* Posts by Terry 6

2549 posts • joined 31 Jul 2009

Why millions of Brits' mobile phones were knackered on Thursday: An expired Ericsson software certificate

Terry 6
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Re: I don't get it

Er no. Having alternative locks isn't the same thing as having no locks.

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Terry 6
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I don't get it

Surely,for organisations as big as that, with service as wide as that, they could find a way of bypassing the need for certificates that expire. Next thing they'll be blaming a lack of 50p pieces for the meter.

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Former headteacher fined £700 after dumping old pupil data on server at new school

Terry 6
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Re: The wrong question

Also, teachers are all individual agents. Each will be given tasks, or will create them. And find their own ways of performing them. So, need to mangle some data, bung it into a spreadsheet. Need a little database? Bung that in a spreadsheet too. (Databases like Access are too complex for the casual user and old fashioned flat database programmes seem to have vanished)

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Tesla autopilot saves driver after he fell asleep at wheel on the freeway

Terry 6
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Re: Time for a firmware update?

You haven't driven in Birmingham (UK) then. Sometimes continuing on your route will mean going straight ahead. Other times you'll need to be in the right lane as your route goes into a sudden right turn/slip road but most of the road you're on carries on forward ( to somewhere). Other times it's to the left. And then there's the roundabouts with 5 or more exits, several of which actually go in a different direction to how they first appear, but all of which require several lane changes.

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Blockchain study finds 0.00% success rate and vendors don't call back when asked for evidence

Terry 6
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Re: Blockchain tutorials

Just reading these comments - so maybe not very representative- the only ones that are positive about blockchain are the ones that say you can still make money ( i.e. speculate) with them. So a currency that only exists for speculation or money laundering. A bit like casino chips then.

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Terry 6
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Re: Gold rush...

Years ago my mother-in-law became aware that gold prices were going through the roof. Her immediate response was to say that she wanted to buy some gold. I had to explain, very slowly and carefully to her that this was the time to not buy gold . She was meant to be the businesswoman. Probably explained why she didn't have a business any more.

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Terry 6
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Re: Blockchain tutorials

The Wikipedia explanation is full of circular gobbledygook, but at least gives an impression of what it's all about, and links to some of the technologies that underpin it. Including that Merkle tree.Which I may read one day.

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Terry 6
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Blockchain is perfect

"Block" and "chain" both sound solid and reliable. Put them together and it sounds really solid and reliable.

OK, so it might mean fuck all for all I know. But it sounds, ahem "Strong and stable".

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OneDrive is broken: Microsoft's cloudy storage drops from the sky for EU users

Terry 6
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Re: backup your cloud storage

I would suggest, if budget supports it,( SOHO for example, not too much data for an external HDD or two) you use the cloud account as the second/third backup. But back everything up locally first. Cloud for when the building can't be accessed/burns down as a business continuity measure. YMMV of course.

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Terry 6
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Re: time to fess up...

"support orifice spent the early part of the outage in denial, asking users to clear their browser cache and cookies".

Yep. It always seems to run like that. Any of these organisations. Customers knowing that something has gone wrong at the suppier end before front line staff are told. A week or so we had a problem with VM ( tbh pretty rare). The support guy started on the usual route, then halted and said something along the lines of "actually my colleagues are getting a lot of calls about this too, hold on". Then he went away for a couple of minutes and when he returned he's spoken to his boss, who'd checked....And you can guess..

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It's all a matter of time: Super-chill atomic clock could sniff gravitational waves, dark matter

Terry 6
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Joke

So..

This new clock is not going to be on my Xmas prezzie list then? :-(

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Microsoft readies the swatter as more bugs wriggle out of the Windows 10 woodwork

Terry 6
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Re: I can hardly believe another MS issue

I up voted, but yet... I have a suspicion that there are a lot of general users out there who just stick with default settings. So WMP/Notepad/Paint/Edge/etc. will, and in their terms should, just open up for them when they click on something.

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Barnet Council reckons Capita's dropped the ball on outsourced services

Terry 6
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I am here in the UK. In Barnet as it happens.

"neo-liberal" means very right wing, market economylead decisions, here too.

https://www.britannica.com/topic/neoliberalism

In historical terms, the difference comes in the difference between "freedom from" and freedom to" if my memory serves correctly. ( It was a long time ago I learnt this stuff.) As in Freedom from poverty V freedom to exploit the poor. In Barnet's case Freedom from lousy under-resourced services v Freedom to dodge paying adequate Council Tax.

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Terry 6
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Not the "public sector". Politicians on a " neo-liberal" leaning. They don't believe in public service and can't accept that services can be any good unless run for profit.

Reality has shown that bean counters prefer to focus on short-term activities to provide short-term gains (profits), whereas public service is a long-term consistent system that tries to run to break even..

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Blighty: We spent £1bn on Galileo and all we got was this lousy T-shirt

Terry 6
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Re: Well, who'd have thought it?

Roland6 Yes. See icon. Deserved.

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Terry 6
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You don't even know that nations have international credit ratings, from A++ down. Which has a dramatic effect on the cost of govt. borrowing. And you are making claims about Brexit?

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Terry 6
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Clean break form the EU ( will continue typing when the hysterical laughter stops).

And anyone who wanted a "clean break" was frankly beyond pure delusion. How do you even think you can have a clean break from your neighbours? You can't even do that in your local street, let alone a continent. We need to trade, share borders, share intelligence, share manufacturing, share design, share patents and so on.

I do recall some idiot Brexiteer posting on Twitter or somewhere like that, that we could design and build our own cars, without needing to import any parts. They didn't seem to have any details about how this would work, though.

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Terry 6
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Add screw our credit rating, massively increase the cost of our international borrowing and lose any goodwill and trust from any trading negotiations for decades to come.

But hey. Blue passports (in our long non-EU queue when we go to Majorca or Ibizia for our two weeks of sun).

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Terry 6
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Re: "lousy t-shirt"

I already knew. Twitter, but verified from quoted regulation documents. (Or was it quoted in the Grauniad? Can't remember. It was weeks ago. Mash Report a bit slow to catch that one)

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Terry 6
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Re: "lousy t-shirt"

The middle classes ( mostly Remainers) will be buying organic chickens, guaranteed no chlorine etc. from Waitrose. And Organic veg for the vegetarians

The poorer folk, more likely to be Leavers, will be eating rats' hairs (to the permitted maximum number per portion ) and chlorinated chickens.

'Twas ever thus.

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Terry 6
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Another myth, I'm afraid. We already have the right to send EU citizens home if they don't meet residence requirements. We chose not to apply these rules.Because these EU citizens pay far more into the economy that they get out. These are all published facts and figures.

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Terry 6
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Beautiful summarisation.

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Terry 6
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Re: Galileo punishment

And the general point. The EU 27 are not doing any punishing. They are just keeping to their rules. It's the European Union. .

If you leave the gym club you can't still keep your stuff in the lockers.

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Terry 6
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Re: It'll be like decimalisation all over again, but spelt decimation due to a shortage of letters.

No. UK was powerful and independent when it was able to control trade with its colonies. You can't build a country on history. The world has changed. A lot. Fifth strongest economy, yes, because we are part of the EU. You need to join some dots.

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Terry 6
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Re: It'll be like decimalisation all over again, but spelt decimation due to a shortage of letters.

And Rees-Mogg (Mr. Hedge Fund) whose father wrote the book on profiting from disaster. etc.

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Terry 6
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Re: Porcine aviation

EU army is not something that could happen if the members don't agree to it. And the 27 are not agreeing to it, in any shape of form ( even if some might, to save money). Every EU country will have some sticking points that they won't let the EU agree to. And there are plenty that won't agree to an EU controlled army. We aren't quite as exceptional as you think we are.

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Terry 6
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That's actually the reverse of the truth.

Murdoch's papers are totally pro-leave (Sun etc.) Rees-Mogg, Rich. Dyson. Rich. Johnson, hardly a struggling pauper, writing columns for the papers about why we need to leave....The list goes on.

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Terry 6
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Re: Well, who'd have thought it?

And add, "straight cucumbers" etc. Years and years of the press and anti-EU politicians saying that the EU were imposing this and that on us. Almost all either lies or stuff we'd agreed to. And those bureaucrats are a myth too. From the same stable. They are no different to our own (Some are our own) officials. But the EU laws are made by our elected EU parliament and our national elected ministers. We had control, we're not taking it back. We are giving it away. Along with our freedom of movement. The 27 have 26 other countries to move around in. Us.?

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Consultant misreads advice, ends up on a 200km journey to the Exchange expert

Terry 6
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"Just". Not just an IT thing.

Anyone who says "just do.." hasn't thought through/traced the consequences. No job, however small can be guaranteed free of unexpected complications.

As in, "You can just move the shed to that side of the garden" . Which is when you find that under the shed there was a two foot deep pit, the base of the shed is rotten and the other side of the garden is rather less even than it looked..

Or " You don't need an electrician. Just replace that electrical socket". Fine, until you find that behind the socket there's a tangle of wires that are somehow, just, hanging into the back, but will never go back in again once moved. (I'm not an electrician, I have changed sockets, but I do know a good one to call if I have any doubts whatsoever. And I do).

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Microsoft slips ads into Windows 10 Mail client – then U-turns so hard, it warps fabric of reality

Terry 6
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I've a nasty suspicion that computer/web site advertising space sells to the advertisers because it's like Poundworld goods. They seem really cheap per unit, compared to say a big CocaCola TV ad. But like Poundworld the cheapness might be an illusion (You get what you pay for).

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Terry 6
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Re: Windows Mail gets worse and worse

But also, there seems to be an element of adjusting the package to fit how they think people ought to be using the system. So they quite literally "deprecate" a function. Because it's not what we're meant to be doing. And the other side of the coin is to impose unwanted "features" to the extent of making them difficult or impossible to remove from the machine and even their alphabetical place in the start menu, Paint 3d/Maps/Connect/etc.

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Terry 6
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Re: "There are plenty of good freeware email clients out there."

I think TB's way of storing the mails in the profile is pretty annoying. (As with Outlook's .pst files, but that's no excuse). I want my actual profile, i.e. settings and the like, tucked out of the way. But my data ( the actual folders full of message) I want in a user folder, Ideally on a different partition. Easy to isolate/backup/reclaim.

Maybe it's just me. But I like settings/programmes and data segregated.. You can replace software. Data is different.

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Terry 6
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Re: "But if you received Windows 10"

Precisely, the Win 7 that came on my desktop, before the forced upgrade, and the Win 10 that came on my laptop were costed into the purchase price. So I paid for the stuff. I didn't ask for them to turn Win 7 into 8/8.x/10

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Terry 6
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Re: WTF?

It's still a lot. But "shareholder value" and so executive bonuses depend on doing better than before (whatever that was). And better than the others. Not better for the punters, far from it. Selling less for more is the way of business.

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Terry 6
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Re: Why would anyone tolerate this?

Which should be OK. Or even right. It isn't. because the bean counter lead corps. all take the piss. But this default, built-in "app" ought to be good enough for the causal user. That's what it is there for, supposedly. And Wordpad is probably good enough too, come to that.

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A little phishing knowledge may be a dangerous thing

Terry 6
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Someone should tell Tesco Bank

Their marketing tossers still send out emails with full screen pages showing offers and a "click here to apply" link. Most recently, this very week, it was for special edition gift cards. Not free, as it goes, just special edition. but it's a short link from one to the other.

It's like a training camp for victims.

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Bloke fined £460 after his drone screwed up police chopper search for missing woman

Terry 6
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Re: Rather it wasn't destroyed.

Fair enough. A bit like when cars are crushed for no tax. Wasteful and bad for the environment.

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Terry 6
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Confiscation

My thought from the headline was "I hope they destroyed his drone". The fine seems tiny otherwise.

They did. Good!

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Japanese cyber security minister 'doesn't know what a USB stick is'

Terry 6
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I think the tradition of the Civil Service was to wait until someone got good and proficient at their job and then move them to another department, so that they didn't "go native". Which could be good with regulators (where of course they don't have such a mechanism) but useless with a civil service.

And these days they bring in external "special advisors" who know nothing but believe strongly in something that has impressed the minister.

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OK Google, what is African ISP Main One, and how did it manage to route your traffic into China through Russia?

Terry 6
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Re: Put your life in the cloud

False analogy.

1.) If you put stuff on a ship (or plane etc) it's because that's core to what your business does. Your analogy works for an ISP. Not a data owner.

2.) Only a portion of the stock is on any one ship usually. Historically, of course an entire company might depend on a single shipment of silk, or spices. So yes, they might literally go under.Not usually these days.

3.) You can insure against a boat sinking. But intangible data data loss, reputational damage and law suits might prove a bit too expensive, even if it's possible to get such an indemnity policy.

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Terry 6
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Put your life in the cloud

Just another pause for thought moment.

All these people and companies who, like me understand nothing about the global infrastructure, but who, unlike me are prepared to stick their life and work on a remote server somewhere.

Well, how confident are they that they'll be able to access their stuff when they need to?

And if they are why the f*** are they?

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Between you, me and that dodgy-looking USB: A little bit of paranoia never hurt anyone

Terry 6
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FAIL

God yes. Who hasn't had an email from their banks with a "click here" rectangle for customers to log in and learn about some new trick with their account. In effect training the public to open an unsafe link and type in their security details. Why's there no hands up in despair icon?

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My hoard of obsolete hardware might be useful… one day

Terry 6
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Sinclair programmable calculator

Teaching in Tottenham in the early 80s I had one of those. Locked in my desk, locked in my classroom. One lunch time one (or more) of the little sods managed to get through both locks ( desk one he just broke if I remember correctly) and nicked the thing. I really missed it, too.

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Terry 6
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Re: Keeping old kit? - YES if it still does it's job.

Psychologically it's probably the investment factor that stops us throwing old kit out. It's pretty well established that we value losses higher than gains*. So we're more averse to writing-off value. That kit represents considerable investment and we don't want to admit that it's gone into the black hole of "progress".

*https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/what-is-loss-aversion/

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Terry 6
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Re: I feel the need...

The Mrs and I know, without any doubt, that various items we can never find are in a safe place. If only we could remember what that place is

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Terry 6
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Re: Hmmm. Maybe it is time time to..

Disagree that one. My main PC has a 2TB main HDD. But two 500 gig HDDs are in there too. One salvaged from an older system and one from a TV digibox. And they're keeping backups. One has images the other data backups. I do also have other backups, a pair of external drives that I swap between, but the first port of call is the internal discs.

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Terry 6
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Re: assuming you know what it is

I actually have a Brother labeller. Very useful for the assorted plugs that work my fish tank*. But it's too late for that to be used on the device leads now. And the next time I identify and use one I'll be in too much of a hurry to put a nice label on. At least, I'll be in a hurry by the time I've identified it and extracted it.

* pump, filter, front LED, rear LED, heater

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Terry 6
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assuming you know what it is

Less a problem with electronic boxes. But LEADS!!

I have a whole tangle* of leads that I might need for a camera or something. I haven't any idea what they are actually for or if I can dump them. Because the manufacturer of the unknown device used a non-standard, but unbadged lead. I have no idea what the were/are for until I find a device with a nonstandard connection and have to play match the plug then extract the lead from the tangle.

*It's one of those unexplored laws of nature. Place two or more cables in a dark, isolated space and leave them undisturbed for more than a week.and they will form an impenetrable tangle.

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Junior dev decides to clear space for brewing boss, doesn't know what 'LDF' is, sooo...

Terry 6
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Naive question here (over the years I've found being asked naive questions has stopped me making some stupid error, and should be welcomed).

Why would database software be written such that deleting an ancillary file ( such as a log file of historic steps) cause it to fall over?

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That amazing Microsoft software quality, part 97: Windows Phone update kills Outlook, Calendar

Terry 6
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Re: I am genuinely shocked

I gave up my Winphone and lay down in front of Google's Android less than a year ago. I kept going with the Winphone because it was a nice phone to use (as well as not being Google's) and meant that my calendar was easily shared across to my desktop and PC. I kept with Outlook on my PC for the same reason. It was when things like the BBC apps stopped working, that I really needed, that I started to give in and accepted that I needed to jump ship.

I now keep my calendar in Outlook.com and Thunderbird with Lightning respectively. But that only syncs because of a third party addon for TB (TBsync). Otherwise I'd be stuffed. It's only when I found TBSync that I was fully able to make the switch.

So for MS to screw up that aspect of Winphone is to break the only part that would have kept me using it.

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