* Posts by chr0m4t1c

919 posts • joined 18 Aug 2009

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Fujitsu strikes are OFF – it's not the 1970s after all

chr0m4t1c

Re: dispute over pay centred on the gender gap that exists in the organisation

Unfortunately, the lack of gender equality in IT isn't something that the unions can easily address.

Last time we hired in my area (a long time ago), we had exactly zero female applicants for two positions, so it's not like we could have even looked at trying to address the mostly male bias in the unit.

By contrast, the last place I worked at had about 35% women and often did have a bit of a mix for job applications. Both are large IT firms.

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Annoyingly precocious teen who ruined Trek is now an asteroid

chr0m4t1c

They're all over the place

>The real problem was lazy writers.

Star Trek was quite bad for lazy writing, but to be fair they're far from alone.

Actually, the one that always winds me up the most that seems to have originated in Star Trek, but is now all over Sci-Fi, is solving problems by "just reversing the polarity of X".

Since reversing the polarity translates as "put the batteries in the wrong way" you can at least have some fun by mentally swapping the two phrases to turn the script into a comedy.

"Of course! We can use the tractor beam to push the asteroid away by putting the batteries in the wrong way."

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Tesla touts battery that turns a Model S into 'third fastest ever' car

chr0m4t1c

Re: Tesla's progress is amazing

>Anybody in the UK buying a Tesla S from 2 April 2017 and will be paying £310 road tax each year for the first five years

Actually that's not 100% clear. From the VED website: "Cars with a list price in excess of £40,000 will incur a supplement of £310 on their SR for the first 5 years in which a SR is paid.".

The Tesla doesn't pay SR because it's a zero emissions vehicle. Or, strictly speaking, it has an SR of £0. So does that count as paying or not paying?

The attached document looks like it might be a bit clearer and does seem to imply that you would pay the £310, but it's hardly cut and dried.

Also a bit woolly on how things like optional extras are handled. If you buy a car that's £39,995 list, but the opt for an extra that adds £500 to the price, does that tip you over into the supplement? Seems a bit draconian, especially as you're likely to negotiate a discount of a few thousand anyway.

If optional extras aren't considered, then I can see a lot of manufacturers offering engine upgrades and the like as "optional extras".

Start with a BMW 318, optionally upgrade the body, engine and equipment, take delivery of a 750 with an original list price of around £25k and £40k of extras.

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Three non-obvious reasons to Vote Leave on the 23rd

chr0m4t1c

>Ask Sir James Dyson if justice can be seen to be done

Can I ask him why he expected the testing to be changed when he couldn't prove that he had a test that gave consistent reproducible results to replace it with instead?

I've just read the ruling, it basically says: "Yes, bag-less cleaners are objectively different and the Commission should consider treating them differently, but your test didn't provide repeatable results from different laboratories".

I'd say that was quite reasonable, TBH.

Oh and the UK leaving the EU wouldn't change things for Dyson's sales in Europe, so you've picked a terrible example there Andrew.

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chr0m4t1c

Re: Three simple points.

1. I don't fully understand how the European Parliament works either, that's *my* fault, not the fault of the EU. I did, however, vote in the European Elections - unlike 65% of the UK. You're right that it's an open and shut argument, but you're wrong that it's undemocratic. Sometimes when people vote you get results that you /personally/ don't like. Tony Blair, David Cameron, take your pick. The results don't suddenly become undemocratic just because you don't like them or if you didn't bother to vote in the first place.

2. When the choice is between something that people know (but may not like 100%) and an unknown alternative, they do tend towards sticking with the existing situation - exactly like they did with the Scottish referendum. But you're right, we shouldn't boil the frog slowly, we should straight into the mincer.

3. I you really think that's what's going to happen, then don't bother voting at all as it won't make any difference.

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Microsoft cancels Remain speech after death of Labour MP

chr0m4t1c

>The majority of British people had a better quality of life before we joined the EU.

Really?!?

Absolutely nothing else could have caused a change in quality of life since then?

In 40 years?

I would like to see any facts that support your supposition that the *majority* of British people had a better quality of life 40+ years ago and it was *because* of EU membership that things got worse (if they have).

You do realise that we don't have access to a parallel universe where the UK didn't join the EU so we can compare outcomes, don't you? You're comparing what did happen to a scenario that exists entirely in your imagination, which is clearly complete nonsense.

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chr0m4t1c

Because if interest rates go up, people can't afford to borrow as much so they can't afford to pay as much.

Depends where you are in the market, but some segments will see a reduction in demand as result meaning anyone who *needs* to sell may have to accept less, which leads to the perception that equivalent properties are worth less.

You can set the price you want, but if the market doesn't agree with you then you ain't selling. You only have control within market limits, you're deluding yourself if you think you can set whatever price you want. Why do you think that areas with lower demand (like the north of England) have lower prices?

Personally I'd love to be able to sell my place for £100m and then retire to the Bahamas, but I doubt I'd get any takers.

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Apple and Android wearables: What iceberg? It’s full steam ahead!

chr0m4t1c

Re: subtle leap-froggingatch

Unfortunately watchOS 2.2 came out in March, so calling it 2.1 might lead to confusion.

They're calling it 3.0 because they've made cosmetic changes to the user interface, performance changes to the main OS and introduced a bunch of new APIs for developers to use. I'd say it was fair to call it a new major release rather than 2.3, because a point release doesn't usually have anything more than half a dozen new features and some bug fixes.

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Patent trolls, innovation and Brexit: What the FT won't tell you

chr0m4t1c

I never knew we had so many astrologers

"This imaginary future that I want you to agree with is better than this other imaginary future that I don't want you to agree with."

Could we get a breakdown of the author's previous predictions and accuracy so we can properly gauge the author's ability for any future articles like this, please El Reg?

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Troll seeks toll because iPhones work

chr0m4t1c
Joke

Re: Let me get this straight....

>since the death of SCO, has the most vicious, underhanded, money grabbing, uncaring, vitriolic legal departments of the modern world?

They're suing Apple, not Disney.

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Brexit would pinch UK tech spend but the EU wouldn't care – survey

chr0m4t1c

Re: Brexit...

Also, vote for exit and the entire reason for Nigel Farage existing vanishes.

So there's your real choice, Boris for PM or a continuation of Nigel.

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UK can finally 'legalise home taping' without bringing in daft new tax

chr0m4t1c

Re: The "right" to listen to music

>No mention of a licence.

You'd better check.

I used to think, but if you dig out your microscope and read the tiny print (can be on the label, booklet or cover) you'll usually find that you have been granted a license for personal use of whatever is on the medium and normally excluding public performance (so a radio station can't just pay £10 for a CD to play on the air as many times as they want, for example).

I must admit, I was quite surprised when I looked into this stuff a few years ago.

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Samsung shoves IT arm into connected cars, hires new hands

chr0m4t1c

Deeper joy. I imagine Samsung are doing this because Apple are rumoured to be working on the same thing and they want to get something out first.

When is Apple's car rumoured to launch? 2020? Expect Samsung's in 2019 and for it to include something technically quite impressive that makes you go "wow", but which is completely useless in the real world - like being able to unlock it by break-dancing or being able to slide your 52" living room TV into the seats to provide rear screen entertainment.

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Facebook conjures up a trap for the unwary: scanning your camera for your friends

chr0m4t1c

Re: Yeah.. No thanks

That still leaves one ear....

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Zombie iOS APIs used to slurp private data

chr0m4t1c

Re: Well done, Apple

Yeah, those idiots, not thinking of every possible scenario that could lead to a breach and securing against it.

Unlike......er.......um......

Hang on, I'll get back to you.

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'Blood on the carpet' ahead for outsourcers, says analyst research

chr0m4t1c

Re: Good.

Don't forget that while China is the largest manufacturer of electronics it isn't the only one by a long way. If they suddenly decided to stop supplying the rest of the world there would be shortages and price rises in the short term but long term new plants would be built to take up the demand.

Chip manufacture goes on around the world, before China the big players were in Japan and Taiwan, now you have South Korea to add to that mix. Those are only the biggest players. There's a chip fab plant around five miles from where I live in the UK, for example.

Ramping up capacity is what takes time, these days the clean room environment that's needed takes around four to five years to establish once a plant is built meaning that you're looking at around a six year lead.

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Hutchison will float O2 … as soon as the Three merger is done

chr0m4t1c

"Consumers don't make their decisions based on broadband speed or network coverage or service reliability or customer service - just price - and so the only winning business strategy is to cut costs and prices"

No, they don't, that's quite patently obvious with just a cursory glance at what is available on the market and the number of customers with each supplier. Only some people decide purely on price.

It is true that there are an unhealthy number of business people who believe this rubbish and end up destroying perfectly healthy businesses in the pursuit of the lowest prices.

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Doctor Who returns to our screens next week – so, WHO is the worst Time Lord of them all?

chr0m4t1c

Re: Having met two of them...

>For a long time there seemed to be a media consensus that Peter Davison's portrayal was a >disappointing, lightweight followup to Tom Baker that started the show's slow decline in the 80s. It's >interesting that this seems to have changed in the past few years, with far more people taking a >positive view.

I think that is because Tom Baker has such a huge presence, anyone following him (apart from perhaps Brian Blessed) was always going to look really flat in comparisson.

Like many here, I think McCoy was probably one of the better doctors, but had both the worst scripts and production values so was always going to be in trouble.

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Witness Apple's iPhone-iPad extravapalooza here in our no-hate zone

chr0m4t1c
Joke

OMG, I never noticed that!

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It's still 2015, and your Windows PC can still be pwned by a webpage

chr0m4t1c

Re: Hmm

>Just after DOS 6 then?

Not if you're old enough to remember DOS 4.

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Well, what d'you know: Raising e-book prices doesn't raise sales

chr0m4t1c

I think they're pretty good examples that price is not the only factor that matters to people if you're not on an especialy constrained budget.

Why people make the decision to purchase certain products or from certain companies may not be immediately clear, or may not even make much sense if you don't share those views/values/whatever.

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Class action launched against Facebook over biometric slurpage

chr0m4t1c

Re: @ Lost all faith ... I really hope this succeeds.

> how do you know if they have collected your biometric information?

When the TwatSpanners(TM) in advertising attach cameras to those colourful LED/LCD/Plasma/whatever advertising boards in shopping centres and then match the camera data to the FB data in order to personalise the adverts to you as you walk by.

I guarantee there are people working in that industry right now who have literally no clue why anyone would be against such a thing.

I think we should lobby our respective parliamentary representatives to have "working in advertising" correctly classified as the mental disorder that it is, then we can help these people with their debilatating social problems instead of villifying them.

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Parallels Desktop 11 brings Windows 10 and Cortana to Mac

chr0m4t1c

Re: Ransomware

I've been running Windows 10 under El Capitan with Parallels 10 without any apparent problems, so I'd hope it doesn't magically "break" when the full version of El Capitan ships.

With previous OSX releases I usually found that Parallels wouldn't work, once because of an API change that fundementally broke it, but mostly because something moved or permissions changed - in which case there were often work-arounds.

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Android apps are flooding on to jailbroken Win10 phones

chr0m4t1c

Re: Remember OS/2 Warp

To be fair that wasn't the only problem they had or daft decision they made, for me the biggest standouts were:

- Launching with minimum memory requirements of 4Mb (yes, Mb!), but really needing 6Mb just after an earthquake took on of the world's larged memory fabrication plants offline causing memory prices to more than quadruple. That's not IBM's fault, just unfortunate.

- Launching without a TCP/IP stack just as the internet was beginning to get traction.

- Trying to charge £95 for the TCP/IP stack when they made it available about a year later.

So just as the home PC market kicked into high gear with machines available around the £600 mark, you needed to spend around £2,000 on a machine that could run OS/2.

They did eventually realise their errors and around late 1996 you could finally get a decent OS/2 setup for around that £600, but by that time Windows 95 was too well established.

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Have an iPhone? Mac? Just about anything else Apple flogs? Patch now

chr0m4t1c

If you draw a Venn diagram containing "People with money" and "People running 4+ year old iOS devices", I'd bet the intersection is quite small.

So while those older devices are vulnerable, it's increasing less likely that anyone would bother targeting them.

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Exploding Power Bars: EE couldn't even get the CE safety mark right

chr0m4t1c

Re: You've got to love that quote from them...

I was left with the impression that EE don't know the difference between refute and repudiate.

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Huge explosion kills 44+ in China, blasts nearby supercomputer offline

chr0m4t1c

I need to get out more

Was I the only one to think "Praxis!" when I first heard of this?

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ANIMALS being CUT UP to make Apple Watch straps

chr0m4t1c

Re: In other (not) news

You can buy ostrich burgers in Iceland now, along with kangaroo, buffalo and crocodile since they started stocking Kezie meats.

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Another day, another stunning security flaw in Android – this time hitting 55% of mobes

chr0m4t1c

Re: Is this the same Android...

Didn't that guy work for Adobe in the Flash team a few years ago?

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Tesla still burning cash: each car loses $4,000

chr0m4t1c

Re: Quite simple where they are going wrong circa demand

>Marketing means understanding what people want.

Model S currently outsells the i8 by more than 30 to 1, seems like they have a pretty good handle on what people want.

But that's a pointless comparison, the Model S is in the luxury saloon sector of the market, people generally aren't saying "Should I buy a 911 or Range Rover? They're about the same price".

Telsa have understandably gone for a conservative design for their first high-volume vehicles, when you're only offering one model you need it to appeal (or at least not repel) as many customers as possible. So far I've heard many comments that the car is too expensive, but I haven't heard anyone say they don't want one because of the way it looks.

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ROBO-TENTACLE with mind of its own wields deadly electrical power – turns on Tesla car

chr0m4t1c

So here's what El Reg missed while doing background research

This is intended for installation with domestic Tesla chargers.

It's intended for use in conjunction with their Autopilot system and an automatic garage door; you park on your driveway, then use the Tesla app on your phone to tell the car to put itself in the garage at which point it also puts itself on charge.

When you want to go out, you can tell the car to meet you on the driveway.

If you sync your calendar with the car it will even pre-warm or cool the interior and be ready for you 15 minutes before you have to leave - even checking the prevailing traffic conditions and letting you know to leave early if necessary.

Yes, there are a million things that could go wrong and a million scenarios (particularly in the UK) where you just can't make use of this technology, but I still think it's pretty cool if they can get it working.

Personally, I have two immediate problems with this,

a) I can't afford a Tesla

b) I don't have a driveway

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Your security is just dandy, Apple Pay, but here comes Android

chr0m4t1c

Re: Existing cards

In order to do it with Apple Pay (and similar), the skimmer would have to validate the transaction on the device, which you would probably notice. At the very least it's no longer skimming.

In addition to that the authorization token generated by the device is single use, so they couldn't repeatedly charge the account from a single skim like they can now.

I would also note that cards that issue single-use tokens are in the pipeline already, which will make skimming less lucrative in future for the same reason.

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KERR-PAO! Reddit interim CEO Ellen quits amid Redditor revolt

chr0m4t1c

Re: Trump

Neat trick that, getting everyone to concentrate on his hair like that's the /worst/ thing about him.

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All right, who guessed 'street mapping' for those mystery Apple vans? Congratulations

chr0m4t1c

1) It's not going live yet, they're collecting data.

2) The shows where they're going to be *this month* not *ever*. Beware of bad journalism.

Will they cover everywhere when they launch? Probably not, but then as someone who lives in an area that wasn't covered by Streetview for the first two or three years I would say that Streetview's initial coverage was not "good" when it launched.

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Everything Apple touted at WWDC – step inside our no-hype-zone™

chr0m4t1c

Re: Search

These are not contradictory things, the OS looks at data on the phone to match the number, it doesn't send the data to Apple for recording and analasys.

In reality it's not that much different from looking in your contacts so that a name can be displayed for an incoming number.

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Apple to tailor Swift into fully open-source language – for Linux, too

chr0m4t1c

Re: Just like FaceTime...

Unfortunately, VirnetX lobbed a sueball and won the case. Apple had to re-write the way FT operates in such a way that avoids those patents and in the process made it worthless as an OS project.

IIRC the patents were around P2P connections used in the old version, the re-write means the connections are now made through a central server.

So you'd either have to OS the server software as well - and rely on people setting up their own servers - or you'd have to route all of your FT communications through Apple's servers.

Neither of those options strike me as something you'd really want.

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Close encounter: Apple Macs invade the business world

chr0m4t1c

Re: really!

Where are you looking?

Dell don't appear to offer the 7020 with a 1Tb drive (only 500Gb) and when you add a monitor it comes to £1142 (inc VAT). The dell website offers £335 off at the moment, but you can get discounts and better support from Apple if you speak to the business team instead of just buying off the website.

Also, you're comparing a consumer offering with a business offering.

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Can't wait to bonk with Apple? Then try an Android phone

chr0m4t1c

Re: hmmm

You're confusing availability with adoption.

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It's official: David Brents are the weakest link in phishing attacks

chr0m4t1c

Re: Time for a Register checklist?

I read somewhere that the grammar any typographical mistakes are deliberate.

Supposedly it makes people who wouldn't fall for the scam ignore the email in the first place as they correctly identify it as dodgy, thus allowing you to end up with a barrel of "easy mark" fish that you can then shoot.

I guess it's a bit like those police sting operations where they catch people on the run by telling them they've won something and then arresting them when they come to collect.

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Steely wonder? It's blind to 4G and needs armour: Samsung Galaxy S6

chr0m4t1c

Re: Signal issues

Maybe he was just holding it wrong....

(Runs away)

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EE springs Wi-Fi phone calls on not-spot sufferers, Tube riders

chr0m4t1c

Re: It will only work on EE branded phones, too

As I understand it, MS and Apple have put the functionality into the firmware already (or it will be in the next release), but some Android devices haven't.

EE are putting the functionality into their "branded" firmware they put on the locked handsets they sell.

It's not clear if the functionality will work if you happen to own a handset that does have the functionality but which isn't EE branded, or if they would block it.

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Scrooges rejoice! Beancounters find formula for perfect Xmas party

chr0m4t1c

What about the Christmas spirit approach?

If you've already won, pull a cracker with someone who's lost and give them the prize whatever the outcome.

It's Christmas, it's mean to be about sharing.

Jeez, talk about missing the point....

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BT to gobble EE for £12.5bn – BTEE phone home

chr0m4t1c

Re: Everything Everywhere except signal in my phone

>Thanks, but after hearing about this I won't be staying an EE customer for long

Are you not going to even wait to see if the deal gets done?

That said, I'm an EE customer and I do not wish to do business with BT either. Personally, I'll probably stay with EE until they try to sell me BT line.

The real problem for me is that we're gradually reaching a point where I don't want to do business with any of the companies offering services that I need because of the buy-ups, so I may end up just having to lump it.

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Facebook injects CREEPY search engine into mobile app

chr0m4t1c

Re: FUCK 'EM

I fear you have it the wrong way around, this is to allow you to stalk others.

Deleting the app won't prevent anyone from stalking you, you need to delete your account.

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18 million iPHONE USERS HAVE NEVER BONKED to ApplePay

chr0m4t1c

Re: the thing tyhe banking world doesn't get is..

>Just think about how special a £50 note feels. It's more special than three £20 notes.

Not to me, I'll give you a £50 note for three £20 notes any time you want.

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chr0m4t1c

Re: UMA was great!

PTT was really badly explained (at least it was by Nokia). I remember getting my first phone that had PTT as a feature, but the description in the manual and on the marketing material just made it sound like a special button for one speed-dial number. So in the end, I just continued using the speed-dials I already had set up.

UMA is making a comeback now the support is in more handsets, I think EE are supposed to be deploying it soon, I expect the other networks will follow suit shortly - except for O2 who have invested in TuGo instead..

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Huawei: 'Nobody made any money in Windows Phone'

chr0m4t1c

Re: Sic transit gloria mundi

"Microsoft would do well to rebadge their mobile offering in an Xbox-like manner (although I can see Apple kicking off at "Xphone"), and re-invent themselves. The recent open-sourcing of .net was a step in the right direction, but there's still huge amounts of ground to make up."

They would have done about five years ago, but now they've started dragging repositioning X-Box closer to the Windows ecosystem, they're beginning to poison the brand.

I predict that at some point in the next 2-3 years, they'll add "Windows" to the X-Box brand, then be confused as the sales tank.

The Windows brand is toxic and its getting worse.

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Sick of the 'criminal' lies about pie? Lobby the government HERE

chr0m4t1c

Re: Ah, New Zealand...

>... home of the best meat pies that I've found on this planet. I particularly remember a venison pie >from Te Anau that was sublime.

This guy doesn't do venison, but he is trying to replicate the NZ pie experience: http://www.gourmetpie.co.uk/

He's doing a pretty good job, too. I bought some of his pies at a food event during August and they were all good, I plan to order some more as soon as the Christmas freezer is emptied at the end of the month.

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Wireless Power standards are like Highlanders: There can be only ONE

chr0m4t1c

It never ceases to amaze me

How can so many people be so clever and so dumb at the same time?

If they spent more time considering the public (whom they claim to care about) instead of how much money they can make from "their" standard, then we would have had all of this years ago.

Now?

Well if you want to get the mobile market going you will either have to get Apple on board (I know people will hate me saying that), or get a credible rumour going that Apple will be putting the tech in the next iThings so that Samsung jam it into their devices as fast as they can.

Tiny bit cynical, I know.

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Why Comrade Cameron went all Russell Brand on the UK’s mobile networks

chr0m4t1c

Re: 'Normal Collier'?

Different phenomona

Norman Collier is when you have dropouts so that you miss words or parts of words.

Dalek is when the data rate drops for voice so you still hear all of the words, but the caller sounds like they are speaking through a "dalek" voice changing microphone.

Record a voice and then encode it with successfully lower bitrates to hear the effect for yourself (you'll probably need to start at something like 80k and work down).

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