* Posts by nematoad

1008 posts • joined 17 Sep 2009

Grenade-gasm autogun gets Raoul Moat Taser shells

nematoad
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Mushroom

Dangerous...

... for whom? Looks like the the arms industry have just declared war on the civil population. I think that we should all invest in body armour, which would also boost the profits for the merchants of death (tm), so a win-win for a much neglected and vital corner of industry.

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Microsoft COO: Our greatest enemy is old Windows

nematoad
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FAIL

or...

... the fact that they are a convicted monopolist, with the same ethical standards as Capt. Jack Sparrow "take what you can, give nothing back" and a stunning lack of innovation.

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nematoad
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running a business?

No, what they are really doing is the same old monpolistic trick that has served them so well and the buying public so badly. Churn, churn,churn, that's what all this is about. To quote Bob Geldof "Give us your ------- money!

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BSkyB/News Corp merger: Wait for the cops, says Ofcom

nematoad
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Stop

Neither do I, but...

by allowing the takeover the authorities would give News Corps a very powerful position in the political life of the country. Just because you and I do not read News Corps offerings does not mean to say that everyone will be immune to the slanted news and opinions given in the papers and on TV etc. Remember " It was the Sun wot won it." or something like that. Politicians seem to be terrified of Murdoch and his minions and I reckon they might just have good reason for their fear.

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Google bypasses admin controls with latest Chrome IE

nematoad
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FAIL

Right...

Presumably you are not an IT person as such, rather a "gifted amateur".

Two things immediately spring to mind:

1) Who carries the can when things you have done to your laptop cause it to go belly up? Don't tell me your IT department repairs things for free.

2) I presume that in order to be in post and be issued with a laptop by your employers, you are expected to do some work from time to time. If you are not working for the IT department why are you wasting your employer's money doing stuff for which they are not employing you?

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Dam Busters dog dubbed 'Digger'

nematoad
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Operation Chastise

"They're remaking a film which celebrates a mission of questionable strategic significance..."

No, although Chastise was of questionable tactical importance the strategic ramifications were huge. For one thing it enabled Churchill, in the USA at the time, to announce in a speech to Congress what the RAF had just achieved. Thus boosting Britain's prestige with the American public. Secondly it boosted British morale at home. The papers were full of what 617 Sqdn had done and in view of the state of the war at that time was a good reason for undertaking the operation. In the larger picture the loss of life is of course, to be regretted. But don't forget,as the saying was " Don't you know, there's a war on?" In war people get killed. One of the most tragic aspects of the deaths caused by the breach was the fact that a large number of those killed were in fact women from a Russian forced labour camp downstream of the Mohne dam.

On a separate note one of the things that Chastise did demonstrate was the superb skill of the crews of Bomber Command. To navigate, at low level over hostile territory at night: to rendezvous at a given time and place and then to attack at 60 feet, no higher or lower, shows the tremendous skills of the crews available to AM Sir Arthur Harris, AOC Bomber Command. Harris was not convinced that his crews had the ability to attack the precision targets that would shortly be called for under the Pointblank Directive. Chastise and the later operations by 617 Sqdn. as directed by Gp. Capt. Leonard Cheshire proved to him that Bomber Command was capable of such attacks. This enabled the RAF to multiply its effectiveness and thus shortened the war. So, although of limited tactical importance Chastise was a milestone in the strategic bomber offensive, showing the way to future possibilities.

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Cabinet Office talks to Facebook & co about new ID system

nematoad
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Not so

"No-one in parliament spots the obvious flaw because none of them have any legal expertise."

Nope, sorry a LOT of MPs are lawyers, Tony Blair (remember him ?) was one and look at the way he viewed the privacy of the public.

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Has Steve Jobs killed the consumer hard disk industry?

nematoad
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FAIL

And if...

you are like me, on a slow connection and with a cap on your internet account? What to do, eh?

Besides as a Linux user I agree with RMS in that I do not trust Apple, Microsoft, Google etc with my data. Should I blindly store my stuff on an unknown server in an unknown jurisdiction? I think not. "Warrant, what warrant?"

Apple have a tendency to lock things down to the maximum possible degree, and if Mr. Jobs decides that what you are storing on your virtual partition does not meet his standards then what might happen. Do an Amazon and unilaterally delete said offending content?

No, I do forsee the day coming when flash overtakes the hard drive as the main backing storage medium on PCs, but in a data centre, not for a long time, I think.

I still believe in the "personal computer" aspect of my use of IT. If I have to switch from HDD to flash then so be it, but trust my data to the giant proprietory companies pushing the cloud, no.

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Skype reverse-engineered and open sourced

nematoad
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Samba, anyone?

"It’s hard to replicate perfectly the behaviour of any software under completely clean-room conditions, and probably even harder to prove that such conditions existed."

If that were the case then I would have expected the developers of Samba to have been beaten in the court case of a few years ago. Andrew Tridgell and his co-workers seem to have avoided all such unpleasantness when they reverse engineered SMB and actually produced a better implementation of the protocol.

Not having seen Bushmanov's work I would not like to say how he did it, but it was possibly not done illegally.

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PSN gaming network outage sparks DDoS rumours

nematoad
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FAIL

Lucky you

I have noticed that getting onto PSN has been rather hit and miss over the past couple of weeks. I contacted the help desk and they confirmed that the account was all in order. I could access other things via the PS3 like BBC iplayer but not PSN or LoveFilm. Checked my router, that was OK but following the help desk instructions I switched the router off for a time. The PS3 loggted onto PSN for a while then dropped off again. This has been happening ever since. On one minute off the next. I don't see that Sony need any DDoS attacks, they seem to be doing a grand job all by themselves. Bah!

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Boffins demand: Cull bogus A-Levels, hire brainier teachers

nematoad
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OK, well done A/C 10:37

If you have achieved your goal in life with the gaining of the degree that you wanted, then congratulations. I too worked hard for my degree and post-grad diploma. I'm not lazy and do take exception to the ad hominem attack.

What I have tried to do in my couple of posts is to say that even with the best will in the world and trying till one is blue in the face some peoples' brains are not wired up in a way that maths makes any sense. Do you critisise someone for not being a good painter or writer? No, probably not. So why dive in mouth first and slag off others who hold a different view on the value of different skills?

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nematoad
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@it wasnt me

"If you want to go and do vocational course and fluffy crap "excuse to party for 3 years"

Just try digging out footings by hand in July on a very sensitive site wth the soil made out of compacted shingle and stone building rubble.

I didn't say that the job I used to do was badly paid. (I'm now retired). As it happens I got a post-grad qualification in systems analysis and design. Believe me when I worked at some of the largest companies in the world (BP, GE, Zurich) I paid plenty of tax. I also earned a lot of money which I retained. What I am saying is that there are different horses for different courses. Not eveyone is skilled in maths. What if it was decided that no-one could get a job unless they could also run a four minute mile or some thing equally arbitrary?

Anyway the whole reason for a university degree is just to turn out droids able to be slotted into the production line. It is also to give the person concerned the skills to learn, marshal your thoughts and arguments and present them in a logical fashion.

In any case who says that the study of man's past is worthless? Are you saying that the discovery of the tomb of Tutankhamun, Maiden Castle, Pompeii are of no worth? If you are then you are doomed to live in a impoverished shallow world with no roots.

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nematoad
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Stop

Hold on a minute

What you and the Royal Society seem to have missed is that the reason people take "the fluffy subjects " that is:

1) they are interested in the subject

2) some people do not have an ability with maths.

I am such a person.

I left school with 3 O levels and never got to take any A levels. After studying with the OU I got a place at full time uni and graduated with a BA in Archaeology. OK so archaeology may not be the best subject to make a lot of money, but I did it because I loved the subject and believe me after three years hard grind if you don't love the subject at the start you sure as hell won't at the end. So why didn't I do a "useful" degree? Simple, I would not have been able to complete the first week let alone three years, my mind just does not work that way. If everyone was the same think of how flat and boring it would be.

It is strange how people with a talent for maths seem to think that everyone should have it as well and that those who do not are either lazy or terminally stupid.

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Hack of Irish job site exposes user names, addresses

nematoad
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Me too

Yes, I got one of these e-mails. I'm glad I now know what it was all about. Looking at the thing rang alarm bells and I just deleted it, I have also deleted my account with RecruitIreland. I haven't used it in years and sheer inertia kept it going. So in one way the spammers did me a small service.

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O2's free Wi-Fi in detail: How free is free exactly?

nematoad
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Not just MS-Dos

We used to have loads of Win3.11 PCs running with DECnet. It was a real pain having to switch mental gears from DECnet to IP depending where on site the PC was. Glad that is a thing of the past.

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UK.gov 'HyperHighway' aims to 'speed up the internet by 100x'

nematoad
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Ha!

To get to 2 Mb/s would be bloody marvellous.

Re. the failure of downloads, use a download manager . I always use KGet for any long-winded jobs and it has saved me a lot of hassle.

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Passenger cleared after TSA checkpoint stare-down

nematoad
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Think that they were Scimitars

The "tanks" that were referred to were, to the best of my recollection Scimitar Light Tanks, not Challenger Main Battle Tanks. Still it WAS a very silly stunt as I cannot think of any way they could have prevented a hijacking or whatever. Except to try and shoot the plane up which sort of destroys the puported "security" reasons given.

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Apple seeks touchscreen display mouse patent

nematoad
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Unhappy

Don't forget the magnifying glass

I wonder about all the new fangled devices like smart phones, some of the smaller tablets and now this strange concoction. All I can say is the developers must have eyes like hawks and finger ends like needles. Some of the PDA's I've used were only usable with the stylus. That now seems to be a thing of the past. Instead we have things that make using them akin to looking through a keyhole and waving a wand to do anything. I wonder how old these developers are, not my age that's for certain. Personally I find my 24" widescreen monitor a bit restrictive these days. And what about the visually impaired or do they not count any more?

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UK.gov descales public data with new corp launch

nematoad
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Tax payers money

“make more data free at the point of use, where this is appropriate and consistent with ensuring value for taxpayers’ money”.

The point he seems to have missed is that the people have already paid for this data through their taxes and yet they still want to make a quick buck by selling it to us. Even the US treats government research, funded through taxes, as being in the public domain; so if in the land of free enterprise this should be so, why can't the government of this country grasp that idea?

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The New Linux: OpenStack aims for the heavens

nematoad
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Open but is it free?

I see that MS is said to be enthusiastic about this project and that rang alarm bells. Now it is well known that MS is deeply averse to the GPL so the question is what license has this project been released under?

The answer is Apache 2 see:

http://www.theregister.co.uk/2010/07/19/nasa_rackspace_openstack/.

Now the reason NASA ditched Eucalyptus and started NOVA was because of the "open core" aspect of Eucalyptus meant that they were unable to contribute code to increase the scalability of Eucalyptus. By adopting an Apache license thay have gone to the other extreme and basically given away all their work to any proprietary shark that wants to freeload on the tax payers' dollar and take the whole shebang private. No wonder MS is keen.

Another wasted opportunity to make the project truely free and open. Bah!

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Ubuntu Wayland: Shuttleworth's post-Mac makeover

nematoad
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Pirate

Yep!

"Does that make me a pirate?"

If you live in the UK then yes, it does. There is nothing in the law that allows you to transfer material that you have legally purchased from one type of media to another.

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Google Cr-48: Inside the Chrome OS 'unstable isotope'

nematoad
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Not quite

"So people are just lumping it as a kinda netbook that doesn't work as well."

No, I think that the wories about this O/S is one of trust. Do you trust some mega-corp to have your best interest at heart? Not without some rigorous SLAs thrown in. With the Wikileaks/Amazon example so fresh what if Google decide that your face doesn't fit?

Sadly I think that there will be some take-up of this device but then as RMS has said there is a mug born every minute. We have to make sure that we still have the choice to store our data where we choose in five years time.

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nematoad
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Alert

Yep, pay, pay and pay again.

I agree, this is another "screw the suckers scam". Unlike you though I can't see a real use for this thing. Maybe some people are dumb enough to want all their stuff locked behind a toll gate. I looks to me as if Google wants the penny and the bun. Get their hands on all that juicy personal data and also make you pay for the priviledge of handing it over.

What concerns me is the rise of the rental mode of doing business in IT. That way you can pay and keep on paying. This might suit the likes of Google but it's not for me. I may be an old fart but to me the PC still stands for "personal computer".

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Google Chrome OS mauled by Richard Stallman

nematoad
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WTF?

Why bother?

Why go through all that rigmarol just to get a secure, private O/S/ The joy of FLOSS is that there is plenty of choice, GNU/Linux/ the BSDs and so on. Just because it comes from Google diesn't make it a mandatory install. Just say NO!

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'The New Kingmakers': Tech giants pay for the love of coders

nematoad
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Unhappy

KIlling the goose...

Yes, the likes of Microsoft and Oracle are in a position to buy FLOSS companies. That's not the real trick though, what is is keeping the developer communities commited and productive. Microsoft's problem is their past history vis-a-vis Linux and other FLOSS projects. The trust is just not there. Sure, you can have some people that buy into the MS way of doing business, Miguel de Icaza for example, but most FLOSS devs don't trust MS at all. In Oracle's case their handling of Open Office and Java has shall we say, been less than adroit. If you want to drive away the innovators and experts then just follow Oracle's lead. So yes there is expertise in getting money from the efforts of others but what you have to do is make all the effort being expended worthwhile; and I have my doubts as to whether a lot of giant proprietary corporations have either the skills or even the will to do this. More likely they will either turn the purchased company purely proprietary or like the asset-strippers of old suck out what they can and dump the rest.

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Silverlighters committed despite Microsoft's HTML5 love

nematoad
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Yes, that's a no

It is true that Mono and Moonlight are lagging behind Silverlight, and that probably suits Microsoft down to the ground.

There are other problems with Moonlight and Mono though. The more apps that are developed using Mono and C# the more leverage is given to MS. RMS has written a piece on the dangers involved. See:

http://www.fsf.org/news/dont-depend-on-mono.

As I said in my previous post the sooner an open standard is reached the better.

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nematoad
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Linux

No!

"because running it is a one click "ordeal"..." Not if you haven't bought into the "Microsoft experience" it isn't. A sterling example of the crying need for open standards for the internet. Maybe if we can avoid an ISO ooxml ballot stuffing fiasco then a decent standard will evolve and hopefully do away with all the proprietary offerings. And yes, before you ask I do use Linux, not because I'm a fanatic but because it does what I want not what someone else thinks I want.

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Devil's dollars drive open source

nematoad
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@ Cazzo Enorme

In the interest of brevity I did not mention the other free licences that are available. I am well aware of the BSD licence, the Apache one etc.

However the GPL accounts for the vast majority of FLOSS programs and the two examples I gave have been able to get going due to the GPL.

As for the "RMS/FSF koolaid" don't forget who started the FLOSS movement. We all have a huge debt of gratitude to RMS and GNU. Without their contrbutions and inspiration we would, most likely, not be having this discussion. Are you really suggesting that "Stallman's viral license " is a bad thing? Most likely Google would not have had the problems with Oracle if they had used the GPL. Just check PJ's comments on Groklaw. Or is she another imbiber of the RMS koolaid?

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nematoad
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Stop

So, what?

I think what is being described here is like comparing apples with oranges. There is no comparison. Sure, proprietary companies support FLOSS projects for, to them, very good reasons, competeive advantage, reduced development costs etc. When a FLOSS project is bought by a propprietary company the FLOSS side does not disappear, the GNU GPL sees to that. We should recognise and welcome proprietary companies' contributions to the FLOSS ecosystem. Because it is FLOSS they can do little harm. The example with Oracle is a case in point, The Document Foundation has forked Open Office to ensure that a FLOSS version will always be available. Magiea forking Mandriva is another example. You can't kill the FLOSS way of working, like the hydra it will just grow another head.

Oh, I did notice that you keep referring to "open source" I think that RMS might have something to say about that. There is more to the FLOSS way of doing things that just open source. By saying "we in the open-source world" you are, in my opinion half way to thinking in a proprietary way anyway.

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Old PCs: When it's time to die

nematoad
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FAIL

Ah yes, the old treadmill approach

It seems to me that this article is really an apeal to refill the coffers of Microsoft. Just because the PC in question does not have a multi-core CPU or 4 Gb of memery is no reason to scrap it. Intelligent use of other O/Ss will lengthen the lifetime of said PC.

Besides aren't we all supposed to be saving the planet? If we can get more use out of existing machines why keep emitting all the noxious pollutants involved in the manufacture of a PC? As I write this an image referring to the article about the niobium/tantalum war in the Congo is sitting to its right. Surely cutting down on the use of such scarce and contentious resources is a good idea. I think that the author has been listening to the bean counters a little to much.

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Shaping your next desktop upgrade

nematoad
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Yeah

Amen to that brother, though you might have mentioned more than Red Hat and Ubuntu. There are lots of distros to suit all levels of experience like PCLinuxOS or openSUSE, and because most are available at no cost you are able to try them until you find one that suits you. Who knows you might decide that Linux from Scratch or Arch is just what you need! Take a look at distrowatch.com to see what there is.

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'Big Four' lose filesharing case against Irish ISP

nematoad
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Good for the Irish

As a former, very contented, Irish resident I say "Good for you". Tíocfaidh ár lá. About time the rule of law trumped the wallets of big business. Personally I still prefer to have a tangible and concrete item in my hand i.e. a CD. Stuff your "licensing" malarkey and sell the stuff . After all, Big Media seems to have forgotten who actually pays the bills. Our day will come and that's not a political statement, just the truth.

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Angry Birds tweet fury at Redmond

nematoad
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FAIL

In US only, I presume.

This would not wash in the UK. I have a feeling that the Advertsisng Standards Authority would come down on it like a ton of bricks. I think that it would fall foul of the rules against deceptive content. If it does not work on Windows Phone 7 then it cannot be claimed that it does. Though given the influence MS seem to have with whatever party is in government the consequences would probably be slight.

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Voice-routing call fingerprint system fights 'vishing'

nematoad
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Headmaster

@AC 09:23

GIT is a revision control system developed by Linus Torvalds after he decided that he was unable to use Bitkeeper due to a change in the terms of use by Bitkeeper's developer Larry McVoy.

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Europe sets minimum PNR standards

nematoad
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FAIL

Oh and if they fail to honour the rules?

OK I can see the logic to having a standard form of agreement throughout the EU and it's encouraging that the EC has taken on board some of the reservations about the current situation; but how do they propose to enforce these rules? I can't see the EU refusing to let people either in or out of the EU just because another country does not live up to our standards and requirements. As with the US/GB extraditon treaty the table seems to be tilted in favour of the US, so how is reciprocity to be enforced and who in the world is going to police all this? The parties themselves? That's not a runner as far as I can see, more likely it will be a case of "you scratch my back..." Maybe the whole agreement will be overseen by a third party committee or something but again, who will do this.

To my mind this is window dressing to keep the general public quite whilst business goes on as usual.

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Private lessons

nematoad
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@ Bob Gateaux

I would seem from your comments that you do not use any of the add-ons mentioned in the piece. On Firefox and Seamonkey on Linux at least, Adblock Plus, BetterPrivacy and No Script all inform you that a new version has been released and asks if you wish to install it. Simple.

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OOXML and open clouds: Microsoft's lessons learned

nematoad
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Hearts and minds

"He reckons, too, that Microsoft has learned its lessons about dealing with open sourcers — people it's relying on to deploy PHP and Ruby apps on Azure."

The trouble with that is most floss developers already have an opinion on MS, and it's not a good one. Since the majority of floss is released under the GPL they have already seen how untrustworthy MS ( baseless patent assertions against Linux etc.) are and probably would not touch any project rolled out by MS with a bargepole. I am in no way a programmer but as an former IT professional I know through bitter experience the greedy, manipulative, bullying that is MS's modus operandi. It for this reason that I will have no truck with the likes of Mono or Moonlight etc. MS's past will be a huge obstacle in gaining any acceptance with the developers. In any case when Linux is now in a state to compete with Windows why should anyone want to do business with a convicted monopolist like MS? Certainly server/internet developers would be writing for a minority O/S if they switched to supporting MS.

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Microsoft should starve on radical penguin diet

nematoad
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Linux

@pan2008

"Persoanlly, I would like my software to just work " Should have bought a Mac then. As someone who made a very nice living for a number of years babysitting and nuturing various varieties of windows, I can say that MS stuff does NOT just work. It needs to be massaged,fiddled with and have its hand held on a continuing basis. What I guess you might be getting at is, you want your OS preinstalled and ready to run, that's different. Anyway, as a Linux user I smile at the CDs included with pretty much every peripheral and spare part I buy. Most of them appear to contain drivers and so on, I can't say for certain as I never need them. With a Linux distro these days all the housekeeping is done for you. You might say it "just works" !

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Microsoft clutches open source to its corporate heart

nematoad
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FAIL

Yes, when this happens

Air Traffic Control to Gloucester Old Spot: "You are cleared for takeoff on runway 27L"

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UK competition authority probes Amazon

nematoad
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Happy

Try Alibris

Try Alibris.com, they provide an excellent service worldwide and don't have any connection with Amazon. I have used them for over three years now and they have not let me down, so far.

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Met launches net café spy operation

nematoad
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Big Brother

They have a name for this

In Germany in the 1930s thay used to have a name for people like this: "Blockwart" who were people who's duty it was to spy on the people in their apartment blocks. Seems that this government is really digging into the archives and doing its research.

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Dell bars Win 7 refunds from Linux lovers

nematoad
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Buying a car.

"if i go to buy a new car i dont buy it then say can i have a £100 rebate for the cd player as im using my own."

I did when I bought my Mini Cooper S from John Cooper. I asked that they fit my cassette player and not the CD changer and I got a £560 refund which I partly used to have a rear washer/wiper fitted. It can be done if you haggle.

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nematoad
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Good for the lawyers, eh?

I just wonder if the people in this case (Dell) who make these kind of decisions are like Darl McBride (ex SCO CEO) in that they have brothers who are lawyers.

If Mr Drake decides to pursue this case, and I hope he does, then really the only people who will gain are lawyers. IANAL but on the face of it it would seem that there may be grounds for arguing that Dell's terms and conditions are unreasonable in as much as seems that they are tying the sale of the computer to the sale of the operating system, and if I recall correctly that has been deemed to be unlawful.

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Gelsinger stuns analysts and colleagues with storage pool plan

nematoad
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Stop

The dream never dies.

It never ceases to amaze me the twists and turns these corporate types will go to get their hands on your data. This isn't a scheme to distribute date globally, this is attempted blackmail. I run my business on my own systems, I own the data just as I do the copyrights etc. There is no way that I will allow my business's future to be held hostage by people such as Amazon, Microsoft or now EMC. PCs are called PCs for a reason, "personal computers".

Anyway how can you trust anyone who takes liberties with the English language such as "and we architect our solutions around these traditional obstacles." What I think he is trying to say, is that they will design the architecture of their product to avoid these problems. Just a guess though!

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MPs bash broadband tax

nematoad
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Alert

Bah!

Why should anyone be penalised for living in the country?

I live where I do because I was born here and my family live all around. I know I'm lucky as I live in a beautiful part of the world and accept that there may be some drawbacks to doing so , though what you have never had you don't miss; but why should I be penalised for going back to where I came from? What I originally posted were some questions asking who would pay but not use the improved broadband service and used my personal example to point out what the consequences of this part of the bill might be

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nematoad
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Stop

Definitions please

"a majority who will not, or are unable to, reap the benefits of that charge,"

What does that mean? Does it mean that people who are forced to pay the levy are in areas that will be covered by fast broad band and thus will pay for something they already enjoy? Or, does it mean that people in remote areas who pay will never reap the benefits because they are too far from the exchange? Finally does it mean that people who have no interest in using the internet, 10 million, by some accounts, will have to pay regardless of the fact that they don't want broadband fast or otherwise?

I am in the second category, I have broadband, of sorts, but will NEVER get 2Mb/s as I am too far from the exchange. So why should I pay when there is no likelihood of me benefitting?

Lots of questions, any answers gratefully received.

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Westminster politicos told to grasp Vista nettle

nematoad
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Stop

Not that old chestnut, again

@ David Arno

When was the last time you looked at Linux, if ever?

I gave a Mandriva box to my computer illiterate sister a couple of months ago, apart from saying "Where's the start button?" she took to it like a duck to water. Another thing, I don't suppose that MPs will be installing Linux themselves, although that is now much easier than it was and even easier than MS Windows. Also why should we be wasting OUR money propping up a convicted monopolist?

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Windows 7 'genuine' nagware winging its way to OS

nematoad
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Stop

Sigh!

@Doug Glass.

You know that it doesn't have to be like this? I realise that Windows may be vital to you in that there are applications that are not available elsewhere or that you have invested time and money in your Windows systems and would find moving difficult. This may be true in the the short term but do you really want to spend the rest of your life on the MS treadmill? Take it easy and move over to Gnu/Linux a step at a time. The amount of time currently spent dodging MS's schemes to control you could be much more productivly spent freeing yourself from their grasp. An added benefit of course is that you would cease giving your money to MS and that would hurt them much more than you getting a bit of satisfaction from defying "the Man"

Think about it, there *IS* a better way.

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Drayson locks Forces chiefs out of Defence budget carve-up

nematoad
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Stop

Who's money?

"in its bid to pocket more government cash."

Just a brief note to remind everyone that the government has NO money. It's the taxpayers i.e. yours and mine.

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