* Posts by jabuzz

173 posts • joined 13 Aug 2009

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BoJo, don't misuse stats then blurt disclaimers when you get rumbled

jabuzz

No the £350 million is wrong. Firstly it is a figure that the UK has *NEVER* sent rebate or no rebate. It is currently way less than £350 million without the rebate. Secondly there is no dictation on what we send the rebate on. So aside the £350 million figure being wrong even without the rebate, with the rebate it is even more wrong and misleading. Sure we would have control over the majority of the money, but actually a significant chunk is going to have to be spent on replicating things that are taken care of by the EU, and putting in new customs arrangements (think a lot more like 5000 extra staff).

Also while we theoretically gain control, in reality at least for some considerable period of time we will have to keep the same levels of spending in the same places as the economic dislocation of not doing so would be ruinous.

Of course BoJo does not care, because he is sufficiently wealthy that it matters not to him.

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SpaceX sneaks in X-37B space plane launch ahead of Hurricane Irma

jabuzz

Re: I was probably cheaper and simpler to launch.

You can quite easily build buildings to withstand a category 5 hurricane. All it requires is the will to do it. I would point you to Darwin in Australia which was flattened in December 1974 by Cyclone Tracy. Some 80% of homes where destroyed. When they rebuilt the city it was to a more stringent building code that makes the houses cyclone/hurricane proof.

In the end it's not rocket science, you just need to build out of reinforced concrete and make sure everything is bolted down to the concrete slab so it can't blow away. Then you do things like put your utilities under the ground.

Want to live in a hurricane prone area then build your houses and other infrastructure to withstand them. When you don't, don't expect me to have a great deal of sympathy for you. I refer you to the following fairy tale.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Three_Little_Pigs

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jabuzz

Re: Getting bored now

If you think about the landing, take a look at those grid fins that are used for most of the guidance. Now take a look at the Wikipedia page on grid fins

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grid_fin

Hum, big grid fins at the tail end of a lot of guided bombs. Now look again at a Falcon 9 stage one booster. Large cylindrical object; check, gid fins at tail end; check. Looking lots like a guided bomb, and there is *plenty* of expertise in getting guided bombs, aka large cylindrical objects on target.

Don't get me wrong it is a super impressive feet to land a rocket, it's watching science fiction become science fact right before my eyes. However the being on target for the landing not so much once you realize where the technology comes from.

Mind you boring and routine 1st stage landings is the goal. That SpaceX has rapidly turned the first successful landing into a routine occurrence is great news. If they could only nail the odd landing it would be a waste of time trying.

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It's happening! Official retro Thinkpad lappy spotted in the wild

jabuzz

Re: Screw 16:10

Go to eBay pick up a mSATA to 2.5" 44pin IDE HDD converter for £3 shipped from China. Then pick the mSATA drive of your choice (capacities up to 1TB are readily available). Screw together and stick in whatever laptop or other device you want.

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jabuzz

Re: Screw 16:10

After 10 years I have finally moved off my 1400x1050 Tecra M5. Before that I had a 1400x1050 Tecra 8200 too. It was the perfect screen resolution for a laptop. However today it would need to be 2800x2100 to get me to give up my 3:2 3000x2000 Surface Book. If it it's not "retina" it's not worth making a fuss over.

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Dell's flagship XPS13 – a 2-in-1 that may fatally frustrate your fingers

jabuzz

If you have an SSD why do you care about a HDD LED? I have used laptops for 22 years now, and I *used* to care about a HDD LED because I wanted to know that the HDD had stopped spinning before I stuffed in a bag and started carrying it around. With an SSD I don't give a hoot because there is zero chance of the head slamming into the platter and ruining the disk.

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Apple bag-search class action sueball moves to Cali supreme court

jabuzz

Re: @jonnycando

Companies have a habit of putting all sorts of stuff in employment contracts that are not legal. They will even insist on doing when they have been told that that it is illegal and won't stand up in a court of law. Sometimes it is just a case of reusing old contracts when the law has changed but not always. I am not a lawyer but my siblings are; one is an employment tribunal judge so actually gets to decide what is and is not the law, and has never had any of his judgements successfully appealed either. So for the record of all the employment contracts I have signed in my life only my current one passes muster.

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Rowhammer RAM attack adapted to hit flash storage

jabuzz

Re: Ext3

An extent based file system would be immune too, so the 20+ year old XFS or the rather newer, exists only for Lustre ext4 would be immune. Does anyone use ext3 in 2017 outside legacy requirements? Well I guess lots of RHEL6 based installs probably do, but how many of those are on SSD? Certainly leaves me in the clear on my servers.

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Red Hat banishes Btrfs from RHEL

jabuzz

Re: ZFS is the right choice for a server system

How do you know that the error didn't occur at write time though? You don't. So DIF/DIX will make sure the write was correct *AND* tell you down the line if it is corrupted. Sure ZFS is better than nothing, but if you really care then there are better solutions than ZFS. I guess you could get ZFS to do a verify on write, but performance is going to suffer in that scenario in a way it does not with DIF/DIX.

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jabuzz

Re: DIF/DIX

Duh, if you have mirrored disks and DIF/DIX you will get a recovery from the error too. So ZFS is emphatically not better.

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jabuzz

Re: ZFS is the right choice for a server system

Yes it does it is called DIF/DIX and if you actually care about bit rot is better than anything that ZFS can ever provide. Mostly because ZFS will only tell you that there is a problem *AFTER* the event. That is if during the write something goes wrong and the data gets corrupted you will only get to find out when you try to read it back, by which time you won't be able to do anything about it, but you will at least know the data is bad.

On the other hand DIF/DIX will stop the corrupted data from being written to the storage device (disk, flash, or whatever comes along) in the first place. It will also highlight any corruption to the data while it sits on the storage device. As such it is a *BETTER* solution than ZFS.

Further ZFS is based around RAID5/6, which is frankly does not scale. Excuse me while I switch to dynamic disk pools.

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Brit uni builds its own supercomputer from secondhand parts

jabuzz

Re: Ghetto but good

In the past the FLOPS/Watt was changing so fast that after 3 years it made sense to replace the kit because the power savings would more than pay for the replacement. Now after 5 years the power savings will just about pay for the new kit.

Oh and with Universities there is a huge and I mean a *HUGE* difference between capex and opex. It is not like a business where you can willy nilly shift between the two budgets.

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Judge used personal email to send out details of sensitive case

jabuzz

Re: Many legal people are hide-bound

The way it works is like this. Lets assume you get some confidential information wrongly via email that has those sorts of legal warning things. Lets assume to make this example easier to understand it included the details of a divorce settlement for a premier league footballer. You think to yourself I can get some money for this and ring up "The Sun" offering to sell the information you have come by to them. You think that you didn't ask for it be sent, you did nothing illegal to obtain it so no come back when you convey that information to a third party. Problem is you would be dead wrong and your life could now be made a complete misery. At least that is what my brother has told me and he is a Judge.

Oh and few things here the court email system is actually crappy IMHO, and my personal email server which my brother (along with the rest of the family) uses but not for court stuff is not crappy being a fully patched and secured CentOS7 Postfix/Dovecot based system. Not everyone running a home email system is incompetent. Heck to get working secure remote email sending I *HAVE* to run my own email system because Plusnets SMTP servers don't understand secure authentication!!!!!

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Tape lives! The tape archive bit bucket is becoming bottomless

jabuzz

Re: Long term problem

Well that is a process problem. The fix is to start using TSM or Spectrum Protect as they like to call it these days and stop taking tapes out your library, just have two libraries with a copy of the data in both of them.

When you upgrade to new tape technology you just get your TSM servers to copy the data to the new tapes. Might take a few months, and you will probably have to once a week take some old tapes out and feed new ones into the library, but you then end up with everything on the new tapes. Rinse and repeat each time you upgrade to a new generation of tape.

My top tip is to keep a couple of the old technology tape drives in the library along with some tapes and dedicate them to TSM's DB backup. That way your DB backups never get blocked, which is a very good thing.

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Imagination: Apple relations still rotten but, hey, losses have shrunk

jabuzz

Re: It is all Apple's Fault

Because they had some scheme of listing on NASDAQ sometime ago. Not sure if it came off mind you. That was around the time they changed from Videologic to Imagination Technologies.

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HMS Queen Elizabeth is delayed, Ministry of Defence confesses

jabuzz

Re: The French

No they concluded it would be cheaper to build a non-nuclear carrier and buy F35B rather than a nuclear carrier which would be needed for steam catapults and an F35C. Of course it then turned out that rail gun catapults which don't need steam work, and could be powered from a non nuclear carrier, but despite the QE class supposedly being able to be modified for rail gun catapults this change was going to cost more than scrapping the ships and starting again so it was back to the F35B.

I am all for the aircraft carriers in principle. The problem is they have been a cluster fuck in bad decision making. Especially given the USA had committed to rail gun catapults for the Ford class by the time that the Queen Elizabeth and Prince of Wales where ordered.

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Baird is the word: Netflix's grandaddy gets bronze London landmark

jabuzz

Re: His mechanical system, even enhanced, couldn't compete

Film was never processed in space, just way to tricky to do that in zero gravity. Early satellite however did take pictures on film which was then returned to earth using a variety of mechanisms. Some of which included plucking it out the sky as it descended on parachute to avoid it falling into enemy hands.

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Why Theresa May’s hard Brexit might be softer than you think

jabuzz

Re: 2 years?

Well large parts of Scotland are of course not part of the island of Great Britain. That aside you are just flat out wrong. The United Kingdom did not come into existence till 1801 with the Act of Union with Ireland. Obligatory Wikipedia article on the subject

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Acts_of_Union_1800

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HMRC IT cockup misses nearly 1m Scottish taxpayers for devo PAYE letters

jabuzz

Anyone living in Scotland knows that they live in Scotland. So apart from a small number of people with second homes one in Scotland and one else where in the UK you don't need a letter from HMRC to tell you anything if you are paying attention.

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Brexit means Brexit: What the heck does that mean...

jabuzz

Third referendum

What leaver's seem to fail utterly to accept is that if it is unacceptable for someone who voted remain to campaign to remain in the EU because you have to "respect the referendum" then they have a moral problem. Because for *DECADES* the likes of UKIP did not respect either the 53.9% of people who voted for parties that campaigned for EEC entry in the 1970 general election as a major part of their platform. Neither did they respected the 67.2% who voted to remain members of the EEC in the 1974 referendum.

Consequently as the leavers never respected the first referendum and campaigned for a second referendum, they have *ZERO* moral grounds for complaining *WHATSOEVER* that the remainers don't respect the second referendum and are campaigning for a third.

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Integrator fired chap for hiding drugs conviction, told to pay compo for violating his rights

jabuzz

Re: When you've done the penalty, that should be it.

There is a difference between needing to pass a criminal records check and disclosing any convictions you have. So he asked if he needed to pass a criminal records check to which the answer was no, and used that as a reason to not disclose his criminal record. Assuming it was not a spent conviction then that would demonstrate a lack of integrity.

However any sensible employer would never give the reason why they let someone go in a trial period. You say something like you don't feel they don't fit in with the company or something else banal and none generic.

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European F-35 avionics to be overhauled at Sealand, says UK.gov

jabuzz

We are getting F35B and hence they don't actually need a runway...

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£11bn later: Smart meters project delayed again for Crapita tests

jabuzz

Re: Gaz and Leccy...?

More Brexiter nonsense, you have got your way so put a sock in it will you. The is no EU diktat requiring the closing of any power station.

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Julian AssangeTM to meet investigators in London

jabuzz

Re: i know but...

EU does not have human rights laws, that's separate and nothing to do with the EU, other than being a member of the EU pretty much(*) requires you to be a signatory to the European Convention on Human Rights and thus subject to the rulings of the European Court of Human Rights which has nothing to do with the EU and it's court aka the European Court of Justice. Yet another thing that many of those voting for Brexit failed utterly to understand.

* The actual requirement is to have legislation protecting human rights. So far every state has achieved this requirement of EU membership by being a signatory to the European Convention on Human Rights. In theory you could do it some other way by strong enough national legislation and an sufficiently independent judiciary for example.

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Web meltdown: BT feels heat from angry punters

jabuzz

Re: DNS Problems?

Indeed I personally think the problem was all down to DNS issues. At least I could ping sites directly with the IP that would just give DNS failures using their FQDN. Changing my forwarders from PlusNet's to Google's miraculously fixed everything.

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Apple struggles with the idea of intelligent life outside Cupertino

jabuzz

Re: control Fearkery?

Except Siri is all done server side too. Trying to do that level of AI client side is not feasible.

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Dell finds liquid cooling tech on eBay, now wants you to buy it

jabuzz

Water cooled rack doors

Title says it all. Had these now for four years and not a problem, and really the chances of a leak seem remote to me. The hoses connecting the flow and return from the cold water supply under the floor are more like car radiator hoses, and the radiator in the door just looks like a large car radiator. I think the inlet temperature on the water is like 12 Celsius, so there is zero risk of condensation, and for much of the year the compressors on the roof are bypassed, as you can just blow the outside air over the heat exchangers.

We are using ColdLogik racks/doors and my view is that not doing water cooled doors at a minimum is negligent as you are just pissing your employers money away.

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Cisco drags down the Ethernet switch market, routers grow a little

jabuzz

Re: Perhaps if they brought down the ridiculous prices of 10G switches and cards

Netgear have a range of 10Gb switches at under 100GBP per port including VAT, which is darn cheap if you ask me. I remember paying *more* for 100Mbps ports.

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Super cool: Arctic data centres aren't just for Facebook

jabuzz

Scotland

The maximum ever outside air temperatures in large parts (if not all) of Scotland are well below the maximum inlet air temperatures required by modern equipment, and an awful lot closer than Scandinavia or Iceland.

Like they say we like summer in Scotland it's our favourite day of the year.

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'Droid Gmail on Exchange

jabuzz

Must be missing something

I must be missing something here as the mail client on Android has been capable of talking ActiveSync to Exchange servers for years.

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Oracle to kill off Java browser plugins with JDK 9

jabuzz

They should fix their ILOM firmware then

Title says it all, every machine they still have under a service contract should be fixed so their ILOM's work in a modern browser without a Java plugin.

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SpaceX makes rocket science look easy: Falcon 9 passes tests

jabuzz

Re: How many times?

The target is around 20-25 times. The engines have had extensive testing and have been through 40 full burns on the test stand with minimal maintenance between burns.

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Putin's Russia outlaws ECHR judgments after mass surveillance case

jabuzz

Re: Before we get too judgemental...

What's the EU got to do with the ECHR, apart from nothing? Admittedly UKIP want to withdraw from the ECHR as well as leave the EU, but that is different from Russia who has not withdrawn from the ECHR but said we can ignore it's rulings if we want.

ECHR = European Convention on Human Rights and has nothing whatsoever to do with the EU

EU = European Union, the renamed EEC or European Economic Community that has in it's found document that we voted on in 1974 "towards an ever closer economic and political union". I would further note that Sir Winston Churchill was all in favour of a United States of Europe as early as 1946.

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Brocade admins: Check your privilege

jabuzz

Re: Fabric OS v6.3.1b is very old

Not only is FabOS 6.3.1b ancient, but anyone running a fibre channel fabric and who does not have access to the management ethernet ports on a separate "management" network where access is highly restricted deserves what they get anyway. That is if someone who is not in a position of trust to have full admin rights over the switch can even so much as access the switch to ping it on the network port then you have failed to begin with.

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GPS, you've gone too far this time

jabuzz

"You're getting confused with something called Selective Availability which was switched off years ago."

Er I think you will find that you are wrong. While Selective Availability is turned off, without access to US military specification GPS units you won't have access to the encrypted P code stream only the C/A code for civilian operation. This is something completely different to Selective Availability and gives the military specification units higher precision than civilian units can achieve without the use of an accuracy enhancement system such as DGPS.

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Thin Client Devices Revisited

jabuzz

Re: Overpriced

Chromeboxes are really rather cheap these days, and if your "thinclient" is an office desk, make much more sense than a Chromebook or iPad.

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Boffins teach Wi-Fi routers to dance to the same tune

jabuzz

Re: Clock signals

Actually very few countries have clock signals. While most of them are based on amplitude modulated LW, some are based on alternative techniques, these include the French TDF, the Rusian RBU. Of the amplitude modulated only MSF, JJY60 and WWVB share a frequency of 60kHz the 77.5kHz of DCF77 is also shared with BSF. This is important because the cheap receivers all used pre-tuned ferrite rod antennas, so even if you equip your WiFi hotspot with both 60kHz and 77.5kHz antennas it will be useless in northern Japan where you need a 40kHz antenna for JJY40. It will also be useless in China which you need a 68.5kHz antenna for BPC. The Russian RBU uses frequency modulation of the pulse which will require another completely different circuit for, and the French TDF uses phase modulate of the TDF radio station signal to encode the bits, which would also require a completely different circuit design.

There are no LW radio stations in South America, Africa, or Australia. There are SW radio time signals but these require much more expensive circuits to receive. Further complicating matters is the fact that many of these time signals are not broadcast 24/7 either.

I think people in Europe and North America tend to forget how fortunate they are to have reliable LW time signals.

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Reg lecture asks what’s so scary about 1.5 tonnes of metal with a mind of its own?

jabuzz

Re: Oh really?

You step out onto the road in the path of an oncoming vehicle and you are not a pedestrian crossing giving you right of way at that point in time then you are to blame. Why would it be any different to the current situation?

Also all teh very *COMMON* scenarios are easy to think up and program rules into the system to deal with. That just leaves the uncommon scenarios, but remember the self driving car only needs to be better than the *AVERAGE* driver to reduce accidents and deaths on the road. I know most people, men especially think they are all the Stig, but the reality is quite different.

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Top telematics: Black box helps driver swerve speeding fine

jabuzz

Re: Didn't work for me :(

Golden rule of driving is to be able to stop in the distance you see to be clear ahead. So unless the Police car overtook you or pulled out from a side road into your clear space and then broke you where in the wrong if you needed to overtake him for any reason. In effect you got off on a technicality and the initial conviction was correct.

Note this golden rule of driving might mean that you need to slow down to go round a bend, not because your car is unable to make the bend at the speed, but because the bend reduces the visible road ahead that you can see to be clear.

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Don't want to fork out for NAND flash? You're not alone. Disk still rules

jabuzz

Re: Give it time

Consumer drives account for a small fraction of the shipped used capacity. My educated guess is most capacity is going in the data centre or at the very least consumer level NAS drives, for which SSD makes no economic sense. So unless there is a huge drop in the cost per GB of SSD's disk is not going anywhere. It's just like tape, need to back up 500TB, well doing that to D2D is just not economic even with dedupe.

So while spinning disks (there has been no spinning iron in disks for decades) may well disappear from end user equipment, and 10k/15k RPM hard drives are on the chopping block, the bulk storage 4TB+ 7200/5400 drives are going nowhere fast. I have a pair of 4TB 7200 RPM drives in a RAID1 and it happily could do six different simultaneous 720p streams from my Plex server. At that point I ran out of playback devices, in these sorts of applications SSD is not replacing HDD any time soon.

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Bezos battery-box bomb beef brouhaha begins as UK watchdog hauls Amazon to court

jabuzz

Re: Coincidentally...

A CRT will never be bio-hazardous waste. That is a term reserved for biological based material that is potentially hazardous, think hospital waste or material from bioscience laboratories.

On the other hand a CRT is full of heavy metals (lead in particular) and is therefore hazardous waste. That said the recovery of the lead from a CRT makes it a roughly cost neutral process, aka the value of the recovered lead is about the same as the cost of recovery.

Note that putting any electronic waste into general landfill has been illegal in the UK for quite a few years now.

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BBC joins war against Flash, launches beta HTML5 iPlayer

jabuzz

Re: get_iplayer

get_iplayer pretends to be a flash player using rtmpdump. If you read the blog article on the BBC website then you will see they intend to still serve to flash based devices for a few years yet. What happens then is another matter of course. Hopefully get_iplayer will be able to switch to HTML5 before then.

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How to build a server room: Back to basics

jabuzz

PatchSee

Sorry but you can just follow the cable afterwards if it is a PatchSee network cable. You put the handy tool thing over the cable and vola the other end is illuminated making identification easy peasy. They also come in lengths from 60cm to 3.1m in 30cm increments all with the length printed on the plug. So no excess cable, and no guessing on the length when reusing the cable.

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Ahmed's clock wasn't a bomb, but it blew up the 'net and Zuckerberg, Obama want to meet him

jabuzz

Re: @Bota I hope..

You don't get third generation immigrants who can't speak English in the U.K. either, unless you are talking about a small child who is being looked after by a none English speaking grandparent and these are tiny in number.

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Sierra Nevada snow hasn't been this bad since 1500AD

jabuzz

Re: They could solve the drought...

That's not going to end the drought however. That is no more water is going to fall from the sjy even if every last almond tree in California was chopped down tomorrow. The result is at a minimum that ski resorts in the Sierra Nevada mountains will still be impacted. That is assuming the drought does not end this winter, which seems unlikely.

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Sign of the telly times: HDR shines, UHD Blu-ray slides at IFA

jabuzz

Re: UHD Blu-ray is already sunk

It is fully blown DRM it is the same scheme that is used by DVD-Audio, which Wikipedia tells me has been broken. However given that CSS in DVD's has been broken, AACS in Bluerays is at least circumventable, and HDCP is smashed into very tiny pieces it is all rather moot.

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jabuzz

Re: UHD Blu-ray is already sunk

Flash seems insanely expensive for what is read only distribution media. A much simpler to manufacture and hence much cheaper one time writeable memory would be much more appropriate.

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'Major' outage at Plusnet borks Brits' browsing, irate folk finger DNS

jabuzz

Re: Uh ...

Because they have tweeted from their mobile phone which is using the mobile signal to send the message and not routing over their Plusnet connection.

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jabuzz

Re: not DNS, but routing issues

I can add that it was definitely a routing issue and not DNS, and it was random. So a connection in Scotland on Plusnet with its own private DNS server worked fine. A similar server in England did not, some but not all DNS lookups where failing. A random Plusnet connection down the road in the next village from the one in England also had partial DNS failures.

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Monster Scalextric Formula 1 circuit to go under the hammer

jabuzz

It's flat!!!

Looks flat to me so there is no Eau Rouge, which is one of the most famous corners in motor racing and Formula 1.

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