* Posts by Richard Jones 1

1094 posts • joined 10 Sep 2009

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Year 1 of GDPR: Over 200,000 cases reported, firms fined €56 meeelli... Oh, that's mostly Google

Richard Jones 1

Re: Companies going too far.

That sounds like a blatant abuse of the act since you have an ongoing (though now breaking down) relationship with the clowns. I understood that GDPR allowed continuing communications concerning the conduct of an existing relationship. Marketing abuse mails are a different can of worms, who was it BT's or Sky's blackmailers?

Now you've read about the bonkers world of Elizabeth Holmes, own some Theranos history: Upstart's IT gear for sale

Richard Jones 1
WTF?

Sorry For The Dog

I dog sit for a Siberian Husky five days a week, she is traffic stopping fine for an over 11 year old dog house trained and very affectionate, though not always impressed when her housemate takes her favourite biscuit. The main issue with Siberian Huskies is that they like to be active or asleep. Without the right support during their active times they get bored. 'Our's' invents games and expects us to (a) understand when she 'talks*' and (b) join in so she can have fun.

*Whether part of the bred or not I do not know; she does not bark but expresses herself in modulated howls that are more like speaking the some people achieve.

The bigger they are, the harder they fall: Peak smartphone hits Apple, Samsung the worst

Richard Jones 1
WTF?

Make At least Some To Be Them Better Phones!

My £100 plus small change Motorola is all the phone I need. Improvements might include a better battery, improved reception, though that is a network issue as much as anything, elimination of pest calls, though those are mercifully few these days.

My demands are very lightweight though, better more reliable voice activated hands free calling would be a great break back to about 2008 when Nokia and the 6230i had that one nailed. I find current 'SMART' things are really crap at voice activated calling. Perhaps when my present phone is as old as the Nokia was, my interest in a phone will have laid down and died anyway.

U wot, m8? OMG SMS is back from dead

Richard Jones 1
WTF?

You Can Phone Me Or SMS me; Period

I have less than no use for any of the so called messaging services and certainly do not need the hassle of trying to work out which ones of the many could be of forced, marginal use. I get a few useful SMS messages without any such sign-up messing about, they are mainly various appointment reminders and those stupid, easily cloned or intercepted authority code messages wanted by an increasing number of agencies.

HPE wants British ex-CFO to testify in UK Autonomy lawsuit before Uncle Sam sentences him

Richard Jones 1
Coat

Just Hold The Popcorn Order

I have a feeling that once you start on the popcorn while watching this one it would be possible to get very, very fat before the farrago ends. HP, or whatever they are called this week/last week did a crap job of evaluating their purchase, (anyone for due diligence?) and are now in boohoo mode. Sorry I am not sad at all.

US counterintelligence agent helped Iran lob cyber-bombs at America, say Uncle Sam's lawyers

Richard Jones 1

Yee Gods

Agents on idiot book? Who had the great idea of letting agents use some daft ideas to weaken their defences? As for idiot number one, with an unstable personality like that should they ever have been employed - anywhere? Does the US actually have any recruitment and training programmes, let alone management worthy to turn on the lights?

No fax given: Blighty's health service bods told to ban snail mail, too

Richard Jones 1
Happy

Re: He doesn't get it.

I log onto our GP surgery and enter the details of what is needed. Recently my wife needed replacement anti allergy substances. I used the 'free form' data entry option and when my wife rang a few days later, she was told it had already been processed and sent to the pharmacy.

I wrote a snail mail letter to a bank only for them to e-mail a reply advising that had been actioned.

The world is improving its use and understanding of how to use technology. Having been a victim of the NHS snail mail losing appointment letters, I applaud the use of better methods.

As a pensioner who retired in 2002, I find electronic communications extremely useful, though the NHS mobile application has so far been a bit of a curate's egg. The delay in getting the 2AF code has been measured in numbers of hours at times, it is not clear if this was a general issue with the poor idea of using the mobile as the authentication side channel or a specific NHS app issue. Other times it has worked OK.

Fake fuse: Bloke admits selling counterfeit chips for use in B-1 bomber, other US military gear

Richard Jones 1
Unhappy

Re: No that's not "Upcycling"

Years ago I briefly worked with a company making complex chemicals for specific cleaning and finishing uses. Every now and again we received a complaint that the products were substandard. We would test the returned soup and find it had been worked to death, but of course we ended up holding the sludge; so it became our disposal problem. We all knew the name of the game; the customer was being inspected by those who could close them down and this was back in the 1960s. I am betting on a certainty it is far worse now.

Bug-hunter faces jail for vulnerability reports, DuckDuckPwn (almost), family spied on via Nest gizmo, and more

Richard Jones 1
Happy

Re: SS7 hacked?

SS7 replaced SS6 which had a number of issues for both carriers and carrier equipment suppliers.

I attended SS7 study group ITU meetings in the 1990s and concerns were discussed about the risk of direct access by bad actors as far back as then. While SS7 may be seen by some as a USA domestic signally system it was very widely used for world communications hence the involvement of the ITU to try to ensure interoperability. National network protocols were a national concern whether R2, MFC, SS7, decadic, AC9 or whatever and many different versions of what the casual observer might consider the same system existed. Out of band signalling systems became popular as the way to frustrate the whistling phreakers, though at a cost. The Australians were very keen that the risks of interprocessor signalling in networks received the attention they deserved, but others had other issues. The French became very exercised by encapsulated end to end signalling transport I recall.

Richard Jones 1
WTF?

Re: Pretty soon, you won't be able to turn them off

Our several years old washing machine came with some form of remote connection capability, I have now forgotten exactly what capability it had. However seen it was seen as totally irrelevant and as WiFi coverage to its area was poor there was less than no point in trying to make the connection. Kit may come with largely pointless or useless connection capability, but it does usually need some (unwise?) interaction to activate the function.

UK spy overseer: Snooper's Charter cockups are still getting innocents arrested

Richard Jones 1
WTF?

Not Entirely Sure

This paints a picture of police activity based and what could only be termed false evidence rather than having a good relationship to any specific laws. The good thing is these cases came to light because of a headline attraction to a specific piece of legislation.

How many other wrong warrants were issued wrong car number, wrong date of birth, etc. and how many false allegations were thrown at other innocents because some clerk or other could not type the right details?

I rate these reports alongside those related to wrong organs and limbs being removed do to other fat or misguided finger exercises in other 'industries' as totally reprehensible.

Kwik-Fit hit by MOT fail, that's Malware On Target

Richard Jones 1
Joke

Start of a bumper year - for puns?

As the title. Start of a bumper year for pun activity,

Have their wings come off,

Got some 'B's in their bonnet,

Something nasty hit their fan,

Someone put the boot in.

etc.

Brexit-ready BT sits back, watches profit rise in CEO's swansong quarter

Richard Jones 1
Happy

Re: "It is too early to estimate the size of any potential impact"

Anyone for buying parachute futures?

I helped catch Silk Road boss Ross Ulbricht: Undercover agent tells all

Richard Jones 1

An Interesting Report

I enjoyed the read, as ever a mixture of luck and right time right place allied with some mind numbing hours or research and leaving no aspects unchecked.

Holy crappuccino. There's a latte trouble brewing... Bio-boffins reckon 60%+ of coffee species may be doomed

Richard Jones 1
WTF?

Re: Temperature?

If only a wind powered pump could be invented, just like they used to use when such things were often quite basic and easily built and maintained even with very simple tools. Cheaper than a solar version and much lower tech. A wind driven water lifter could be built for peanuts using local skills almost anywhere, with no other environmental impact other than that down to the water movement.

NHS England claims it will be all-digital within the decade

Richard Jones 1
WTF?

Re: creating joined-up systems

Cleaning, oh cleaning, 40 plus years ago my then employer spent a small fortune investigating cleaning and 'wet scrubbing' in an effort to remove problems from technical areas. Recently a trip to an emergency room showed the floor in a hospital to be 'varnished' with the remains of past patients fluids. Clearly the mop and bucket regime was not doing what you might hope to control the situation. A cruise ship had tighter infection control protocols then many hospitals currently achieve. As for medical protocols, my wife is supposed to have three weeks of radiotherapy, one set up scan and then treatment. So far four visits have secured 3 'one time' set up scans but only two therapeutic treatments, very considerable pain and one pain only (torture session?) with a failure to treat at all. I suggest training is a major issue that needs parallel attention to ensure that the increasing amount of technology is correctly employed. That along with eliminating FAX machines, eliminating hand written prescriptions and instructions might be a wise move*. Hand written, poorly coded instructions take orders of magnitude more time to process than correctly prepared electronic instructions, yet some princely medical staff refuse to use the superior (to their manual time wasting ways) electronic systems. They are 'too busy' to save time for patients, back office staff and even themselves.

*It resulted in one female patient being given erectile dysfunction cream for an eye condition causing considerable pain and additional treatment needs, hence costs.

Amazon's creepy facial recog doorbell, Facebook open sources machine learning code and much more

Richard Jones 1
WTF?

What Is Wrong With Knowing Who is Visiting Me?

The title sets out my stall. If someone comes to my door I have the right to know who it is before I respond. If I know the person I might (or might not) open the door. If I am not expecting anyone and do not know who is there I may well not want to respond, what gives anyone the right to demand that I do not know who is waiting there? What next a ban on small windows in doors or those spy glass things that some doors have already?

Having said that I have some doubts that I will spend out shed loads of cash for something that may well require hours of fettling to make workable. However, since both my wife and I have some health and mobility issues knowing who is at the door has considerable appeal before we rush to answer. This is especially true if we are upstairs or elsewhere in the house and can avoid trying to rush for a conman or whatever. So it has considerable appeal.

I simply fail to see the basis for the knee jerk reaction of the let 'the criminals trade freely' bunch, in short if you don't want to be recognised, do not knock on my door

Brazil bested by hackers, Virgin plugs hub bugs, and France surrenders… records

Richard Jones 1
Unhappy

Possible Panic Vector?

While the security risk of the French break in should be low, sending out mock alerts could result in either panic or a devaluation of the value of the system. I would expect the former as a potential risk as some do delight in spreading disturbance or promoting panic.

'Cuddly' German chat app slacking on hashing given a good whacking under GDPR: €20k fine

Richard Jones 1
Thumb Up

@a_yank_lurker Right On

Sorry I can only give you one upvote, my impression is that as an early offer action and fully explaining what was done it struck the right note. I suspect that the scale of response might tend to increase as the system beds in, though always with the perpetrator's intent in mind. The Zuckerbergs of this world have a mind set only on maximum return for them and to hell with everything and everyone who might threaten that result.

If at first or second you don't succeed, you may be Microsoft: Hold off installing re-released Windows Oct Update

Richard Jones 1
Joke

Wait For Another October?

Happily for MS there will be another October in the'2019 time frame', so all is not yet lost.

We definitely don't need more towers, says new Vodafone boss scraping around for €8bn savings

Richard Jones 1
FAIL

Re: "creating a virtual tower company"

Oh well, just wait for the virtual customers paying virtual bills with virtual money that disapears in a flash.

Top AI conference NIPS won't change its name amid growing protest over 'bad taste' acronym

Richard Jones 1
Stop

Re: TWTAs

New usage for old abbreviations also emerge, anyone else remember how Subscriber Trunk Dialling became the same as Sexually Transmitted Disease (STD)?

Given advanced sensitivity on one side and a moronic lack of sensitivity on the other perhaps a sensible code of conduct is the right and only way to handle the issue. It also has the great advantage of being rather more pervasive across society.

If a form of behaviour is wrong, it is wrong everywhere. In this case I submit it is the behaviour and the propensity to misbehave that is wrong and not just whatever the name of the conference, group or whatever happens to be

Amazon's neural net offer to border cops, Waymo charges fares, the first AI portrait sold at auction, and more

Richard Jones 1
WTF?

Immature Technology Anyone?

A few view points: ever since I started photography the issue of subject failure has been talked about. Subject failure is a bit of an oxymoron really it means that the photography medium is not able to record the details of the subject accurately. I first came across the term in relation to some flowers where the visual spectrum you or I can see is not the entire range produced by the flower. However, this wider range could be picked up and misinterpreted by the photographic medium producing what appeared substandard results. The issue of different total ranges of faces was also discussed, but in more muted style due to the emotions that it carries. To me it is clear that these issues still exist in modern media's ability to capture and separate tones in a way that will allow accurate representation.

To me this comes down to the old phrase - more hard work is required.

As for the issue of so called AI and the frankly crap results obtained from the present training efforts, surely this is covered by GiGo, garbage in garbage out?

Use an image that is a poor representation of the subject, then match this to a limited range of test samples, matching only a limited subset of data points and (don't) be surprised that the result is weak. Mind you, a human doing the same work will also have significant failure rates unless they are a super recogniser. To my mind the only way that training can ever be judged to have been effective is to have a small but entirely random number of target faces. Then to lose them in a large, truly heterogeneous mass of other faces and train and improve the results on a continuous feed back loop until the results result are way better than 98% success. It is almost certain that such systems will not travel well, the current range of characteristics in different locations is vastly different, take China, India, any European Country or North American city for example. Height, weight and tonal ranges will all be challengingly different. If, as at present the characteristics match range is as truncated as reports suggest it is I cannot see how you can expect anything likely to resemble accuracy.

No system should ever be the sole arbiter for guilt or innocence. It can only be a single screening grid in a 'gravel sorter' of evidence, this is true for machine and human recognisers, the results need cross matching with something really old fashioned, such as evidence.

Ah, um, let's see. Yup... Fortnite CEO is still mad at Google for revealing security hole early

Richard Jones 1
WTF?

Re: On one hand...

Yes, or it could be seen as egg on the face of someone who bucked the system, e.g. Epic. One point that no one picked up is whether Epic have modified their installer to check for updates for itself before it tries to run and install anything else. Otherwise leaving it 90 days before a check for updates does appear to be sleeping with a risk factor.

UK chip and PIN readers fall ill: Don't switch off that terminal!

Richard Jones 1
Happy

Re: That's odd

I believe there have been several gateway type issues that affected different countries with a common cause. As for me, I take different credit cards, cash cards and cash, so I always try to be prepared. The funny thing is that while I can almost understand Lee's Obsessive Compulsive Disorder like symptoms I guess I have an issue with obstructive technology disorder as technology always throws a hissy fit at the least possibly convenient time, e.g. when my wife is checking in for a hospital visit requiring umpteen items of data to be entered by a one fingered, possibly bind and certainly arthritic typist.

If you're serious about securing IoT gadgets, may as well start here

Richard Jones 1
WTF?

Why?

What does a cheap and insecure gizmo add to anyone's life? A thermostat that can be controlled from the far side of the world, but not from the same room if the internet, server, ISP or anything else falls over. So it is with the rest of the tat. The washing machine can message indicating its progress through the wash cycle, but why bother? I have no need for such fluff and it is a Wi-Fi not spot anyway, it is either washing or finished and if finished it needs an attendant on site. A time switch can turn on lights if I am not there, if I am there I have light switches. So it is with all the not much use functions. The TV could monitor our channel habits, but we almost always use a PVR as the real time or time shift tuner. As for using voice controls, I might have some movement issues, but I can still move and press buttons on a remote. People get paranoid about mobile security, but then invite a pack of uncontrolled spies to come in, one question, why.

If there is a real need, do the job correctly, do not use something out of a Christmas cracker or worse.

On Android, US antitrust can go where nervous EU fears to tread

Richard Jones 1
Flame

Re: I Want Something That Just Works

OK in am not in your paranoia club however many of them there are, I still want a mobile that just works. You want MY choice to be either the unaffordable daft touchy feely Apple rubbish because it is some allegedly secure - (against what?) or something that I must spend hours rendering into something useful so you can feed your doubts and worries. Exactly how does the alleged 'insecure by design' affect me? I know my credit card s is be tracked, my car is be tracked, most of the places I visit record my entry, my business and exit time and I do not care.

I would be far more affected by a search engine that fail to find anything useful. By cost structures that balloon to apple like dimensions and still prevent anything useful for me. Still I guess there are still a few of those nice red phone boxes available somewhere.

Richard Jones 1
WTF?

Re: I Want Something That Just Works

Well thank you to the four selfish types who wish to deny me an easy road to something that works because they like the rough with the rough. I not care about apps collecting whatever, since I did read the list of access demands they made and that was the end of that them, the apps became toast. So what that Google knows where I have been, so do the doctors, hospitals, supermarkets filling stations and so on that I use. The mobile is also my travel diary. I do not give a rats arse about Facebook, Linkedin or any of the antisocial dross that some infect phones with, clear that plague out by all means, and deny them the accesses they demand to private information if you must use them, but allow me a working mobile experience 'out of the box' (along with the ability to update the OS as promised Motorola). Though I will never put anything of value on the dumb mobile.

Richard Jones 1
FAIL

I Want Something That Just Works

I have no interest in failed companies that could not foist their junkware onto the public. I tried 'Can't find em' - once, was it a lame attempt at a frustration game? Was it better on an Apple?

My wife wants a new mobile, sure she would like one without the usual load of OEM crapware, Backsidebook, LinkedSomewhere and so on; all just junk. A good, compatible web access method is probably essential without having to go on a treasure hunt to find one - I know who my wife's 'treasure hunter' will end up being.

I have no problem with Google Mail, and I believe it backs up to Google somehow though I never use the mobile for sending mails: mail on a mobile is strictly for masochists., I use voice to text sometimes though hands free calling is inferior to Nokia circa 2007. I don't give a flying fig for most 'apps', I use Google Maps, there are no mystery tours. I have Word, which I never use, the BBC which I rarely use and one left over from my experimental use of a PAYG network. The mobile does waste time updating such as unwanted guests like Hangups(?), Bizarre keyboards, and 'Play this that and the other', they are barred web access anyway.

The EU are offering me an inferior future I do not want, but might have to suffer.

LabCorp ransomed, 18k routers rooted, a new EXIF menace, and more

Richard Jones 1
Happy

VLC

I do not use VLC very often so thank you for the warning about that issue.

As Corning unveils its latest Gorilla Glass, we ask: What happened to sapphire mobe screens?

Richard Jones 1
Happy

Re: Seems obvious ...

I tend to agree, mine lives in a case and then in a shirt pocket. I answer via a button on the headphone since it is to darned hard to find any other way to answer the darned thing. Since I am likely doing something like driving, (so no phone handling), dog walking, grocery juggling or another two handed task, adding a phone to the mix is for the birds. I have dropped in once and tested the strength of the walls via its projectile properties two or three times, but it is still OK: cases are wonderful.

Two-factor auth totally locks down Office 365? You may want to check all your services...

Richard Jones 1
Joke

Where is all this 'lost' Money?

With all this money being 'lost', why can I never find so much as a single cent?

Fix this faxing hell! NHS told to stop hanging onto archaic tech

Richard Jones 1
Happy

Re: Not the only Guvmint dept to use fax

Some years ago in a land far away the customs wanted a form showing all the right signatures. So with a bit of cut and paste experience from the past I soon had a suitable prototype, then with a bit of artistic recreation the art work as ready and entrusted to the trusty(?) FAX machine. Honour done the customs then cleared the goods and everyone was happy. The contractor of the time wanted the original artwork to frame for his home office wall as a reminder of the good times he enjoyed in the land of the FAX machine.

Of course all those security minded folks do not remember the bloody awful paper that faded in 101 different ways, that jammed, that ran out at the wrong time and so on and so forth.

My local lot electronically transfer a lot of stuff point to point on their internal network not via the fred.bloggs.net network, pharmacists receive electronic prescriptions and place orders with the suppliers. I have even had MRI scans transferred that way. Better than the bloody paper files which are never in the right place when you make 60 mile round trips and pay a fortune for parking but cannot have a proper appointment, 'because the main file is missing'. Nothing too important of course, just what the references say is an aggressive cancer. I try again on Monday week, so one cancelled appointment, one useless appointment and now into week three. FAX was tired and useless in the 1980s that some clowns still have 1880s systems is their dumb fault, better not drop their quill pens into their damned FAX machines.

No, seriously, why are you holding your phone like that?

Richard Jones 1
WTF?

Re: Linky = Come home to a real fire

I understand that thanks to the highly skilled(?) fitters used it has been known for some of those in the UK to allegedly at as fire raising agents.

US taxman wants AI to do the security checks it seemingly can't do itself

Richard Jones 1
WTF?

@jmch, I tend to agree. There is no point in deciding on the technology, 'the how' when it it is passably likely that you do not know any of the rest of the deal. Certainly looking into the present 'systems' (I use the term 'systems' in its loosest sense) to see how much falls out when you so much as look, should be a first point. Adding quality, security or any other 'nice to have' as a bolt on extra is like adding a go faster stripe on an vehicle inspection failure. It is a waste of money. Sadly it takes time, money and a few bruised egos before you get anything worth having and it is doubtful that it is what the 'innocents with the cheque book' thought they wanted.

Imagine a patent on organizing computer files being used against online shopping sites. Oh, it's still happening

Richard Jones 1
WTF?

Re: But but but ....

I was trying to see what was different between the current fiction, sorry case and what you said about data bases, e.g. DBase 3. I was doing much the same thing in the early 1980s onwards on PCs sorting production data from online systems to produce all sorts of shopping lists of information, e.g. lists of under performing devices and connections. Clipper programs ran pretty much autonomously 24 hours per day, and before that compiled MS Quick basic; one version of which came out with a bug that if you opened and closed many files it eventually fell over. I was one of those who 'benefited' from that particular bug. That should date it to the middle part of the 1980s. Those versions also had a 'soundex' function in case you used a wrong spelling and a look up list of valid entries that could be used to find targets. The lists were dynamic back then since they were added to by the program while operating as it was able to add fields according to need from the data encountered. Useful when converting accounts records to in service operational data and ensuring customers got what they paid for, and only what they paid for.

Europe's scheme to build exascale capability on homegrown hardware is ludicrous fantasy

Richard Jones 1
WTF?

What Could Have Been?

Once upon a time such things were being worked on then we had such things as the everyone together ICL a government fabrication. For a while Rodim made disk drives and chips were designed and I believe made even in the UK, certainly transistors were produced here. So we have something of a track record of both chasing the wrong mirages and not doing well in business either.

However, we do need to better harness brains to achieve results to take us forward, remember one of the early computer developments was the result of a tea shop, the LEO computer was a commercially lead development that 'somehow' failed to develop further, neither did the tea shop so we ended up with Starbucks and its elk.

There are other highly desirable developments for which clear commercial needs exist to solve currently emerging problems. Rather than forcing commercial groupings the strategies should push investment into the research needed to answer needs,. Exascale might make nice vanity projects but things to provide food and jobs might be just as useful and could help both fund and support the exotic development. Otherwise the only structures we will deliver will be walls, floors roofs and power, if we are lucky.

A year after devastating NotPetya outbreak, what have we learnt? Er, not a lot, says BlackBerry bod

Richard Jones 1
Happy

System Boundaries

As a start point where the machine meets any network or other external boundaries and ensure they do not exist. This clearly includes external devices, portable external drives, thumb drives, etc. I have an old XP machine, actually several but none of them have had a problem since they are not currently turned on and used. Were they to be employed it would only be by me for a controlled reason under defined circumstances, set out by me. (Possibly this would include the extraction of data thought to be held there if not found anywhere else.)

Now NHS Digital is going after data on private healthcare too

Richard Jones 1
Thumb Up

Not Just a Private Hospital Point

I wish it was possible to load the stats in some way to allow those who deal with more acute, nearer to EOL, very serious ill patients, etc. received a weighting so that they do not have to complain their states are worse than somewhere dealing with well patients for a grease and service.

I have been treated in both types both as a privat patient and NHS and have to say that I did not find the two in anyway similar. (That ignores the time I was given someone else's diagnosis of terminal kidney cancer, least said soonest mended.)

GDPR forgive us, it's been one month since you were enforced…

Richard Jones 1
Go

C0 Alarms Anyone

I guess those 'wonderful' C0 alarms recently withdrawn on Amazon and e-bay for giving you a good nights sleep followed by an everlasting deep sleep as you failed to wake up in the presence of C0 would be a prime candidate for such action. They did not explode, they just did nothing.

Um, excuse me. Do you have clearance to patch that MRI scanner?

Richard Jones 1

@ Adam payne

One issue that I heard about was that the device(s) have a far longer life than the OS on the underlying support terminal. So your MRI/CT whatever scanner might have been built before a newly discovered problem with a 5/10 or more year old device becomes apparent. So how do you find a way to solve that issue within a budget? It is not a machine function issue, as it still works fine for the role it was signed do, but rather in many ways it is a site management, i.e. 'client' issue. Just as driving a truck into the building, losing power, or having someone walk off with an essential part - or even use the embedded 'terminal' for some 'foreign', i.e. not the task it was installed to do, purpose, I had someone do that with a (non medical) in service live device years ago. They were not happy when it overwrote their data - naughty boy.

Computer Misuse Act charge against British judge thrown out

Richard Jones 1
WTF?

Re: Thrown out? Or she should be jailed?

So it would be better to sit back, allow the whole thing to run into a court case, then fail when it was realised that a material part of the session was compromised because some party or parties had not disclosed an association, or better yet the case was declared as a mistrial?

I am sure those costs and implications would be 'considerable'.

There is a possibly better way, that is for a suspicious party or their connected relative to be able to declare their family tree to another officially recognised 'case connected party'* and declare the risk of mistrial should overlapping connections be found between those conducting the case and the declarer.

*The access party to the case does need definition/clarification e.g. clerk of the court or higher.

EE seeks guinea pig millennial hipsters for 5G experiments

Richard Jones 1
WTF?

I Want To Apply

I'm not in Shoreditch, but I hoped the experiment of new kit that might, just might get a signal just beyond the M25. Sadly I see I shall continue to live in the valley of dead EE promises with no reception at home..

TSB meltdown latest: Facepalming reaches critical mass as Brits get strangers' bank letters

Richard Jones 1
WTF?

Guiness Book Of World's Records

Who is trying to scoop the pool for the most disasters in one gloriously screwed up project?

It must be time to hit both the stop and re-set buttons and try to do something else.

Meet the real spin doctors: Scientists tell H2O to chill out so they can separate isomers

Richard Jones 1
Joke

New Bath Taps?

But will I need new bath taps or shower controls to gain any advantage from either type of water. I am assuming that the more reactive form cleans better?

Leaked pics: Motorola to add 'unpatriotic' 5G to 4G phones with magnets

Richard Jones 1
FAIL

Re: I dont really understand why i need 5g at all

I would like to say I agree with you, but EE have no sensible any G reception at home beyond the occasional text message for which 2G was OK and the odd voice call where quality is the pits and was better in 2G days. Still I guess we are outside of the M25 so do not count, though we are not outside by an intergalactic distance, so having usable 4G would be interesting. I can only say thank heavens for wired broadband and wired phone service. Otherwise it might be smoke signals to communicate, though as it is now belting with rain starting the smoke signal fire could be an issue.

It would be nice up Motorola phones could actually get promised and otherwise available updates, which my one and only Motorola 4G Play which will be replaced when it goes, by anything except a Motorola briquette.

About to install the Windows 10 April 2018 Update? You might want to wait a little bit longer

Richard Jones 1
Happy

I Saw No Problems (- No ships Either)

The family's five machines all updated fine, even the slowest portable was done in about 35 minutes. A ten year old Dell portable was ready in less than 30. No problems so far and the first machines went through on the 1st of May, so long enough for any issues to emerge I think.

Look how modern we are! UK network Three to kill off 3G-only phones

Richard Jones 1
Coat

Re: As long as they run a 3G service ...

Except where 4G,3G,2G are all too crap to get any service when your option are smoke signals, wireline or flags on poles.

Seriously, Cisco? Another hard-coded password? Sheesh

Richard Jones 1
WTF?

Why Move From Pig in the Middle?

When I was young the game was pig in the middle, OK time moves on but surely pig in the middle scoffing at whatever trough of knowledge they fancy is more accurate. Pigs have an excellent sense of smell so make great goodie sniffers.

DOJ convicts second bloke for helping malware go undetected

Richard Jones 1
WTF?

Re: Wait a minute

Aiding and abetting.

Handling stolen goods.

Conspiracy to rob.

Failure to report criminal activity.

Computer misuse.

Wire fraud

Those ideas are just for starters, I am sure that some jurisdictions could come up with some more colourful ideas.

It would have been a shame if they were paid using a stolen credit card...

What is wrong with 35 years, it would be best if they were put to some useful activity while serving as guests of the country's hospitality.

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