* Posts by TRT

4986 posts • joined 11 Sep 2009

What weighs 800kg and runs Windows XP? How to buy an ATM for fun and profit

TRT
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800kg? What's that in Reg units?

Or pounds. Or would that be confusing?

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Re: "...too accessible to ne'er-do-wells"

There was a warehouse in a large town to the northwest of London where ATMs of all make, size and model were simply dumped outside at the back. I used to walk past it on the way to the train station every day and every night. No security to speak of, just a sensor light.

I wrote to the company pointing out how easy it would be to obtain a genuine machine front for doctoring for nefarious purposes and asked if they felt any responsibility for the wave of ATM crime at the time. No response.

So I wrote to the council. No response.

So I wrote to the police and enclosed a photograph of the area, of the whole in the chainlink fence made with bolt croppers by the look of the cut ends and of a broken machine front where someone had unsuccessfully tried to remove one. Within a month the yard was cleared of all but the skips full of scrap metal and the whole site had CCTV, IR alarms and a dog patrol.

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Re: JavaScript?

The cat is saying "Dis is computeh, so where is mouse?"

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Linux-loving lecturer 'lost' email, was actually confused by Outlook

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Late night copy shop, hefty bribe, a scalpel and a Pritt stick.

Better call Saul.

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Re: ...IT guys run around in red T shirts

Yeah, expendable crew members. I see where you're coming from. ;)

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Atari shoots sueball at KitKat maker over use of 'Breakout' in ad

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Re: A bit late

Yeah, they should have sped up a bit. Obviously missed that power up.

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It was back in the days...

when "writing" a computer program meant pretty much using a soldering iron or wire-wrapping tool.

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Re: Arkanoid was legally made

Well, on a legal point, you'd have to consult the adjudication surrounding Tetris. There is a legal maxim that you cannot copyright the mechanism of a game, only things like graphics, music etc. but it was found that a Tetris clone, minimax or something like that, was so similar to the original in look, feel, operation and concept that it did in fact impinge on copyright. I picked Arkanoid as an example of a similar game that was produced by a rival company and asked the question "At that time, did Atari seek remedy over the similarity of that game to Breakout?" If they did NOT, and failed to do so with many of the other clone games then the US court system would deem it to be an undefended intellectual property, and simply throw the case out of court. I suspect that Arkanoid was not licensed and if the copyright was challenged, then I suspect Atari lost the case on the grounds you mentioned. In any event it puts Atari on a very shaky footing.

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I think the real question here is, have Atari defended potential infringements of their "Breakout" IP before? Was Arkanoid licensed, for example? If they've failed to previously enforce or defend copyright on the style of the game, then they might as well Have a Break themselves. And hope Nestle never used the phrase "breakout" during the 60 year (since 1957) that the "Have a break" slogan has been around (although they stopped using that slogan around the early-mid 2000s, I seem to recall).

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British Airways waves Bing dong: At least it's not a tech cockup

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Hot-dog/legs? meme

Hang on... why are there THREE hotdogs in the photo?

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Is their marketing slogan...

Meatus on the beach?

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UK.gov is hiring IT bods with skills in ... Windows Vista?!

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I found one the other day. Someone had resurrected a "stickitinthecorner-unt-forgetaboutit boxen" and wanted to use it as a desktop machine for a summer student. Wondered why the network kept rejecting it.

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What does "DV cleared" mean?

Or is it one of those questions that if you have to ask, you aren't?

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I say, BING DONG! Microsoft's search engine literally cocks up on front page for hours

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Unlikely. 6 hours at most. Tides you see, it'd be washed away.

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How to build your own DIY makeshift levitation machine at home

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Re: Microscope slides interfere with the beam path...

It still relies on differences in air pressure, though, and that must involve some degree of variability in the position of the pressure boundary.

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Boffin

Also...

does this work by creating standing areas of higher and lower air pressure from the interference of the two sources? Because I thought, long ago about this... you know the heat haze over a road which distorts light waves? Well that's caused by different densities of air, this time caused by heating. So if you create different densities of air through sound waves which are inherently more controllable, then you could create a sort of fresnel lens out of air. A "sonic lens".

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Microscope slides interfere with the beam path...

but that can't be as much of an image killer as, say, ooh... rapidly vibrating the sample? We spend a fortune on pneumatic tables which decouple the instruments from the vibrations of passing tube trains, lorries, people walking a bit heavy footed in the next room.

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10 minutes of silence storms iTunes charts thanks to awful Apple UI

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Re: Copyright violation ?

I'd ask Simon and Garfunkel about the sound of silence.

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Re: Autoplay and Rule 34

That'd be the track, "A a a a a a a a ooh ooh ooh ooh yes yes baby more deeper ooh ooh AAAAAAA"

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Vaping ads flout EU rules, even if to promote healthier lifestyles

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Re: Nicotine is not Tobacco

Because the Law specifically includes Vapes. You don't get away from the legislation by hiding behind finicky word definitions with this one!

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So presumably Niquitin and that ilk...

are NOT tobacco related products?

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Batteries that don't burn at the drop of a Galaxy Note 7? We're listening

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Re: The inventor of Li-ion batteries already has the replacement ready

There's some people round here who've managed to find a way to harness the energy of sound waves to power their mobile phones. At least I think they have. It's the only reason I can think of for them to shout so frickin' loud when on a call.

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RBS sharpens axe again: 900 IT jobs to go by 2020

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Re: You've not actually worked in a Bank have you?

No, I've never done a bank job.

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FFS, RBS

What's this we hear about "Northern Powerhouse" and shit? What's wrong with having the bulk of your IT staff outside of London, eh? Nothing if it's India, it seems, but it's a no go if you want to put them in Sheffield or Scunthorpe or even, here's an idea, SCOTLAND. I hear there's a lovely castle for sale up there for less than the amount you spend on Nespresso pods on a single floor in a year.

Or is this all down to rubbish digital infrastructure in the UK?

How's this as an idea... the UK government, so keen to retain banks and finance etc, coughs up some of the dosh for companies like banks to put in some decent heavy-duty backhaul connections to areas of the country where broadband is bad, but where they can give their staff capable of remote working a decent, healthy place to live which isn't going to cost them the earth, and where you get a better standard of living for your wage.

Why do banks and other big companies keep doing this short-termist cost cutting instead of investing in mid to long-term plans which balance staff welfare against financial rewards?

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APT-style attack against over 4,000 infrastructure firms blamed on lone Nigerian 20-something

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Nigeria as an emerging nuclear generator...

Any infrastructure improvements that the Nigerian or other emerging government makes, such as in distribution, billing, generation etc, will need hardening against new threats such as these recent cyber attacks. These criminal activities, as well as action along a more militaristic line, have caught out companies in so-called developed nations as well. So to say that the UK, EU and USA’s energy and nuclear legislation and their plans for construction and operation are fully matured models ready for adaptation and adoption in developing and emerging nations would be a naive statement indeed. This makes the goal of new nuclear generation, indeed ANY new generation, much more daunting. The engineers are constantly busy playing catch-up in "rich" states, so any cascading of talent and knowledge to the "poor" states will be a somewhat forced condition rather than a natural gradient of opportunity.

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Place your bets: How long will 1TFLOPS HPE box last in space without proper rad hardening

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Re: In space...

Which sounds like the ideal environment for Justin Beiber fans, actually.

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Re: In space...

no-one can hear your fans scream.

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I'm sure they've already done that. This is to see how as close as practicable an off-the-shelf computer fares, knowing already how the chips themselves do.

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For what the adverts tell us...

off-the-shelf iPhones and American wrestlers are already being space tested.

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Blighty’s beloved Big Ben bell ends, may break Brexit bargain

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Ah...

I can hear the chimes now. I'll miss that.

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Repairing the damage...

from when that Slitheen space ship clipped it during a crash landing.

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HMS Queen Lizzie impugned by cheeky Scot's drone landing

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Re: Assuming it was armed...

A mahoosive fly swat?

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Hell desk to user: 'I know you're wrong. I wrote the software. And the protocol it runs on'

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I've had something similar...

with an electrophysiology amplifier that was giving someone some gyp. They'd come to me on a computer issue and seen all the electronics gear on my workbench. "Do you know anything about electronics then? Because we're getting some chronic noise on a pre-amp."

I said I'd take a look and lo, they'd mismatched the impedance on the headstage to the pre-amp and subsequently had the gain right up. I pointed it out and they said they couldn't change the input impedance. "Yes you can", I replied. "No, you can't", they said. "Look... no switch."

I pulled the module and showed them the jumper on the board.

"Yes, you can." And pointed out my initials which were worked into the tracks on part of the PCB.

I had done some improvement work to the company's original pre-amp about 20 years ago, and gave a copy of the design to the company rep next time I saw them. No charge. It was low volume, quite specialised equipment, and what I had done was only a fairly obvious improvement to the common-mode noise rejection circuit which let the user fine-tune the pre-amp to match a particular headstage and correct for notoriously variable experimental set ups, but they incorporated it into the Rev B boards for the next 5-10 years or so. Out of vanity I had arranged the components in the shape of my initials and that found its way into the production model.

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Smart streetlight bods Telensa nearly double full-year revenues

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Re: How long before they're hacked?

There's even more mileage to be had from smart lighting.

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Re: Better CRI= less lumens needed

Only if you're actually bothered about colour rendition. There's 5 orders of magnitude difference in the amount of energy required between the scotopic and photopic ends of the mesopic range of vision - that's the range of illumination where you don't bleach the rods, and the cones are still detecting photons. It's the ideal range of light levels at night as you still get foveal vision as well as peripheral.

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The office of watcher watching and regulation.

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colour perception... maybe, but is that a good thing? Lights are not everywhere, and when you've bleached all your rods with short-wave containing LED generated light it can take quite a while for you to recover your night vision.

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Salesforce sacks two top security engineers for their DEF CON talk

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If they wrote this...

"building upon a framework designed to support efficient yoloscoped adversarial campaigns against capable targets."

...Death's too good for them.

Well, if they didn't have tongue firmly in cheek at the time.

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70% of Windows 10 users are totally happy with our big telemetry slurp, beams Microsoft

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70% of Windows 10 users...

And what is more, we didn't even need to ask them!

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Watch this nanochip reprogram cells to fix damaged body tissue

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I do brain science if that helps any.

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So long as it can't...

convert facial tissue cells into the appearance of a gas mask...

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Foot-long £1 sausage roll arrives

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Yum...

12 inches of prime pork wrapped in patsy.

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One drive to rule them all and in the data centre bind them

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Looks nice...

back towards the look of a line of DIMMs, which, when you think about it...

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Britons ambivalent about driverless car tech, survey finds

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The ONLY time I want driverless...

Is a button on my phone that brings my car to me. If I'm not inside the thing, I don't care if it's driven by a robot. So often, I've gone for a wander around a place and found myself fucking miles from where I left it, with only 15 minutes on the ticket and it's a bloody panic trying to work out how to get back in time: my sense of direction tells me it can be done, but town planners seem intent on blocking the straight line paths to places with shitty little boxy estates with no footpaths, 8 foot high garden fences at every turn, and every turning off the winding, winging road leads into a dead end close with no way through.

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Yes...

Auto-park on the Prius. Used it the first few months out of novelty value, but got bored as it's so slow, and I don't trust it anyway. Now, I'll only use it once in a blue moon, usually to scare someone who hasn't seen it before. Activate it, yawn and stretch, then with the hands off the wheel it just quietly backs into a space.

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Re-identifying folks from anonymised data will be a crime in the UK

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Re: IP Addresses

I think what might swing it is the wording "natural person". My IPv4 address identifies only the corporation that has been allocated that range. It't not a natural person. However, my ISP has the ability to map my IP address to my particular NAT'd router at any particular time point. So really, my ISP could anonymise my IP address by jiggling it about a bit instead of only changing it once in a blue moon (seemingly quite literally that infrequently). How that all might be with IPv6 is another matter as intrinsic to the design is keeping a lot of the things the same and doing away with NAT.

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Re: "...and share and process it as necessary"

From REGULATION (EU) 2016/679 OF THE EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT AND OF THE COUNCIL - (30) "Natural persons may be associated with online identifiers provided by their devices, applications, tools and protocols, such as internet protocol addresses, cookie identifiers or other identifiers such as radio frequency identification tags. This may leave traces which, in particular when combined with unique identifiers and other information received by the servers, may be used to create profiles of the natural persons and identify them."

The GDPR definition is not in any way at odds with the existing body of law. It imposes upon a data controller an obligation to consider the implications to the end user of their storage of the information. It leaves the actual day to day implementation of techniques compatible with the law up to future adjudication to decide. GDPR also explicitly defines sensitive information rather than just personally identifiable information; a higher standard applies to these data.

How the UK's Act will be worded remains to be seen. The devil is in the detail.

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Re: "...and share and process it as necessary"

Well, not per se under existing law.

Klimas v Comcast 2003 and Robinson v Disney 2015 both ruled that the IP address alone is not PII, however when used in combination with other data sources the resultant information could be used to identify an individual.

However, insofar as you don't use it to attempt to extract or compile PII, then existing law has determined that an IP address is not PII in itself. Typical, of course, of this Government to actually ignore the existing body of law and simply make stuff up as they go along. Why this particular item has to be specifically included rather than the USE of this information being legislated is just beyond me. Far more personally identifiable is the MAC address, and if THAT is not specifically mentioned in the law... I mean, that's a hole the size of Kansas. But Mme May was notorious for that kind of sloppy thinking and lack of technical understanding when she was home secretary... I don't think she'll hold her successors to a very high standard of competence.

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Re: IP Addresses

I do feel a little bit exposed in that my personal details are freely available from the domain registration service.

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IP addresses are "Personally identifiable information" are they?

Despite Sony et al trying to say that you broke the law because your IP address was used to share e.g. Torrented pirate films, even when the IP address had been hijacked or was a shared one...

Or when I store the IP address of a computer used to fill in a web-form in a school setting, so as to provide a 60 second hold-off against multiple submissions, where the same computer is used by a dozen different children one after another.

Or do they mean e.g. IPv6? Some sort of personal IP address that travels with you across different networks, only it isn't really that is it, because you still need to route to a particular network - you can't hold routes to every single IP device in the universe in the one distributed table.

That suggestion is just utterly ludicrous. Are you supposed to ask everyone "does your IP address identify you personally?" every time they go onto your network? Or are you expected just to encrypt ALL your logs even if doing so is a pointless and time-consuming task? We suddenly have to buy new networking hardware with processors rated at 20-30 times the previously required performance just to handle the encryption load?

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