* Posts by Alien8n

773 posts • joined 15 May 2007

Page:

It's here! Qualcomm's new watch chip is finally here! Oh, uh, never mind

Alien8n

Re: Nobody cares

@Voyna I Mor

Not strictly true, my old Apple Watch was given to my daughter when I upgraded mine.

Reason I have one? I find it useful to get notifications on the watch while the phone is in my pocket and I get around 3 days use between charges. Not too bad considering. Very useful when doing the weekend job wandering around a festival for 3 days and unable to hear the alarm on the phone going off telling me I need to be somewhere in 5 minutes.

0
0

A flash of inspiration sees techie get dirty to fix hospital's woes

Alien8n

Re: Hey! I earned a badge again for posting too much. Sorry!

Most blind people see something, even if just different shades of grey. So they can usually tell which direction a light is for example. Singer for a band I shot not that long ago is legally blind and uses a white stick, but actually has pretty good forward vision. The stick is more to do with the complete lack of any peripheral vision. At a guess it's classic tunnel vision, so like staring down a cardboard tube.

3
0

A boss pinching pennies may have cost his firm many, many pounds

Alien8n

Re: Developer PC

First proper engineering job there was a report run every morning on the slowest laptop (old 486) in the engineering department. The report took about 20 minutes to run and the reason it was ran on that machine and not one of the new P90s was that the button to run it was pressed at exactly the same time that the day shift took their break for breakfast. Cue mug of tea and a full English every morning.

It was still running on the same laptop by the time I switched jobs about 2 years later :)

21
0

Apple cops to iPhone 8 production oops, offers to fix borked phones

Alien8n

Not Europe?

Fairly sure I can confirm it's also affecting European sold iPhones as well. Our CEO is on his second iPhone 8 after the first one started freezing and having Wi-Fi issues. Was replaced due to a faulty chip. His replacement is now exhibiting the exact same symptoms.

6
0

Microsoft gives Windows 10 a name, throws folks a bone

Alien8n

Re: "Video addicts/hobbyists or folks who have DLSRs"

Hitting the nail on the head there, always store in RAW. For your average hobbyist JPG may suffice if you don't want to do any editing of the photo, or if you use Photoshop for editing, but for serious photographers it must be RAW and something that like Lightroom for editing. 1TB might be a bit limited though, I do about 1TB a year with 20Mb RAW files. The newest cameras are 50Mb + per file.

1
0

Abracadabra! Tales of unexpected sysadmagic and dabbling in dark arts

Alien8n

That is a good point, especially on a Friday afternoon

13
0
Alien8n

I've done that with a call to China once :)

At work they dread whenever I go on holiday, I've suggested a cardboard cut-out to be placed next to offending machines but so far the solution seems to be "work on another machine till he's back". Invariably whatever the issue is fixes itself the moment I'm looking at it.

13
0

Apple web design violates law, claims blind person

Alien8n

Re: ..well in Cal about 90% of ADA lawsuits are straight scams

@tiggity Our council gives badges based on the PIP level, no mobility payment no badge. Which is frustrating if we go anywhere and expect to spend any time as we need the wheelchair. But as she can walk with a stick for short distances she only gets the living component. not the mobility payment, and therefore no badge.

0
0
Alien8n

Re: ..well in Cal about 90% of ADA lawsuits are straight scams

Sounds like an idea, however first they should make it enforceable for disabled and child parking spaces, as currently I see them parking in these spaces all the time due to the extra space so they don't "scratch their car" getting in and out.

And don't get me started on disabled parking either, my wife has MS but because she can walk short distances with a stick she doesn't get the mobility payment and so can't have a blue badge. And yet we always see other people who are clearly more mobile parking in these spaces with a badge.

2
1
Alien8n

Re: ..well in Cal about 90% of ADA lawsuits are straight scams

"Don't get me started on the standard UK 8' wide parking bays"

2' gap to open your car door? Sounds like luxury, Our local supermarket's bays are so narrow it's physically impossible for larger vehicles to park legally (by which I mean of the former agricultural type now commonly owned and driven by the wives of wealthy businessmen). You get a normal sized saloon car in both bays to the sides and you're lucky to have a foot of space to open the door in.

7
0

Techie's test lab lands him in hot water with top tech news site

Alien8n

The timing is perfect

Literally just had to bring up a server that was refusing to come back up.

Long story short, new servers being built. To facilitate the new servers we power down a QNAP NAS temporarily, plug it back into the correct UPS and power it back up. At this point I'll explain that the job of doing this is actually that of the IT contractor who has come in to build the server.

So the QNAP is powered down, plugged back into the correct UPS and all is happy. Until about 10 minutes later when the file server starts becoming non-responsive. Decision made to reboot the file server, but it won't boot back up (it's a VM). Turns out it's complaining about a missing virtual drive.

We disable the virtual drive, boot up the server and check to see which drive appears to have failed. At which point I notice that the drive that's actually stored on the QNAP is the missing one. And the IT contractor suddenly remembers he forgot to turn it back on. QNAP turned back on, missing drive added back to the VM and all back up and running.

In case anyone thinks it looks like things are now back to normal, we then find out that the new server can't be built because a vendor who's name rhymes with Hell has installed the wrong HD controller card and the nice shiny hard drives can't be configured in RAID. So project delayed by another couple of days.

14
0

Boss regrets pointing finger at chilled out techie who finished upgrade early

Alien8n

Re: It was a dark and stormy morning...

I posted elsewhere about an ex IT Manager boss, but this just reminded me of yet another idiot moment he had.

FAST somehow managed to persuade him that open source software was ILLEGAL. The argument being that to be legally used by a business you had to apply for a license to use it. And that involves paying for said license. As there was no way to apply for a license to use free software it must therefore be illegal to use.

Completely ignoring the fact that open source software that is free to use in a commercial environment comes with a lovely little box when you install the software that informs you of the open source license agreement that you accept to continue installing. That or it's just in the T&Cs on their website...

53
0

Prank 'Give me a raise!' email nearly lands sysadmin with dismissal

Alien8n

Re: The reason I left...

@The Boojum nope, if it had been I think I'd feel more open to admitting that. Unfortunately the individual in question shares the same name as someone rather famous who died earlier this year. Which ironically makes it impossible to verify any of his claims (you'd think his claim of being on the Olympic archery team would be verifiable at least).

0
0
Alien8n

Re: The reason I left...

There were plenty of other things that rang alarm bells. Such as how he was apparently a super duper database developer. The accounts database which he created in Access generated over 8Gb of data and took 8 hours to run. After optimising the ODBC queries and moving the where clauses to the initial database query I got it down to 2Gb of data and 2 hours to run. He really didn't have a clue, but was always ready with some bullshit story about why he was better than everyone else in the company.

Apparently his fully cryogenically cooled Cray supercomputer was bought for a song and used to generate oil exploration data for the UK government and was connected to the internet with a T1 connection, which according to him meant he had to be registered as an ISP. Also apparently he was allowed to keep surgical titanium rods that were used to hold his collar bone in place, which is why he was unable to compete for the Olympic archery team, due to an accident involving a herd of red deer.

1
0
Alien8n

Re: The reason I left...

@AC no scam, he really was a complete idiot. As said, he claimed to be an Einstein level genius, but couldn't get his head around the simple fact that VAT is ADDED tax, not a % of the sales price. Luckily for him you don't pay VAT on postage which meant that the numbers kind of balanced out, but if HMRC ever audited the client they'd have some serious questions to answer.

15
0
Alien8n

Re: The reason I left...

Simple, because I was the one who ran the report, on his orders. Except after the client kicked up a fuss he denied all knowledge of signing off the report. Despite there being witnesses. But because said witnesses weren't IT, it came down to his word against mine. And as it was me that actually ran it, it wasn't enough to give him the push, not without a very protracted and lengthy tribunal case by him. Personally I was happy to take the month's wages, I was already looking for another job after having to work a 24 hour shift every 2 weeks (24 hours due to an overnight report that then had to be debugged and fixed due to said billing errors).

16
0
Alien8n

The reason I left...

Reminds me of the reason I left one place. Luckily the IT Director realised what was going on and arranged a month's "garden leave" for me when I handed in my notice.

Long story, the IT Manager, who I'll simply call "Dick" (pretty much everyone in the company called him that), was of the arrogant "I know more than anyone else and I can't do anything wrong" type.

So apparently he owned a multi-million dollar oil exploration data company in the USA, had a Cray supercomputer in his barn, used to be on the Olympic archery team, completed 6 degrees at University at the same time over just 18 months, counted Richard Branson as a personal friend, could play classical piano to professional level, you get the picture. Lived in a 2 up, 2 down in a cul-de-sac in Gloucestershire.

Somehow this genius managed to program part of the code to the billing system, a third party system no less, that resulted in random debits and credits being added to customer's accounts if only a partial payment was made. By random I mean anything from a few pence to thousands of pounds. Part of my job was looking into why it was doing this, and when I finally found the cause we got it fixed. Cue testing of the reports that go out to the client, which "Dick" promptly tells me are absolutely fine because he's written them. And which promptly showed the thousands of pounds of un-billed customers that owed money because of the bug he'd introduced in the first place.

As the person running the report (on his orders) I'm promptly called in and put on notice (it's at this point the IT Director calls me in and says he can at least guarantee me a month's wages, which on the grounds that saving my job means working with the manager from hell straight after dobbing him in suddenly sounds like a great idea). Day of the meeting I promptly hand over my resignation and proceed to discuss in great detail how much of a complete idiot my boss actually is (including how for the last 3 years he'd been calculating VAT wrongly on all the client reports, despite being told he was doing it wrong. He'd been calculating VAT as 17.5% of the Sale price). Needless to say I enjoyed that. Almost as much as I enjoyed the month's holiday on full pay after the IT Director informed HR that they had to pay me for that month as technically I was still employed despite being on garden leave.

As far as I can tell the company folded about 2 years later. Probably as a result of losing clients due to the IT Manager's incompetence.

36
0

Phased out: IT architect plugs hole in clean-freak admin's wiring design

Alien8n

Re: get out quick

As my step dad was blind I was taught how to do household electrics (before he lost his sight he was a sparky at a power station). This taught me enough to take one look at the botch job done by the previous owner of the house we now live in on the kitchen lights. Previous owner was an electronics engineer, which in no way shape or form makes them qualified to do household electrics as proven by what I discovered.

Issue with the under-cupboard lighting, trace switch from wall to a junction box behind the cooker. Trace one direction under the sink to an open connector block directly underneath the taps. From there to several 5A spotlight units under the cupboards. Now back to the box behind the cupboard and trace in the other direction to... the 30A cooker main. All this meaning in the event of a fault with the lights the fuse wouldn't have tripped until after catastrophic failure, and as it was a home bodged installation all buildings and contents insurance from any resultant fire would have been null and void.

Needless to say I disconnected those lights straight away.

17
0
Alien8n

Re: Never trust the back of an envelope

By a quick finger in the air calculation... probably somewhere in the region of about £10M. Twice.

2 separate incidents where I was moonlighting as a weekend operative (while employed as a Product Engineer during the week) which ironically made me the highest ranking person in the building both times. Both times we had a sudden spike in failures of transistors at test. Cost of silicon, about 20p each, cost of final device about £20. Both times resulted in tracing the fault back to the silicon enabling us to test and dispose of the silicon instead of the finished product.

In typical arrogant fashion we were still forced to use one batch of silicon as the US wafer fab refused to update their test limits, despite the obvious savings to the company as a whole, but as our factory was UK based we were treated as a customer and not part of the same company.

This was the same company who then moved manufacturing to Mexico and demanded all the test equipment be supplied without safety cut-offs, which could have resulted in the Mexican staff being electrocuted. Needless to say the manufacturer's response was, "no safety cut-off, no machines"

26
0

Top Euro court: No, you can't steal images from other websites (too bad a school had to be sued to confirm this little fact)

Alien8n

While I feel this has been handled the wrong way I must disagree with you on most of your points. Yes, it's a picture of a town, a public space. However the law is very clear, copyright remains with the photographer. There are some very good photos of "public spaces", I have one of my photos taken on a canal adorning the walls of an LA office. And my experience as a photographer means I can take a photo that is pleasing to the eye and has artistic merit. Do you know the best time of day to shoot a town scene? Mid day? Early morning? Late evening? These little factors all affect the end photo. What lens should be used? Where to stand? How much processing is required? You can usually tell the difference between a photo taken by a professional photographer and someone just snapping on their phone, and it's the light, the composition and the post-processing done on the photo that make the difference.

And for you information, the best photos taken in sunlight are taken an hour after dawn or an hour before dusk. These are known as the "golden hours" due to the way the sun's light changes and also creates the most aesthetically pleasing shadows from buildings and trees. To get the best from a public space you want to create a focus in the photo, so people in the background are blurred drawing your eyes to your subject. To do this you use large aperture lenses, fixed 2.8 is a very common lens to use, or a fixed 1.8 which is a very common portraiture aperture. Cheap kit lenses and phone cameras tend to shoot with a small aperture, the standard consumer lenses for most cameras are between 4.5 and 5.6, which creates a much flatter looking image where foreground and background can both be within the cameras depth of field.

6
3
Alien8n

Re: Daft question maybe, but...

Press kits already come with explicit permission. When shooting a band for "press" photos there's a very large fee involved that includes the waiver for 3rd party reproduction. These may include, but not limited to, reproduction as part of album artwork, web, and print media, as defined by the release clause for the photographer. There are other factors to take into account as well, whether the photo was commissioned by the artist or their representative, or whether it was commissioned by the photographer or their publisher. When commissioned by the photographer or their publisher it's not unusual for the subject to sign the release clause allowing the photos to be used. There may then be another clause allowing the subject use of the photos. For live music photos the photographer may be asked to sign a release clause, limiting the use of the photos. This is one of the hottest areas of contention in music photography where big name artists not only demand full rights to the photos, WITHOUT recompense to the photographer, but also to restrict the use of those photos to timed single use in web or printed media. There have been plenty of cases of photographers going to shoot concerts who when presented with what is in effect a full rights grab of their art simply rip it up and walk away.

2
0
Alien8n

Re: A bit much...

Actually there's an EU DMCA process as well, it's not just a US idea. While the specific steps are different from country to country, even those within the EU, the end result is still the same. The fact is this case should never have reached the EU courts, but it's clear from this case that people still don't actually understand how copyright actually works and how it's protected. There are existing procedures in place designed specifically to prevent cases like this one, but not everyone in law knows the specifics of every law, and this is blatantly clear where the internet is involved. Copyright law should not be used to sue a school because of a child's homework, it should be used to prevent large media organisations from stealing photos that are then printed in millions of newspapers around the world without the rightful recompense to the rights holder.

3
0
Alien8n

Re: A bit much...

For all the downvoters I'm not saying the photographer doesn't have the right to protect his copyright. I'm saying he shouldn't have gone straight to suing. If this had been myself I would have approached it the same way as I have done previously.

1. Contact the infringing party direct and request the infringing image be taken down or replaced with a licensed copy.

2. If they refuse to remove the image then subject them to a DMCA notice.

3. At this point you make a statement of intent, if not removed with immediate effect then they will be pursued in the courts. This is usually enough to force them to take down the image. I've never had to do more than this.

4. Take them to court.

This procedure is used by every photographer I know, I know none who would jump straight to court except in the event of a photo being used for printed media. In the case of this kid I doubt I'd even get past step 1, unless I'd been specifically commissioned to take the photo on behalf of the travel site I would be more than happy for them to use it on a credit basis. And as the photo is so generic in nature I seriously doubt it's been commissioned.

4
0
Alien8n

Re: A bit much...

@Jason but there's already laws in place which detail how he should have gone about this. He's actually bypassed existing laws in order to create a situation where he'll make the news. He hasn't made any case law, nothing resulting from this case didn't exist prior to it. The only reason for suing is the publicity and the money, nothing more.

6
7
Alien8n

As a music photographer all I can say is you don't have a clue what you're talking about. Only dozens worth copyrighting? I have thousands, and if any publication was to use any of them without paying me for their use you'd better damn believe it when I say I'd sue them. My nature photography generates an income, albeit a small one, from Adobe Stock. Here I'll agree that the majority of stuff has been shot, there are only so many times you can shoot a picture of a bird in flight, and that affects the value, but it doesn't diminish the art. Good quality camera equipment isn't cheap and the style of photography I do is most certainly an art. My photos are used by bands for promotion worldwide, from offices in LA to houses in Berkshire. A good photographer has a style unique to them, I see a shot of a band in a magazine and I often don't need to check the credits, I know who took the photo just by looking at it. You send 100 different photographers to the same place, you'll get 100 different photos back. Even if they're standing in the exact same spot.

11
3
Alien8n

A bit much...

It's a bit much suing at that point. As a photographer I've had photos taken and used by 3rd party websites and so far I've never had to sue. Personally I feel his actions should have been to first contact the school and ask for the photo to be taken down, or to offer to negotiate a fair price for licensed use. There are already laws in place that allow copyright holders to do this without resorting to the courts unless the other party refuses to comply. In my own case it was a band photo that a music review site took from their Facebook page and then cropped to remove my watermark. They knew full well that they didn't have the rights to use the photo. My response was to contact the website first and ask them to either remove the image or license it. When they refused to respond that was when I asked them to remove the image or be sued. They eventually removed the entire article from their website. All this photographer has done by suing the school first without approaching them and failing to use the relevant DMCA procedures is show him to be a) a very petty minded individual and b) more interested in the publicity of taking it to court than protecting his copyright.

8
3

Think tank calls for post-Brexit national ID cards: The kids have phones so what's the difference?

Alien8n

Currently the anti-Semitism debate seems to be basically:

"Hitler was an alright guy" = person quite rightly removed from their role and disciplined

"Israel should stop murdering Palestinians" = OMG YOU ANTI-SEMITE!

There is a concerted effort to remove ALL criticism of Israeli actions in Palestine under the guise of "it's racist to condemn Israel". This is a highly dangerous stance to take. It's much like the stance taken in America where any criticism of Trump is shouted down as being "unpatriotic" by his supporters. All governments must be held to account where needed, no government should feel emboldened to the point that they can commit atrocities simply because some feel sympathy towards them. If Israel want to stop terrorists from attacking them it's quite simple, stop creating them by killing Palestinians and start treating them with common decency and humanity. You know, like we had to with the IRA. Ask anyone who supported the IRA why they did so and you'll get pretty much the same answers, the treatment of the Catholics at the hands of the Protestant majority and the fact that the UK was seen as an occupying force in *their land*. When you understand that, maybe then you'll understand why the Palestinians are fighting.

If that isn't obvious enough for you then try this thought experiment:

The UN decides that as Britain was once part of the Roman Empire part of England is to be given to Italy. The Italians decide they want more and force the entire population of England into Scotland and Wales. Do you simply setup in the makeshift camps on the Scottish and Welsh borders? Or do you fight back? Remember it must all be legal, the UN said so. And in the meantime Italy is provided with the best military equipment the USA can afford, free of charge, to stop the evil English from trying to return to the homes that they've been forced out of, at gunpoint. Everything you once owned is now legally owned by a family from Italy who has never seen England before. And all the while you're complaining and doing nothing, because if you so much as look at the border towards the homes you used to own you'll be shot and killed, Italy keeps moving the border, taking more and more land that was once part of Scotland and Wales. At what point does enough become enough and you fight back?

57
20

Early experiment in mass email ends with mad dash across office to unplug mail gateway

Alien8n

Re: Majordomo woes

Reminds me of the early alt.fan.pratchett days when we had a 14k Demon internet dialup account and email and news access was via DOS. Some of the more techie members set up a mailing list for the group which was very popular until 2 members (who actually worked opposite each other) decided it would be great fun to spend the day emailing each other via the mailing list. End result was firing up the email client at the end of the day to several hundred emails from just the 2 of them. A few stern words from some of the more senior and respected members of the group soon put paid to that, when it was pointed out that most members were still paying per the minute for their internet access.

4
0
Alien8n

Groupwise

Back around 2000 I worked for a company that used Groupwise for email. While there 2 senior managers went on holiday at the same time, but one of them made the mistake of firing off an email before turning his PC off.

Needless to say back then auto-replies weren't intelligent enough to know you've already told the other person about your holiday so the email queue soon filled up with the bounce messages between the 2 managers each telling the other about them being on holiday. About a million times...

13
0

Sysadmin trained his offshore replacements, sat back, watched ex-employer's world burn

Alien8n

Re: Retired

Similar to me. Company decided to change the job descriptions and put myself and the other configuration analyst guy on notice. He stayed, I got pushed (surprise surprise, he was earning about 3k less than me. That extra 3k? I was the only one who could write Crystal Reports).

It very rapidly became clear that the "new roles" were actually exactly the same as the old roles, I have no idea if they ever managed to replace me. But I did get to go back for a few days when they called me up a week after being let go. Turns out they needed some Crystal Reports rewriting, and no one else there knew how to do it. I gave them a figure that was exactly double my previous salary. You could hear the shock at the figure over the phone followed by, "but...". My response? That's what you paid me as an employee, now you pay contractor rates for a Crystal Reports Developer. That was very satisfying when they got back to me an hour later and agreed to pay what I asked.

47
0

I predict a riot: Amazon UK chief foresees 'civil unrest' for no-deal Brexit

Alien8n

Re: Vogon

"Quite why people want a bunch of unelected bureaucrat's in Brussels telling what time of the day they can even take a shit puzzles me. Britain can get along fine without the EU, and any problems are likely to be deliberately caused by the EU bureaucracy to "punish" Britain for having the temerity to leave."

Much the same as our own government. The Conservatives have a long history of punishing the public for having the temerity of voting Labour. That's the real purpose of austerity and the demonization of the unemployed, sick and disabled. It's that or they really are even more economically incompetent than even Labour.

4
1
Alien8n

Re: Voland's right hand

"Er, how? Your summary matches our article and the Times' and the quote – so how exactly was it taken out of context?"

My guess would be the commentards are taking it out of context. Judging by some of the frothing at the mouth seen on these comment threads today he may have a point.

3
0
Alien8n

Re: Vogon

"Don't lots of educated people vote Labour? The country is still picking itself up for the mess they left last time round."

Actually they did a pretty good job considering. Not that I would ever vote for Blair, they're were pretty much just a paler shade of blue. The "mess" as you call it was actually a result of the collapse of the US sub-prime market and the resultant collapse of the world banking sector.

What's more interesting is that the current lot sold austerity on the promise that they'd eliminate national debt. Instead they've dramatically increased national debt while simultaneously making every person in the UK worse off except for the top 1%. The exact reverse of what happened in the rest of the EU's more socialist leaning countries.

And as for Brexit, the best idea we have for where the UK will be post-Brexit is actually 1970's Britain. So pretty much we're screwed, with Labour and Conservative governments flip-flopping between each other and inflation reaching dizzying heights again. Fuel prices sky rocketing. But at least I'll be able to afford a house again...

13
3

Security guard cost bank millions by hitting emergency Off button

Alien8n

Re: Not quite IT

Unknown, but I do know the band that was playing at the time was not amused.

7
0
Alien8n

Not quite IT

Just last week a council jobsworth decided the best way to shut down a music event held in the market square was to pull the plug on the generator powering everything. Apparently someone had complained about the noise (for an event that happens every year) at about 6pm.

End result, several thousand pounds worth of damage to the PA system that was running all the sound.

13
0

IBM fired me because I'm not a millennial, says axed cloud sales star in age discrim court row

Alien8n

Re: Best mentor ever!

Not quite the same but when Marconi did the switch over from defence to telecoms they managed to retain most of the defence engineers and sales droids. As a result when the telecoms side was bought out by one of my previous employers they had a conversation something like this:

Engineers: "You should look at the IP that came with the business"

Management: "Why?"

Engineers: "You now own these (MMIC)"

Management: "What do they do?"

Engineers: "They make profit"

6
0
Alien8n

Not the first time

Not the article I was looking for, but another El Reg article looking at IBM's attitude to older staff had a link to a story where an ex-IBM employee got $1.5M for age discrimination:

Lexisnexis story here

4
0
Alien8n

Re: Take the money

@AC fairly sure I recall an El Reg story a few years ago where IBM effectively ripped up all the sales droids' contracts and rewrote the bonus clauses. Exactly because of the level of bonuses that were being given. That resulted in them being sued by a former employee that time as well if I recall.

[Edit - As someone else has pointed out, bonus and commission are 2 separate things, it may have been the commission clause that was rewritten]

7
0

The future of radio may well be digital, but it won't survive on DAB

Alien8n

Re: Reception

Nope, but I have noticed much worse reception in Abingdon and surrounding villages.

2
0
Alien8n

Reception

My biggest gripe with DAB is reception. I live in Oxfordshire and my journey to work is a Russian roulette as to whether I can listen or not. Usually I get about 5 miles out and then it gets patchy, some days I can't even get out of my street before reception goes. Not an issue with the BBC stations, only the commercial ones. I get a better reception switching to the radio app on my phone.

1
0
Alien8n

Re: The economics??

From what I understand Team Rock were paying close to £1M a year for the DAB license. One reason why they were in so much trouble (that and the fact they borrowed the money to acquire everything, much like how Man Utd went from being one of the richest to one of the most in debt clubs overnight when they were bought by the yanks).

5
0

US Congress finally emits all 3,000 Russian 'troll' Facebook ads. Let's take a look at some

Alien8n

Re: Well, it's just about FEAR

@Jellied Eel

"Curious thing about the IRA would be who bankrolled it" - am I the only one who read this and who's first thought was why are Russia funding Northern Irish terrorists? I had to read up a bit to remind myself it's a different IRA, must be a generational thing...

10
0

BOFH: But I did log in to the portal, Dave

Alien8n

You'll notice in this episode Simon has setup the boss nicely should there be any repercussions. All traces of carpet fibre and quicklime will now be found in the boss's car and somewhere there will be CCTV footage of the BOFH and the PFY clearly enjoying a pint or few in their local.

32
0

In a touching Monty Python tribute today, Microsoft's Office 365 makes everything spam

Alien8n

Re: TITSUP

All back up after about an hour of issues. Another fun day at work then...

0
0
Alien8n

TITSUP

Would be good if this was the only email issue today, but it looks like all the whole email system has melted. Unable to send or receive any emails and accounts that are still active are being flagged as not existing when trying to send to them with some emails generating bounce backs as undeliverable.

(edit - test email from our service supplier finally arrived after over 15 minutes. So could be a repeat of the issues we had the other week)

0
2

The tech you're reading these words on – you have two Dundee uni boffins to thank for that

Alien8n

Re: Wonderful.

Which goes to show where the patent process is broken. Unfortunately they created the physics behind the technology but the patent is for the process of creating the technology. As they had no process they had nothing to patent and by the time they worked out the process they'd given the Japanese enough time to work out and patent the process before they could.

23
0

Oh dear... Netizens think 'private' browsing really means totally private

Alien8n

They used that in a show recently (Deception?). Basically they had been trying to track some Russian gangster and only got a line on the guy when he accidentally dropped his burner phone down the toilet forcing him to use someone else's phone. By some quirk of story telling this phone was being monitored and hey presto they tracked him down.

1
0

Super Cali health inspectors: Tesla blood awoke us

Alien8n

Re: Why California?

While cost of living may be high land costs in California are actually ridiculously cheap for industry. Wafer fabs in California are some of the only ones built in a linear fashion, similar to car plants. Everywhere else builds them in a daisy petal design with a single photolithography room in the centre. When I was doing semiconductor engineering the wafer fab was based in El Segundo, California for this reason. To get around health and safety laws though the usual trick is to relocate the more labour intensive work to Mexico where the health and safety laws a re more relaxed. Thankfully for the workers in Mexico the supplier of the testing equipment refused to supply the test kit without the safety cut-off switches in place. The company wanted them removed to save 5000 dollars per machine, but the manufacturer pointed out that left nothing between the operator and a potential 10,000 volts. When the company still insisted on not having the safety cut-outs that was when the manufacturer dug in and refused to sell without them, and quite rightly so.

11
0

No, Sierra Leone did not just run the world's first 'blockchain election'

Alien8n

Re: So what was blockchain used for?

Sounds like a proof of concept prior to entering the realm of voting machines.

As a concept it actually looks very good. Even today voter fraud is brought up in every election in the world. Now imagine a world where you can vote online via an app on your phone from anywhere in the world? And the result is 100% guaranteed correct. No postal fraud, no "hanging chads", no "spoiled" ballots. Where the cost of actually holding a vote becomes marginal enough that people can actually be allowed to vote on things that matter to them instead of expecting their elected representative to vote how their constituents actually want them to vote and not how they're told to vote by party leaders.

Mind you, even when we do get offered a referendum it's loaded towards the government or just based on blatant lies and idiocy.

4
0

Maplin shutdown sale prices still HIGHER than rivals

Alien8n

Re: Support from Maplin ?

@Alaiin you may want to re-read the OP. That was the exact point made...

73
1

Page:

Forums

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2018