* Posts by Symon

1633 posts • joined 18 Aug 2009

Fat-thumbed dev slashes Samba security

Symon
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Stop

Re: Mitigation (Actual mitigation)

SELinux for the win.

https://access.redhat.com/security/cve/CVE-2017-7494

Mitigation

Any of the following:

SELinux is enabled by default and our default policy prevents loading of modules from outside of samba's module directories and therefore blocks the exploit

Mount the filesystem which is used by samba for its writable share using "noexec" option.

Add the parameter: nt pipe support = no to the [global] section of your smb.conf and restart smbd. This prevents clients from accessing any named pipe endpoints. Note this can disable some expected functionality for Windows clients.

https://stopdisablingselinux.com/

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8 out of 10 cats fear statistics – AI doesn't have this problem

Symon
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Pint

Re: The issue is a good percentage of the population doesn't grasp the concept of probability...

Well, on the other hand, even if the odds are stacked against you, there's still the pleasure of playing the game. In that sense, it's no different to anything else we pay for for enjoyment. I don't have to go to the pub and pay for beer to talk to the same people about the same things over and over. But I still do it for the pleasure of the experience, despite the hit on the wallet.

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Symon
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Alert

More data like this?

http://prefrontal.org/files/posters/Bennett-Salmon-2009.pdf

"Subject. One mature Atlantic Salmon (Salmo salar) participated in the fMRI study. The salmon was approximately 18 inches long, weighed 3.8 lbs, and was not alive at the time of scanning.

Task. The task administered to the salmon involved completing an open-ended mentalizing task. The salmon was shown a series of photographs depicting human individuals in social situations with a specified emotional valence. The salmon was asked to determine what emotion the individual in the photo must have been experiencing."

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Mouse sperm kept frozen in SPAAAAACE yields healthy pups

Symon
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Pint

"assisted reproductive technology"

I assume this won't "increase the chance of conception" in space?

https://youtu.be/h5a9rsxpO2c

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Vegemite tries to hijack Qantas name-our-planes competition

Symon
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Happy

Re: Other Australians

Clive James. He reminds me of Wilco Johnson, true bravery in the face of death, and then given a second chance with almost miraculous medical interventions.

https://www.theguardian.com/culture/2015/oct/10/clive-james-still-being-alive-is-embarrassing

Wilco:-

"October was my deadline," he says. "If I can use that word." "But October had come and gone," he grins, "and a friend of mine - who is both a photographer and a cancer doctor - became curious as to why I wasn't dead. And why I wasn't even sick."

http://www.gq-magazine.co.uk/article/wilko-johnson-cancer-interview

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Symon
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Black Helicopters

Re: Bruce

There is no plane six.

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‪There's a ransom-free fix for WannaCry‬pt. Oh snap, you've rebooted your XP box

Symon
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Thumb Up

Re: "the antithesis of a strong and stable operating system"

@katrinab. I hope your downvote was for not having a proper UPS.

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Nukes tests caused space weather, say NASA boffins

Symon
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Re: "a valve the size of a MOSFET, it would have a similar inherent vulnerability to EMI, "

"I can't think, why since you don't seem to know that MOSFETs (which is what all LSI digital is made of) are much more akin to valves than bipolar transistors, being voltage switched, not current switched devices."

I can't think why you don't seem to know the difference between resistance and impedance.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electrical_impedance#Resistance_vs_reactance

You have already pointed out that the gate of a MOSFET looks like a capacitor. In a real circuit, the gate is switching on and off. That charges and discharges the capacitor. When the gate is switching at 100's of MHz, the current soon mounts up. This is why your PC's CPU has a fucking great big piece of aluminium stuck to it to get rid of the heat generated.

Now, the same thing could apply to valve circuits. But here's the rub. Back in the day, valve circuits were big things with tiny gate currents switching very slowly, compared to modern logic circuits. This means that most of valve logic stuff is high voltages with tiny currents, connected by wires floating around in the air. The impedance of all these wires makes it a high impedance circuit, where the electric field dominates. Modern circuitry is switching like a bastard, pouring current into the tiny capacitors which are the gates of the MOSFETs. The connections between the components are printed onto sheets of fibre glass bonded in layers with ground planes next to the conductors, maybe 0.1mm away. This means in modern circuits, the conductors have an impedance of maybe 50 ohms. (Remember, impedance, not resistance) This makes these circuits low impedance, where the H-field dominates. Lots of current, low voltages. Remember, the impedance of free space is 377 ohms. Below that, the H-field dominates the electric field.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Impedance_of_free_space

Please let me know if you have any further questions you think I can answer for you, but before I sign off, one thing to bear in mind. Before advocating the use of 'reliable' valves over 'delicate' transistors (bipolar or FET types) do a bit of googling of MTBF.

https://books.google.co.uk/books?id=D4nLBQAAQBAJ&pg=PA6&lpg=PA6&dq=vacuum+tube+mtb#v=onepage&q&f=false

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Symon
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Re: "-460ghz-vacuum-transistor"

" Gate and the Drain and Source. From some angles this looks like a capacitor, with a very thin[] dielectric. "

In fact, from every angle! Keep this in mind.

"But the kind of big (Kiloamp) very fast current pulse of an EMP can punch holes through that oxide layer, which isroughly 1/10 the smallest feature size on a chip. In fact it can vaporize the layer."

No, it's voltage that breaks down a dielectric. Not current.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electrical_breakdown

One quick question for you. How does an EMP induce Kiloamp (sic) current pulses in circuitry? What's the coupling mechanism.

"Electrons move faster"

No-one gives a hoot about the speed of electrons in a circuit. They travel very slowly, a few µm/s.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Drift_velocity#Numerical_example

It's the speed of the electric field that matters.

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Symon
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Re: Fallout @bearbonez

Don Luttrell. 91 years old.

"LUTTRELL, Donald Allen Col Donald A. Luttrell, USAF (Ret) passed away on December 27, 2014 at Presbyterian Hospital of Dallas. He was born on September 27, 1923 in Hatfield, Arkansas"

http://www.legacy.com/obituaries/dallasmorningnews/obituary.aspx?pid=173687969

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/07/20/george-yoshitake-nuclear-test-five-5-men-nevada_n_1687233.html

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Symon
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Re: IIRC these were the tests that showed what EMP could do to electronics

Jeffy says:- "It's EMP. EMI is a different topic."

1) You're wrong. An EMP is a pulse of EMI. Although, EMI is also a record label. Is that what you meant?

2) "Seven satellites failed over the months following the test, as radiation damaged their solar arrays or electronics, including the first commercial relay communication satellite, Telstar, as well as the United Kingdom's first satellite, Ariel." So, the pulse didn't kill them. Have you been watching a lot of stuff like '24' and 'The Matrix'? Those EMPs are fictional. It's not like real life. In real life, we have little metal boxes. Full of ticky-tacky.

Jeffy says:- "Since valves the size of a MOSFET do not exist"

1) MOSFETs can be big, e.g. IPC302N20N3 is 30mm².

2) Tubes can be small, http://newatlas.com/nasa-vacuum-channel-transistor/22626/ which has 150nm feature size.

Jeffy says:- "the hard vacuum between the tube elements would be far more resistant to short circuits than a solid state medium."

Hahaha, good troll! How much do you think your 'hard' vacuum attenuates an electromagnetic field? And how much does it slow down 1MeV electrons? Oh, that's right, it doesn't.

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Symon
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Re: Tubes vs. transistors vulnerability

"I imagine it would wreak havoc with modern LSI electronics". LSI? Hello, grandad, the kids are using VLSI! Oh, I just checked, it's ULSI now. Whoops, showing my age too!

As it happens, the modern stuff can be much more rugged. The parts these days all have protection diodes integrated onto their signal pins, and have had since integrated FETs came along. They only work if the power pins are connected, that's why you see those static safe bags for un-mounted components. The diodes conduct only if the input signals go outside of the power supply pins' voltage range, and dump the energy into the supplies. Like you say, all the shielding is much better too, a lot of testing goes into all this stuff.

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Symon
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Mushroom

"Now I am become Death, the destroyer of worlds."

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Symon
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Pint

Re: IIRC these were the tests that showed what EMP could do to electronics

"not so much with valves"

That's a huge generalisation. If you made a valve the size of a MOSFET, it would have a similar inherent vulnerability to EMI, and more than a bipolar transistor. The reason that it's better "with valves" is simply the size of the things, it's harder for the induced currents to damage big metal electrodes. Mostly, it's not the technology, it's the ruggedness of the components*. Of course, if you know what you're doing, you can take advantage of the small size of transistors. The induced currents depend on the loop area of the conductors, so, with a small part, it's easier, to shrink the loop area. And put it in a little metal box, and be careful with the signals going in and out.

As for satellites, it's gonna be much easier to launch a machine made from transistors, than from valves like these:-

https://youtu.be/EzyXMEpq4qw

Anyway, I did a bit of research. It seems most of the damage to the satellites was to their solar arrays, stuck out flying through the soup of MeV electrons, rather than to their internal gubbins.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Starfish_Prime

* Of course, it's a bit more complicated than that. Valve circuits are generally high impedance circuits. Not much current flowing, high voltages. The electric field dominates. Transistor circuits are usually the opposite, it's all about the H-field. A lot of digital electronics engineers were taught by people who grew up with valve circuits, and hence don't get that current flows in loops. This helps to keep me in a job.

http://www.sigcon.com/Pubs/news/noEMC.htm

p.s. For clarification, in that America, a thermionic valve is a vacuum tube.

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Chelsea Manning leaves prison, heads straight for booze and pizza

Symon
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Childcatcher

Re: You can change the name

"man hands". Tell that to Richard Herring. He and his wife went to a studio show of the making of Harry Potter.

"As we left we saw that at the door were the handprints of the three young stars of the film. With my notoriously tiny hands I wanted to see how I matched up against these tiny millionaires. And it turned out that my hand fitted pretty much exactly into the handprints of Emma Watson. I have Emma Watson's hands. We are hand twins. This has all kind of terrible implications for the world. I once talked of using my small hands to sit behind a curtain and provide relief to unwitting paedophiles, but now perhaps I can open a slightly more respectable establishment where I provide relief to people want to be wanked off from behind a curtain by Emma Watson."

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Dell BIOS update borks PCs

Symon
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Unhappy

It tolls for thee.

& knell

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Train station's giant screens showed web smut at peak hour

Symon
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Coat

Rather good.

Ah, reminded me of Thomas the Wank engine.

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Vigorous tiny vibrations help our universe swell, say particle boffins

Symon
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Paris Hilton

Re: That paper has 214 equations!

I see you're basing that calculation on the book's sales figures. The actual readership is reputedly far less.

"Stephen Hawking's A Brief History of Time may have sold nine million copies world wide, but it is also supposed to have earned the dubious honour of being the world's most unread book."

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk/1078475.stm

http://www.npr.org/2014/07/12/330889518/tracking-the-worlds-famous-most-unread-books

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Lib Dems pledge to end 'Orwellian' snooping powers in manifesto

Symon
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Coat

Re: Liberal Democrats have pledged to end the "Orwellian nightmare" of mass-snooping powers..

re: "stopped clock". Not if it's a 24hr clock. Also, what if it happened to stop on a leap second? I.e. 23:59:60 Then it's hardly ever right. You should never disregard these corner cases. Anyway, ---->

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Ransomware scum have already unleashed kill-switch-free WannaCry‬pt‪ variant

Symon
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Black Helicopters

Well, the guy who found it has now been doxed by the Telegraph, Mail, Sun etc. So, I guess he's not too pleased with the public announcement...

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Strap yourself in, fasten your helmet, and try out FreeNAS 11.0-RC

Symon
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Pint

Crash test dummies. Off topic..

When you leave your body to medical science, unless boffins leave it to rot in the woods to investigate entomology for forensic science, there's a chance that what was you could be used in a crash test.

Actual corpses are more lifelike* than crash test dummies. The picture of child sized dummies reminded me that child safety seats are harder to test, because very few parents (a.k.a. zero) are willing to have their recently deceased child's remains smashed into a brick wall. Anyway, on that pleasant note, roll on beer o'clock.

https://www.pri.org/stories/2014-02-10/europe-takes-cue-us-and-decides-use-cadavers-make-cars-safer

Also, https://www.wired.com/2010/08/how-a-cadaver-made-your-car-safer/

"Cadavers have been essential to making driving safer since the 1930s, when researchers at Wayne State University threw a body down an elevator shaft" Those crazy Detroit boffins!

*Intended bad joke.

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Symon
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Thumb Up

^^I second that.

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The world (of backup) is not enough for Barracuda

Symon
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Not a fan of articles written like this.

"Analysis Data protection and security player Barracuda is being affected by customers moving away from point products, and the resulting combined data protection plus security themes could mean other pure-play backup suppliers are going to be left behind."

'player' = company, 'point product' = specialised product, 'pure-play', 'security themes' blah, blah, blah. It makes it hard to read.

It wasn't even clever in 1957.

https://youtu.be/xDKUTCdts3E?t=1623

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Uber is a taxi company, not internet, European Court of Justice advised

Symon
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Happy

Re: But

What portion of the readership is Scottish?

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Symon
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Paris Hilton

Re: But

Cakes go hard, biscuits go soft.

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CERN ready to test an EVEN BIGGER gun

Symon
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Re: Lineac 3?

It's still there and "Linac 3 is expected to be in use until at least 2022."

https://home.cern/about/accelerators/linear-accelerator-3

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Symon
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Paris Hilton

Re: A little side action?

Richard XII. I don't think lead acid batteries make negative hydrogen ions. Just regular positive ones.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lead%E2%80%93acid_battery#Electrochemistry

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LastPass connectivity snafu locks out Brits from password manager

Symon
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FAIL

Re: Three Words...

This site can’t be reached

www.themooltipass.com refused to connect.

Try:

Checking the connection

Checking the proxy and the firewall

ERR_CONNECTION_REFUSED

p.s. https://pwsafe.org/

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SpaceX settles $3.9m shift pattern class action lawsuit

Symon
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Elon Musk, gros fromage de SpaceX

Steve: He'll never bring it down in this soup. Never! Not one chance in a million.

Rex: I know. I know. But it's his ship now, his command; he's in charge, he's the boss, the head man, the top dog, the big cheese, the head honcho, number one...

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America's mystery X-37B space drone lands after two years in orbit

Symon
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Re: it is unlikely that it carries any weapons... cough... cough...

Sometimes pendant mode is like an albatross hanging from your neck.

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Symon
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Facepalm

Re: it is unlikely that it carries any weapons... cough... cough...

Aladdin, of course, you're quite right. I withdraw the comment about spherical projectiles. A shot ball from a smooth bore gun will behave a bit like a knuckleball in baseball, it will move all over the place as it tumbles. Thanks for the correction!

https://youtu.be/e3uzXOuYUcM

Or in football:-

https://youtu.be/00fcef8z0z0

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Symon
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Stop

Re: it is unlikely that it carries any weapons... cough... cough...

"the air rifle is incorrectly named as the barrel of an air rifle isn't rifled"

Bollocks. I looked down the barrel of mine, using my remaining good eye, and you can see the rifling. A quick internet search confirms this.

http://www.pyramydair.com/blog/2006/08/different-types-of-rifling/

Here's a picture.

http://www.airgundevelopment.com/images/rifling/DSC05929.JPG

Maybe BB guns aren't rifled? There's no point if the projectile is spherical. Air rifles fire pellets. Here's picture with the rifling marks.

http://www.photosbykev.com/wordpress/wp-content/gallery/various/_mg_9948.jpg

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Facebook is abusive. It's time to divorce it

Symon
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Pint

Re: "wanted a way to keep our friends informed while we were on our vacation"

"I still write postcards."

I put them in envelopes. They arrive, and arrive quickly!

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Symon
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Alert

"on our vacation to the US" Did you get burgled while you were away?

"It's very stressful living in London. There was a rapper in London, one of these rappers that they have now. You've seen them, er... On adverts and things, and, um, his name was Ironik, I R O N I K was how he'd spelt it. And last November, Ironik, he went on the tweets. He was a tweeter and, er, one Saturday last November, he twatted, which is the, er, The past tense of tweet. One Saturday last November, Ironik twatted that he'd bought a new diamond necklace, and he twatted that he was on his way to Southend to do a gig, and then he twatted that he was on his way back to London, and then he got mugged outside his house. And now Ironik understands the meaning if not the spelling of his name." -- Stewart Lee.

Twitter, a state surveillance system run by gullible volunteers. https://youtu.be/7XpvH-j9BHg

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Symon
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Facepalm

Re: Life without facebook is easy!

Indeed.

"But only because we were yet to understand that everything we entered was recorded by Facebook, all of it analysed, all of it compared against everyone else sharing all of their personal trivialities. Too late we realised that everything we shared was more useful to Facebook than it was to our friends."

Speak for yourself! Quite a few of us realised this up front.

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Uncle Sam backs down on slurping passwords from US visa hopefuls

Symon
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Stop

"no one in the EU or UK needs a "visa" to enter the USA"

Unless you have a communicable disease; physical or mental disorder; or are a drug abuser or addict. Or, unless you ever been arrested or convicted for an offense or crime involving moral turpitude or a violation related to a controlled substance; or have been arrested or convicted for two or more offenses for which the aggregate sentence to confinement was five years or more; or have been a controlled substance trafficker; or are you seeking entry to engage in criminal or immoral activities. Or, unless you want to do journalism. Etc. etc.

Also, not all EU countries are eligible. E.g. Romania.

https://skift.com/2016/12/21/eu-angry-that-u-s-visa-waiver-program-still-has-haves-and-have-nots/

Truckle, the visa does give you the right to go before a judge. On the visa waiver program, you've waived that right, and the immigration official can send you back.

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Fire fighters get grinding on London man’s trapped genitalia

Symon
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Paris Hilton

How about a jubilee clip? Stainless, of course.

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Don't listen to the doomsayers – DRM is headed for the historical dustbin, says Doctorow

Symon
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WTF?

This is interesting...

... but mainly because of the previous that Doctorow has with the The Register.

https://brian.carnell.com/articles/2006/cory-doctorows-devastating-rant-against-andrew-orlowski/

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iPhone lawyers literally compare Apples with Pears in trademark war

Symon
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Re: Dear Apple.

"nuts are a fruit" Just like poor old Mr. Logic!

http://i1.wp.com/viz.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2015/03/Screen-Shot-2015-03-18-at-18.30.24.png

p.s. I don't think that walnuts and pecans are botanical nuts. Viz has let itself down badly.

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Oh dear, Prime Minister! Nearly 100 Beeb bosses make more than you

Symon
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Pint

Re: downhill

BBC3 reached its zenith with Monkey Dust ... and that, darling, is what really happened.

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IT error at Great Western Railway charging £10k for 63-mile journey ticket

Symon
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Holmes

Re: small city @Spudley

^What Peter said. There was this hot barmaid down the pub doing a psychology degree at a former poly. She could barely string a written sentence together, I guess no-one had taught her decent English language skills. I spent an evening reading about "theory of mind" on the internet and rewrote her dissertation in a few hours. We got a 'Desmond'.

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Symon
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Coat

Re: small city

Ah, Half man half biscuit. Trouble over Bridgwater.

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Jimbo announces Team Wikipedia: 'Global News Police'

Symon
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Paris Hilton

Re: Filtering Fake news

Laf, here's what a real news organisation does.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/editorialguidelines/guidance/terrorism-language/guidance-full

"Definitions. Unfortunately, there is no agreed or universal consensus on what constitutes a terrorist, or a terrorist attack. Dictionaries may offer definitions but the United Nations has again just failed to reach agreement. The obvious reason is that terrorism is regarded through a political prism."

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Give 'bots a chance: Driverless cars to be trialled between London and Oxford

Symon
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Mushroom

Re: There's a great deal

Fast breeder reactors that use uranium are, by all intents and purposes, renewable. Brush up on your differential equations and eat this:-

http://large.stanford.edu/publications/coal/references/docs/pad11983cohen.pdf

p.s. United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority cars. Do they look like this:-

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spectrum_Pursuit_Vehicle#/media/File:SCARLETSPV.jpg

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Robo-Uber T-boned, rolls onto side, self-driving rides halted

Symon
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Stop

Nice anecdote, wolfetone. Some of us like proper science and engineering though, so here's some actual data on 5 mph collisions:-

http://www.iihs.org/iihs/news/desktopnews/passenger-vehicles-sustain-huge-damage-in-5-mph-crash-tests-mazda-promises-improvement-volvo-looks-into-airbag-deployment

Scroll down until you find the Volvo S80 thing. A 5mph crash head-on into a brick wall would cost you $5,137, the most expensively damaged car in the tests. So, I know the data's from 2000, and it's a specific model, but I'd suggest some actual research rather than rely on a friend of a friend, before deciding which car to buy!

Now, bearing that data in mind, a more expensive crash isn't necessarily a bad thing. You didn't mention what happened to the occupants of the cars. I think I'd prefer to be in the Matiz you mentioned if its airbags and crumple zones cushioned my impact, whereas the Volvo driver got their face smashed against the windscreen, and their sternum broken by the seat belt. I think that explains the expensive repair job for the Volvo in the 5mph test.

p.s. My (worthless) anecdote. I personally have seen a couple of accidents on the motorway, where cars bash into each other nose to tail. You end up with a line of cars on the hard shoulder with damage to front and rear where they've been sandwiched. Both times there was an apparently undamaged BMW 5 series in the middle of the line.

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Teen charged with 'cyberstalking' in bomb hoax case

Symon
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Coat

"A public defender said he does not have a criminal record, but has suffered from a brain tumor since he was 14 that appears to effect his cognitive functions. He has been homeschooled since the diagnosis and cannot work or serve in the Israel Defense Forces, his attorneys added. The court granted a request by the suspect's attorneys to have him undergo a medical evaluation.[] U.S. authorities are not expected to seek extradition." (sic)

http://www.nbcnews.com/news/world/israeli-police-arrest-suspect-bomb-threats-made-against-american-jewish-n737581

So, rather than him being dumb, it might be a tumour.

https://youtu.be/OaTO8_KNcuo

Couldn't resist, sorry.

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Hard-pressed Juicero boss defends $400 IoT juicer after squeezing $120m from investors

Symon
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Boffin

Re: Juicing is bad

"Grapefruit". Be careful with graprefruit if you're taking certain drugs. As any fule kno, grapefruit juice decreases the activity of the cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP3A4) enzymes that are responsible for breaking down many drugs and toxins. Grapefruit contains compounds known as furanocoumarins that block the CYP3A4 enzymes.

No really!

https://www.drugs.com/article/grapefruit-drug-interactions.html

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Drunk user blow-dried laptop after dog lifted its leg over the keyboard

Symon
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Pint

Re: Good on Jim

@pLu. It seems that you're right. Thank you for the correction.

http://www.livescience.com/45800-confirmed-urine-not-sterile.html

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Symon
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Joke

Re: Ah, but progress...

" in a bowl of rice" Boiled, pudding or egg fried?

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