* Posts by andy 103

151 posts • joined 18 Aug 2009

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Vodafone, EE and Three overcharging customers after contracts expire

andy 103
FAIL

Only applies to thick people

I don't feel sorry for anyone who is "caught out" by this.

Clearly if you get a brand new smartphone and have left the shop without paying anything for it, possibly beyond the first months rental, then clearly you have not been given a phone "for free". You are paying for it, over the lifetime of the contract, which includes airtime/data.

And why would you just let a deal continue with *any* product or service, without looking into alternatives? A prime example being car insurance. Unless you're a total simpleton you can pretty much always get a better deal by using a price comparison website every single year.

Sorry, but this would only happen to the most stupid of stupid people.

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So the 'Year of Linux' never happened. When is it Chrome OS's turn?

andy 103
FAIL

People buy off people

Whenever these stories are published, I always sigh when I read comments about whatever people seem to think is technically superior, or why their particular OS/device of choice isn't the most popular and should be.

People buy off people. Whether you want to admit it or not, that's why Windows did so well. You see back in the day Microsoft had suited up sales reps, who went into businesses and "sold" the Microsoft dream to other suited up business types. They did this early on. Home users thought, well if it's good enough for massive companies, it's probably good enough for me - it has backing of people and a company. That's why it took off. It was never to do with how technically superior the OS/software was, or anything like that. It's all to do with the human connection and interaction when selling an "idea" (hardware, software, both, *whatever*) to potential users (aka customers, aka people who will help make it more successful by providing financial backing).

If you contrast this to Linux... well, who do I speak to if I'm thinking of using Linux? Who's selling it to me? Where's the marketing? Is it cool - does everyone else use it or want to use it? It has a massive identity crisis.

Google and Chrome OS is an interesting one. Google is obviously a massive - and incredibly well known - company with huge amounts of resource and not that bad at marketing. But, it's faceless. If I want to talk to someone about a Pixelbook, I don't want it to be some spaz in PC World.

Why have Apple done so well? Aside from their marketing, they have countless stores with "geniuses" (a term used very loosley)... but nonetheless, if people need support they can just go and speak to *someone*, or talk and find out more about a device. The key word is "someone" - people interacting with other people - and subsequently gaining market share.

I've never really been sure how Linux fits into this model - a model of how the world actually works, and what end-users want. I'm 50/50 on whether Chrome OS will do well, but on the face of it, no it won't. At all.

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Open source sets sights on killing WhatsApp and Slack

andy 103

Re: Searching for old messages in different apps = nightmare

"You could, put it in an address book"

...

"Care to elaborate why?"

You're assuming it's always an address! Unfortunately I used address as the example but that's one of literally countless examples of things people send you in messages (on any platform) that you need to be able to find easily later on. Try scrolling through 2000 Whatsapp messages to find a recipie** your friend sent you 6 months ago, and you'll understand what I mean!

** Please don't take every example I give as literally the only thing this could apply to. There are many examples of things people send you that you need to be able to find later on, and not all of them can be stored in fields of an address book.

Not all data fits into specific fields (e.g. an address book). And why would I want to duplicate that data on my phone - it's already in a message! The problem is searching for and finding old, historical messages, in an ocean of messages, in a variety of apps/platforms. Duplicating it all over the place is not the answer.

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andy 103

Searching for old messages in different apps = nightmare

It is annoying having messages in loads of de-coupled systems. I have some friends who use iMessage, some who use FB Messenger, some who use Whatsapp, some on traditional text, the occasional email(!).... the list goes on.

The real problem is searchability and finding an old conversation. For example, a friend has sent me their address countless times, but every time I visit them I have to ask for it again, because I simply can't find it in whatever app I was using, assuming I can remember which app it was!

Ironically, my solution to this was to write it down on paper - something which has worked rather well. Obviously that's not practical for everything!

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BAE confirms it is slashing 2,000 jobs

andy 103
FAIL

Streamlining and de-layering

Streamlining == Streamlining the flow of money into CEO and directors pockets, at the expense of employing enough people to do the jobs which generate said money to the required standard.

De-layering == Getting rid of people who may spot what's going on (see also: streamlining).

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What is the probability of being drunk at work and also being tested? Let's find out! Correctly

andy 103
Mushroom

It's always 50%

The chance of anything happening - being caught on a given day or not - is that it will either happen, or it won't. Some might say that's 50:50, or 50%. These people are known as dicks.

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WordPress has adverse reaction to Facebook's React.js licence

andy 103

Re: Wordpress doesn't use React

"Wordpress spits out post as JSON"

A JSON feed and React are two totally different things.

I thought this was a tech website?!

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andy 103

Re: re zero respect for WordPress as a product

The issue is not with Wordpress itself. The issue is with developers who think "you can make anything with Wordpress". Be it an ecommerce site, a web application... Sure, it has its uses. But it's not a PHP framework (like Laravel, CakePHP, etc) but some stupid developers think it is.

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andy 103

Wordpress doesn't use React

Sorry, please can someone clarify this... Wordpress itself doesn't use React, unless I'm mistaken?

Or are they talking about some other tools that the developers use? The headline is misleading.

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The new, new Psion is getting near production. Here's what it looks like

andy 103

"El Reg on Firefox on Debian"

Regarding the screenshot titled El Reg on Firefox on Debian, you guys still haven't made your website responsive, and it's 2017. Why is that?

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Massive iPhone X leak trashes Apple's 10th anniversary circus

andy 103

Other tech you could buy for a grand...

Go on... list what you'd spend 1k on, if you could...

I've said this before. Apple could charge 10k for a phone, and people would still buy it. It's nothing to do with how good the technology is. It's to do with how it's marketed, the hype and perception of it. You could make something technically superior, but unless the word gets out, and it's perceived as "cool" then it's a non-starter. This is how successful people make money - it's called "a business".

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UK council fined £70k for leaving vulnerable people's data open to world+dog

andy 103

So, what actually happened? Details, details.

It would be interesting to know more details about how they "posted" these details.

What this suggests is that a file has been placed within their publically accessible web space, and then possibly indexed by a search engine.

However, there are a lot of questions over that. Firstly, how/why had it been put there? By who? For what purpose?

Or was it a sloppy developer who built a web application where it wrote files containing form data to the web root (yes, seen it happen) and those were indexed? Was it a developer, or a non-IT member of staff?

Fining people alone isn't the answer. Knowing about what has happened would actually help in situations like this, but no doubt they'll do some "investigation" and be non the wiser themselves. Each party will blame the other, etc etc.

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Continuous integration platforms are broken – here's what needs fixing

andy 103

Re: Stability

I work as a web app developer so can sympathise. But to me, a lot of the problems we see are not to do with things like jquery vs React, etc. They're to do with the fact everyone is so focused on "automation", version control, CI, or whatever other bullshit buzzword they've read about. And whilst focusing on these they have dropped "old fashioned" core principles like planning and testing (previously known as "common sense" and "what you should be doing anyway").

You want to build a web app for a browser in 2017? It's not that hard. Write a detailed plan of what you're going to do. If you get some tosser saying it has to be done in a "agile" way, stay away from them, because they've no idea what it really takes to deliver software successfully. As you go along, throughly test things - yes, manually *shock horror*, with human input and interaction. Once you get to the end and have completed your final fixes/tests, it's unlikely to "break" unless either the code is randomly changed without testing (which it shouldn't be) or a *new* browser that wasn't around for your testing at the time comes along. In the latter case it may never cause an issue and should be a relatively minor one if you've planned and coded the application well.

Even now I bet someone will downvote this or say, oooh why would you use manual/human processes when there is *insert new tech in this space*. Well, it's because some of us know how to do things properly, which is why I'm able to take some time to write this at lunch, rather than piss around configuring a CI tool.

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Guess who's hiking their prices again? Come on, it's as easy as 123 Reg

andy 103

Set your own price

It's 123reg so you can just change the prices by manipulating the URL query string anyway... I joke, but there was a company (BT?) where that was actually possible a number of years ago. I'm sure 123reg did something equally stupid such as passing the logged in user ID in the URL a while back too. A shockingly bad company.

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Brit firms warned over hidden costs of wiping data squeaky clean before privacy rules hit

andy 103

Re: How does it work for historical orders?

"this has been dealt with a number of times."

It hasn't been dealt with properly though. Read some of the comments further down where people have highlighted how it doesn't even begin to cover what's actually required. No, not going to bother explaining this to you either.

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andy 103
WTF?

How does it work for historical orders?

So imagine you run an ecommerce website. It has details of all the orders made.

If someone requests all their data be removed, that's not just their account, but all the details of the orders they made, delivery address, products ordered etc?

How does that work? Companies are required to keep information on orders for both accounting and security purposes. Imagine if someone phoned up and said, oh I didn't receive my 5k retina display iMac. Oh, well we'll have to send you a new one as someone may or may not have wiped your details. Or, we can see a payment was made, but have no idea who it was from, or what for.

Sounds like it's not been thought through. At all.

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No, Apple. A 4G Watch is a really bad idea

andy 103

Never understood the point

So even if you have an Apple Watch, essentially all it's doing is acting as a second "display" for your iPhone or other devices.

Given that you still need your phone (or another device) to actually do anything useful from that point with the information it gives... why not just use your phone? And if telling the time is all you care about, you don't need a smart watch at all.

The technology moves on so quickly that nobody is going to "double up" on buying a phone AND a smart watch at the same time when they know that even 1 of those things will likely need replacing, at a minimum, every 2 years.

If you think Apple's offering is expensive though, be sure to check out Breitling's Exospace - a watch that costs around 6 grand and does less than an Apple watch. I've never seen anyone with one, and reckon they'll have sold in single figures. Does have the name though I guess.

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Mediocre Britain: UK broadband ranked 31st in world for speed

andy 103

Re: All I wanna know is...

Landline Voice calls are worthless to most people now.

Sorry, but they're not. At all. Whenever I phone my parents from my mobile they always call me back landline to landline because the quality of the call is so much higher and has no danger of dropping out.

Businesses also want landlines for exactly the same reason.

Mobile is good for, well when you need to be mobile. If I'm sat in my living room having an hour long chat with someone, I'd prefer to be able to speak clearly with them.

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andy 103

Re: "superfast rollout is continuing at speed."

never got to know the people I was "meeting" with

Yeah, I get there's a balance to be had. My point is where do you draw the line? I've done a 500 mile round trip before to essentially discuss some images for a website before. There's no way that journey was needed.

I get that human interaction is irreplaceable and still important. But if your client was say, in America, you wouldn't just go and visit them every time you needed a discussion on the basis it's good for relationships. Sometimes you have to draw the line.

At the same time the government are going on about pollution, and people are moaning about overcrowded transport. Well there are ways around all this, but we have to think differently to how we've done things before.

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andy 103
FAIL

"superfast rollout is continuing at speed."

"superfast rollout is continuing at speed." Oh, the irony.

Things which are going to help fuck up our economy and make us less competitive in the next 10 years:

1. Crap / slow methods of transport between A and B.

2. Crap / slow Internet connections

3. Governments who don't understand how to properly address (1) and (2) and spend loads of money on getting people who have equally no idea to come up with "strategies".

4. People who don't understand the correlation between (1) and (2) and the fact we could be far more efficient with transport if we could do more online reliably. For example, why is any company sending people from Manchester to London for a 1 hour meeting when there's video calling? Oh yeah, because it's unreliable, and isn't something all people can / are prepared to do.

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DevOps, Containers, Continuous Delivery? Tell us your stories

andy 103
Stop

I'd like an explanation of wtf it actually is

So all these terms, DevOps, continuous integration, etc are being banded around. Along with names of software packages - Kubernetes, Docker, etc...

The thing which seems to be missing is an explanation of what problem(s) these things are actually solving or addressing.

In many cases they seem to be replacing common sense, or doing "what you should have been doing anyway, and was perfectly possible with other tools".

So, if anyone can actually enlighten us peasants who are still going about our professions without all this stuff, please explain what it is, what it solves, and why you can't do without it.

Then, and only then.... will we be interested in anything else to do with it.

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UK IBMers lose crucial battle in pension row

andy 103

if it sounds too good to be true, it probably is

IBM has always been run to pay the people at the top, and occasionally, shareholders. In that order. The employees are merely there to serve that goal.

If you're an employee of that dire company then my advice is to get out. The only way they'll learn is if nobody is there to help the top people achieve their "goal" of becoming rich whilst shafting everyone else.

If you find ANY employer, in 2017 Britain, that offers a pension scheme that seems too good to be true, it definitely is. Bear in mind that many companies don't even offer any kind of pension scheme (except for the one they've been forced to offer due to recent changes) or any real contribution. If you're making any significant AVC's on any pension, particularly early on, who do you think is using that money? Hint: not you, and you won't be for some time as you're not of retirement age. You just hope it'll come to fruition later on. Do your homework, spread the risk, and don't put all your eggs in one basket.

It's an absolute disgrace that staff can be shafted in this way. But keep in mind the old phrase - if it sounds too good to be true, it probably is.

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Microsoft Surface laptop: Is this your MacBook Air replacement?

andy 103

Re: Macbook Air replacement my arse

"You have to "jailbreak" that too, by installing bootcamp and a copy of Windows"

Well in my case, I haven't, and don't need to.

I understand some people run software where there's no non-Windows equivalent. But I don't think for a moment they are the majority of users. What software are you running, out of interest, that has no such equivalent? Bearing in mind the article mentions business users and students, much of what they use has been ported to some sort of web-based application anyway, so a decent browser is all you need (which again is a reason I wouldn't want to be tied to anything which suggests Edge is the only option!).

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andy 103

Re: Still in two minds about the ports..

It's like this - 13 years ago I had a Toshiba laptop that had a serial port, parallel port and even an infrared sensor.

One could argue that all of those have their uses.

However, times change. I've moved on and adapted....

Last time I bought a TV I didn't say, oooh the lack of a SCART socket or S-Video could cause me serious limitations? Not unless I was being a pedantic, backward thinking tosser.

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andy 103
FAIL

Macbook Air replacement my arse

There are 2 of these sat on a desk about 10ft away from me. They look (at least from the side) like my Macbook Air. On closer inspection, they still look quite a lot like my Macbook Air.

But...

They run a shitty OS which you have to "jailbreak" to get a slightly less shitty OS. This is aimed at business users and students? Can't see many of them bothering. They just want to do their spreadsheets or look at porn in a decent browser. In contrast, my Macbook Air has software which lets me just get on with my work without any fannying around (no pun intended). Oh, and it's 2 years old as well, and still runs fine.

What are MS going to do next, come up with some sort of iPhone killer/copy? At least come up with your own ideas, and make sure they aren't half baked and over priced.

I know The Reg hates Apple but saying this is some kind of Macbook Air replacement or rival is just completely misguided. They're very late to the party and haven't come up with anything new or innovative. It's just new and innvoative by THEIR piss poor standards.

Now excuse me, I'm going to polish up my 'Nicks' trainers and head over to the gym with the cool kids. The cool kids, and me.

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Currys PC World rapped after Knowhow Cloud ad ruled to be 'misleading'

andy 103
WTF?

At Currys/PC World...We start with..bullshit

Curry's don't even have the required skills to sell a toaster.

Why would you trust them with cloud storage (or indeed anything to do with your data)?

If anything, it just goes to back up (no pun intended) that these people know precisely jack shit about what they are selling.

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Moneysupermarket fined £80,000 for spamming seven million customers

andy 103
Meh

If you'd like to opt-out of this...

...untick the ticked tick box to not not receive emails that you will not recieve if you don't untick the ticked tick box that's currently unticked but will be ticked if you don't untick it.

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The life and times of Surface, Microsoft's odds-defying fondleslab

andy 103
FAIL

Stick to a given set of hardware, and software that works

Things most people (particularly non-geeks) want:

1. Reliable hardware - i.e. they don't have to return it because the hard drive or some component died after 2 months.

2. Reliable software - if it shows any bootup or error messages, forget it.

3. Something which looks aesthetically pleasing.

They want the whole package. Not to have to know about different vendors or manufacturers offerings.

And everyone acts surprised about why MacBooks have sold so well!

Instead of letting world + dog put together a bunch of random components in different cases, use the same set of hardware to produce a given model. Make sure the software is free of errors or incompatibility with said hardware (easier when you know exactly what the hardware is).

Microsoft have finally started to grasp the concept of you cannot just throw any old shit into a plastic case, install a buggy OS and expect people to put up with it. The trouble is, they have a reputation for doing just that, especially with all the Surface crap that came before this.

You can bash Apple all you want, but nobody else has come close to giving people what they really want in terms of a laptop, or tablet + keyboard combo. And when I say "people" I don't mean just people who read The Reg. I mean ordinary, every day people.

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Male escort says he gave up IT to do something more meaningful

andy 103
Happy

"I get to make a genuine difference to people's lives"

"I get to make a genuine difference to people's lives - a small number to be sure, but it's something that IT never allowed me to do,"

On a serious note, that's why a lot of people give up when they're working in I.T. Because they are rarely thanked for what they do, and it's often hard for them to see how what they do impacts in a positive (or negative!) way for their clients. This is especially true of developers in large organisations. I know some amazing developers who have gone on to do other things - albeit not escorting - for this very reason. I'm lucky because I'm finally working in an organisation where they really appreciate and value what you do. It makes a world of difference and I've never worked anywhere with such low staff turnover. I'm sure other people will have had experiences both ways (no escorting-based pun intended).

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Ex-NASA bod on Gwyneth Paltrow site's 'healing' stickers: 'Wow. What a load of BS'

andy 103
WTF?

@45RPM

Sorry but whenever anyone starts talking about their home audio/HIFI setup - you're really no better than Paltrow et al.

There's never been so much bullshit talked especially when it comes to cables and interconnects with HIFI enthusiast twats. Essentially all that matters is this - if it sounds good to you, great. Nobody else needs to know, or gives a shit, what set up you use. In fact this applies to most other things people discuss on this site - if you're happy using your custom made Linux PC then great for you, if you use a Mac and it works for you, that's fine. What does it matter to anyone else, and why do you think they care what you specifically use or do?

It's the amount of BS that's talked by such people (including Paltrow) that really gets on peoples tits. If she said I'm selling these stickers and they are a blatant rip off and have no real magical properties, I'd actually have more respect for her and be more likely to buy them!

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Brit uni blabs students' confidential information to 298 undergrads

andy 103

Re: 3. Someone - with access - exports data, and emails it to 2

"The problem is not being able to send the data - the problem is the usual lack of attention to context and detail that makes this kind of mistake possible."

True. But it largely comes down to convenience for either the sender or recipient. Imagine if the recipient was sent a link to the secure system and they didn't have a login. They reply to the sender telling them they can't access it. Even if the sender can set them a login up, the sender doesn't want to deal with that "problem". So they just send the data in a format they know the recipient can open with no problem. In a similar way, people with legitimate access might say, oh I cba logging in to that, just send it me in something I can open directly. it happens ALL the time in business, trust me, I've seen it first hand in many different organisations - especially ones where it should not.

Even if people are aware of what they're doing is wrong or against protocol, they will still do it, because they don't want (short term) hassle - usually from the recipient(s).

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andy 103

And so it continues

Who's seen a scenario like this before:

1. Company invests in a system where its staff have to login to access certain data. The point being, anyone who should be able to access the data has access to the system, and nobody else.

2. Someone (who may or may not have access to the system) requests some data.

3. Someone - with access - exports data, and emails it to 2.

4. You've completely negated the point of 1.

Unfortunately people will always choose "convenience" over policy, or what's right. Until they personally get in trouble. But you know, they rarely do. And so it continues.

And as for all that "this email is confidential so don't open it if it's not really for you" bullshit at the bottom. Yeah, good luck with that. That's a bit like saying if you find my PIN number written on the back of my card, please don't type it into an ATM. Too late at that point I'm afraid.

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Samsung releases 49-inch desktop monitor with 32:9 aspect ratio

andy 103

Retina Display still wins

27" iMac with Retina Display.... 5120 x 2880

Second monitor running in whatever resolution I want. Useful for testing for users with shit resolution screens, for example.

Width is useless unless you have the height to match so no idea what Samsung are thinking.

My iMac is a refurb model and the second monitor wasn't much. The entire thing didn't cost that much more than this Samsung monitor alone!

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Banking websites are 'littered with trackers' ogling your credit risk

andy 103

Re: Are there any legitimate uses for client side scripts on a banking website?

"jumping from field to field when filling in a form"

tabindex in the HTML?

"calendar to select a date"

http://www.html5tutorial.info/html5-date.php - although this won't work in older browsers. Maybe degrade it back to using a series of dropdowns (day, month, year)?

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andy 103

Re: Are there any legitimate uses for client side scripts on a banking website?

"when someone enters "100/23" they may try to transfer 10023.00 instead of 100.23"

Oh dear. That's exactly why I mentioned server side validation in the original post. You can still post the value "100/23" from the form but the validation on the server should check that's a legitimate monetary value (which it isn't, as it contains a /). I take the point that you might stop them posting it *at all* by using client side validation, but the principle still applies that the server should sanitize then validate all user input from forms anyway, so it's kind of redundant.

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andy 103

Are there any legitimate uses for client side scripts on a banking website?

Just wondering - and may well be wrong - but what would be a legitimate use for any client side scripting on a banking web application?

Validation? Hell no. It may be used to enhance the UI, but should obviously be being done server-side.

Ajax? I'd rather have a slower experience with full page reloads and everything done server-side.

UI / UX enhancements? I don't need the developers to give Chrome a boner. Just serve the plain HTML and style it with CSS. We don't need any fading and transition bullshit thanks.

Erm, can't think of many other uses for client side js... Please can someone expand on this? I honestly don't see why you'd have to use any client side scripting. If you're showing people their balance, or they are submitting (posting) a form, why not just let the server side application take care of it all? Modern web developers will cite UX no doubt, but I'm pretty sure you can still build a full application with absolutely no client side scripting... Unless anyone has 2 cents (no pun intended) otherwise?

If this were the case you should be able to use every banking app with js completely disabled...but you can't.

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andy 103

Yeah but...

... as with most things, all of this is stated in the small print. It's just that nobody bothers to read it and then complains and acts shocked when this sort of thing happens.

You know when you get one of this "annoying" Cookie Policy notices and just dismiss it? Well that's where they're telling you more about what they're doing, but you're too annoyed to bother reading it.

*cough* https://www.theregister.co.uk/Profile/cookies/ *cough*

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BA IT systems failure: Uninterruptible Power Supply was interrupted

andy 103

Re: A data or application problem most likely

"Do you know something we don't? There are a thousand ways and more this could have started with a power failure."

No, I don't. However consider all of this....

1. Assume there was a power failure at the primary DC.

2. The primary DC has backup/UPS power - why doesn't that work? The article suggests *maybe* the main power and backup were applied simultaneously causing the servers to use 480V. Fair enough.

3. How does (2) affect what happens at the secondary DC? Why does exactly the same thing happen on a redundant system which is designed to mitigate against such problems occurring at one DC?

If the power management is also controlled via software, that is a data/application problem, which hasn't been tested - if you are sending the "wrong" data to the secondary DC it will only have the same results, and replicate the problem there!

I can't see how this would just come down to a "freak" power incident (nobody else in the area has reported it either) that knocked out two physically separate data centres, whereby the UPS also failed to work. It's just too coincidental and convenient.

It's more a case of whatever happened at DC1 was mirrored at DC2 - either by humans - or by data sent from one site to the other.

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andy 103

A data or application problem most likely

This is the biggest load of BS ever. There's no way this started with a power failure at all.

What's more likely is there was a data/application error that they'd never encountered (planned for, or tested) and someone decided to kill the power ("have you tried turning it off and on again"). Because the systems at the other sites mirror the one that had the problem, they will then have wondered why killing the power did absolutely nothing to fix the problem. So then they'll have killed the power at the other sites and tried to power it back up. As the applications came back online they may have been faced with loads of data corruption which were possibly fixed either manually and/or with a combination of tools built into their applications.

The article quotes someone as saying a data problem is easier to fix than a hardware one. No idea where you got that total bullshit from. It depends on the circumstances. Even if you had to replace some hardware, that can generally be done faster than trying to fix a set of applications with corrupt or otherwise invalid files that are all trying to talk to one another.

And as for "this all happened in the UK and isn't outsourced" - who developed and tested the applications? Oh yeah, outsourced Indian workers. *Slow clap*

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Massive scale, tight security – what's not to love about Kubernetes 1.6? Well...

andy 103

Can someone explain Kubernetes in simple terms?

It seems to be a buzz-name that's being banded about, but never explains what real world "problem" it actually addresses. The Kubernetes website is piss poor at explaining what it does, as are various other articles.

There was an article about DevOps hype on here the other week, and it seems very much to fit into that category of bullshit people use when they want to pretend they're very clever or using something which fails to address any real life problem in a significant way.

(No, this isn't a sarcastic post)

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DevOps hype? Sometimes a pizza really is just a pizza

andy 103

Re: Unfographic

I think it's very much an intended way of spelling it, and you have worked out the meaning all by yourself. Well done have a cookie.

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New iPad revealed. Big price cut is main feature

andy 103

Missing the point

I've said this before, and I'll say it again. Apple could charge 2 grand for a tablet, or even a phone, and still sell them.

It's to do with the brand perception and the fact that for the average person using their technology, it does "just work". Nothing to do with how good the technology is, as such, or whether they're pushing any boundaries.

That's why when you get people coming out saying oh well I could build you a Linux tablet and you'd have thousands of pounds left to spend on a charity of your choice, and there's no dodgy tax avoidance company attitude involved... nobody cares.

Apple's best asset is the fact they know how to *sell* products - it's never been about whether they're groundbreaking! Selling and making money is what they do. This is called "a successful business" :D

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Today's WWW is built on pillars of sand: Buggy, exploitable JavaScript libs are everywhere

andy 103

Re: Stop obsessing over JavaScript

"The only think I can think of is timing-sensitivity"

I understand what you mean, but I think there's this perception of a need to mollycoddle end-users. For example if you're booking tickets and it says "you have 10 mins to complete this transaction", does a serious buyer really need a countdown? Most people know roughly how long 10 mins is, and if they're prepared to go ahead and complete a transaction (a serious buyer) they will find a way. Why do they need a countdown timer for that? And conversely if it's someone who isn't a serious buyer, they just get an error message if they submit the page, say 20 mins later. But they've been informed at a prior step that that would happen :)

I build web applications for a living and I'm really against all this js bullshittery, even though it's "the thing to do". If end-users need so much hand holding, they're possibly not the kind of people you want to do business with anyway. Although I accept that's very much a web developer's way of looking at things!

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andy 103

Stop obsessing over JavaScript

About 10 years ago I worked at a web development agency. They were building an application and some of the developers wanted to try and go down the ajax, js-heavy route, because it was trendy.

I had a long conversation with them about how the particular application could use absolutely no Javascript at all, and all be done in server side languages. The only caveat was they'd have to have the page reload rather than use ajax to get a "smoother" experience.

I firmly believe that there's nothing wrong with doing full page reloads and writing sites/applications that use no js at all. It's become relied on for everything from validation (which you can obviously disable, by disabling javascript) to ajax requests (not needed as you can just reload the page) and transitions/effects (which few people actually care about). I honestly don't know why so many people are obsessed with javascript.

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Linus Torvalds explains how to Pull without jerking his chain

andy 103

git shit

I think what he's moaning about is the fact that pretty much anyone who uses git - myself included - finds it incredibly tedious. But of course Lord Torvalds won't have that, because it's another one of his creations.

If you search for "git man pages generator" there's a web page which generates random gibberish, however, it's so similar to the *real* documentation that you can't really tell it's satire.

Maybe the tools you've come up with are a load of bullshit, and that's why people are going against your particular way of working, Linus?

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Java? Nah, I do JavaScript, man. Wise up, hipster, to the money

andy 103

Re: Java is absolutely crap for web applications

"Since when did someones salary equate to the suitability of the product they were using?"

I'm not even going to carry this on because clearly you have no idea about modern application development in a web-based environment. To answer your last question though, this particular article is about careers and employment.

You've already acknowledged an advantage of PHP in terms of rapid development. In terms of PHP's suitability, I beg to differ, but as it's what I've done professionally for years and also used Java for web apps, I'm pretty well versed in making that call.

The end result is that you have a language which - if used properly - is great for web application development, and I've confirmed I get a significant salary for making applications with it. In terms of my career then, why would I want to use a language which makes things more difficult?! PHP's simple and get's the job done, whilst also getting paid a lot to use it? Yes, I'm fine with this!

Maybe you like pissing into the wind and get a boner over reading about data types... but some of us have a career AND time to have a life outside what we do professionally.

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andy 103

Re: Java is absolutely crap for web applications

@boltar - You might want to consider some of the applications and services which are based on PHP before you go mouthing off. Seriously, go and have a look, it's not 2000 anymore and things have moved on somewhat. A "toy language" indeed... utter rubbish. They certainly don't pay me toy money to develop using it! And as for "making pretty pages"... that's front-end development, not PHP. Idiot.

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andy 103

@wolfetone

As someone who has been in your position I've got an alternative that involves no Java at all...

In PHP roles you are correct that there is a ceiling salary which is lower than in other areas of development. These types of jobs are typically advertised by web agencies, and the market is frankly a little flooded, hence the lower than expected salaries.

Look into web based Software Engineering roles. Make sure you know more than just PHP - look particularly at frontend development frameworks (Bootstrap, jquery), database management, and web server administration (Apache, etc). If you have all of those skills combined you will get a lot further than just being "a PHP developer".

There is a bright future in web based application development, and Java-based technology is absolutely awful when it comes to web apps, IMO.

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andy 103
WTF?

Java is absolutely crap for web applications

I don't know why Java even gets a mention when it comes to web applications. To any competent web developer (i.e. those of us who have used other non-Java technologies) it's an absolute joke.

The article mentions developing a mortgage application. Whatever the requirements of that, I guarantee, a Java-based web framework would yield absolutely appalling results - in terms of bloat, time taken to develop, maintanence costs, etc - even than using the simplest of PHP frameworks.

The only people who disagree with this are people who don't know any better, people who think Java is the shit because that's what they've spent their career working with.

If you're a developer or software engineer, you really need to realise what year it is, where things are going (i.e. web-based applications and software) and learn some new skills.

Java for web applications? Think I'd rather cut my balls off with a rusty knife.

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Samsung phones, Apple's iPhones are 'overpriced', says top Huawei exec

andy 103

WhoAreWe?

It's all about business.

It's hard to take the piss out of Samsung and Apple when you work for a company that sounds, aptly, like "who are we".

It doesn't matter if Apple charged 2 grand for a phone, they'd still sell them. Same for Samsung.

People don't seem to understand that there's not an exact correlation between how technically good/bad something is, and how popular it is, or how well it sells.

Once you understand that mindset, you might be more profitable than those you are taking the piss out of. See also - people who slate Microsoft. Well, they've done pretty well financially, so maybe they have some idea of how to run a business.

Maybe some companies understand marketing and branding better than others. You can ignore this if you want, but nobody's even going to know that much about you to care, if you ever come up with something "good".

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