* Posts by Stoneshop

3981 posts • joined 8 Oct 2009

Copyright troll sues for ownership of Drudge Report domain

Stoneshop Silver badge

righthaven.com

Domain Name: RIGHTHAVEN.COM

Registrar: GODADDY.COM, INC.

Whois Server: whois.godaddy.com

Referral URL: http://registrar.godaddy.com

Name Server: NS39.DOMAINCONTROL.COM

Name Server: NS40.DOMAINCONTROL.COM

Status: clientDeleteProhibited

Status: clientRenewProhibited

Status: clientTransferProhibited

Status: clientUpdateProhibited

Updated Date: 26-oct-2009

Creation Date: 26-oct-2009

Expiration Date: 26-oct-2011

Bloated US patent holder sues 9 tech companies

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Pirate

A fine match

Melissa Pinocchio working for Intellectual Vultures

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Flame

They have given up

They don't check anymore, they just rubberstamp the application after cashing the registration fees.

iPad-smuggling women pinched in China

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Headmaster

"customs deceleration forms"

It's pretty common for Customs to slow you down, but I've never needed to fill in forms for that very act; it's always the result of something else they want.

Ad man offers fine drugs and finer print to Macbook thief

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FAIL

So, it's his only copy?

I am extremely unsorry for him.

CNN flashes gay todger over interwebs

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FAIL

Does it?

Can you tell it's a *male* arse being depicted?

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FAIL

@JakeyC

"You must be new here"

Fortunately, my keyboard is coffee-resistant.

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WTF?

And the words

"gay todger" aren't sufficient?

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Submit

the words "Harvey Milk" to your search engine of choice

Diary of a Not-spot: One man's heroic struggle for broadband

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Megaphone

Are *YOU* reading the comments

Mister "I figgered out how to do these them things and I'll keep telling ya until you follow my advice"? The boxed used have a main 16dBi directional panel antenna, PLUS the omni you keep blathering about. That 16dBi panel is more than sufficient to bridge the given distance. I know, I've seen it done, first-hand.

Stoneshop Silver badge

Nah

You don't want, as a private person trying to share broadband, to invest in an all-out fiber setup until

- you've established that the conduit (hosepipe) with the cable in it will remain unmolested during plowing season and

- you're sufficiently confident that the person you're going to share the link with won't pull out of the deal (as has been the case here)

Apart from that, gig fiber would be not just overkill, but over-the-top-overkill here. 10Mbit is good enough when you're just after an always-on *) connection with a workable bandwith and latency. A pair of 10Mbit copper-to-fiber converters such as the AT-MC13 can be had for 30 quid including postage, Gbit stuff will set you back at least ten times that.

*) for values of "always" and "on" as defined by your telco.

Stoneshop Silver badge

Funny

The first component the signal encounters after it enters the network card from the cable is a pair of transformers, often even inside the jack. There's no galvanical connection between cable and system, except for the shield if you are using SFTP (which you'd better, given the distance and the environment). Grounding the shield at one end only is the way to deal with differences in earth potentials, and the simplest way to do that is to use a RJ45 coupler (the thingies you use to connect two CAT5 cables together) plus a small length of unshielded CAT5 at the other end.

If you're worried about lightning strikes (the effects of which van be very nasty indeed), then a pair of copper-to-optical converters at both ends (so the main run can still be the far cheaper copper cable) with a meter or so of fiber patchlead between them. Secondhand converters can be had for next to nothing if you don't need 100Mbit/s, which you probably don't.

Stoneshop Silver badge

I did the maths back then

and with an Iridium phone you would be getting something like a 19k2 data link. I'm not sure, given the antenna constraints (sats whizzing past overhead instead of being stationary so you can point a dish at them), that you'd be getting much more than that now, and unless the Roman Empire put in your telephone wiring after they were done with the aquaducts, you'd likely be better off (and certainly cheaper) staying terrestrial.

Stoneshop Silver badge
FAIL

Why?

"I grew up without a cellphone, without the internet, why is it now something that I need?"

Because the guvmint, in all its manifestations, and biznisiz are all working towards comurnucashun exclusively via this inturnetz thingie. Want info? You can phone up, but the first thing you get told by the voice response system is "RTFM, available at http://farble.blarble.glorg". Service? Same. Want to buy something? Gone is the high street shop that listens to what you actually want/need and trying to get you that, instead (passively or actively) limiting your options to what they have on the floor. Spare parts to fix something (insofar things are fixable nowadays anyway)? Forget it, unless you can locate a source yourself, which means searching the internet.

Deny it all you want, external circumstances are seriously putting pressure on that attitude of yours, granpa.

Stoneshop Silver badge

This is already outdoors point-to-point stuff

And I've seen similar gear being used to carry about 30MB/s across 5km of (flat) farmland. This involved two scaffolds at either end though, which I wouldn't recommend for a permanent installation.

But those flat-pack antenna/transceiver units are a bit iffy to aim right. With a parabolic dish like this http://www.wifiandmore.com/images/uploads/HYPERLINK HG2424G-NF.gif you can tie a laser pointer to the forward-pointing bar and get the aim spot-on in minutes, weather cooperating.

Stoneshop Silver badge
Coat

24GHz is license-free

and the gear is a bit under 10k euro per station. A bargain, really

Stoneshop Silver badge

It's not the cable

it's the connection speed. 100BTx is limited to 100m, at 10BT you can get up to 185m (with a good-enough cable, of course). Signal reflection, propagation delay and crosstalk are what's limiting. Given that you'd be connecting to an ADSL line that does 2Mb/s on a fair day, downhill and with tailwind, nailing your switch ports to 10Mbit doesn't sound like it would stomp on your bandwidth.

For that matter, I've reliably run 85Mbit PowerLan gear over 200m of standard extension cord cable in a point-to-point setup. Effective speed was 3 to 3.5Mbyte/sec, so not too shabby.

Stoneshop Silver badge

The first thing you do

is feeding a nylon cord through the hosepipe (just duct-tape a vacuum cleaner to the other end and feed in the cord), then with the actual cable you pull a second cord. This allows you, given sufficient diameter of the hosepipe, to pull a second cable if the need arises, although it's usually better to pull back the existing cable and feed it back in together with the new one.

Herts cops 'ate the evidence' at scene of crime, court told

Stoneshop Silver badge

"Instead" or "despite"?

He may well have made the connection (I can't remember if he's the one who says "The evidence must be under our very eyes") but decided that, given his recently-deceased-ex-colleague was quite the asshole, the already-taken course of action (i.e. eating the evidence) had best be pursued until the very end.

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Boffin

Some boffin recently investigated

to what extent Big Macs go off when left uneaten (which I consider a decent strategy) and left around the office (which I consider less so) in various places.

By and large, they didn't.

I fully expect Domino pizzas to have similar properties.

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Headmaster

So in what way

is October 1954 (the date this Goon Show aired) earlier than 1953 (the date Lamb to the Slaughter was published)?

Mass mind control artist condemns El Reg to obscurity

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FAIL

Indeed

"Hardly likely to win you any credibility points with the big fat idiots and small minded american's is it now?"

I doubt El Reg is yearning to collect those points.

I doubt it very much.

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Boffin

And on top of that

El Reg's Standarts Converter: http://www.theregister.co.uk/Design/page/reg-standards-converter.html

They don't just uphold their standards, they allow you to express them in more conventional quantities, awkward as that may be.

'ALIEN' LIFE FOUND in California

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Flame

@thecake

You must be American.

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Coat

No energy?

It's got vast lakes full of methane, for crying out loud. The same stuff people on earth use to heat their homes with. But maybe they lack gas burners on Titan.

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Headmaster

Pedantry pedanticised

"the obvious and tangible mistake that Ford haven't actually made cars in Dagenham for the best part of a decade, "

That would tie in perfectly with the police response, which we all know to be timely and accurate, surely.

We probe the Google anti-trust probe. Vigorously

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Headmaster

The problem is

that you appear to fail to see "telll someone to buld a PC to measure" as equal to "build your own" as opposed to "buy cardboard box at $retailer with manufacturer-made computer in it".

Stoneshop Silver badge
FAIL

"Nobody is forcing you to buy Windows."

Try buying a PC or laptop without some form of Windows preinstalled. There even was a time when Bill equated selling OS-less computers as an incitement to software piracy, because obviously noone in their right mind (or left) would be installing a non-Windows OS on them, and refusing to pay for crap that they'd not be using.

Yes, you can get a refund now. Which is a comparatively recent development. And of course you could build your own, which simply isn't for everyone, and somewhat hard to do if it's a laptop you need/want.

Stoneshop Silver badge
WTF?

My existing Google account

is non-existent, and will remain in that state.

Apple Facetime flings out frightening random calls

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Grenade

Designers and architects

should be subjected to the consequences of their design decisions. Of which "being woken up at 02:30 by a wonky program" would be just a minor nuisance.

How to kill your computer

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Alert

From http://www.cluefire.net

If being dropped out of an aircraft into what is, for all anyone knows,

a minefield is "moderately rough handling", what would constitute

"rough handling" or "very rough handling"?

-- David Richerby

Being shipped UPS.

-- Dave Brown

Has CERN made the VATICAN ANTIMATTER BOMB for real?*

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Grenade

From a friend with access to the appropriate gear

"You don't burn books. So we took it out the back and shot it"

This was about a book by the founder of the cult of fictionology, but the same sentiment applies.

(I myself have treated that pile of dross with an angle grinder and an alligator saw. Unsurprisingly, he book lost)

LHC boffins turn lead into quarko-gluotic Big Bang incrediblo-stuff

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Boffin

Oh yes they do, kindof. The scientifically advanced way

They simply feed the tinsel into the particle source whatsits,crank up the accelerator thingamajigs a bit, then continuously adjust the collision aim doodad so that the point of collision gradually moves along the entire length of the tunnel. You can see the result of those collisions in the pic in the article; if that's not festive I don't know what is.

The forgotten, fat generation of Mac Portables

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Flame

SCSI was no Apple first

It was an established industry standard already, although not really common in prebuilt desktop systems. Computer shops' price lists were not that much shorter for the SCSI section than for the others (MFM/RLL or IDE) though, so they sure were used by the DIY crowd. SCSI disks were only a bit pricier than the others then, too, otherwise Apple would not have chosen them. They then bastardised the SCSI standard to allow for cheaper cables ("ooh, with one ground pin for all those twisted pairs it will work just as well". Yeah, right), which did little to take away the SCSI reputation for being finicky.

Stoneshop Silver badge
Grenade

WD coexisting with any other brand

required deep, intense voodoo, and it made no difference if the bus was SCSI, IDE, ESDI or ST-506.

And only now that those incompatibilities are really a thing of the past it is that a single drive per channel gets to be the common configuration. Of course, as all hardware (as well as software) sucks, you'll be getting incompatibilities between controller and drive to make up for it.

Stoneshop Silver badge

"Is there anything it can't do?"

So far no luck in getting it to do the dishes and feed the cat, but apart from that?

I've heard it's the single most manufactured IC ever.

Stoneshop Silver badge

Much better than x86

with its totally fscked memory model.

For a while I wrote testing software for modules for voice response systems, which were 68k-based. Mostly C, but with splashes of assembler left and right. Pretty nice-ish all around, but the 6502 is still favourite.

Stoneshop Silver badge
Boffin

Auxiliary voltages

probably for the RS232 port, creating -5V or -12V out of whatever voltage the battery supplies. Switched-cap supplies aren't the black art that switched-inductor supplies are, though. You can even build a quite competent one out of a 555 oscillator, with a few additional caps and diodes.

And glasss-cased SMD diodes (MELF) are rare now, but not at all extinct.

Hadron Collider switches to heavy ions, tinfoilers wet pants again

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Flame

Re: So...

Among other things, they've found it's a rather involved way to make piping hot custard with rhubarb crumble, and then only teeny tiny quantities thereof.

Stoneshop Silver badge
Boffin

@Harvey Trowell

You forgot the most important bit: does she wear glasses?

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Paris Hilton

So, they're pretty close to the Big Bang

After that, they can start looking for the Best one.

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Boffin

No holes in space-time fabric yet?

They don't have any cats at CERN?

PARIS joins the 17-mile-high club

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Headmaster

Title

"Is that the Mediterranean or the Atlantic?"

Yes.

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Boffin

Puncture

Yes, that looks like the wing damage. And judging from its shape (detailed pic in the landing/recovery story), with two more or less straight edges at right angles, I'd say the wing hit one of the corners of the payload box. Supporting evidence is that it's the port wing, which can be seen tilting up on the release video.

PARIS in 89,000 ft climax

Stoneshop Silver badge

Vertical launch

You'd then want the box vertical as well. With a short U-shaped loop protruding from the rear of the plane (grabbed by a pin just like on PARIS 1), both ends of the U anchored inside the plane, so that there are no knots, twists or ends to snag on the edge of the hole. I'm still thinking about a mechanism to keep the plane from swinging (excessively) relative to the box, which would not be susceptible to icing.

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Thumb Up

@Parax

Same idea, different location (they do have more than one in that city)

Stoneshop Silver badge

Parishute

I don't think it'd have effect immediately, especially not at 89k ft.

Stoneshop Silver badge
Flame

You may want to ask

how well they work at 25 miles up. Burning requires not only fuel but also oxygen; the latter is pretty scarce already at the summit of Mt. Everest, let alone three times higher.

You'll also have the problem that controlling the resulting temperature (lithium batteries dislike overheating even more than freezing) will not be a simple task. Beef up the camera battery a bit, add a controller and a heating element, and you're set.

Stoneshop Silver badge

Barcelona airport?

He should of course land right here: http://maps.google.com/maps?q=51-57,+rue+de+Courcelles,+Paris,+France+75008&oe=utf-8&client=firefox-a&ie=UTF8&hq=&hnear=57+Rue+de+Courcelles,+75008+Paris,+Ile-de-France,+France&ei=3wvQTMdzxofhBubvxYcH&ved=0CBQQ8gEwAA&t=h&z=16

Stoneshop Silver badge
Boffin

The balloon

Immediately after the release you can see the camera view change from "swaying" to "tumbling", which would imply the main box is also falling freely.

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