* Posts by fidodogbreath

354 posts • joined 23 Sep 2009

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Google now mingles everything you've bought with everywhere you've been

fidodogbreath
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Re: Not so fast

Did I miss anything?

7. Disable WiFi.

Any app with "view available WiFi connections" and network access can geolocate you based on the SSIDs and signal strengths of nearby WiFi networks. This works even if location services are disabled. All they have to do is exfiltrate the SSID data and match it to database info on their end, instead of reading it from your device. A VPN will not protect you from this.

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Google wants to track your phone and credit card through meatspace

fidodogbreath
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Big Brother

Has anyone ever bought anything on the strength of a web advert?

Thanks to the miracle of AdGuard, I never even see them.

With that said -- Google can fsck off and die. I'm sick of the unblinking gaze of the panopticon. From now on, if they want my info they'll have to steal it (as described in this story).

I've gotten rid of most of our Android crap, and the rest will be gone soon. I'm in the process of disconnecting from almost all of their web services (including Gmail). I can't believe I was stupid enough to give them so much data for so long.

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After stiffing us with Trump, Weiner 'fesses to underage cock shot rot

fidodogbreath
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Re: He forgot something important.

He didn't mention anything about God or Jesus helping him to get through this.

God, perhaps. Probably not Jesus, though, since Weiner is Jewish.

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fidodogbreath
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I came to grips [...] I hit bottom.

So, business as usual, then.

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Bye bye MP3: You sucked the life out of music. But vinyl is just as warped

fidodogbreath
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Re: Hipsters

You're only a true hipster if you've carved the LP out of wood from a tree you felled and lovingly butchered yourself

You can actually hear the higher authenticity of hand-carved, artisanal audio, but only when it's played through sustainably-grown, fair-trade bamboo speakers.

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40,000-plus AT&T staff threaten to strike Friday

fidodogbreath
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some of whom average from $115,000 to $148,000 in total compensation

So, now we know that the highest-paid union employee at AT&T makes $148K and the second-highest-paid makes $115K (including benefits).

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Proposed PATCH Act forces US snoops to quit hoarding code exploits

fidodogbreath
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Oversight

They should create a secret Patch Court, where only the NSA is allowed to present arguments and approval is granted 99.9% of the time. Then the rule of law will truly be upheld.

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Cryptocurrency miner found armed with same exploits as WannaCrypt

fidodogbreath
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I know if I went down to our datacentre right now and saw someone with shades, a hoodie pulled over his head and that expression on his face [...] I'd call security!

A real spy would try to blend in: pasty fluorescent-light complexion; ill-fitting, clay-colored pleated chinos with last year's model Samsung phone on a belt clip (rooted, of course); un-ironed white shirt with bits of Cheeto dust on the cuffs; and a desultory tie from the sale rack (but only if required by the dress code).

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Beaten passenger, check. Dead giant rabbit, check. Now United loses cockpit door codes

fidodogbreath
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Hmmm

United's PR boss must be praying for death at this point

Uber's former PR flack is looking for work. Given her extensive recent experience with conflagrant trash receptacles, United Airlines PR would be a perfect fit for her.

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US spymasters trash Kaspersky: AV tools can't be trusted, we've stuck a probe in them

fidodogbreath
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Re: Wow, that's pretending at its finest..

I met Eugene Kaspersky for a private conversation in Paris and I personally cannot picture him as a government stooge

I have no idea whether these Kaspersky allegations are true; but as a general rule, spies don't act like spies. That's kind of their thing.

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fidodogbreath
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Re: Better them than US (see what i did there)

I would rather have my info flowing to Russia than the US.

Great news! Now you can have both.

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fidodogbreath
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Ha! Apparently Captain DaFt and I were riding the same thoughtwave...

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fidodogbreath
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Re: Kapersky has done more to stop computer security threats...

AC might be onto something here.

Perhaps they're casting aspersions on Kaspersky because it interferes with NSA / CIA / FBI spyware.

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fidodogbreath
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"I would be very happy to testify in front of the Senate, to participate in the hearings and to answer any questions they would decide to ask me,"

Sure, because we all know how well-qualified US senators are to analyze the inner workings of security software.

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T-Mobile USA sued by parents after their baby dies amid 911 meltdown

fidodogbreath
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Re: Dunno about Texas

In CA, it's because the city / county / state gov't is spending so much on lavish law enforcement retirement benefits that they can't afford people to answer the phone or respond to calls.

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America 'will ban carry-on laptops on flights from UK, Europe to US'

fidodogbreath
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Re: I wonder...

If this Ban is less about Passenger Safety, and more about containing those with Camera Phones

That would be a much more likely scenario if it applied to phones...

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Microsoft emits code for DIY Linux IoT hubs. Repeat, Linux IoT hubs (that talk to Azure, duh)

fidodogbreath
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It's too hefty to run on a bog-standard IoT sensor or controller

It ran fine until they added the telemetry...

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Microsoft touts next Windows 10 Creators Update: It's set for a Fall

fidodogbreath
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Re: Failed Creation Edition!

Neither of these futures is something that we want. So the question is: what are we going to do? Are there practical ways we can make progress?

Why, yes, there are a couple of ways to make progress. Switch to Linux, or buy a Mac. (Yes, I know, Tim Cook's garden has walls, too. But at least Apple explicitly says that monetizing user data is not part of their business model.)

Meanwhile, SatNad refuses to say how M$ use and monetize the mass quantities of user data they collect. Given that Windows 10 has been dogged by negative press about data privacy since day one, maintaining the veil of secrecy just keeps that suspicion alive. Presumably, M$ believes that the ongoing controversy is better than what would happen if the truth were known...

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Another IoT botnet has been found feasting on vulnerable IP cameras

fidodogbreath
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Re: "more than a thousand different internet protocol camera models."

I know it's infantilely stupid but shouldn't everyone start with the question "What ports are open on my machine?"

The electronics industry has created a flawed expectation that consumer IT products are just like hooking a Blu-ray player to a TV: plug it in, press Power, enjoy.

What fraction of average home users even know that UPnP exists, much less what it does and why it's dangerous? And without UPnP, how many would have the skills to enable secure remote access to a camera system or other IoThingie?

The root problem is these are IT products, made by companies that don't provide support, sold to and installed by people with no IT skills. So we have crap like UPnP, otherwise the new shinies get returned to the store because consumers can't make them work.

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Rich professionals could be replaced by AI, shrieks Gartner

fidodogbreath
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Re: Hopefully

The Magic Quadrant....like the Bermuda Triangle, a mythical shape created by confirmation bias and constant repetition.

Should Ms. Rowling ever return to wizard stories, though, I think Harry Potter and the Curse of the Magic Quadrant has a nice ring to it.

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fidodogbreath
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Giant ants COULD take over the earth

Microsoft COULD write non-bloaty software

I was with you on the giant ants, but you lost me with the Microsoft one.

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fidodogbreath
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But the important question is will an AI lawyer (etc) charge a lot less than a fleshbag version?

If the lawbots are in fact capable of learning, they will soon figure out how to maximize their revenue.

The real question is, what will they do with all that money, since (presumably) lawbots will have no use for Bentleys, mansions, yachts, etc.

My guess is that they'll learn to bribe legislatorbots to create laws so complex that only lawbots can understand them, thus boxing out any lingering meatbag competition.

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HPE dumps Grandpa Software in Micro Focus care home, hightails it

fidodogbreath
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Expensive fumigation

The stench of Leo Apotheker's reign still clings to the carpet and drapes.

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IBM: Remote working is great! ... For everyone except us

fidodogbreath
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Re: Except you need competent management

If you have competent management

Translation: we're doomed.

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Facebook is abusive. It's time to divorce it

fidodogbreath
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Re: Such a true reflection of a sad world

Generally pissed off, bored and cynical

In other words, we're all a bit Dabbsy.

Sounds about right.

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Can you spout digital bollocks? London is hiring a Chief Digital Officer

fidodogbreath
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Is there a corresponding Chief Analog Officer?

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Jeez, we'll do something about Facebook murder vids, moans Zuckerberg

fidodogbreath
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Re: Not turtles its A'holes

I think it is also down to egos and a sense of superiority, not only Zuck's but all the way down.

I agree with your premise, but I think the problem extends "all the way down" to users.

The root problem here is not that Facebook created a live streaming service; it's that there are people who think it's fun to torture and murder people for a live audience, and others who think it's fun to watch. It's amazing to me that Zuck et al are surprised that cruel assholes would use Facebook Live to live-stream cruel asshole things.

To be 100% clear: I'm in no way excusing Facebook of responsibility to deal with this thing that they have foisted on the world. But were they really that naive?

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What is this bullsh*t, Google? Nexus phones starved of security fixes after just three years

fidodogbreath
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Re: Gotta remember who Google are

So, all these dates show us is that they have the data to show that the vast majority of people change phones every 2 years with a smaller percentage taking up to 3 years

More likely: they used big data to find the shortest possible support time frame, where customers are not quite pissed off enough to change brands at their next refresh.

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fidodogbreath
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Re: I love you Android, but goodbye.

*hate* using iOS, and I detest so many things about Apple, but my next phone will be an iPhone

I recently switched to iPhone, for the same reason, and with the same reservations. By far the biggest pain point for an Android refugee is the lack of file system access. iOS inter-app communication happens through the "share" command, which forces awkward work-arounds for common tasks that are stone simple on Android (e.g., using a 3rd-party app to open, edit, and save a file from cloud storage).

That said -- preventing apps from fscking with the file system (outside of their own userspace) is a big part of the iOS security model. The fruit giveth, and the fruit taketh away.

If you come at iOS like "why won't this POS let me decide where to put a file, like a real computer?" you'll be frustrated. If you modulate that to, "yeah, file management was way easier on Android, but at least now I can install my bank app, and I can choose not to be surveilled by Google," then it's a lot more palatable.

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fidodogbreath
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Re: 3 years is ok, but ....

Why can't phone makers do the same?

They can, but they choose not to. Instead, they take turns swiping each other's disgusted customers. For everyone who buys a Galaxy this time because Moto screwed them, there's someone else buying a Moto G because they got screwed by Sammy. It's the smartphone circle of life.

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fidodogbreath
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never had a problem with security either

That you know of...

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fidodogbreath
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Re: Just wow.

So, if for compatibility or stability, you want to freeze the version you are on, then after 18months it will not be as secure????

Yes, but in fairness, "freezing" the OS version is a choice that you are making; M$ are not unilaterally rendering your system obsolete with this policy. And in any case, skipping major updates is no magic bullet, since there's always the possibility that even a seemingly minor update can bork "compatibility or stability."

When your frozen OS version reaches EOL, you have the option to update to the then-current version of Windows, thus extending your security support for another 18 months. There's at least a chance that your environment can be stabilized again on the newer version. That may not be ideal for your specific use case, but it's not the same as completely cutting off support for your device.

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fidodogbreath
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Re: Bye bye Android

I'd always had Androids from Motorola and Samsung, but in December I switched to an iPhone -- primarily over the lack of Android updates. Viewed solely in terms of UX, I'd call the switch a mixed bag, as one would expect. In terms of security, though, it has exceeded my expectations.

I've gotten more iOS updates in the past five months than I received for all of my Androids combined over 5+ years, and that's not an exaggeration. Apple has even patched the Broadcom WiFi bug; I think it's safe to say that most Android devices in use today will never see a fix for that. It sucks, but that's the reality that Google has created.

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It's a question worth asking: Why is the FCC boss being such a jerk?

fidodogbreath
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Holmes

Never saw that coming

he instead embarked on a fact-free, frequently misleading and highly partisan speech that bordered on a rant, even going so far as to mock and dismiss anyone who opposed his idea

From a Trumpkin? Huh.

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UK.gov throws hissy fit after Twitter chokes off snoop firm's access

fidodogbreath
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You keep using that word...

insisting that Rudd meant to say "hashing" (as in cryptography)..."

Said with a straight face, no doubt, because the mouthpiece didn't understand it either.

...and not hashtags, which are used on Twitter as a means of making tweets easily searchable by topic.

"Why can't those awful computer people just use words normally? Honestly, who ever heard of birdies twittering about hash? And what does any of that have to do with searching crypts? They seem to find this all very funny, but I think it's dreadful."

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Yahoo!'s Marissa! will! eject! with! $186m!.. $185m!.. $184m!..

fidodogbreath
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Go

A more cost-effective solution

I would have been happy to drive Yahoo into the ground for a mere $50 million. I wouldn't even have made them pay my COBRA health insurance premiums.

To any multinational-corp board members reading this, please know that my offer still stands. If your goal is to preside over the collapse of a company (once-proud or otherwise), please contact me. I'll guarantee to do the job for HALF the price of a "name-brand" CEO such as Mayer or Apotheker.

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We're 'heartbroken' we got caught selling your email records to Uber, says Unroll.me boss

fidodogbreath
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It's an outrage, I tell ya

I can't imagine why Unroll.me thought it was OK to monetize the contents of my GMail account!

Huh? No, I didn't read it. No, I didn't read the GMail T&C either. Why do you ask?

Really? What about my Android phone, surely they don't....

Oh, that too?

Never mind.

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Linux 4.11 delayed for a week by NVMe glitches and 'oops fixes'

fidodogbreath
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Re: Good lord, man, testing software?

Testing before release? That's just crazy-talk.

Actually, here's the real crazy-talk: "We're going to force-install privacy-invading 'telemetry' to monitor how you use your personal property, so that you can provide mandatory unpaid alpha- and beta-testing for our expensive commercial OS. For some reason, you will blindly accept this."

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fidodogbreath
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It's a trap!

"So go out and test, guys and gals, and make sure that I can do a final release next weekend instead, ok?"

Who are you, and what have you done with Linus?!?!?

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Farewell Unity, you challenged desktop Linux. Oh well, here's Ubuntu 17.04

fidodogbreath
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Re: My thoughts on this ...

Ditto for Mint; I like Mint XFCE a lot better than Cinnamon. It's not flashy, but it's super stable and it runs great on any hardware.

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LinkedIn U-turns on Bluetooth-enabled 'Tinder for marketers'

fidodogbreath
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Holmes

Re: Deleted on all of my devices

The worst case of data slurp I have ever seen.

Data slurp, eh? And who owns LinkedIn?

Well, there's yer problem...

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US surveillance court declined less than 2 per cent of applications

fidodogbreath
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Re: 702 of FISA

9/11 was 17 years ago. It's time the hysteria it engendered is put to rest

It's vital to understand that the current surveillance regime was not a response to 9/11 hysteria. The USA PATRIOT Act was already written, and had been for some time.

The PATRIOT Act would have happened one way or another. Because it is fundamentally anti-democratic, it could not have passed in the normal course of legislative business. It required a crisis so that it could be enacted without examination or debate, and skeptics could be shouted down as unpatriotic.

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fidodogbreath
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Re: The land of the ....?

Both are considerably worse than the supposedly diabolical regimes in Russia and its satelites.

I agree that both the US and UK have gone overboard on surveillance, but the statement quoted above is not even remotely true.

The US and UK still have free press; Russia, not so much. Neither the US nor the UK uses state security services to execute journalists and regime critics, at home and abroad; Russia does both routinely, and indeed has done so many times in the UK. Neither country shoots at people who try to leave, as East Germany routinely did. I could go on.

So yes, both governments are imperfect. Both contain individuals who make bad decisions out of fear of making a mistake, and individuals who are driven by a lust for power and control. However, that is true of every country in the world; it does not make either of us worse than Berlin-Wall-era Soviet bloc dictatorships.

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fidodogbreath
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Re: On the other hand

On the other other hand...

How egregious does a "request" have to be in order to be rejected?

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Will the MOAB (Mother Of all AdBlockers) finally kill advertising?

fidodogbreath
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Re: Advertising seems to "work"...

As for TV ads, the wife desperately does all she can to skip over them (via TiVo)

I'm sure you're aware that Tivo tracks everything you watch and record, in order to "show you more relevant ads (both on TiVo products and on third-party websites)." From their privacy policy:

Information we automatically collect may include, for example, data about your viewing behavior (such as how you use, watch, record, rate and interact with content accessed on or through TiVo products), device (such as model number, software versions, and unique device identifiers), location (such as GPS data, zip code, and time zone), and cable service (such as cable provider and cable channels).

There is no escape.

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Trump's self-imposed cybersecurity deadline is up: What we got?

fidodogbreath
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why trust a private company to be safe if you let them access your network?

Because when you try to make them secure their systems, they complain to their bought-and-paid-for elected officials. Said officials then quash the new "job-killing" security rules, because they "stifle innovation."

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SPY-tunes scandal: Bloke sues Bose after headphones app squeals on his playlist

fidodogbreath
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Re: The younguns

I don't understand why people don't object to data slurping

It's all they've ever known. When we reminisce to millennials about things like "privacy," it's like when our grandparents talked to us about fetching water from the well or churning butter. It's so far outside their experience that they have no frame of reference for it.

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fidodogbreath
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Re: Orwell's 1984

"many idiots think it is fine and even defend the practice"

Problem identified. now, how do we solve this?

Eugenics?

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fidodogbreath
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Re: The advantages of poverty

The issue is one of audio compression on the Bluetooth link. It's not full, uncompressed 44.1kHz 16 bit stereo PCM.

A song stored in 44.kHz 16-bit WAV format is typically 40-50MB. However, most people will be listening to that song from an MP3 or AAC file, that was squashed down to 4MB or less using lossy compression. Bluetooth is not the weakest link in that signal chain.

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Google's 'adblocker' is all about taking back control

fidodogbreath
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Re: Google blocking ads...

what about all the tracking

Everything is a data point. By tracking which ads you block, they will be able to serve you more relevant ads...which their "blocker" will no doubt allow to pass through unmolested.

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