* Posts by Daedalus

359 posts • joined 15 Oct 2009

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Revealed: 779 cases of data misuse across 34 British police forces

Daedalus
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Guess they had to add "Legitimacy" to the tests

Otherwise it would have been a PEE survey.

Sounds of Sir Robert spinning in grave...

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Details of 400,000 loan applicants spilled in UniCredit bank breach

Daedalus
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John Glenn said it best

Sitting on top of tons of rocket fuel, he said that he "just realized that his ride was built by the lowest bidder".

Security provided by the lowest bidder. Slightly better than letting the crims in the front door.

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Southern awarded yet another 'most moaned about rail firm' gong

Daedalus
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Life is tough

Must be hard to keeping millions of moaning Williums and NIMBY's happy. It probably takes a month to get permissions to change a light bulb, let alone run better track. But let's face it, if you had convinced yourself that it was worth all that money to live in the sticks and work in the big city, wouldn't you feel like moaning if things didn't go right all the time?

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US vending machine firm plans employee chip implant scheme

Daedalus
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Re: Not a good plan?

RFID tech has been pretty much spoof-proofed after years of use in entry cards, subway cards etc. Of course, that's really just a matter of making the expense of spoofing exceed the rewards of spoofing. A typical RFID thingy has an 8-byte hard-wired ID and some programmable memory for local stuff. Between the two you could create something that's more or less spoof-proof as defined above. Note they don't use RFID for access to bank safes (yet).

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Daedalus
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Chips will be the subject of...

...the next wave of phishing.

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Burglary, robbery, kidnapping and a shoot-out over… a domain name?!

Daedalus
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Er, "Hamilton" ?

Checked the Tony awards for the last few years recently?

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.. ..-. / -.-- --- ..- / -.-. .- -. / .-. . .- -.. / - .... .. ... then a US Navy fondleslab just put you out of a job

Daedalus
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I can see it now

"Signal received, sir. Signal reads 'Send three and fourpence, we're going to a dance' "

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Jodie Who-ttaker? The Doctor is in

Daedalus
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Re: Two comments

"Troughton threatened to walk"

An empty threat from most actors, and particularly Patrick T., who was known to be nervous as hell about being unemployed. He would tout himself around the Beeb every chance he got, even when playing the Doctor.

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Daedalus
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- a Gene Hunt quote?

Also a Robert Heinlein title : "- All You Zombies -"

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Daedalus
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Looks too BBC?

You mean she looks like a Redgrave or a Richardson. Not to disparage her, but if you wanted a Redgrave or a Richardson and you couldn't get one, you might wind up with the first actor who looked like one. Perhaps those dynasties have had the effect of spawning a generation of lookalikes.

See Jemma Redgrave's turn as Kate Stewart, and indeed the spin-off portrayal.

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Daedalus
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Re: Two comments

Bear in mind that the early seasons were over 40 episodes apiece. Each of the first two actors put in over 120 episodes, then the season was cut to 25 or 26 episodes for the third, fourth, and fifth doctors. It was downhill from there with 13 or 14 episodes per season.

None of the actors after Davison put in as many episodes as Hartnell or Troughton did in a single season. Baker (T) still holds the record for most episodes. Pertwee in 5 years did about as many episodes as his predecessors did in 3 years.

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Daedalus
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Never mind the gender, feel the height

Past doctors have been tall by the standards of leading men (cf T. Cruise Esq. and similar midgets), so we might have expected a tallish woman for the part. JW is only average at a non-metric 5'5", which is going to make setting up face-to-face confrontations with villains a whole new ballgame, as we say here.

This may bring back platform boots!

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Google must cough up contact info for 8,000 employees in gender discrimination case

Daedalus
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Re: Executive order

Much as you might like to crow about this sort of thing, these arbitrary ukases from the White House have the effect of discouraging smaller players from accepting Federal contracts, thus making sure that the deep pocket companies with armies of lawyers get all the pork. How would you like to be faced with a retroactive demand for information based on work you did in the past when the order was not even in force?

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Bupa: Rogue staffer stole health insurance holders' personal deets

Daedalus
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Re: Boggled

Access to sensitive info is one thing. Mass access is quite another. It all seems to come down to either "reporting" or "mail shots". The first needs to be tightly controlled, the second tossed out.

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Daedalus
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Boggled

I am continually amazed that organizations allow mass access to data to anybody at all, even developers. Nobody can "accidentally" download data or "lose" a data disk containing tens of thousands of personal information nuggets if such access is impossible. At the very least, personal ID's should be hashed as soon as entered into the system so that their only function is to verify details given by the patient, and then only on a per-need basis. The only access should be on a single-record basis once ID is verified by the hash.

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Juno beams back first closeups of Jupiter's unsightly red acne

Daedalus
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It was first seen by...

...Lady Macbeth. Out out!

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Barracuda's so solid crew: We got three more quarters to go

Daedalus
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Never mind P & L

They're still just a bunch of tossers. Ask them how to block specific types of e-mail and all you get is gobbledegook. We had a system from another company that was A-1 foolproof and secure by default. Then their sales droids got to work. These guys are the IBM of infosec: all sales pitch, no innovation.

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Slower US F-35A purchases piles $27bn onto total fighter jet bill

Daedalus
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How much for one?

Years ago, somebody noticed that the curve of ever-increasing cost of one (1) new generation military jet and the flattening curve of the US defence budget were going to converge sometime early in the 21st century. The joke was that the Air Force and Navy would have it 3 days a week each, and the Marines would have it on Sunday.

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NASA flies plane through Earthly shadow of Kuiper Belt object

Daedalus
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Boffin

Steady on, chaps

Bits of hyperbole creeping in so far. The object didn't "whizz". It's out beyond Pluto and moving much slower than the Earth is. It would be more accurate to say that the Earth "whizzed" through the object's shadow. The footprint of the shadow was about the same size as the object itself, somewhere between 18 and 45 km. The shadow would have travelled at something like the Earth's orbital speed, which is maybe 50x faster than a jet. Probably the "occultation" (the official word) lasted only a few seconds.

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'My dream job at Oracle left me homeless!' – A techie's relocation horror tale

Daedalus
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"Experienced techie" ?

Nope. Look at the LinkedIn page. "Lead generation". "Business development". One occurrence (exact meaning not clear) of the word "programming". "Network Administration" buried way in the past.

Sales droid. Nothing to see here....

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LHC finds a new and very charming particle: the Xicc++ baryon

Daedalus
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Re: "are there any 2 or 3 quark particles that are not predicted?"

Since all quarks have a charge that is a multiple of 1/3, any three-quark particle has a whole number charge. For the "familiar" quarks, all the combinations have been seen and catalogued. We've found triple-up, triple-down, and triple-strange, for instance. The only barrier to seeing triple-charm, top, or bottom is the energy needed to make them, and the probability that they will decay very quickly, making them hard to see. In fact you "see" them by recognizing their decay products, which have to be predicted ahead of time. That's harder that "predicting" the existence of the particles themselves.

The only 2-quark particles that cannot exist are those where a quark is paired with another one, and not an anti-quark as in a meson. For instance, up/up, up/down, are illegal in the Standard Model, but up/anti-up is just the familiar neutral pi-meson.

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Sysadmin bloodied by icicle that overheated airport data centre

Daedalus
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Re: Frozen winter shit.

<Cesspit pipe clearing poop producing panic>

Now come on. That's just a rehashing of a Blaster Bates story, surely.

Just kidding. Good story. Blaster's was even better.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blaster_Bates

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Nothing could protect Durex peddler from NotPetya ransomware

Daedalus
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Hmmmm

Sometimes a company has to book an off month anyway. Maybe they're just throwing some bad receivables on the fire and blaming the cyber attack?

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Braking news: AA password reset email cockup crashes servers

Daedalus
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And the bozocalypse continues...

There aren't enough good people to handle the tech we already have, and manglers can't tell the difference between good ones and idiots anyway. Throw in a lack of gatekeepers on things like mass mailings, and this is what you get.

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Researchers solve screen glare nightmare with 'moth-eye' antireflective film

Daedalus
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They're missing the point

The producers of laptops, TV's, and phones are proud of how shiny their screens are. It must be a major selling point, otherwise why would the anti-reflective screens we used to get have disappeared? Laptops need shiny screens match the sexy low-profile silvery utterly bloody useless keyboards they have. Flat screens have to be reflective enough to shave in - save on those mirrors you only use once a day!

All hail our sales droid masters!

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Smart burglars will ride the surf of inter-connected hackability

Daedalus
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Re: Who needs to hack?

Re: "The Death Ray", the actual story title is "Let There Be Light".

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Daedalus
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Who needs to hack?

Like most tech types, we're overthinking it. People will mess with the coming horde of smart devices the way they mess with that other horde of smart things known as animals. Ever see somebody tease a dog? Suppose you come across a trundling delivery bot with collision avoidance. How many ways can you think of to interfere with it just by standing in the way, or placing a handy object in its path? Once some bright spark comes up with a way to make the bot trundle in circles from one obstacle to another, the trick will spread like wildfire.

Even the autonomous cars are going to be vulnerable. Read Clarke's "The Death Ray" to get an idea of what can be done with a bright light shining from an unexpected direction on a car. And since the autocars will also have collision avoidance, you can imagine the scenes at pedestrian crossings. ISTR that a cyclist already played some tricks on a Googmobile during road tests.

When it comes to buying, installing, maintaining and using tech, people are dumb. When it comes to abusing it, they come out ahead every time.

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Fighter pilot shot down laptops with a flick of his copper-plated wrist

Daedalus
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A strange ironic copper bracelet....

It says here that copper, while an excellent conductor of electricity, is not in the least bit magnetic.

One suspects that any relief the ex-pilot got was beyond placebo, because there was very little copper in his bracelet to give him the effect. Or was it the iron? If he had been told that iron was even better, would he have obtained even more relief?

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Currys PC World given a spanking for misleading laptop savings ads

Daedalus
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The real scandal

£1,149.99 for a laptop! Almost cheaper to fly to the USA to get one!

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Marissa! Mayer! out! as! Yahoo!-Verizon! closes!

Daedalus
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"Oath? Why?"

- so Cockneys could call it by its true name.

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Connectivity's value is almost erased by the costs it can impose

Daedalus
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Amazingly still not going dark...

Some years ago I noted how easy it was to wirelessly link up two laptops while connecting one to the wired network. If I could do it across a room, it could be done between the building and a car parked outside. We've also had plenty of "stupid luser" tales where a rogue wireless network appeared in an installation because some sales droids snuck in a router. Wireless networks = zero security.

And yet, probably because of expense and the fact that it would rob the suits of their ability to stream pr0n on their phones, buildings are not going in for EM shielding, even at the room level. It's not enough to secure your own stuff, you have to prevent any other stuff from running inside your "secure" zone. Whether you're running a brokerage or a prison, smuggled in wireless equipment is going to destroy your security.

There will probably be a massive incident sooner or later that will set the trend to turn buildings into Faraday cages. Then there'll be laser links, so goodbye windows....

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Two hot Jupiters around two similar stars orbiting at similar distances look similar, right? WRONG

Daedalus
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"But these clouds are probably quite different to the ones on boring old terra firma, which are full of lightweight, water-based elements. On these warm exoplanets, they are likely formed of heavy molecules such as sodium sulfide and potassium chloride."

It's hard to know where to start with this. Our clouds are full of mostly water. There is no such thing as a water-based element, unless by "element" we don't mean, er, an Element. Formally our clouds are a colloidal dispersion of water in air. Air is oxygen, nitrogen, carbon dioxide, water vapor, plus traces of other stuff. I suppose sodium sulphide and potassium chloride are technically "heavier" but neither has a molecular mass greater than 100, unlike volatile stuff like octane, for instance. The "amazing" thing about finding them in vapor form is that their chemical bonds in the solid are so strong it takes a lot of heat energy to vaporize them. Nothing to do with weight per se.

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Class clowns literally classless: Harvard axes meme-flinging morons

Daedalus
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Re: The one good thing about social media...

This is Hahvahd we're talking about. The qualifications are like Oxbridge: money or high intelligence, both accepted at a pinch. So "dumb" is not likely to apply, and the money students wouldn't be facing expulsion, such is the way of the world.

What's more interesting is how postings from a private group leaked to the point where TPTB could see them. Somebody snitched?

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BA IT systems failure: Uninterruptible Power Supply was interrupted

Daedalus
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Willium strikes again

(wearing brown overalls with a ciggie in his mouth)

"Emergency power? More than my jobs worth, mate"

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LIGO physicists eyeball a new gravitational wave

Daedalus
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Not quite

"As mass travels through spacetime, a trail of gravitational waves is emitted"

As a mass *accelerates* through spacetime gravitational waves are emitted.

Being in an orbit counts as being accelerated. As the orbit speeds up when the black holes approach each other, the frequency of the waves increases until they merge and you get the massive backwash followed by silence.

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RightNow founder turned politician gets assault charge after 'bodyslamming' reporter

Daedalus
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Re: @Public Citizen @ Daedalus He made one mistake

If the Grauniad is now a tabloid then things have indeed gone to pot in the old country. Back in the day it was a liberal to mildly lefty broadsheet, and much liked by the granola brigade who couldn't bear the Times or the Telegraph. However if the web site is anything to go by, they're just as fond of clickbait as any of the other British rags.

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Daedalus
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Re: He made one mistake

'Another witness, BuzzFeed’s Alexis Levinson, said: “Ben walked into a room where a local TV crew was set up for an interview with Gianforte,” '

- from the New York Times

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Daedalus
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He made one mistake

To deal properly with aggressive reporters - and apparently this one came into a room where Gianforte was prepping for a Fox News interview and stuck a mike in his face - you keep some muscle around so you don't have to do your own corrective action.

It's hard not to sympathize with Gianforte. Journalists in the USA think that something called the First Amendment gives them the right to go anywhere and do anything. TPTB have occasionally exploited this with things like "perp walks" that exploit the desire for pictures, quotes, anything that can get into print or on video. The so-called journalist - more like a blogger - who tried it on with the guy from the FCC in DC was a similar case: outside the conference proper, aggressive in a public space. Maybe he'll think twice next time too.

Notice members of certain notorious crime-oriented organizations don't get this treatment. I wonder why.

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After reusing a rocket, SpaceX tries reusing Dragon capsule for ISS resupply

Daedalus
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I can see where this is going

One day the supply ship will appear by the space station, with different coloured panels all over it, one light not working and a stale doughnut in the dashboard.

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'Odour' from AnalTech ramming leads to hazmat team callout

Daedalus
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Much ado...

If you read the actual reports, they're quite sober and matter-of-fact. The officials should have had some idea about what they were to encounter, if the facility was licenced in any way. Hazmat was brought in to handle any cleanup, but really a company in that business should be quite capable of handling its own spills. As for the smell, my money is on DMSO or possibly chloroform/dichloromethane, typical TLC solvents, although not usually used to make TLC plates. Neither alcohols nor hydrocarbons would have excited anybody nearly as much.

BTW, in this context getting a "thumbs up" isn't nearly as gratifying as you might think.

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Daedalus
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Chemistry joke

Looks like their brand needs some TLC.

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Huge flying arse makes successful test flight

Daedalus
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Re: What is this for?

I'm sure that the developers of this craft are salivating over the prospect of donating it to Oxfam.

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Daedalus
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What is this for?

OK it carries 10 tonnes. If you want to go from London to Glasgow, you send it by rail or lorry. If you want it to go overseas, you send it by ship or Chunnel.

Where are the places that you want to send 10t that you can't send by other means? And also where you don't have to worry about being shot at (an occupational hazard when flying a blimp over 'Merka, let alone a war zone). Delivering supplies in the Himalayas? Note that bad weather is also a hazard for these craft.

All filled up and nowhere to go?

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Daedalus
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Re: R100 and R101 history

Too right mate. The R100 was a nice piece of engineering while the ill-fated R101 was a Ministry snafu, which crashed because the bureaucrats wanted it bigger, faster, and flying before the kinks had been worked out. When it went down, it took the R100 with it.

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Rich professionals could be replaced by AI, shrieks Gartner

Daedalus
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LOL

Doctors: maybe diagnosing symptoms can be automated, but getting patients to be honest about their symptoms and sorting through the mixture of real and imagined info? No.

Surgeons: contrary to anything you've seen in books, human innards do not come color coded. Often the main concern of surgeons, and why they tend to work in two's, is identifying the bit they're supposed to cut as distinct from the bits they're supposed to leave alone.

Lawyers: well, theoretically the function of lawyers is to do law. Actually it's to advocate, negotiate, obfuscate, equivocate, and whatever other -ate will get their clients what they want. When machines are smart enough to do that, the singularity will truly have arrived.

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What's driving people out of tech biz? Unfair treatment, harassment, funnily enough – study

Daedalus
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Re: In my career I knew 4 women who left IT in Canada for reasons other than being promoted

Odd. My experience is that most women are keen to get into supervisory and manglement roles and leave the heavy lifting to others. There have only been a few dedicated to getting on with the job at hand, although often it was detail-mongering or "design".

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Daedalus
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Something missing

None of the responders seemed to have owned up to leaving because they were complete tossers.

OTOH, experience shows that complete tossers are the ones who stick around the longest, even if they don't go into manglement.

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EU plans for blockchain 'observatory' raise concerns, says expert

Daedalus
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Unhappy

Here we go again

"I'm from the EU and I'm here to help"

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Barracuda looks more like a flatfish in face of renewal period volatility

Daedalus
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Bottom feeder

You have to feel concerned about a company that touts its e-mail security cred but only has the most rudimentary web interface, no apparent signature collection ability, and lets through glaringly obvious phishing e-mails. I get "Hey we quarantined some Viagra spam" notifications every few days, while dealing with unwanted stuff from less obvious sources. For this we gave up a company that offered whitelisting, blacklisting and everything we could want in between.

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HMRC beer duty bungle leaves breweries struggling to pay online

Daedalus
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It's the bozocalypse!

More signs that we don't have enough competent people to maintain, let alone create, the myriad bits of software that the droids in charge insist that we use.

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