* Posts by Stoneshop

3826 posts • joined 8 Oct 2009

‘Elders of the Internet’ apologise for social media, recommend Trump filters to fix it

Stoneshop
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Re: Veritaserum

I like the Viking custom of trying to reach agreement on an important matter by holding a drunken conclave in the evening followed by a sober one the morning after.

The morning session may not be quite coherent, but at least there won't be much shouting.

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Stoneshop
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Coat

Re: They had me at "Trump filters"

Anyone calling themselves a "Task Force" is rarely legitimate.

They mispeeled "Tssk Force".

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Official probe into HPE’s Oz 3Par crashes would create 'further negative publicity' if revealed

Stoneshop
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Facepalm

Crucially, the denial letter we were sent also mentioned that disclosing the final report raised “the prospect of further negative publicity it could generate for HPE”

And holding back this information won't have customers, current and prospective, figuring there's something dicey to be kept hidden.

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Stoneshop
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Holmes

Re: Reading between the lines...

It's very interesting that the ATO only mentions HPE in its letter of denial when DXC were also involved "...tech services giant DXC, which installed the storage boxes..." in the implementation.

You are aware that DXC is the services branch of HPE, with just another name and half the knowledge lopped off?

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Heatwave shmeatwave: Brit IT departments cool their racks – explicit pics

Stoneshop
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Re: I've done this too

You really _REALLY_ have to wonder why with millions of squids worth of kit and redundancy up the wazoo,

Eh, what? Redundancy? At that time there were a dozen 785/8600/750 systems, half of them in a cluster, the others standalone (although the two PDPs could run the other's tasks if one of them failed) plus a scattering of MVII's. Disks: lots. Four HSC50s, maxed out, for the cluster. Plus some RAs for the standalones. PDPs ran off 4 RP06es each. I don't think there was disk mirroring in use (can't be arsed to look up if that was even an option with VMS 4.5), but there were a couple of unused disks which were used as lukewarm spares when needed. They didn't even have a no-break until the site became crucial as a comms hub for NW Europe. Which was close to a year later.

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Stoneshop
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Re: I've done this too

Over 20 years ago, so no smartphone pics.

Aircon popped in computer room. Getting toasty rapidly.

Close to 35, in my case: I'm in the computer room for some reason when I hear the dull roar soundscape changing. After a couple of seconds it dawns on me that it's the aircon rumble that's absent now. Which means that there's now close to 100kW going in every second that's not taken out, which is clearly suboptimal for the continued operation of the equipment present. I sprint out the door and into the sysadmin pen, and alert those present. Half get assigned to raiding the offices and confiscating any fan they see, the others shut down and switch off all the systems and storage not deemed absolutely essential. It's the one time I've seen a thermograph move, climbing 10 degrees in as many minutes.

We lost maybe three RA81 HDAs and one logic board out of well over a hundred, and one memory board from one of the systems.

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Stoneshop
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Re: Ceiling or floor?

Those 10U wall racks aren't usually that big a problem regarding heat, though. Half the height is patch panels, one or two cable management panels, three or four switches at maybe 100W each. A decent rack design can deal with that.

Mine (10U) takes 130W max, and internally it's about 5 degrees above ambient

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Stoneshop
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FAIL

Re: Never mind the H&S of attaching fans with cables

If someone can access the equipment at all you're just waiting for a security breach.anyway, cable or not.

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Stoneshop
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Facepalm

Additional cooling

One contract I had was with a branch of the Dutch Ministry of Agriculture, housed in (then) 40-year old barracks. Single story, low tarpaper roof, and even on just moderately sunny days the offices were already uncomfortably toasty. Cooling to the computer room was half-knackered, as one of the two units had a pinhole leak that apparently wasn't fixable, which had caused them to use up their freon-based coolant quota already. This lack of cooling caused serious swings in the computer room temperature, with a resultant well-higher than average component failure rate.

Their method of trying to keep the temperature within acceptable values was by installing garden sprinklers underneath the heat exchangers, and turning them on when temps in the computer room hit 25 degrees. Time to turn the tap off was often well into the evening, requiring one of the sysadmins to clock several hours of overtime. On really warm days boosting the cooling capacity like this was insufficient, and relief had to be brought by opening the back door and pointing half a dozen floor-standing fans at it.

(My suggestion to dump a few buckets of white paint on the roof, or tack a couple of rolls of alu-coated foil over it was dismissed, as 'this is just a temporary building'. It had been temporary since the mid-1950's, and it continued to be temporary for at least five more years after I left)

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Tech team trapped in data centre as hypoxic gas flooded in. Again

Stoneshop
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Re: Buncefield

Thought one of the kids had fallen out of their bunk bed. Next door's loft hatch fell in to their bedroom. And that was 12 miles away.

I was living in Enschede when the fireworks storage went up, and in my street there was no damage worth mentioning despite being a mere 1.6km away in a straight line; elsewehere there had been windows blown out at 10km and more.

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It's 2018 so, of course, climate.news is sold to climate change deniers

Stoneshop
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Holmes

Re: Denier?

so these are people interested in meteorological change and who judge the thickness of yarns?

Well, with average temperatures rising one tends to see a significant decrease in, or even absence of hosiery, and a corresponding reduction of the thickness of the yarn out of which it's made.

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Stoneshop
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Headmaster

Re: WTF!!

Homeopathy was invented by a German doctor in 1802.

s/doctor/quack/

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Chirp unveils free tier of shouting-at-IoT devices audio net tech

Stoneshop
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Boffin

Re: Pet Safe?

including the odd human who could hear the base oscillator in greenscreen monitors when the computer was off.

Not that odd, it's just 15625 Hz, might be even lower depending on the free-running behaviour of the line oscillator. It was common for people to be able to hear audio frequencies that high if they hadn't been attending heavy metal/disco/house[0] concerts regularly.

[0] depending on decade

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No, seriously, why are you holding your phone like that?

Stoneshop
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Headmaster

Re: Marketing

Mines the one with the pockets full of leaves.

How many of those have you dug up so far?

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Geoboffins spot hundreds of ghost dunes on Mars

Stoneshop
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Boffin

Re: Giant?

The dunes at Noctis Labyrinthus are about 285.71429 linguine, 0.28925748 brontosaurus high, the ones at Hellas basin are about 535.71429 linguine, 0.54235778 brontosaurus high.

Better?

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US military manuals hawked on dark web after files left rattling in insecure FTP server

Stoneshop
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Pirate

the default password on the Reaper drones.

Gr1m

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UK privacy watchdog to fine Facebook 18 mins of profit (£500,000) for Cambridge Analytica

Stoneshop
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Devil

“to reflect on their responsibilities in the era of big data "

That comes after those companies' responsibilities towards Big Money, especially when it's their own.

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An $18m supercomputer to simulate brains of mice in the land of Swiss cheese. How apt, HPE

Stoneshop
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Re: Is it legitimate to ask

Another question: I've never understood why can't a regular PC simulate a human neural network. Aren't PCs powerful enough?

They probably can, but at a speed that would make glaciers look positively frisky.

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Stoneshop
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$18M for something that looks like a wardrobe?

Any 1970-1980ish mainframe looks like a wardrobe. And they're pretty useful (the air-cooled ones that is) when you come in soaking wet from a rain shower; it was quite common to hang one's coat or jacket near the fan exhaust and have it dry before your second cup of tea. Your local service engineer would probably object to you hanging your clothes inside one.

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Stoneshop
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Thumb Up

"This is what Deep Thought should look like".

Deep Thought is actually a fair bit more impressive

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Stoneshop
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Swiss scientists should expect to find a desire for cheese

But which? Leicester? Tilsit? Caerphilly, Bel Paese? Red Windsor? Stilton? Emmental? Gruyère? Norwegian Jarlsberger, Liptauer? Lancashire? White Stilton? Danish Blue? Double Gloucester? Cheshire? Dorset Blue Vinney? Brie, Roquefort, Pont-l'Évêque, Port Salut, Savoyard, Saint-Paulin, Carre-de-L'Est, Bresse-Bleu, Boursin? Camembert, Gouda? Edam? Caithness? Smoked Austrian? Japanese Sage Darby? Wensleydale? Greek Feta? Gorgonzola? Parmesan? Mozzarella? Pippo Crème? Danish Fimboe? Czech sheep's milk? Venezuelan Beaver Cheese?. Cheddar? Ilchester? Limburger?

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Imagine a patent on organizing computer files being used against online shopping sites. Oh, it's still happening

Stoneshop
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Headmaster

Have you considered

the possibility that a book may have pages missing, duplicated or bound in the wrong order? That would cause the reader to be presented with a different story than the writer intended. Or does your method include a way to resolve each 'subsequent page' reference to the actual page as it should be, over the air (electronic or avian)?

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Gemini goes back to the '90s with Agenda, Data and mulls next steps

Stoneshop
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Holmes

The top six requested features

...

5. Larger battery

6. A better list indexer.

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Every step you take: We track you for your own safety, you know?

Stoneshop
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Re: Battery life ?

Third point: company delivery drivers tend to have dedicated communication thingies, ruggedised, large batteries, with just the app installed that does all the delivery-related stuff (tracking, signing, navigation and such) and nothing else. No Angry Birds, Youtube, Farcebook.

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ZX Spectrum reboot firm boss delays director vote date again

Stoneshop
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Have they got the money for boxes?

They can always get some used ones from supermarkets etc., but that still leaves the packing tape, the shipping labels and the stamps.

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Adidas US breach may have exposed millions of customers' personal info

Stoneshop
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Holmes

The company has notified law enforcement and brought in experts

Gumshoes among them?

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Drug cops stopped techie's upgrade to question him for hours. About everything

Stoneshop
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Black Helicopters

One night

on call-out, I was woken with the request to go fix an 11/730 with a broken power supply. "Where?" "New-$Placename". Now, $Placename was in my region, so my initial reaction was "OK, but are there any sites there?" "Oh yes, it's the regional ATC for light airplanes." "Hmm, is that really in $Placename?" (I would surely have heard about it). "No, NEW-$Placename. It's near $City".($City was in my region too, so New-$Placename probably was, as well. Never been to that site, though, but that was something that happened occasionally). "Present your passport and your badge at the gate, they know to expect a DEC FS guy"."Oh?" "Yes, it's part of the military base there". "Ah, OK, right. I'll be off now."

So, in my car, past $City, to the site. Gate guards let me in, no problem. "Drive on for some 200 meters, there's a building on the right, the sysadmin will be at the door". "OK, thanks". It's 02:00 or so, pitch dark.

I find the building, park, get shown in, down a lot of stairs, and past several blast doors. Deep in some hardened room there's the 730. The replacement PSU arrives, I extract the broken one, fit the new one, test and that was that. The sysadmin takes me back up all those stairs and out the door, to my car. It's now 05:30, and in the first morning light I see the building has a couple of manned machine gun nests around it. Which was, eh, rather stunning as a couple of hours back I had walked past one quite closely without noticing.

And to top it off that site was actually the responsibility of another region office, but oh well.

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Not OK Google: Massive outage turns smart home kit utterly dumb

Stoneshop
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Re: Hahahaha

If you lose power due to a house fire, your remote device would not work,

Local devices might not, too.

and you could be unable to escape from the fire?

Doors are not the only way to exit a building, and not necessarily the fastest either.

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Stoneshop
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Mushroom

Re: Repeat

It always seemed a travesty of democracy that the last appointment by Obama was blocked by the GOP just out of political spite.

Since Nixon's downfall the GOP has trampled over every democratic process that it was able to find.

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Stoneshop
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Big Brother

Re: Repeat

Big brother is in control, just not the way 1984 lead us to believe.

George might have wanted to have a chat with Isaac Asimov, to expand on the technological possibilities for, essentially, mind control. But maybe readers would have considered such a 1984++ too far-fetched, dismissing it even more strongly than most of them already did (if they weren't using it as an instruction manual instead).

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Stoneshop
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Holmes

Re: Hahahaha

Want to predict that internet services won't always be reliable,

So you build your home automation system to be autonomous, and not rely on the predictably unreliable Internet and its clod services.

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Stoneshop
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Holmes

Re: Hahahaha

I wholeheartedly agree with the previous speaker.

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Is it a bird? Is it a plane? Is it a giant alien space cigar? Whatever it is, boffins are baffled

Stoneshop
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Boffin

Re: Logically if a comet makes enough passes near the sun....

Of course if this thing really has been in interstellar space getting some samples off its surface (or some detailed surface analysis) would seem like quite a good idea.

Maybe the next one if we spot it coming in, and manage to get Bruce Willis out of his cryo container and defrosted in time. For this one you'll need a mighty fast rocket just to catch up with it, and then there's the getting it back.

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Galileo, here we go again. My my, the Brits are gonna miss EU

Stoneshop
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Boffin

Re: Fgs

There is not much point in having a nuclear arsenal if we can only aim it when the yanks say its ok.

With nuclear stuff I doubt that it would matter much if one was a couple of miles off, and as it would probably trigger MAD (from more than two adversaries, as it is now) there's not that much need for extreme precision anyway. The US and USSR managed fine (for particular values of 'fine') without GPS precision for decades that way.

It's the conventional guided missiles that you want to fly in the bathroom window, then down the stairs and into the storage cupboard that need it.

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Stoneshop
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Headmaster

Re: "Minister for Defence Procurement Guto Bebb"

Yes I think he's a real person.

[ ] integer - not a politician

[ ] complex - a scientist, probably

[x] real - none of the above

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Relive your misspent, 8-bit youth on the BBC's reopened Micro archive

Stoneshop
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BBC keyboard

And a damn fine keyboard it is, nice and crisp and just the right amount of travel. C64 keys had an unpleasantly long and somewhat mushy stroke, and the less said about Sinclair's undoubtedly cheap abominations the better.

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Stoneshop
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Re: Ah...

Believe it or not my Speccy clone actually came with the full circuit diagram in its manual

The BBC B Advanced User Guide came with not just a circuit diagram, but there was also the better part of a chapter explaining the more advanced functions (like the processor speed switching from 2MHz to 1MHz for slower peripherals), and described adding interfaces. It also detailed every sodding OS function.

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Creep travels half the world to harass online teen gamer… and gets shot by her mom – cops

Stoneshop
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Holmes

Re: "Flew halfway around the world" = "Auckland to Sydney"?

Auckland is in New Zealand. :-)

Sydney, however, is in Australia.

Going via Sydney also got him closer to 'travelling halfway around the world" than a direct flight from AKL/NZAA would.

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German researchers defeat printers' doc-tracking dots

Stoneshop
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Facepalm

Re: personal printers of mangement in your ...

True, but if the dot pattern is related to the source of the document, not just the hosted printer

It's the printer that adds the dot pattern. Note the mention in TFA that Samsung, Brother and Tektronix printers don't seem to add those dots.

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Cops: Autonomous Uber driver may have been streaming The Voice before death crash

Stoneshop
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Re: Lets...

If one wants to find an organisational failing, it might be in the area of psychology - i.e not putting safeguards in place to ensure the human driver is fully engaged with the job in hand. Perhaps requiring then to give a running commentary on the road situation, as is done in training for advanced driving licences (police drivers etc).

In Japan train drivers are required to acknowledge all signals they pass by pointing at them; this is being recorded and reviewed. And yes, this is on top of Automatic Train Control, which would slow or halt the train anyway if the driver ignored the signal.

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How a tax form kludge gifted the world 25 joyous years of PDF

Stoneshop
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Devil

For the love of $DIETY

Now with 30% less hellfire and damnation.

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Microsoft CEO wades into ICE outcry: Cool it, we only do legacy mail

Stoneshop
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Devil

Re: All microsoft have to do to become the most popular company

And delete all emails and data, including backups.

How about 'accidentally' removing any access protections instead?

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Stoneshop
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Re: It's not a new law

Jail the parents, who have done something illegal (set aside the debate over if it should be illegal or not, the fact is they broke the current law by crossing the border),

Which is a federal misdemeanor the first time they do it (it becomes a felony on repeated attempts) at the same severity as transporting honeybees without a license or false claim of postal losses. Seriously, look it up, it's in US code 18. Never mind that entry AND CLAIMING ASYLUM is not illegal anyway.

"Keep, ancient lands, your storied pomp!" cries she

With silent lips. "Give me your tired, your poor,

Your huddled masses yearning to breathe free,

The wretched refuse of your teeming shore.

Send these, the homeless, tempest-tost to me,

"I lift my lamp beside the golden door!"

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Um, excuse me. Do you have clearance to patch that MRI scanner?

Stoneshop
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Holmes

Re: obvious solution ...

You could even connect from the RS232 port of the MRI computer to a computer that is on the network,

As MRI data sizes are expressed in GB, using RS232 appears suboptimal. I think you'd want something optical (easy to make sure the receiver cannot send) with speeds of at least 100Mbit/s. And only hardware flow control signalling back to the sender.

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Developer’s code worked, but not in the right century

Stoneshop
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Boffin

Re: Lars & the future interview

The bigger question is: is he going to show up on the date you set?

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Stoneshop
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Holmes

Re: What did you break by getting little details like dates wrong?

Your teeth, if you try to eat them fresh from the tree.

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Stoneshop
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Boffin

Re: timestamp is a date format

Maybe The Register can come up with its own special timestamp ? Milliseconds since el'Reg started ?

Sheepmarathons (the time required for a sheep at maximum velocity in vacuum to finish a marathon) (straight line, I expect it'll have some problems cornering at that speed).

That's 0.0070383633 seconds, to be exact.

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Stoneshop
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Re: Never mind the date... what about that algorithm?!?!

[1] The story's modern enough to relate to loyalty points so I assume we're not still on tape storage with sequential access only.

The story is clearly dealing with, er, legacy issues if not actually happening several decades ago, given that custom date format which is something you decide to use if you're strapped for space Maybe the environment has been upgraded and space is not the issue it was, but the date format, and probably oodles of other cruft, is still there. And the environment may well still act as if it's sequential access, like it was when the first line of code was punched.

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Stoneshop
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Trollface

Re: No standard for epochs - @katrinab

Possibly, yes. IIRC parts of the US nuclear deterrent still relies on 8" floppies

Launching fiery death in 50 ... 40 ... 30 ... -65510 seconds, abort.

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Stoneshop
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Trollface

Re: why in the blue blazes...

They had come to a longer term fix by the time I left, just before they ran out of letters.

After Z, maybe switch to Unicode?

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