese cloud giants 'before US govt' about CPU bugs

Notas Badoff
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Re: Possible word to wise...

"... is small fry"

and noted by big money and governmental crews.

Even TheInquistor had to mention ElReg.

I think I smell piquancy.

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All your base are belong to us: Strava exercise app maps military sites, reveals where spies jog

Notas Badoff
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Revealing state secrets

Well now, that's going to restrict their movements, what with some countries jailing people for mentioning even commonly-known facts, as "revealing state secrets". Hotel California, anyone?

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GOLD! Always believe in your role. You've got the power to know you're indestructible...

Notas Badoff
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There's gold in them thar budgets

"GOLD scans the entirety of the Earth’s disk every half hour."

Limb, as in looks at the edge of Earth's atmosphere?

I'm imagining that some data resolves more sharply seen edge-on but other data is from tracking changes across wide areas.

And, of course, projects get funded and championed much more if they have sexy names. I mean, the Arecibo dish would get lots more money if it was called 'Marilyn'.

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FYI: Processor bugs are everywhere – just ask Intel and AMD

Notas Badoff
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We repeat ourselves

A long time ago in a machine room far, far away as the codger walks, there was a four (!) CPU mainframe wondrous fast. It made seismic reflection squiggles shimmy so pretty the geophysicists danced. Migrations moved them to tears. All was happiness.

Back then patches and/or "local code" required the whole OS be recompiled. Hundreds of large files of assembly massaged, then 'linked' into binaries. Long jobs taking much time away from happy-making production, thus much frowning.

Occasionally the 'link' step would die horribly and mysteriously, losing the entire rebuild job. Then occasionally seemed to be more frequently, and always very very mysterious. This shouldn't happen became over time "this can't happen!". And that was the techs, not the customer mangers, for indeed there was nothing wrong in the linker code or the data or the OS.

One bright spark wasting time over the rising stacks of dump listings, happened to notice that each dumped failure was running exactly the same section of tight code in the linker. Catching scent in verifying that, they then happened to notice it was always the same CPU. Same code, same CPU, every time.

A feature of these machines was that the processors could retain up to four (!) instructions in a on-CPU cache. And if you could architect a loop in four or less instructions, wicked fast. Great for array and string processing.

And the linker had such a four instruction loop, and for what the code was doing there, it was very very clever (and fast). But sometimes died mysteriously, on that one CPU, of hundreds of those world-wide.

Cue more "shouldn't happen" and "can't happen", 'cept back at Engineering Central. We got to see a half-dozen luminaries - stars! - come to see us in the field, arriving from on high. (Minnesota)

Much muttering and magic made as they tracked the bug down. Awed murmuring from us, watching hands flying over the engineering "front panel" 6 feet by 7 feet tall with hundreds of blinkin's and switches and rollers to access the dozens of internal registers. Awed tittering from us, as instructions were toggled into memory to replicate the bug on barest possible metal.

Pure awe as they lifted "that one" card from the wall of 6" by 8" cards, from one of the four CPUs. Replacing it, they carefully packed the card away for interrogation later back at Engineering.

We're repeating ourselves, without thinking things out. The circuits are ever so shrunk, but the instances are ever so multiplied. Shrunk by 6 magnitudes but multiplied by 8+ magnitudes?

Anyway, after seeing that, when Aunt Edith complains that that one file in her collection of Fabio pictures crashes her tablet, I just smile and ask "have you tried using a different program?" I'm good, but I "can't handle the truth!"

BTW: ECL keeps you warm on a cold day! I miss it just now...

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It's 2018 and… wow, you're still using Firefox? All right then, patch these horrid bugs

Notas Badoff
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It's 2018 and… wow, you're still using ...

clickbait headlines?

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That's not very ice! Blizzard silently patches games hack hole, gives Googler cold shoulder

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Hey, I know how to do this!

Blacklist: "Is it an even number?"

Whitelist: "Is it not divisible by something other than one?"

One of these is a mental shortcut, yet terrible at identifying prime numbers.

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Facebook grows a conscience, admits it corroded democracy

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Re: Hopey changey

"ingenuity..."

Most likely in the form of some groups laboriously flagging postings with the "looks squirrelly / nutty to us" warnings, funded by someone else of course.

Meanwhile, unfunded, I can volunteer for free: "looks like bullshit to me!"

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OnePlus minus 40,000 credit cards: Smartmobe store hacked to siphon payment info to crooks

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Hells and Hails

"We are eternally grateful to have such a vigilant and informed community, ..."

Can we at least mix into the shower of "hell!"s a few 'hail's that (for whatever reason) they recognize that the relationship with customers can be of benefit to them, however much it might look antagonistic? Every company ought to have a "Tips and Corrections"-like response mechanism.

When the clock is running out on your reputation, you want to know bad stuff soonest!

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Sad-sack Anon calling himself 'Mr Cunnilingus' online is busted for DDoSing ex-bosses

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"Mr. Cunnilingus, in the network, with a soldering iron" is not your common-place solution in Clue. Please, let the BOFH not take notice.

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Wondering where your JavaScript libs went? Spam-detection snafu exiled npm packages

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Risk analysis

Hmm, this bit here looks wrong. What would happen if we disable it?

A) production goes down

B) payroll goes down (and it's end-of-month)

C) muzak goes down

Presumably NPMinc has tracking statistics where they could ask the question: how many people/downloads per day for this project?

Hey, you want to invalid $1000 dollar bills? Nobody will notice. $20 dollar bills? Revolution.

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Kernel-memory-leaking Intel processor design flaw forces Linux, Windows redesign

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Re: Hmmm...

"So different tasks will suffer to different extents." But the hardware...?

"The downside to this separation is that it is relatively expensive, time wise, to keep switching between two separate address spaces for every system call and for every interrupt from the hardware."

So now we'll have a little tax charged for every interrupt - *every* *interrupt*. How much software do you run that doesn't use disk or network or any I/O?

This was not the financial micro-transaction future I was thinking of.

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China may stick to its own DRAM memory soon – researchers

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Self-sufficiency

Draw up a list of everything essential and necessary to China's military. If they can't already source each domestically it is a priority for them to develop the manufacturing base to do so. In doing that, most everything essential to domestic civilian consumption follows also, and keeps the public quiet.

Whatever else it may resemble, this is a command economy directed to become independent of all international entanglements. Then, no one will be able to interfere in future developments as there will be no levers to use against them. This is economic strategy motivated by strict nationalism.

If you want to sell them ivory or teak or bulk refined ores, fine. Everything else is a negative for them.

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Firefox 57's been quietly delaying tracking scripts

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Oh, that's why

I have wondered what the hay was the problem. A news site page will peg out CPU usage at 60-75%, sometimes for minutes (in amazement I tried that many times). You see flash after flash of network activity as the various evil burrowing gnomes desperately load/reload/re-reload/re-re-re-re-really? I've killed tabs and watched as activity on the process continued for up to a minute! Stupidly starting "too many" tabs I've repeatedly had to kill FF entirely to grab my system back from the 'net.

"The feature won't behave perfectly in every case – but that, Bambas wrote, is because some pages are simply badly written. An ill-designed page that uses Google's Page-Hiding Snippet, for example, might load as blank for a few seconds, and if a developer is sufficiently inept to refer an API of an async tracking script from a sync script, a race condition is set up."

Hunh, we're talking about advertisers here, right? Do they *care* if their code is badly written? What protection does Firefox give us against that?

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