* Posts by Bullseyed

789 posts • joined 20 Aug 2009

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MacBook Pro owners complain of short batt life – so Apple kills batt life clock in macOS

Bullseyed

Re: The Big Head ruined Apple

> forgetting the 20 years of 5% market share

That is very generous. Apple market share was much closer to 2%. Still around there for Desktops/Laptops. Their market share is down below 20% in phones now and continuing to fall.

They have enough cash to coast for 100 more years though.

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Bullseyed

Re: been doing it for years

Yeah, I was a bit confused, especially in the comments.

Remember when Apple was using faulty antennas that constantly dropped calls? They updated iOS to make the phone show full bars all the time, instead of the real signal strength.

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Bullseyed

Re: Time remaining is always a guestimate

"they are squandering the legacy bequeathed to them by Steve Jobs."

If you think Stevey J wasn't all about design elegance at the cost of practicality, then you've had too much koolaid.

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BOFH: The Hypochondriac Boss and the non-random sample

Bullseyed

Re: "IT skillset of a potato"

Not just chips, french fries too!

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Everything at Apple Watch is awesome, insists Tim Cook

Bullseyed

> Nonsense, said Cook, who emailed the Reuters news agency to tell it that the Apple Watch's "sell-through" was at a record high. IDC thinks that Apple shipped just 1.1 million Watches in Q3 2016, down from 2.7 million in the previous quarter.

> It’s perfectly possible, maybe even probable, that both Cook and IDC are correct.

Sounds like there was a lot of excess inventory in retail from the previous quarter. They're selling more now than then, but still not at replenishment rate.

ie.

Month/Quarter A: Shipped 5,000... Sold 1,000... Inventory 4,000

Month Quarter B: Shipped 1,000... Sold 1,500... Inventory 3,500

= record sales, record sell through... still bad.

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Yeah, that '50bn IoT devices by 2020' claim is a load of dog toffee

Bullseyed

> So the market will be worth $73bn the year after next (and presumably similar if not more for the two years following that), yet there'll only be 1bn devices by 2020? 73 * 3 = 210, in other words $210 per device... isn't this obvious bollocks?

You think they're just putting a bunch of random devices out there and not doing anything with the data or software?

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Bullseyed

Re: Who's buying all this IoT stuff?

> Who's buying all this IoT stuff?

Everyone in any manufacturing related industry.

This isn't consumer stuff. This is a sensor in your local waste treatment facility telling some tech when the filters need to be changed. This is a pump at your local brewery phoning out for a tech to come onsite when a pump is going to fail.

Consumer IoT is out there as a concept to help pay for the cost, but most IoT stuff isn't aimed at the consumer.

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The hated Trans-Pacific Partnership trade deal will soon be dead. Yay?

Bullseyed

Re: China and TTIP

> Would it had fucked china? YES

> But also, destroyed democracy, as we would have private judges deciding for corporations, and laws imposed withour recourse.. and it would also be a club that if you are not part of it, you are fucked.

> Terrible, horrible.

Unsurprisingly, Clinton claimed to have authored it and said it was the gold standard of the best law ever written.

Opposed by Bernie, Trump and the vast majority of Americans.

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Sony: Get out Comedy Central, MTV – we've built a wall around Vue, the greatest wall ever

Bullseyed

So in non-biased reporting, this means that Viacom hiked their prices. Sony had to choose between cutting their channels or raising the price of their service. They decided to cut the channels.

Soon Viacom will cave, and Sony will re-add them to the list. This will then be reported as Sony caving by anyone who is biased in favor of Viacom.

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Cheap, lousy tablets are killing the whole market says IDC

Bullseyed

We all know that Android devices last much longer than iOS ones. Android users update their phones far less frequently, holding to a 2+yr cycle, while Apple users tend to need to update every year or less.

The same is the case here for tablets, except tablets seem to last a lot longer. I got a Samsung Galaxy Tab S 10.5 a couple years ago. Still works fine. No reason for a new one. Battery lasts for weeks in standby and days in use.

So what drives sales? New users. New users tend to be college kids, poor folks who couldn't previously afford one, and kids/teenagers who are getting old enough to want their own. All of these are good targets for 'cheap' devices. Thus, cheap devices are selling well.

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Oh Snap! How intelligent people make themselves stupid for Snapchat

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FBI overpaid $999,900 to crack San Bernardino iPhone 5c password

Bullseyed

He found Apple employed security-through-obscurity rather than "fully thought through" hardening in its protection against NAND mirroring attacks.

I thought it had been known for a while that that is the entirety of Apple's 'no viruses' history. It has rarely been profitable to bother attacking an Apple device due to low marketshare.

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Bullseyed

Yeah and it wasn't clear how much time was actually spent. They referenced time and being part time, but didn't give an indication of man hours.

It wasn't really development though, the guy was just reading about the documented ways to do such a thing. The NAND attack is well known. Just hadn't been tried with this phone, possibly.

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Nest offers its thermostat in three new pretty colors!

Bullseyed

Re: Colors are products too

> This just reminded me of the breathless wait for the white iPhone 4 and the endless stream of articles in mainstream media anticipating it's arrival, about how Apple couldn't get the proper shade of white on the button, then announcing it once it finally came out as if it was a major paradigm shift in mobile communications.

Except a phone goes in your pocket and has a case on it.

A thermostat goes in the middle of your wall. Often in the most used room of your house. Matching the color is a liiiiittle bit more important. At my last house I had to use one of the wall plates the Nest came with to cover the hole in the wall from the old thermostat. The wall was kind of an offwhite cream color. The plate was white. The thermostat was silver. It looked weird, I got used to it.

The plate was supposed to be paint-able to match to the wall, but I didn't paint the wall and thus had none of the paint.

Anyways, having other color options would have been nice. The black one looks cool. The white one would match the current living room of my house, if my furnace was compatible.

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Bullseyed

Re: such hostility

> Its not the path that nest seems to be taking, but already the average wi-fi router is also a NAS (its cheap enough to add a few gig of SS storage that many routers do so even in the expectation that 90% of customers won't even realise its there) and a few other things.

Isn't the Google OnHub router line supposed to basically do this for smart home type stuff?

Google does a much better job than any other company at making all their stuff work well together, but there still are so many easy opportunities for improvement.

Sadly I don't have a Nest thermostat though. The previous owners installed a new Carrier furnace just a few months before selling the house. Carrier does all their wiring in a proprietary format to prevent people from using any 3rd party stuff. It's like having an Apple. Sigh.

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Bullseyed

Re: Fuck that

I'd like a camera to monitor the inside and outside of my chicken coop. I'm not going to buy and run a server to do that. These Nest cameras sound handy.

Only problem would be getting power out there. Wonder how much a solar/battery system would cost.

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Excel abuse hits new heights as dev uses VBA to code spreadsheet messaging app

Bullseyed

Re: When all you have is a hammer......

> ......every task looks like a nail.

It's not like these business people making these apps have a copy of VS provided by their boss and refuse to use it... And chances are their IT department wouldn't allow them to run code they wrote anyway.

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Bullseyed

Re: "Messages are delivered within 40 seconds"

I like that while Lync is dead, Skype for business still says "Lync has disconnected" if it messes up your business meeting.

Also, sometimes I send an IM to someone and then leave for their desk and arrive at the same time my message does.

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Inside our three-month effort to attend Apple's iPhone 7 launch party

Bullseyed

Re: Hopefully...

> I'd like to understand why Ford have a need for 16 million IPs.

IoT for Ford cars.

Solved.

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Bullseyed

Re: Here's a novel idea

> What if all the media not invited just don't report on anything from the unveiling? Apple needs to get their head out of the clouds, and that would certainly deflate them a bit further. You (The Register) are after all providing them free advertising by your reviews, something for which you don't even get one of their samples.

It's pretty weird. On the local radio this morning, like regular news radio, they actually took like 2 whole minutes to read out all the features (including no mention of all the negatives around no headphone jack). Figured it was paid.

Instead of places like The Register going radio silent, I feel like they should report just whatever fake stuff they want. Claim the iPhone 7 will have a built in pacemaker. Get traction with people to the point where people are buying iPhone 7s and throwing away their pacemakers because they think they don't need it anymore. Then when it evitably goes bad, just point out that Apple refused to provide information and it is their fault the coverage went ary.

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Quip away, but Microsoft Excel 365's REST APIs win the day

Bullseyed

Re: Yup you're old

> IMHO, putting your whole business into Azure or AWS is just foolish. Those providers can hold you and your business to ransom as and when they see fit.

Yeah, it is only against the law and would trash their brand, putting them out of business essentially overnight.

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Microsoft adds useful feature to PowerPoint. Seriously

Bullseyed

Feature isn't new. The presenter mode as offered a grid of slides and the ability to click on one to go to it for a very long time. It is just that most people giving presentations are tech illiterate.

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Did Donald Trump really just ask Russia to hack the US govt? Yes, he did

Bullseyed

Re: Treason

> More importantly, if they already have them, they don't have to find them.

Easy to tell who has never used a database in their life in this thread.

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Bullseyed

Re: Treason

> and, did ANYONE ever think that Trump *might* be telling a JOKE? *I* thought it was UPROARIOUSLY funny!

Very obviously was. He said the media would reward them for it. The media is paid for by Clinton and will not publish things that harm her campaign.

Even discussing this is part of the fail media's plan, but... There is no part of the government that could be hacked to reveal Hillary's missing emails. Unless there is a larger treason scandal involving Obama and every department of the government, including FBI and Justice Dept. So right off the bat, the liberal/Clinton false story this article is running on is disproven.

Second, Hillary said under oath that the deleted emails contained no sensitive information. So even if the Russian could hack something and get them, that would represent no risk at all to security, unless Hillary lied under oath. If she did, then she is no longer eligible to hold office.

Finally, the Russians already have the information, as they compromised Hillary's server. The fact that they haven't released the emails yet shows they are working with Hillary's campaign, which is probably why they're so bent on claiming the opposite with Trump.

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Smartphones aren't tiny PCs, but that's how we use them in the West

Bullseyed

NFC is more advanced than QRC.

People in China are less concerned about security, so they can use lower grade tech that we got rid of for security reasons.

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Software bug costs Citigroup $7m after legit transactions mistaken for test data for 15 years

Bullseyed

Re: Interesting footnote

> The reporting logic treated letters, such as A, B, C, as being less than the number 0.

That seems unlikely to me. I'd believe it if they said they excluded anything over 89.

That or if they said it was a Y2K/Windows 9 type thing where it would look if the first two digits were 9 or 10 and skip it.

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Bullseyed

Re: One of the simplest checks of all

> WTF they don't match up?

They would likely match up, but they should have always had extra money in their accounts. You'd think someone would have noticed.

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Revealed: The revolving door between Google and the US govt – in pictures

Bullseyed

Re: former Google staff occupy key posts in areas essential to Google’s

Ditto for Deloitte, GM, IBM, etc.

I have a theory about all of this... I will call it "6 degrees of separation". I think it may catch on.

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Bullseyed

Re: former Google staff occupy key posts in areas essential to Google’s

Luckily publically questioning the morals of another is itself immoral, so pot, kettle, etc.

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Bullseyed

Re: Microsoft? Apple?

Most of Apple's workers are in Foxconn sweatshops. Not likely to transfer to government. That is the difference between IT and marketing.

How many Apple folks have become Mad Men? Probably quite a few.

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Bullseyed

Re: Microsoft? Apple?

Shocking "the government" "Google" are both big companies. You could do the same chart with Google and GE or Google and GM or Google and Apple or Google and Amazon and see lots of people moving all over.

The number of companies that oversee databases as huge as the ones Google runs are fairly limited. Ergo, there will be a relatively small circle of companies competing for the same resources. For example, one of the leaders on the Microsoft side for their CRM not that long ago quit and went to Salesforce. I'm sure at least one person has quit Salesforce for Microsoft, or Oracle, or SAP, etc.

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The case for ethical ad-blocking

Bullseyed

Re: View from inside

"Donate to us and we'll give you access without ads"

I refuse to contribute to those who lack knowledge regarding the definition of the word donate.

And surely if ads work, then those people like seeing ads. By definition those people would never use an ad blocker, as they like clicking the ads and buying stuff. Ad blockers actual help the content providers by making sure they aren't charged for ad views by people who would never buy the product being advertised.

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Bullseyed

Re: Ethics don't don't come into it.

"The only web folks that are worried about this are the ones that just steal and link to other superior content."

That's all of them, though. For example, the vast majority of news on the internet is written by the AP. Lots of 'news' places just buy those stories and repost them. Sometimes they add a few words here or there, like the book reports they somehow got a college degree in.

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Bullseyed

Re: @ tannin

"People wouldn't continue to purchase advertising if it didn't pay more."

Simply not true. No one has any idea how much advertising actually pays. All of the employees on both sides depend on advertising 'working' for their jobs to continue to exist, so they report accordingly. Nobody wants to admit that they ate a Big Mac because they wanted to, so if you harass people with questions, they'll claim the advertising made them do it.

And that's just the base layer. That doesn't account for the systemic fraud, routinely exposed on sites like Facebook, where they run bot armies to click links and likes to justify the advertising costs they charge their customers.

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Bullseyed

All adblocking is ethical. Unethical behavior includes auto-play videos that somehow never need to buffer and play at higher quality than the actual video. Given that most people access their internet content on smartphones with limited data plans, pushing content that is not requested by the user (ie ads) is actually theft of bandwidth and data quota.

If I take a site like this one and in addition to entering text into fields and hitting the submit button, inject code to affect the database, I have committed a felony via unauthorized computer access. However, if I click a link to this website and it injects code to insert data into my client, they have done nothing wrong?

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Bill Gates denies iPhone crack demand would set precedent

Bullseyed

Re: Really?

Former Apple employees could not digitally sign software with a legitimate Apple signature. You don't know what you're talking about here.

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Bullseyed

Re: Apple has access to the information, they are just refusing access..

> The key point is "legislation". The elected representatives of the people enacted a law.

Said law would be unconstitutional. The Constitution would need to be amended, and then a law passed.

Also, interesting that the primary defender of rights in the US political system died under suspicious circumstances just prior to this whole event.

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Bullseyed

Re: keylogger

> Microsoft collects speech, inking, and typing information

Is this the part where we expect to be able to use voice commands but object to the processing of voice data necessary to parse voice commands?

Siri has to listen to every word you ever say, send it to Apple and to the third party who actually does the processing for Siri, so she can tell if you said "hey Siri".

This data could be potentially aggregated or spied on, prior to being discarded after processing. Or you can just go without voice commands. Predictive keyboards and spell check work the same way, but with keystrokes.

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Bullseyed

> ...and when the government are the bad guys?

Gates is a liberal. The concept of a government bad guy does not compute.

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Microsoft patent filing confirms existence of 3D Jedi gesture phone

Bullseyed

Samsung has had hover options on their phones for what, 4 years?

When the Samsung Galaxy S4 was released last year, Samsung included a feature called Air Gesture. This feature allows you to navigate your smartphone like moving between pictures and images, scrolling through email, accepting incoming calls, or checking for notifications without physically touching your Android device screen.

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Confused as to WTF is happening with Apple, the FBI and a killer's iPhone? Let's fix that

Bullseyed

Re: "For Your Protection", yadda yadda.

> At least someone significant is standing up for our privacy.

Yeah, Scalia mysteriously died the week this issue comes up. He would have been the swing vote in the Supreme Court to side with the people against the FBI.

Odd how that timing worked, eh?

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Bullseyed

Re: To be clear

> So even though the flash memory could be cloned, that is useless without the key, which stays buried in the CPU at all times. So you need both the memory and that particular CPU running valid code to be able to get at the data.

But the issue is the wiping of the memory after 10 attempts. If the memory were backed up, the CPU could be bruteforced, no?

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Women devs – want your pull requests accepted? Just don't tell anyone you're a girl

Bullseyed

Not only that, but women often have more locked down social media profiles than men do, so chances are a greater % of the unidentified accounts are women.

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Bullseyed

In most of my engineering/database/programming classes, I was in an extreme minority of white males, while the class was predominantly a 75/25 split of male and female people from India. I was in a class where a professor once commented that he only taught the class in English because I was there, as the only white person.

To pretend this is only a white female issue is biased.

Also in those classes for projects, it seems the Indian females were desired as teammates. Unlike white females, they didn't seem to form cliques with each other. They often had better organizational skills than the Indian males in terms of setting meetings, keeping deadlines in mind, etc. They were typically very quiet and unassertive, unless they were close friends with one of the males in the group.

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Bullseyed

Re: @Pascal

> It would be reasonable to expect code from women where gender is not known would be roughly as good or as bad as code from those where gender is known.

False.

I expect people who go around advertising they are vegans to be worse people than those who are vegan without lecturing others, for example. If you're running around online saying LOOK AT ME I HAVE BOOBIES then chances are you're going to have much worse code than people who don't care to expose their profile information.

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Bullseyed

Re: Transparency doesn't matter

> Code is code. It doesn't matter whose fingers typed it, or whether or not they were perfumed. What matters is that it works.

Where in the study did they analyze whether or not the code that was rejected even worked? You have no basis for making this statement.

Let's do a line by line teardown of the code accepted and rejected and see if the best code was what was accepted.

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Bullseyed

> The study, Gender bias in open source: Pull request acceptance of women versus men was written by Josh Terrell, Andrew Kofink, Justin Middleton, Clarissa Rainear, Emerson Murphy-Hill​, and Chris Parnin.

As you can tell from the title of the study, the 'researchers' found the outcome they wanted.

The conclusion actually supported by the data here is that coders who choose to include their gender are weaker coders with less skill, whether male or female, and therefore are accepted less often. It is kind of like how people with bumper stickers, even ones about peace and love, are far more likely to engage in road rage than the general population.

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Samsung trolls Google, adds adblockers to phones

Bullseyed

Re: Not the most urgent job

Shipping an updated browser app is not shipping updates in your definition? Wut?

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Bullseyed

Re: Adverts are not the essence of the problem ...

Perhaps the goal of advertising should be redefined to not include being noticed. Like a crying baby at a play, the best ads do not stand out.

How is it that we can spend all this time redoing apps and icons to be flat and basic and declare it the greatest design and art and then have these ads that are so... opposite. I have never intentionally clicked, tapped or otherwise selected an ad in my life. I have had stuff jump around on a page, redirect or pop up to try to make me accidentally click it. This should be treated as unathorized access to a computer and be a felony, if 'social engineering' can be considered a crime.

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Rooting your Android phone? Google’s rumbled you again

Bullseyed

Re: To all of you with older phones...

> since they basically just follow some descriptions on some forum to do so, throw the security out of the window.

You completed missed the point.

But yes, following steps on a forum is equally as big of a security issue as heartbleed or stagefright, I guess.

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