* Posts by Terry 6

1737 posts • joined 31 Jul 2009

UK mobile number porting creaks: Arcane system shows its age

Terry 6
Silver badge

Re: SMS Black Hole

Boll**ks. It's usually b***er all to do with "social anxiety". Sometimes you need to send a brief written message to someone (especially when the person isn't even there with you).. Often a reminder, or an address. Maybe something to collect from the shops on the way home, or a client's request. SMS is usually the only sensible way to do this. It doesn't have to interrupt, it doesn't need immediate attention, it doesn't need to be scribbled down by a recipient who is hearing it while trying to rush off somewhere. And it's there, in writing, when it's needed.

2
0
Terry 6
Silver badge

Re: Makes me wonder..

Funny, but poor understanding of texts. (People don't have to read them at the time they get them). And in my case it's more a matter of "Why didn't you send me the text you promised?" I did" "You didn't" "I did" "you didn't"...etc etc

0
0
Terry 6
Silver badge

Makes me wonder..

I have problems sending texts to my wife's phone, number ported from Virgin to I think EE, now with Three. My own phone's number went from VM via Tesco/O2 now also with 3. I can receive and respond to texts she sends me. Maybe that's something to do with their routing database too. It's impossible to get any kind of sense from the network(s).

1
0

This is why old Windows Phones won't run PC apps

Terry 6
Silver badge

Re: "What Win10 on ARM is, is a desktop-type experience,"

Updraft102's comment puts his finger on it. Users need two things; to be able to share data across various devices - mostly a main machine of some sort and a mobile one. and to be able to use their data both devices without thinking too much about where the buttons are.. It doesn't have to be the same OS. It doesn't even have to look exactly the same, as long as there are no obvious contradictions and complications. Things like those dreadful hidden "charms" and swipes in Win 8 that only activated when you didn't want them. I have no problem moving between a Win 10 desktop, a laptop and a Windows phone ( that 640 model). They are similar enough . And I will not be creating much content on my phone, so the only "apps" I need on that are ones that access my content and some basic programmes to do the practical stuff. But on the laptops and PC I might need full-fat programmes to create, edit, curate and manage content, (and by the way not Windows Store applets as in these new "S" Windows machines). The OS is just there to make the programmes I need work- other than that it should be invisible. A good OS is one that keeps out of the way - not one that imposes itself, its adverts, or its unwanted Start menu items on the users.

3
0

UK government's war on e-cigs is over

Terry 6
Silver badge

Re: Oh god no resturant will be safe again

rubyduck

The other side of that is where the smokers' cabal - which included the manager(s)-sat around and made decisions that were never discussed with the rest of the staff, sometimes never even communicated to them. I can think of two schools where the head and a few nicotine stained cronies used to do this,sat around a table in the staffroom. Other staff were an out-group fended off with clouds of evil smelling fumes.

0
0
Terry 6
Silver badge

Re: Jesus, NO!

Yes and if you liquidised tomatoes then heated them to vapour a blew it around an office we shared or a pub we were both in I'd have a problem with that to.

Like Cuppa-Soup you mean.

0
1
Terry 6
Silver badge

Re: We already know.

And to add to John Brown(no body)'s point; saying " Popcorn lung" is still out to jury" in this circumstance is not too far from the same kind of logic as saying that evolution is just one theory..

0
0
Terry 6
Silver badge

Re: "Drs thought it was harmless"

False Analogy argument here. Because vaping replaces smoking and contains nicotine it is not automatically analogous to smoking. Significantly different is that it does not contain combustion materials. More significant, it has already shown itself to be safer than cigarette smoking, even if some unpredictable harm were to appear. Most significant the contents and processes are known.

Yes you can argue that smoking was thought to be safe and proved not to be - but that's no more relevant as an an analogy with vaping than with, say, eating Quinoa.

1
0
Terry 6
Silver badge

Re: Jesus, NO!

That Huffington Post article doesn't really say anything at all. Behind the headlines and dramatics there are just a few speculative maybes. Formaldehyde is found in new carpets, among other things. Yes nicotine and associated vapour may have it and other chemicals in small amounts. But most things contain something nasty. As mentioned, if we're going to ban vaping for that then maybe we should get a move on with motor vehicles first. Or barbecues, or chipboard, or salt or whisky, or sugar or........ ( extend list with all the things that have been implicated by association with things that might possibly be harmful). I personally wouldn't recommend anyone to take up vaping. But that's no reason to jump to the default ban it position either.

To be avoided a all costs is the view that everything is a killer until proven to be 100% safe. That's just a pathway to paralysis. Follow that route and you find yourself advocating living in a hut made of dried grass and wearing leaves. And you'd still be a at risk from poison ivy or nettles (Nothing is ever 100% safe, for that matter)

4
0
Terry 6
Silver badge

Re: Argh

That's the one anti-vape comment that does make sense to me. They can be pretty ghastly. I don't think there should be laws about these things, but normal workplace rules that are agreed by the staff or are reflected in management decision is another matter. Like having vape-free areas.

That being said even as a lifelong non-smoker I still suspect that the anti-vaping moves come mostly from the puritanical "If you can enjoy it it has to be bad for you " school of public health.

16
0

Vendors rush to call everything AI even if it isn't, or doesn't help

Terry 6
Silver badge

over-promise, under-deliver

Marketing types, and to be honest I don't think it's their fault* seem to build their lives on that premise.

*My impression is that they are merely doing what they need to do to keep their jobs under pressure from bosses who say things along the lines of "We need to show we're already in (Target_name=latest new thing)". And I'm guessing that they in turn are worried about share holders, who are fickle and prone to sell established and buy trendy-new stocks.

1
0

The curious case of a Tesla smash, Autopilot blamed, and the driver's next-day U-turn

Terry 6
Silver badge

Maybe a problem with Teslas.....

.....could be the people who (can) buy them.

(Other known fault, the nut behind the wheel).

5
0

Want to kill your IT security team? Put the top hacker in charge

Terry 6
Silver badge

Re: Manifesto for the incompetent

Well stated Vic.

While managers are seen as being akin to executives and skilled professionals are seen as akin to the workers this is going to be an issue. I do wonder how much of this is a UK/Anglo-Saxon hang over from the 1950s thing. Some kind of blue collar/white collar view. You have to stop doing stuff (blue collar) and start telling other people to do stuff (white collar) to be respected.

2
0
Terry 6
Silver badge

Re: Not limited to Infosec engineers; this is sector agnostic

Dabooka

And some teachers ( I'm sure this applies in Infosec and know it applies in lots of other areas) sometimes start in the profession determined to be Headteachers from day 1. They have a plan for their progress. They may not be great teachers, but make bloody sure they have great contacts, use the right jargon, jump in and out of the latest new fad with exquisite timing. On the other hand, some rise up the ranks through good teaching and a willingness, possibly reluctant, to take a lead. Both can turn out to be useless as managers, but at least the latter group can be human. The former seldom seem to be. That is still probably better than a manager who is just a manager. - the type of individuals who used to sit in LEAs ( and probably now run Academy Trusts instead). Because they tend to focus on targets, test results, outcomes, schedules - all the suit pleasing proxy data- and not actually look at whether the kids are really learning stuff.

5
0

Now here's a novel idea: Digitising Victorian-era stamp duty machines

Terry 6
Silver badge

Progress

Steady on there, no need to rush into this.

25
0

Top tip for all you insider traders: Don't Google 'insider trading' from your work PC

Terry 6
Silver badge

Maybe

There's possibly an element of a generational thing. A generation that think they are ( Individually) somehow above normal, sensible behaviours. That they can Google away at work, and don't need to be careful because they are too knowing to get caught.

In fact, of course, he should have been working, at work. Not Googling. And done that at home, or even better, at an internet cafe if he wanted to get away with this scam..

6
2

Wi-Fi firm Purple sneaks 'community service' clause into its T&Cs

Terry 6
Silver badge

Re: Form Gov.UK

Contacting Trading Standards and being routed to CAB about an issue seems to lead to a dead end before anything useful can happen. At a very minimum you have to have been harmed, personally, before they'll even listen. Proactive action, along the lines of "I've spotted an issue that you should be aware of.." (e.g. a local shop selling fake goods) goes nowhere. Until there's a victim. If even then.

0
0

Dell gives world its first wireless-charging laptop if you buy $580 extra kit

Terry 6
Silver badge

Re: I've never understood this

Well that's the point (my point anyway). A wireless charger might be useful. But in ££ terms, how useful? It might be worth paying an extra £20, or £50, over the cost of the standard kit, but while North of a hundred quid may be a realistic price point for the amount of kit involved is it worth paying? I dunno. More than that????

And the article does point out that the widget still needs plugging in, so it's not much more than a convenience. A couple of spare chargers sounds much better value.

4
0
Terry 6
Silver badge

I've never understood this

Over the years the IT industry has come up with lots of good ideas, but then priced them so wildly that the alternative is much cheaper. The worst example I have was my LS120 ( I think that's the name/number) superfloppy drive. The discs for that were so expensive that no one bought the bloody things. And fairly soon along came optical drives with media at a fraction of the cost.

It seem as if there is a disconnect, too often, between price and value. The £200 item that would be worth having for the convenience, say, if it was £50. But otherwise, who needs it.

8
0

Bloke takes over every .io domain by snapping up crucial name servers

Terry 6
Silver badge

Re: "unaware of any issues arising from this brief exposure."

Stuff procedures. Someone was presumably being paid good money to make sure they know what is going on and prevent cock ups.

1
0

OMG, dad, you're so embarrassing! Are you P2P file sharing again?

Terry 6
Silver badge

Who's of thunk it

Middle aged blokes who do P2P file sharing also seek paid "escorts". Since I only hit one of the three criteria I can't judge whether that is reasonable or not, but I'm sceptical. Still, who am I to doubt marketing?

5
0

BOFH: That's right. Turn it off. Turn it on

Terry 6
Silver badge

Re: do not enter the hypen!

The most important words should be; "What I need to be able to do is....... because then I can........". said by frontline staff ( users) to IT staff (developers)

Sadly the people who need to be heard saying those words often hear someone saying "What we've done is make it possible for you to do <insert something complicated and unwanted>." to them.

My impression is that this comes from a lethal mixture of developers (because they can and it's whizzy) and remote managers ( because they're clueless but it sounds whizzy).

1
0
Terry 6
Silver badge

DrSyntax

OH God yes! I've actually phoned my bank to complain about that stupidity.

OTOH it sort of suggests that marketing and Phishing folk share a mindset, doesn't it.

4
0

Google blows $800k on bots to flood the UK with 30,000 'articles' a month

Terry 6
Silver badge

Re: "increasing demand for consistent, fact-based insights"

A bot can also not either make connections or form hypothesis to investigate based on human understanding or be creative in considering links. i.e can't depart from the algorithms.

1
0
Terry 6
Silver badge

Re: Gresham's law

I was referring to the Murdoch/Lebedev/Google types with their friends in the revolving door of party politics. and outside directorships ( or editorships!). People who share a vested interest in attacking the BBC (and even ITN). But putting the usual suspects on the BBC board etc is also an act by the politicians of one kind or another to protect their own vested interests and do favours for friends.

11
0
Terry 6
Silver badge

Gresham's law

automated data journalism.

But also, the likes of Murdoch, and so I'd expect Google, can't avoid attacking the competition if it doesn't sink to their level, which in the UK means BBC ( and ITN). And they have friends in low places who love a free market dive to the bottom.

17
0

Microsoft boasted it had rebuilt Skype 'from the ground up'. Instead, it should have buried it

Terry 6
Silver badge

Re: Office

Yeah, on my current laptop I have both LO and MSO 2010. I seldom use the latter, though Publisher is quite useful. Note though that most home users won't have Publisher. In one of MS's earlier bits of stupidity they chose to omit Publisher from home versions, where it's probably most useful. And if my memory serves me they included Access in those earlier version (2003?) which most Home users would never touch. Always a mystery to me, would MS have lost any revenue by including Publisher? Was it just pure mean spiritedness? Did they think people would stump up to buy the pro edition instead? So that they could make a greetings card or a youth club poster once or twice a year. But then LO doesn't have any equivalent either. Beats me why not. It's what the SOHO user needs to make those items, from time to time. Using WORD/Writer just doesn't cut it.

I won't bother with MSO when I set up a new lappy soon. (But then I'm very tempted to strip MS out and go to MINT anyway)

2
0
Terry 6
Silver badge

Re: Skype Alternatives?

And ironically, the same thing worked against them with the phones. Having lost the initiative they had no chance against the "cool" iThingy devices, or even the almost as "cool" Android/Samsungs. We Winphone users have a good phone that is totally ignored by almost everyone, so it's pretty much landfill.

0
0
Terry 6
Silver badge

Re: Market research

If you're using your work phone they can call you on it. Have your own for when off duty, even if it's a dumb phone.

2
0
Terry 6
Silver badge
Devil

Re: a colleague skyped me..

As much as I like my Winphone, some features do show the MS disease, and the autocorrect is one. The suggestions are also pretty grim. Most often I'll mistype a single letter in a word, and instead of showing me a list of real words that correct that error or are close to it it will show a list that often retains the error but change most of the rest of the word. Imagine - an invented example because I can't think of a real one at the moment,- you type cemeont instead of "cement". Instead of offering "cement" it will offer "common/recount/covet/duvet/moment/.." anything you could think of except "cement"

0
0
Terry 6
Silver badge

Two people downvoted Hollirethevo. But no reply to say why. WTF. This, and AbsolutelyBarking's comments sound perfectly sensible to me - and I've suffered through more than a few "projects" that weren't developed with actual users' actual tasks in mind. Often spending hours and months of my time feeding back the problems, finding work arounds or just calming down irate frontline staff who can no longer do the things their jobs require them to do without spending twice as long as it used to, for half the outcome they used to get.

Come to that, more than once I've suffered having my own, simple functional working tools, such as an A4 checklist ,replaced by specially "tailored" off-the-shelf packages that cost the Earth, were too complicated for ordinary users to use (unless they were employed full time just to manage the one package that ought to only take a few minutes to use!) and were incapable of actually giving the information we needed. And in many of those there had been a "consultation" that came no where near my team. In one case the only people consulted were subordinate colleagues of the person commissioning the work, who all thought like she did and had no concept of how any other users of this supposedly cross-disciplinary package did their work. It was even full of jargon and word meanings that no one outside the coterie understood or used the way they did.

2
0
Terry 6
Silver badge

Re: "This new app is absolutely terrible"

Some of the lock-down stuff, especially stuff that blocks scripts, will remove functionality that is needed. I use PaleMoon mostly. If that happens I move to Firefox, and if still not working I hold my nose and use IE.

1
0
Terry 6
Silver badge

Re: a colleague skyped me..

Windows Creationist edition?

4
0
Terry 6
Silver badge

Re: @Chris

This is the company that produced a calendar "app" with no search function. Do we need to say anything more?

10
0

Virgin Media admits it 'fell short' in broadband speeds ahead of lashing from BBC's Watchdog

Terry 6
Silver badge

Re: Had just the same issues

VM have a long and dishonourable history of not admitting when there is a problem. In fact, not even telling their own front line staff, a kind of new slant on plausible deniability - the people you speak to genuinely don't know there's a problem unless they find out by accident and tell the users, which is how I was able to discover about a serious outage in my area after previous staff had all been doing the old turn it off and on again boll**ks.

1
0
Terry 6
Silver badge

Re: "Up to" may not go up to. News at 11

And there's the sales. Up to 50% off. Try finding anything (let alone much worth buying) at 50% off. Or 40 or 30% even.

6
0

Bonkers call to boycott Raspberry Pi Foundation over 'gay agenda'

Terry 6
Silver badge

Re: Rainbow

Colours of; Red Orange Yellow, Green Blue and Violet - equating to the three primary colours and the three overlaps. Newton invented a 7th colour because of his mystical belief in the significance of the prime number 7

10
1
Terry 6
Silver badge

Re: @Wolftone - the whole bible?

So if there's a bottom level in hell, it's filled with LIARS. next to the bottom, ARROGANCE.

Errr, PPI phone callers?

6
0
Terry 6
Silver badge

Re: Do as I say, not as I do.

It's always good to remember that the American "Pilgrim Fathers" didn't actually go there to avoid being persecuted, but to avoid being prevented from persecuting other Christian groups here.

11
1
Terry 6
Silver badge
Pint

Change.org

It's just Twitter for the annoyed. Armchair activism. AKA Slacktivism

I like this one.

https://www.change.org/p/mr-long-a-mini-fridge-for-this-room-please-the-milk-goes-off-proper-quick-and-it-sucks-man

3
1

Constant work makes the kilo walk the Planck

Terry 6
Silver badge

Re: Confused

When I started this hare it wasn't about which is best. It was just an observation on the reasons for our rather mixed up systems. I do think the metric systems could have been better organised in terms of human use. Units with simpler names and appropriate values. Imperial units grew up from practical uses, metric units were defined and applied retrospectively to practical uses.

0
1
Terry 6
Silver badge

Re: Confused

Hmmm. I'm not usually one to defend the humans, but I'd say that people flow to the easiest path, which is not quite the same thing

2
0
Terry 6
Silver badge

Re: Confused

Absolutely, despite the assumptions of the (surprisingly few) metric warriors here, I'm happy using most Metric units and struggled with the yards in half a mile stuff in primary school ( I prefer calculation to rote). But in general discussion I have to use Imperial for most people; even the kids I meet often use miles and gallons, and many will give people's heights in ft and inches and weight in stones just like us older folk. Or come to that a surprising number still use the inch side of the ruler if it has one.

1
1
Terry 6
Silver badge
Pint

Re: Confused

......walk the planck , surely.

Edit, just saw Korev got there before me.

A pint for Korev, rather than just deleting.

1
0
Terry 6
Silver badge

Re: Confused

Toltec

I'd go with that. it's not the most attractive word "dec" with two hard consonants. But it'd do. "Mil" works better in speech terms, but is usually a tiny unit and confusable out of context. Kilo has already caught on pretty well for groceries. It has a softer sound and is a reasonable size. But that then pre-empts it being used for distance, ( people will say "5k" though instead).

The point is that people are asked to adjust to metric, but Imperial was adjusted to people..

4
1
Terry 6
Silver badge

Re: Confused

As for litres being too small for petrol, you must really suffer when trying to fill your car up given that petrol has been sold by the litre for a few decades now.

Which sums up the paucity of your reasoning here. Few people actually think about the number of litres ( or gallons) they buy. They talk about a tank full or £10 worth etc. Or miles to the gallons .

And we prefer saying "miles" to "Kilometres" because it's a bloody sight easier to say.

6
5
Terry 6
Silver badge

Re: Confused

You could always start using deca/deci hecto/centi for the ones that are just in between the straight unit and it's kilo or milli notation.

Try saying it. "The car took 8 decalitres of..." people seldom use words of more than two syllables. And consciously avoid them over three. Think; feet inches pints gallons mile yard pound ounce ( furlong fathom rod pole and perch fwiw, too). Add to that the confusing similarity between deca- and deci-

The metric system is one designed for machines, not people.

6
8

Forums

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2017