* Posts by AndrueC

3479 posts • joined 6 Aug 2009

The Google Home Mini: Great, right up until you want to smash it in fury

AndrueC
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Re: Silly Valley

Dayna?

Yeah, she was a highlight of the 3rd series. Kept it going for a bit. It was the fourth series where it all went a bit wrong. Some very weak stories there.

The entire series is now available to watch for free on YouTube (with a questionable funky introduction). The story lines are noticeably weak after Terminus. But for all that it stands the test of time reasonably well. Those of us that watched the original broadcasts (7:10pm Tuesday if I remember correctly) will always have a place for it in our affections :)

Actually I missed the first showing of the Andromeda battle. My parents had me going to confirmation class and I didn't feel it worth the hassle of complaining. Maybe that's why I'm an atheist these days :)

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AndrueC
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Re: Silly Valley

..and the last thing Zen ever said was "I'm sorry".

Nearly made me cry, that did :-/

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UK.gov: Who wants £25m... *cheers*... to trial 5G? *crickets chirping*

AndrueC
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Re: The Apple Connection...

It has always baffled me as to why I can't have unlimited data on my mobile service.

It's a combination of factors:

* There is only so much data that can be carried over a given range of radio frequencies.

* There is a finite range of radio frequencies available to us.

* A lot of other things are using radio frequencies.

* Adjacent transmitters have to avoid each other's frequencies or Bad Things(TM) happen.

What this means is that hundreds (sometimes thousands) of users are all trying to talk to the same mast at the same time and the laws of physics mean there is not enough bandwidth for them. To minimise the problem the operators ration the bandwidth to encourage people not to 'hog the airwaves'. The smaller your allowance the less time you will spend downloading and the more time that leaves for other users.

This is what's known as contention and it can occur at various points of any network. However the problem with wireless communication is that we are up against the laws of physics. If a telephone exchange is congested another fibre can be lit. But the radio bandwidth we have is all we have.

Beam forming is a possible solution because it allows us to only transmit where it's needed. Thus even though you and I might be connecting to the same mast if we're far enough apart our signals don't interfere so there is no contention. It's almost as if we have our own masts.

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AndrueC
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Will they come with the stupidly low data allowances

Probably, yes. Large numbers of people all hanging off relatively few masts with limited radio frequencies available all mean that sharing the bandwidth is essential. That means dissuading punters from downloading too much.

Leastwise that's the current state of play. But if the backroom boys can get beam shaping out of the home and out to the cell things might improve. That ought to allow the mast to partition the cell into 'sub cells' which means less need for sharing. It's basically Wifi's MIMO on a larger scale.

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Grant Shapps of coup shame fame stands by 'broadbad' research

AndrueC
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Re: I don't think openreach cares enough to want to pre-empt faults.

From the replies I've had elsewhere it seems like for once I'm the one unfairly maligning openreach. They do still run nightly tests and their database does attempt to record line length information so they have a pretty good idea of the state of their local loop. That being the case it strengthens my view that the Ofcom figures are more believable than the Shapps' figures. Ofcom will at least get answers from BT and probably won't be lied to (well..not much) whereas it's unclear if Shapps would ever get anything beyond PR material.

So thanks those of you for correcting me. I did indeed learn something interesting.

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AndrueC
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Re: I don't think openreach cares enough to want to pre-empt faults.

Well we're talking about the local loop here. I'm sure they monitor the core and one reply I've had on another side says that they monitor E-side but I don't see what they would gain from monitoring the D-side (and that's all you have with FTTC). It's just a lot of hassle and expense and it's not like they have a stringent SLA to keep on top of. Openreach is only aiming to fix faults within three working days. We know they have an almost permanent backlog of work so why add to that by trying to fix faults before they actually occur?

Sadly that level of care doesn't sound like the openreach I've ever heard about.

Hopefully the poster can provide us with more information.

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AndrueC
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Re: Intersting snippet

Sorry, but they do

That doesn't sound very likely. I don't think openreach cares enough to want to pre-empt faults. They are far more likely to take the philosophical view 'If a line fault occurs and no-one reports it, did it really happen?'. It's an interesting suggestion so I'll go and ask a few people I know. If you're right we'll all have learnt something and that's a good thing :)

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AndrueC
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Re: Intersting snippet

but only for the first 100 that sign up and the other 600 will be left out.

Depending on cabinet type and size a cabinet can service 128, 288 or 384 lines. BT usually only install the minimum number of line cards but will add more until the cabinet is full. After that they will build another cabinet. They seem quite keen to do that and it's probably because it's more cost effective than building a totally new cabinet. Most of the expense is incurred for the first cabinet. Adding more cabinets is pretty cheap and easy.

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AndrueC
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Re: Intersting snippet

Well for most cabinets it's going to be true for the majority of lines. Most cabinets serve urban areas and the majority of lines served by them are less than 1km in length (I believe the typical length is about 500 metres). So most lines connected to a cabinet will get in excess of 10Mb/s if that cabinet is FTTC enabled.

But of course 'majority' and 'most' are not the same as 'all'. It's also made more difficult because BT don't have a complete map of their local loop. Prior to xDSL no-one cared how long a line was so nobody bothered to measure it or record it. For the same reason they don't know the electrical characteristics either. And after all that they don't know how xDSL signals on that line are going to be impacted or will impact other lines in the area.

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Top of the radio charts: Jodrell Bank goes for UNESCO World Heritage status

AndrueC
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Re: 960,000,000GB of data per day

Maybe they should go directly to Yottabyte ?

Good data there you have. Important insights it will bring.

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Visual Studio Team Services having some 'performance issues'

AndrueC
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Re: VS2017 Community Edition is a POS

I've not personally had any memory issues with 2015 since the second update. If you are seeing them then make sure your version of 2015 is up to date because it absolutely fixes some memory leaks.

Now don't get me wrong. I use it day in and day out and it frequently pisses me off. One day last week I had to swap between two branches several times in one hour so had to sit through the teeth grinding hell of it trying to figure out first how to unload shit then how to reload shit. Sometimes I have to restart VS to get it to correctly rebuild a solution. WTF is that about? Is this the 20th century?

And don't even get me started on why I have to keep the WPF designer hidden. Fair enough there's a lot to be said for working purely in XAML but it shouldn't kill VS just to render my bloody form. And with it hidden after a few hours it will still enter a go slow phase where it keeps pausing for several seconds when I'm typing. Eventually I get so sick of it I have to restart it..and that means another unload/load cycle.

Someone complained that there wasn't a 64 bit version so I provided a link to a blog where a VS developer claimed that it's a deliberate choice because they don't think it's worth the bother. Just for the record at no point have I ever expressed an opinion on the validity of that statement. I merely thought it would be a useful discussion point.

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AndrueC
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Re: VS2017 Community Edition is a POS

Still doesn't run as a 64-bit IDE - it gets installed as a 32-bit even on Windows x64.

There is no 64 bit version of Visual Studio and the development team have stated that it wouldn't help and might actually make things worse.

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You may not have noticed, but 'superfast' broadband is available to 94% of Blighty

AndrueC
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Re: I assume Thinkbroadband are using the "can pay extra for fibre" definition of ("has access to"?

This could mean "most Brits who have a choice between ASDL and FTTC are too tight-arsed to pay the extra £5-£10 per month for FTTC"

And it would be correct. There are plenty of people who can't see any point paying extra for FTTC. And even amongst those who have opted to upgrade most choose the lowest package. The same thing happens with cable. The top tier package has the fewest subscribers. Last I heard even in cable areas BT-based ISPs have the most subscribers. I've not seen figures since 2015 but it says a lot when crappy wet-string copper has more users than coaxial cable where both are available.

The truth is that people who want the fastest possible connection are in the minority. Most people want the cheapest possible connection as long as it's adequate and for most residential properties anything above 30Mb/s is adequate. At the moment.

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New coding language Fetlang's syntax designed to read like 'poorly written erotica'

AndrueC
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Re: Love the honestly listed 'features'

I've occasionally thought that abusive versions of error messages might help lighten the programming mood:

"Object reference not set to an instance of an object you stupid idiot".

"The name 'ibble' does not exist in the current context you pillock."

"Cannot implicitly convert type 'string' to an 'int' - have you gone mad?"

"'Fred' is inaccessible due to its protection level. Mind your own business."

"'IZero' does not contain a definition for 'ibble'. Why don't you try reading the documentation or learn to type?"

On seconds thoughts, maybe not :)

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Lenovo spits out retro ThinkPads for iconic laptop's 25th birthday

AndrueC
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Re: 17" laptops

Guess I was really lucky to get my Acer Aspire ES 17 then. It was just under £500 and aside from the large screen is just a bog standard laptop. With a crappy touchpad :-/

And yeah I guess I should have said 'the lowest, reasonable spec laptop' but rants don't have to be accurate :)

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AndrueC
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Bah. All I want is a laptop with a large screen (17" is currently adequate - bloody presbyopia) and dedicated mouse buttons. I don't need anything else. Ought to be possible to find one for a few hundred quid.

<old git rant>

Why is it laptops never seem to really come down in price? They get faster but somehow the lowest spec laptop always costs about £400. And large screens don't seem very popular. Odd that. Maybe as the rest of the population ages they'll become more popular. It wouldn't be so bad if web site designers didn't waste so much screen space these days. O! for the days when you could read most of what you needed to without having to scroll the screen.

</old git rant>

Happy Friday, everyone :)

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He's no good for you! Ofcom wants to give folk powers to dump subpar broadband contracts

AndrueC
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And for a real world analogy let's consider cars. I'll pick the Honda Jazz.

'Advertised speed' - up to 118mph (yes, really)

'Connection speed' - up to 70mph (I never break the speed limit)

'Throughput' - 42mph (my daily commute is part rural, part urban).

But of course 'throughput' can be measured in many ways so:

a)No higher than prevailing speed limits along chosen route.

b)42mph daily commute.

c)60mph - driving from home to Dad's house (over 180 miles, mostly motorway and dual carriageway).

d)30mph if M40 J11 is closed during commute (screws up Banbury traffic flow even more than normal).

If you wanted (gawd knows why) to advertise a Honda Jazz based on speed what figure do you choose? And at what point does a Honda Jazz driver have the right to complain to Honda about their car being slow?

Now this analogy actually falls at the first hurdle because a car is a 'good' and an internet connection is a 'service' so different consumer laws apply (the latter doesn't have to be 'fit for the purpose') but I still think it's an interesting thought experiment.

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AndrueC
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Now all we need to do is make sure that consumers understand the differences between 'advertised speed', 'connection speed' and 'throughput'. Some clarifications from me:

'Advertised speed' - a figure that describes the technical capabilities of the technology.

'Connection speed' - a figure that indicates what speed the technology is actually providing at a specific installation.

'Throughput' - a figure that indicates how much data can be actually be transmitted in a given period of time.

Note that 'throughput' needs further clarification as it could be measured in several ways some of which are:

- The maximum speed at which data can arrive at or leave from the end user's modem.

- The maximum speed at which data can travel between the end user's modem and their ISP's servers.

- The maximum speed at which data can travel between the end user's modem and whatever server they are choosing to measure (note that this is a very complicated thing to define and the Internet offers no speed guarantees).

Oh and all of the above need to be measured by the consumer over a fully wired connection.

I've wanted Ofcom to concentrate on throughput for a long time (not least because it's a product differentiator that can actually be meaningfully controlled through customer choice as opposed to connection speed which can't be for most of us). Unfortunately it really isn't a simple topic. I don't see how advertising can ever provide the requisite information. The nearest I can think of is a rating system but we're still left trying to choose how we measure throughput.

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Nothing matters any more... Now hapless Equifax bags $7.5m IT contract with US taxmen

AndrueC
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and will be worth $7,251,968 to the troubled credit reporting agency

Shouldn't that be '..the troubling credit reporting agency'?

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Forget the 'simulated universe', say boffins, no simulator could hit the required scale

AndrueC
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Re: But when no one's watching...

The simulation outputs are for the observers, and they can be comfortably oblivious of 99%+ of anything not observed

Quite. All good programmers realise that the users only know what they tell them.

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UK third worst in Europe for fibre-to-the-premises – report

AndrueC
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Re: Central Manchester

The fibre run is Virgin, not Openreach. And you're right in what you're saying - when Openreach work they're (generally) great. But when they don't it turns into a game of pass-the-parcel with the problem.

Ah! Yes, of course, I'd forgotten they were involved in leased lines and of course will be present in Manchester centre.

And you're absolutely right about the hell of dealing with openreach. I once nearly got two fibres blown to the same location. I was saved by a miracle. A lady at openreach who spotted the duplicate request called me to query it instead of just extending the order and charging us double. She was probably new and hadn't finished indoctrination yet :)

Of course that all started because OR lost the original order. Although their response to our 'what's the delay?' tried to imply that it had never been placed. We offered to send a copy of the order confirmation but they weren't interested in it.

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AndrueC
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Re: Central Manchester

What? So we can't get FTTC in there this year and FTTP later? We ditched Openreach and got an all-fibre line in via Pulsant. Sorted.

From looking at their website Pulsant don't appear to own any backhaul cable (not many leased line sellers do) although those are all copper based services. My assumption would therefore be that you are using openreach cable that Pulsant are paying to rent. That's how most leased lines operate simply because openreach has so much cable in the ground. It's rarely worth anyone's bother overlaying what BT already have in place in the local loop and for a leased line BT are generally quite happy to blow new fibre.

They may even be using openreach for the core network although there at least there is a lot more competition to choose from, especially somewhere like Manchester.

The thing is that what a lot of consumers don't see is that once you get past the hell of ordering from openreach the actual product - the data transportation - is bloody reliable and covers just about everywhere. It's not even that expensive if you are dealing with them direct. Unfortunately dealing with them direct can also be incredibly frustrating. I've done it a few times now and every time I swear I'm never going to do it again and will choose someone else. But then you discover that means dealing with several other companies just to get your data from A to B and suddenly the attraction of the one-stop-shop of openreach doesn't seem quite so bad. Just keep a bottle of Valium to hand.

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AndrueC
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Sounds like contractor delays. BT can't do everything and two of the most common causes of delays are the local power network provider and the local council. There are several stories of new cabinets being erected then left empty for six months waiting for power. For FTTP they are very much more at the whim of councils and contractors.

Being in the middle of Manchester makes it even worse. BT do have some code powers to cut through red tape but they still can't just charge into the centre of the second (third?) largest city in the UK and start digging up roads and laying cables. These things have to be planned, approved then contractors scheduled. It's a shame openreach can't give you a better schedule but they probably just don't know.

As is so often the case in the UK - too many cooks in the kitchen and most of them are rubbish at cooking anyway.

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AndrueC
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Boffin

Apparently, the regulations actually prohibit installing fibre equipment inside the exchange!

Sorta. What they actually forbid is the installation of equipment that can't be electrically masked appropriately. VDSL falls into that category (ANFP document). There's nothing stopping fibre equipment being installed because it doesn't give out any electrical interference worthy of consideration and certainly not to copper lines. But the VDSL modems that are inside the street cabinet are not allowed in the exchange.

These are Ofcom rules. BT has a hand in developing them of course but it's basically an industry consortium that agree on what equipment can be attached to BT's network rather than BT itself saying it won't do it.

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AndrueC
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Yeah EO lines can be a pain to deal with. Sometimes the topography means that there's just nowhere that enough of them meet together to make a cabinet viable. Or maybe there is but it's a long way from the actual properties (often the case in rural areas) making the resulting service worse than ADSL(*).

Unfortunately in some cases the only options for EO lines are FTTP or rerouting cables. Both of these are very expensive and since the problem often only afflicts a relatively few lines is not economical. You can cover far more properties with your money by moving on to another town.

(*)Strange to say but ADSL performs better than VDSL on very long lines.

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Want to keep in contact with friends and family without having to sell your personal data?

AndrueC
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Re: Really?

Damn' right. My Dad (mid 80s) used to run a community centre having helped build it (his idea of 'retirement' :) ). He's still very active in it and is forever sending emails. His circle of 'oldies' know how to text. Most of them have a smart phone (though not usually the latest model and in my Dad and his partner's case 'smart' is stretching things a bit).

I even remember that he watched iPlayer before I did. In fact I think it was him pointed out to me that a show was available online when I hadn't even thought about that at the time. Sadly he they went on to annoy me by asking how he could connect his laptop to the TV which turned out to be a pain in the arse.

'The elderly' don't spend hour after hour online but then that's just not how their lives work - and they aer probably all the better for it. They prefer to be out and about chatting face to face and enjoying the fresh air. The only real difference I see is that those over 70 seem to see the internet as an occasionally useful tool. Those under 40 see it as an essential part of life. At 50 I feel half way between the two. I don't live my life online but equally it's more than just a tool to use when I have to.

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AndrueC
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Re: Sounds good as a prototype, but not ready for sale yet?

Actual knobs

I suppose that's an improvement on the virtual knobs usually found on the web.

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If you need to replace anything other than your iPhone 8's battery or display, good luck

AndrueC
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Happy

In 17 years of owning a mobile phone I've broken one once. An HTC Desire. Quite a memorable day actually. I was temporarily redundant and had two job interviews that day. The first was in Banbury and easy to get to. The other in the depths of industrial Milton Keynes.

So I had to use the Desire to navigate me to the second one. It got me there just fine but as I was leaving the interview I took my suit jacket off and put it over my arm. And the phone slipped straight out of the top pocket and hit the carpark, cracking the display. The damage was so bad the display just wouldn't work.

Realising that I was getting a lot of important calls I knew I had to get another phone. So I decided to go into MK centre. Except..I'm not familiar with MK and I knew that would be a challenge. With the help of the road atlas I keep in the car and a bit of common sense (follow the main roads) I was able to get to the shopping centre. I parked up and went to pay..using my mobile phone. Uh oh. And I live a cashless life so there was nothing other than an old five pound note in my wallet.

Luckily I found 40p in the console of my car and that turned out to be the minimum charge for parking where I was. So then I had to walk half a mile to the shopping centre in crappy shoes and a suit. Oh and it started to snow. Then I had to wander around looking for a phone shop. When I found one I braced myself for a hard sell.

But that was the most amazing part. I don't know if it was the suit or a look of desperation on my face but when I approached a young assistant (stunning blue eyes) and asked if there was an equivalent phone she just got a Desire HD from stock, and ran my card. No attempt to upsell. Just pay for the phone, wait while she put my old sim in it and off I went.

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You forgot that you hired me and now you're saying it's my fault?

AndrueC
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Ofcom to crack down on telcos' handling of nuisance callers

AndrueC
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Re: Hmmmm

Ah well, that'll be another £1.75 on my monthly line rental in one of BT's 4 price increases next year ......

And therein lies a tangled web :-/

The BT that you pay your line rental to has indeed been increasing the price it charges you. As have most other CPs (Communications Providers). However what few people know is that the BT which actually owns and maintains your telephone line has been reducing the rental cost.

This is a TBB article from two and a half years ago. And the current price of OR line rental is £86.72 per annum or £7.23 per month (£8.50 including VAT). If you open the historic tab you'll see that the overall trend since 2006 is downward.

Now of course the BT you pay is more than making up the difference so on a BT Group basis they are getting more money. But then you have to consider that line rental is pretty much the same across all CPs. For Example Sky are currently charging £23 a month for their cheapest phone service. £8.5 goes to Openreach so Sky are charging £14.5 to transport an audio stream between two end points. Gotta get me some of that business!

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AndrueC
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Yah,I have a TrueCall unit. I'm still paying for CLI though :-/

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AndrueC
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Re: Calls from BT OverReach

Nor do the NHS.

That, at least, is supposedly to protect privacy. The idea is that one member of your household might not want the others to know that they are receiving calls from their GP. That's a reasonably assumption since GPs usually only call with test results which people often prefer to keep secret even from other family members.

Whether or not that's effective is another matter. Most receptionists will probably say who they are if asked or even announce it straight out. Still - at least it would mean that 'Our GP' doesn't appear on the list of callers when you check the phone for received calls :-/

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AndrueC
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Boffin

Telephone numbers displayed to people receiving calls must be valid, dialable and uniquely identify the caller.

How will that apply to international calls? A lot of countries can't/don't/won't supply CLI last I heard. Of course banning those will cut out a fair bit of 'spam' but enforcing it will also block legitimate calls from large swathes of the world.

According to Wikipedia very few countries do (which I find a little unlikely) and don't follow the same standards (which sadly doesn't surprise me).

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A todger, a 2.5kg dumbbell, the fire brigade... and the inevitable angle grinder

AndrueC
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Re: If he was visiting the A&E department...

as it took three hours to get it off.

So, he's got a lot of stamina then?

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'Don't Google Google, Googling Google is wrong', says Google

AndrueC
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Gov claws back £645m in BT broadband from subsidy

AndrueC
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Re: Can someone explain please?

As a result, HM Money-Bags will immediately give that money back to Openreach to install broadband

Not quite. BT will refund the money to the councils. It's then up to the councils what they do with it.

It's like you paying Amazon £10 for a book with the promise by Amazon that if it proves popular they will drop the price and refund you. A year later the book has turned out to be more popular than Amazon expected so they credit your account with £5. What you do with that £5 is up to you.

Councils can pay BT for more coverage. Or they can pay someone else for more coverage. Or they can buy some pretty flowers for the park. Or they can pay for a jollyfact finding trip to the Bahamas. Or they can put the money in their savings account.

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AndrueC
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Re: BT should return ALL the subsidy...

I think you'll find that BT Openreach and BT are the same company

Well, alright, yes. But all divisions are kept isolated by regulation. They can't just move funds around as they see fit. Certainly not funds given to one particular division for a specific purpose by the government.

BT Openreach can simply jack up their wholesale prices...In fact, BTOR jacking up wholesale prices means that they make their resellers more expensive and thus benefits BT Retail

Ofcom regulates those, precisely to ensure that Openreach doesn't squeeze out competitors.

A recent example here.

Of course there are things BT does to try and reduce the costs of regulation but the kind of funding reallocation the OP is suggesting is a whole order of magnitude beyond what most industry pundits would be prepared to consider. But anyway if you reread my post I didn't actually deny it or try to defend BT. I just implied that I felt it unlikely and that the OP should report what evidence they have to the appropriate authorities.

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AndrueC
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Stop

Re: BT should return ALL the subsidy...

I strongly believe BT has deliberately misused the subsidy to build market share by squandering it on sports

That would be a different company. The money was 'given' to Openreach. It's BT Retail that has bought sports rights. Yes, they are part of the same group but there are very strict rules and even laws about how funds can be moved around the group. If they have done what you are suggesting then it is a serious misuse of government funds, a violation of their license and almost certainly fraud.

It is of course possible that the kind of accounting/business fraud that you propose has taken place but if you have evidence I suggest you send it to Ofcom and/or the police. It would probably be one of the biggest scandals of the decade.

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Boffins: 68 exoplanets in prime locations to SPY on humanity on Earth

AndrueC
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Joke

Closer planets are more likely to be seen? Well those scientists don't need to be told then.

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Indian call centre scammers are targeting BT customers

AndrueC
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I have a Truecall unit. That screens my calls without me getting involved. Pretty much all cold callers give up when they hear the message. Calls from numbers on the whitelist go straight through. I believe there's a couple of BT phones that include the technology and Sky has something called 'Shield' that I believe is free as part of their telephone service.

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It's official: Users navigate flat UI designs 22 per cent slower

AndrueC
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Re: Personally

Hot and Cold taps

Warm on left,cold on right.

Except that the cold water tap in my main bathroom runs warm at first if the heating has been on and the hot tap of course runs cold at first :)

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AndrueC
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Re: Personally

Or not have say Dave and Dave + 1 a hundred channels apart.

I wonder what Channel 4 have done to piss Sky off - C4 HD is way down in the list. Even further down than ITV HD. But I don't pay much attention to channels these days. Just browse the EPG looking for something interesting then mark it to record. Eventually I'll bother to watch it.

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AndrueC
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Re: Microsoft UIs are horrible...

Visual Studio when loading a solution - like a drunk trump staggering across a slippery road at night.

Yeah gotta love that 'Oops I can't render the skin for this refresh so will have to just leave the underlying framework visible'. Always puts me in mind of the 'Mr X' image Homer Simpson used on his web page.

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AndrueC
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Flame

You've not used Visual Studio have you?

Don't get me started on that. For a premiere development tool it is disturbingly badly thought out and not particularly well implemented. After several iterations the controls in the properties pages still don't resize/flow properly. The Quick watch still doesn't choose sensible column widths or remember what I last dragged them to. Context menus need vertical scrollbars even before you've added a few essentials.

And it takes so long just to open. And opening a solution takes even longer. During both of those operations it will sort of, sometimes, appear to respond to commands. Background processing? The VS development team have heard of it.

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AndrueC
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Re: Personally

And the Sky EPGs are the worst.

I was fine with the Sky HD EPG but Sky Q is just badly organised and implemented. Several multi-page views (like, for instance 'My Recordings') don't have a scrollbar. The TV guide now requires several button presses to get to it. They've also wasted nearly a third of the screen width with a stupid corporate logo and the mini-TV.

Help - we need to employ a good UI designer.

Then there's the amazing context menu that stays open and defaulted to 'delete' after you delete something so that if you press 'Ok' twice another programme gets deleted (there is an undelete option).

UI conventions? We've heard of them...

It does what I pay it to (yeah..I know...) but the UI pisses me off pretty much all the time I see it.

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Asteroid Florence buzzes Earth, brings two moons along for the ride

AndrueC
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Re: Schelte Bus ?

You wait ages for an asteroid to come past then three come at once.

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It's happening! Official retro Thinkpad lappy spotted in the wild

AndrueC
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Unhappy

What complicates my quest for the right lappy is that my ageing eyes also need the largest possible screen. The Acer I bought has a 17.3" screen. Last I looked the only lappys that size that had discrete buttons were gaming machines selling for thousands of pounds. I only want something to surf the web and read emails :-/

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AndrueC
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The thing I miss most with modern laptops is the lack of dedicated mouse buttons. I've had my current lappy for nearly a year now and I'm still struggling with the stupid touch pad. It mainly just ignores some 'clicks' but occasionally for fits and giggles it will generate a spurious one. To say nothing of the hit and miss right clicking :-/

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