* Posts by Richard Jones 1

1071 posts • joined 10 Sep 2009

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Ah, um, let's see. Yup... Fortnite CEO is still mad at Google for revealing security hole early

Richard Jones 1
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Re: On one hand...

Yes, or it could be seen as egg on the face of someone who bucked the system, e.g. Epic. One point that no one picked up is whether Epic have modified their installer to check for updates for itself before it tries to run and install anything else. Otherwise leaving it 90 days before a check for updates does appear to be sleeping with a risk factor.

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UK chip and PIN readers fall ill: Don't switch off that terminal!

Richard Jones 1
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Re: That's odd

I believe there have been several gateway type issues that affected different countries with a common cause. As for me, I take different credit cards, cash cards and cash, so I always try to be prepared. The funny thing is that while I can almost understand Lee's Obsessive Compulsive Disorder like symptoms I guess I have an issue with obstructive technology disorder as technology always throws a hissy fit at the least possibly convenient time, e.g. when my wife is checking in for a hospital visit requiring umpteen items of data to be entered by a one fingered, possibly bind and certainly arthritic typist.

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If you're serious about securing IoT gadgets, may as well start here

Richard Jones 1
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Why?

What does a cheap and insecure gizmo add to anyone's life? A thermostat that can be controlled from the far side of the world, but not from the same room if the internet, server, ISP or anything else falls over. So it is with the rest of the tat. The washing machine can message indicating its progress through the wash cycle, but why bother? I have no need for such fluff and it is a Wi-Fi not spot anyway, it is either washing or finished and if finished it needs an attendant on site. A time switch can turn on lights if I am not there, if I am there I have light switches. So it is with all the not much use functions. The TV could monitor our channel habits, but we almost always use a PVR as the real time or time shift tuner. As for using voice controls, I might have some movement issues, but I can still move and press buttons on a remote. People get paranoid about mobile security, but then invite a pack of uncontrolled spies to come in, one question, why.

If there is a real need, do the job correctly, do not use something out of a Christmas cracker or worse.

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On Android, US antitrust can go where nervous EU fears to tread

Richard Jones 1
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Re: I Want Something That Just Works

OK in am not in your paranoia club however many of them there are, I still want a mobile that just works. You want MY choice to be either the unaffordable daft touchy feely Apple rubbish because it is some allegedly secure - (against what?) or something that I must spend hours rendering into something useful so you can feed your doubts and worries. Exactly how does the alleged 'insecure by design' affect me? I know my credit card s is be tracked, my car is be tracked, most of the places I visit record my entry, my business and exit time and I do not care.

I would be far more affected by a search engine that fail to find anything useful. By cost structures that balloon to apple like dimensions and still prevent anything useful for me. Still I guess there are still a few of those nice red phone boxes available somewhere.

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Richard Jones 1
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Re: I Want Something That Just Works

Well thank you to the four selfish types who wish to deny me an easy road to something that works because they like the rough with the rough. I not care about apps collecting whatever, since I did read the list of access demands they made and that was the end of that them, the apps became toast. So what that Google knows where I have been, so do the doctors, hospitals, supermarkets filling stations and so on that I use. The mobile is also my travel diary. I do not give a rats arse about Facebook, Linkedin or any of the antisocial dross that some infect phones with, clear that plague out by all means, and deny them the accesses they demand to private information if you must use them, but allow me a working mobile experience 'out of the box' (along with the ability to update the OS as promised Motorola). Though I will never put anything of value on the dumb mobile.

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Richard Jones 1
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FAIL

I Want Something That Just Works

I have no interest in failed companies that could not foist their junkware onto the public. I tried 'Can't find em' - once, was it a lame attempt at a frustration game? Was it better on an Apple?

My wife wants a new mobile, sure she would like one without the usual load of OEM crapware, Backsidebook, LinkedSomewhere and so on; all just junk. A good, compatible web access method is probably essential without having to go on a treasure hunt to find one - I know who my wife's 'treasure hunter' will end up being.

I have no problem with Google Mail, and I believe it backs up to Google somehow though I never use the mobile for sending mails: mail on a mobile is strictly for masochists., I use voice to text sometimes though hands free calling is inferior to Nokia circa 2007. I don't give a flying fig for most 'apps', I use Google Maps, there are no mystery tours. I have Word, which I never use, the BBC which I rarely use and one left over from my experimental use of a PAYG network. The mobile does waste time updating such as unwanted guests like Hangups(?), Bizarre keyboards, and 'Play this that and the other', they are barred web access anyway.

The EU are offering me an inferior future I do not want, but might have to suffer.

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LabCorp ransomed, 18k routers rooted, a new EXIF menace, and more

Richard Jones 1
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VLC

I do not use VLC very often so thank you for the warning about that issue.

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As Corning unveils its latest Gorilla Glass, we ask: What happened to sapphire mobe screens?

Richard Jones 1
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Re: Seems obvious ...

I tend to agree, mine lives in a case and then in a shirt pocket. I answer via a button on the headphone since it is to darned hard to find any other way to answer the darned thing. Since I am likely doing something like driving, (so no phone handling), dog walking, grocery juggling or another two handed task, adding a phone to the mix is for the birds. I have dropped in once and tested the strength of the walls via its projectile properties two or three times, but it is still OK: cases are wonderful.

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Two-factor auth totally locks down Office 365? You may want to check all your services...

Richard Jones 1
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Joke

Where is all this 'lost' Money?

With all this money being 'lost', why can I never find so much as a single cent?

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Fix this faxing hell! NHS told to stop hanging onto archaic tech

Richard Jones 1
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Re: Not the only Guvmint dept to use fax

Some years ago in a land far away the customs wanted a form showing all the right signatures. So with a bit of cut and paste experience from the past I soon had a suitable prototype, then with a bit of artistic recreation the art work as ready and entrusted to the trusty(?) FAX machine. Honour done the customs then cleared the goods and everyone was happy. The contractor of the time wanted the original artwork to frame for his home office wall as a reminder of the good times he enjoyed in the land of the FAX machine.

Of course all those security minded folks do not remember the bloody awful paper that faded in 101 different ways, that jammed, that ran out at the wrong time and so on and so forth.

My local lot electronically transfer a lot of stuff point to point on their internal network not via the fred.bloggs.net network, pharmacists receive electronic prescriptions and place orders with the suppliers. I have even had MRI scans transferred that way. Better than the bloody paper files which are never in the right place when you make 60 mile round trips and pay a fortune for parking but cannot have a proper appointment, 'because the main file is missing'. Nothing too important of course, just what the references say is an aggressive cancer. I try again on Monday week, so one cancelled appointment, one useless appointment and now into week three. FAX was tired and useless in the 1980s that some clowns still have 1880s systems is their dumb fault, better not drop their quill pens into their damned FAX machines.

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No, seriously, why are you holding your phone like that?

Richard Jones 1
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Re: Linky = Come home to a real fire

I understand that thanks to the highly skilled(?) fitters used it has been known for some of those in the UK to allegedly at as fire raising agents.

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US taxman wants AI to do the security checks it seemingly can't do itself

Richard Jones 1
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@jmch, I tend to agree. There is no point in deciding on the technology, 'the how' when it it is passably likely that you do not know any of the rest of the deal. Certainly looking into the present 'systems' (I use the term 'systems' in its loosest sense) to see how much falls out when you so much as look, should be a first point. Adding quality, security or any other 'nice to have' as a bolt on extra is like adding a go faster stripe on an vehicle inspection failure. It is a waste of money. Sadly it takes time, money and a few bruised egos before you get anything worth having and it is doubtful that it is what the 'innocents with the cheque book' thought they wanted.

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Imagine a patent on organizing computer files being used against online shopping sites. Oh, it's still happening

Richard Jones 1
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Re: But but but ....

I was trying to see what was different between the current fiction, sorry case and what you said about data bases, e.g. DBase 3. I was doing much the same thing in the early 1980s onwards on PCs sorting production data from online systems to produce all sorts of shopping lists of information, e.g. lists of under performing devices and connections. Clipper programs ran pretty much autonomously 24 hours per day, and before that compiled MS Quick basic; one version of which came out with a bug that if you opened and closed many files it eventually fell over. I was one of those who 'benefited' from that particular bug. That should date it to the middle part of the 1980s. Those versions also had a 'soundex' function in case you used a wrong spelling and a look up list of valid entries that could be used to find targets. The lists were dynamic back then since they were added to by the program while operating as it was able to add fields according to need from the data encountered. Useful when converting accounts records to in service operational data and ensuring customers got what they paid for, and only what they paid for.

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Europe's scheme to build exascale capability on homegrown hardware is ludicrous fantasy

Richard Jones 1
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What Could Have Been?

Once upon a time such things were being worked on then we had such things as the everyone together ICL a government fabrication. For a while Rodim made disk drives and chips were designed and I believe made even in the UK, certainly transistors were produced here. So we have something of a track record of both chasing the wrong mirages and not doing well in business either.

However, we do need to better harness brains to achieve results to take us forward, remember one of the early computer developments was the result of a tea shop, the LEO computer was a commercially lead development that 'somehow' failed to develop further, neither did the tea shop so we ended up with Starbucks and its elk.

There are other highly desirable developments for which clear commercial needs exist to solve currently emerging problems. Rather than forcing commercial groupings the strategies should push investment into the research needed to answer needs,. Exascale might make nice vanity projects but things to provide food and jobs might be just as useful and could help both fund and support the exotic development. Otherwise the only structures we will deliver will be walls, floors roofs and power, if we are lucky.

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A year after devastating NotPetya outbreak, what have we learnt? Er, not a lot, says BlackBerry bod

Richard Jones 1
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System Boundaries

As a start point where the machine meets any network or other external boundaries and ensure they do not exist. This clearly includes external devices, portable external drives, thumb drives, etc. I have an old XP machine, actually several but none of them have had a problem since they are not currently turned on and used. Were they to be employed it would only be by me for a controlled reason under defined circumstances, set out by me. (Possibly this would include the extraction of data thought to be held there if not found anywhere else.)

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Now NHS Digital is going after data on private healthcare too

Richard Jones 1
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Not Just a Private Hospital Point

I wish it was possible to load the stats in some way to allow those who deal with more acute, nearer to EOL, very serious ill patients, etc. received a weighting so that they do not have to complain their states are worse than somewhere dealing with well patients for a grease and service.

I have been treated in both types both as a privat patient and NHS and have to say that I did not find the two in anyway similar. (That ignores the time I was given someone else's diagnosis of terminal kidney cancer, least said soonest mended.)

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GDPR forgive us, it's been one month since you were enforced…

Richard Jones 1
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C0 Alarms Anyone

I guess those 'wonderful' C0 alarms recently withdrawn on Amazon and e-bay for giving you a good nights sleep followed by an everlasting deep sleep as you failed to wake up in the presence of C0 would be a prime candidate for such action. They did not explode, they just did nothing.

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Um, excuse me. Do you have clearance to patch that MRI scanner?

Richard Jones 1
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@ Adam payne

One issue that I heard about was that the device(s) have a far longer life than the OS on the underlying support terminal. So your MRI/CT whatever scanner might have been built before a newly discovered problem with a 5/10 or more year old device becomes apparent. So how do you find a way to solve that issue within a budget? It is not a machine function issue, as it still works fine for the role it was signed do, but rather in many ways it is a site management, i.e. 'client' issue. Just as driving a truck into the building, losing power, or having someone walk off with an essential part - or even use the embedded 'terminal' for some 'foreign', i.e. not the task it was installed to do, purpose, I had someone do that with a (non medical) in service live device years ago. They were not happy when it overwrote their data - naughty boy.

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Computer Misuse Act charge against British judge thrown out

Richard Jones 1
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Re: Thrown out? Or she should be jailed?

So it would be better to sit back, allow the whole thing to run into a court case, then fail when it was realised that a material part of the session was compromised because some party or parties had not disclosed an association, or better yet the case was declared as a mistrial?

I am sure those costs and implications would be 'considerable'.

There is a possibly better way, that is for a suspicious party or their connected relative to be able to declare their family tree to another officially recognised 'case connected party'* and declare the risk of mistrial should overlapping connections be found between those conducting the case and the declarer.

*The access party to the case does need definition/clarification e.g. clerk of the court or higher.

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EE seeks guinea pig millennial hipsters for 5G experiments

Richard Jones 1
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I Want To Apply

I'm not in Shoreditch, but I hoped the experiment of new kit that might, just might get a signal just beyond the M25. Sadly I see I shall continue to live in the valley of dead EE promises with no reception at home..

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TSB meltdown latest: Facepalming reaches critical mass as Brits get strangers' bank letters

Richard Jones 1
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Guiness Book Of World's Records

Who is trying to scoop the pool for the most disasters in one gloriously screwed up project?

It must be time to hit both the stop and re-set buttons and try to do something else.

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Meet the real spin doctors: Scientists tell H2O to chill out so they can separate isomers

Richard Jones 1
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Joke

New Bath Taps?

But will I need new bath taps or shower controls to gain any advantage from either type of water. I am assuming that the more reactive form cleans better?

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Leaked pics: Motorola to add 'unpatriotic' 5G to 4G phones with magnets

Richard Jones 1
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Re: I dont really understand why i need 5g at all

I would like to say I agree with you, but EE have no sensible any G reception at home beyond the occasional text message for which 2G was OK and the odd voice call where quality is the pits and was better in 2G days. Still I guess we are outside of the M25 so do not count, though we are not outside by an intergalactic distance, so having usable 4G would be interesting. I can only say thank heavens for wired broadband and wired phone service. Otherwise it might be smoke signals to communicate, though as it is now belting with rain starting the smoke signal fire could be an issue.

It would be nice up Motorola phones could actually get promised and otherwise available updates, which my one and only Motorola 4G Play which will be replaced when it goes, by anything except a Motorola briquette.

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About to install the Windows 10 April 2018 Update? You might want to wait a little bit longer

Richard Jones 1
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I Saw No Problems (- No ships Either)

The family's five machines all updated fine, even the slowest portable was done in about 35 minutes. A ten year old Dell portable was ready in less than 30. No problems so far and the first machines went through on the 1st of May, so long enough for any issues to emerge I think.

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Look how modern we are! UK network Three to kill off 3G-only phones

Richard Jones 1
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Re: As long as they run a 3G service ...

Except where 4G,3G,2G are all too crap to get any service when your option are smoke signals, wireline or flags on poles.

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Seriously, Cisco? Another hard-coded password? Sheesh

Richard Jones 1
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Why Move From Pig in the Middle?

When I was young the game was pig in the middle, OK time moves on but surely pig in the middle scoffing at whatever trough of knowledge they fancy is more accurate. Pigs have an excellent sense of smell so make great goodie sniffers.

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DOJ convicts second bloke for helping malware go undetected

Richard Jones 1
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Re: Wait a minute

Aiding and abetting.

Handling stolen goods.

Conspiracy to rob.

Failure to report criminal activity.

Computer misuse.

Wire fraud

Those ideas are just for starters, I am sure that some jurisdictions could come up with some more colourful ideas.

It would have been a shame if they were paid using a stolen credit card...

What is wrong with 35 years, it would be best if they were put to some useful activity while serving as guests of the country's hospitality.

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Zero arrests, 2 correct matches, no criminals: London cops' facial recog tech slammed

Richard Jones 1
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Re: checks and balances on incorrect id say MET

I understood that in his highly unfortunate case the failed identification was by wetware without any cross checking by machine or face ID to verify the details, so was this a relevant reference? Hopefully the machines will/can get better, but how do you improve the wetware? Improved training and processes can only go so far.

This in no way disguises the unacceptable outcome in his case.

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Govts should police... Google's algorithms, says News Corp chief

Richard Jones 1
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I guess dodgy traders put forward the same arguments when someone invented a weighing device.

Horse traders were not too impressed when carts carried more than a single horse.

Horse and carts were put out of business by mechanical vehicles - road safety improved.

Sailing ships lost out to steam and other powered vessels tough, but maritime safety improved.

News corp are worried that they could lose out on the creation and distribution of fairy stories, see above.

Should anyone need the exercise they can still walk/drive/fly to an outlet to buy their fantasy fix from News Corp.

The digital platforms have taken over where the likes of News Corp have already failed in the digital era.

Anyone got a mirror for those dinosaurs at News Corp to understand their historical failure.

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'Alexa, find me a good patent lawyer' – Amazon sued for allegedly lifting tech of home assistant

Richard Jones 1
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Re: Alexa replies : There are only evil patent lawyers

Updating code within an application was something I did back in the 1980s, not content with passing variables to a subroutine through the call to that routine and thus modifying the results it could produce, I went one further and modified the routine because about >90% of the code was what was wanted but a subtle change in the code internals would allow a whole different process to run. This was with the 640k PC so code recycling/repurposing was 'valuable'. Extra fun came from some IBM folk getting upset at the thought of code being changed on the fly.

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Heir to SMS finally excites carriers, by making Google grovel

Richard Jones 1
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Re: So, once again instead of being about messages, it's about more ads???

If this wonderful new thing is aimed at a specific demographic I am not part of that demographic. If it really does aim to replace SMS then all it has done is replace a useful asynchronous function with an unwanted and largely useless cost generator that I would seek to disable. Voice is 'now,' SMS is 'when I can ' and advertising is for sometime after the third millennium - on someone else's account., so called messaging is voice or it does not exist I only bought a new phone for (a) map functions, (b) hands free voice in the car when emergencies strike and (c) for anything extra should a use ever arise. My typical data use is 50~70 MB per month usually in hospital waiting rooms. The worst interruptions I have suffered have been indications that so and so has an open WiFi network - lucky them, I think.

As long as SMS continues this new thing can be allowed to pass me by.

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Cambridge Analytica dismantled for good? Nope: It just changed its name to Emerdata

Richard Jones 1
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Re: "it was ignored"

The problem is that 'Big John' has only just dreamed it up! By the way what is his Moscow address?

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Irish High Court slams Facebook's conduct, smacks down bid to drag out data probe

Richard Jones 1
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Well Said That Justice

Justice Costello apparently prefers east side of the pond legal niceties to those on the west side. For my money it was a very smooth turn back of a faulty application, or more bluntly said don't game my system.

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'Computer algo' blamed for 450k UK women failing to receive breast screening invite

Richard Jones 1
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Re: The real question is...

I fully understand your comments, my wife has had a false NEGATIVE screening in October and repeated false negatives in April, however the surgeon realised that there was something wrong. It turned out that some cancers, even developed cancers do not show up on a screening test. Ultra sound guided biopsies of the right type plus MRI and CTI scans are needed. My wife is now starting her treatment next week.

Please accept my sympathy over your loss.

I am not entirely sure about your proposed prostrate investigation plan for the dumb nut. Surely a suitably heated old fashioned toasting fork should be used for both their examination and possible excision of any offending material.

PS concern was expressed about a possible secondary site in my wife a 'false positive' in wankers nomenclature: a rapidly organised examination showed that the suspect item was not a problem, so treatment can go ahead, in spite of other unconnected existing problems, comorbidities in the jargon.

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Brit bank TSB TITSUP* after long-planned transfer of customer records from Lloyds

Richard Jones 1
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Re: Simple fix - change your bank

With TSB systems revelling in undocumented software features quite how would you transfer the account to another bank? A bank whose software is so old it now runs on dinosaur's droppings rather than the new fangled rocking horse and hen's teeth fuel?

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EU under pressure to slap non-compliance notice on Google over pay-to-play 'remedy'

Richard Jones 1
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Blocking Comparison Web Sites And Foundem

I am looking for a widget so I go to Google to find a widget, that is available, at what price and how to get the item. What do not want is a dumb comparison site that has no one with available widgets. As for Foundem I tried the site several times; what does it do? I have never ever found anything even when I specifically tried it directly.

So how do I block ever seeing another waste of time comparison site and especially the likes of cannot-find-anything aka Foundem which in my experience should be done under the trades misinterpretation laws .

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BT pushes ahead with plans to switch off telephone network

Richard Jones 1
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Re: Next thing you know...

Ah DAB, that stands for Diabolically Awful Broadcasting I believe.

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Google accidentally reveals new swipe-happy Android UI

Richard Jones 1
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FAIL

How Do You Get a damned update?

My supposedly updatable Motorola G4 Play is still stuck on 6.0 even though it was supposed to get 7 sometime. How will it ever happen is what I would like to know from the lazy blighters in Lenovo. Happily I never put anything important on the telephone brick, so I guess the old OS is less of a concern.

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Facebook tried to access and match medical data – report

Richard Jones 1
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Re: BTW: Anonymized data is a 'fake news' story as confirmed here:

I had a read through your link and to be honest I wondered why I get few adverts and offers then I realised Ghostery must help as they suggested. The bigger issue for me is to work out why the few adverts I do see are so far wide of any use or interest to me. If they really are doing all this huge effort, they are buying old rotted rope not new and three legged racehorses on which to bet. I almost only ever use one device in one location so perhaps I bore their algorithms to dead.

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Richard Jones 1
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Wrong Vector But Action Needed

Having had several family cases of interactions between patients and treatments I have a foot in more than one camp. On Tuesday when the cause of my issue was possibly pinned on a treatment I am undergoing, I told to the physician I was already familiar with side effects. I explained that one antibiotic could and often did abreact with a specific pre-existing condition. He was unaware of the issue and made notes to follow it up.

So while @John Smith 'Did not ask for. Do not want.' sadly there is a need for improved understanding of side effects and wrong diagnostic outcomes. I for one need to avoid the issue being kicked into the long grass of prevarication, while patients 'enjoy' such delights as induced Lupus, anaphylaxis, breathing difficulties and other life affecting afflictions. I have severe doubts that Facebook is the vehicle and while Google might also raise hackles, I wonder who has the resources and skill to achieve the desired improvement in patient outcomes.

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1.5 BEEELLION sensitive files found exposed online dwarf Panama Papers leak

Richard Jones 1
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Re: Just because you have found a file on the internet doesn't mean it's a security issue.

Were all of these tax papers in one or two treasure chests from some sloppy accountant(s) or were they several thousands of returns all stuck somewhere by people dealing with their own affairs? The headlines are wonderful fodder but I do wonder quite what was actually happening, e.g. were the files orphaned off by some now shuttered enterprise? Deluging authorities with complaints might be fun for some, but will it simply slow up any resolution?

There are already tens, perhaps thousands of SMEs who are being scared about GDPR and wondering what, if anything they can do. A 'business' with a few thousand pounds of turn over is clearly not in line to spend huge amounts on a consultant to verify their system, paying their increasing business rates is probably further up their action list. HMRC forcing as many as they can to go digital probably have not helped, at least an old exercise book had no online presence or rapid search function and probably held minimal personal data anyway. Middle ranking outfits possibly have more data, processes, and greater risks of missteps and a number of obsolete.systems.

The glib let them fail and put several hundred out of work is all very well, especially if they were the last available supplier. The care sector is already struggling, the loss of a few more providers would help no one I can think of.

I know of a raft of services that are being shuttered offering a range of facilities, it is a right pain in the behind, but no great harm to me, yet.

I bet I see no reduction in the crap mails and telephone calls I get.

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How machine-learning code turns a mirror on its sexist, racist masters

Richard Jones 1
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Meh

Re: No Asian, African texts?

It is all fair and more or less OK until the meaning of words in more or less common use migrates either to a less common application or to a totally different meaning. Even worse from a standards point of view, different age bands or social groupings may also assign different uses if not different meanings to words in common use within their groups. The number of words which have dropped in popularity or changed their meaning during my life time is quite startling, if you are sentient enough to think about your experiences. AI is probably not written to achieve that end.

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Any social media accounts to declare? US wants travelers to tell

Richard Jones 1
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I've Heard of Bucket Lists But The US must Want to be The Slop Bowl of Undesirable Locations

I used to visit the USA in the 1980s, but I moved on from those roles and with the move I broke the association. I have probably had 5 passports over the years I doubt I could find the number on more than 1 or 2. In addition to such now undesirable locations as the USA I have also lived in, visited, or passed through a range of locations such as The Lebanon, Iran, Bangladesh, Italy Switzerland, Germany, Spain, Sweden, France, A middle East Kingdom, India, Japan, Canada and maybe a few others; time weakens the memory. Could I ever be bothered to dig through old memories or lost in the dust of time dates to fill out their dumb form? No chance. Trump should should just put up a simple sign saying, closed to visitors. As for social networking wot's that?

The last five years is easy data is easy, I've barely been out of the house so travelling across the pond is just not going to happen without anyone making it the least desirable location on earth

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Autonomous vehicle claims are just a load of hot air… and here's why

Richard Jones 1
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Wetware Drivers Are not Perfect Either

Round where I live the wetware drivers do not have such a great record at avoiding road furniture other wetware drivers, pedestrians flora and fauna either. Either roundabouts are invisible to them or they earn special points for flattening anything and everything on them. Some also treat speed limits as a sort of minimum target to be beaten at all costs to other drivers.

Having said all of that I to suspect that we are some years away from a really autonomous vehicle, though a 'are you sure mode' of guidance might be a step forward.

As for the UBER disaster, as it is subject to investigation and probably legal action I should be guarded in what I say, but I find it troubling that neither the test pilot nor the vehicle registered the presence of an object in its vicinity. The alarms on my newish car go off only too readily and they are only warning the wetware in the driving position.

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Nest reveals the first truly connected home

Richard Jones 1
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Re: The Smart Door Lock power issue

Car doors have been able to get a power supply for years, if and a bloody big IF you want a toy like this for some obscure reason then do a properly engineered job, not a bodger job with feeble batteries.

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Richard Jones 1
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Re: Soo...

I have no idea about other people's insurance documents, but mine specify the nature and style of locks I have to use and none of them described in this write up appear to comply with the very specific documentation I hold. That is quite apart from the existing key fob controllers I already use in an otherwise very low technology almost 24 hour a day occupied house. As for equipping more than 10 rooms and about 20 radiators with thermostats and controls that could be disabled on a whim by the supplier, I am sorry I am not smoking what they smoke, neck or whatever. More to the point with more than one person in residence I can only imagine the potential for anarchy even before the network goes down

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Ofcom to networks: Want this delicious 5G spectrum? You'll have to improve 4G coverage

Richard Jones 1
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WTF?

About 8 miles north of the M25 I do not consider that I am out in the boon docks, however EE coverage inside the house varies between nothing and crap, though texts do usually manage to struggle through. Frankly what hope has the rest of the country, carrier pigeons?

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Europe plans special tax for Google, Apple, Facebook, Amazon

Richard Jones 1
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WTF?

Re: I'm not sure that targeting specific companies is the way forward.

They might have avoided tax, but tax evasion is a totally different animal and already subject to stiff rules - when they are applied. How many claim their tax free limits in various forms, that is tax avoidance, tax evasion is not declaring your income at all, hopefully all are virtuous in that regard or are we all?

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Oops, this article can't be found

Richard Jones 1
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Happy

Fixing Voice Call Quality Issues

We have found an answer to voice calls via EE, have the caller call our land line, which does allow voice calls at decent quality. When completing every sort of form we ask the recipient to only send texts to the mobile but to call our land line to speak, or we deny having a mobile at all leaving the box on the form blank.

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James Damore's labor complaint went over about as well as his trash diversity manifesto

Richard Jones 1
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Re: oh the irony

@NerryTutkins, thank you that explained a great deal of what went wrong and why Damore did what he did. Many people who know those with his sorts of fundamental issues know that while they are not fun the other part of the word after the 'da' can appear to apply in spades. One I know will come out with the most egregious things and be unable to understand that their view of the world may not be shared by others. Once the 'bee is in their bonnet' that is the end of the matter they may not have seen the subject or read an article about the matter but they know instinctively that you are wrong.

Some will never be able to work, some will work for a while then blow up and leave economic activity, while others can sometimes find a niche and thrive. Your quote "all their failures are the fault of others" rings especially true in my experience of several real life examples.

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