* Posts by Terry 6

1628 posts • joined 31 Jul 2009

Wannacry: Everything you still need to know because there were so many unanswered Qs

Terry 6
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Re: PITA

It's certainly true that we were mandated to have every computer checked for Y2K compliance - even the stuff that was only used to type up a few notes; not networked, no database, no vital records. Nothing that the millennium would have made any difference to. And there were a good few of these.

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Crooks use WannaCrypt hysteria as hook for BT-branded phishing emails

Terry 6
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Re: Shortened URL's

Ledswinger Your post highlights the real mystery ( to me anyway). The tidal wave of annoying adverts, unsolicited emails and general spam ( including 'phone calls) must actually get customers to buy stuff - or the advertisers wouldn't bother with any of that. Who are the idiots who feed this market? Where are the people who think it's sensible to respond to an annoying flashing banner, or buy from a random double glazing email, or who trust a PPI salesman who phones them out of the blue? Why are these people not being looked after?

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Terry 6
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Worth remembering

They only say "We take customer security seriously" after they've been hacked.

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Terry 6
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Re: Maybe we should bring back plain text email.

You're not the only user who reveals the URL, but then you're not a typical user (hint ordinary user != techie user). Ordinary users don't know that there is a URL, certainly don't know there is an IP address and probably think that the click here links work by magic, or at least wizardry

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Terry 6
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Re: Maybe we should bring back plain text email.

Part of that issue is that for "normal" users links don't exist. Just rectangles to click on. And a click here link could take users to www.jawsofHelldamnedforAllEternity.com for all the users know.

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Terry 6
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Oh FFS

It does seem as if big companies, (not just ISPS) seem unable to get the message that sending out legit messages that resemble known phishing emails are just going to make users more vulnerable to the "genuine" scams.

This includes banks with "click here for our new credit card/cheaper loan" emails, Halifax with it's Thunderbirds themed " win an unexpected lottery prize you didn't buy a ticket for " advert and various retailers emailing "suspicious attempt to log into your account, change your password here [clicky]" type emails.

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Windows 10: Triumphs and tragedies from Microsoft Build

Terry 6
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Re: "I'd like to employ Microsoft F'CU (NT) S to help clean up this Ransomware mess"

I'm glad you said that. I used to think it was just me that didn't get the registry, and since I was not a proper IT guy, just an upstart amateur doing the jobs that had to be done because no one else could, I have always assumed that there was a deeply important reason for piling everything and anything into the monolithic database that is a registry.

Oh and fwiw, to me the problem with the ribbon is that it deliberately prevents me from hiding the elements that I'd never need from one year to the next. i.e. it's only different from before because instead of having a set of customisable menus it has a set of non-customisable menus.

And tying these two things together, the Win 10 Start menu is both based on a database and virtually non-customisable even though it contains tons of entries that users will not directly use from one year to the next ( pdf readers for example are only ever launched by clicking on an actual pdf file).

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Terry 6
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Re: What Is Microsofts End Game ?

Pascal Monett

Yes. Microsoft got left behind at the start of the Web and had to run to catch up. Each successive innovation has come from elsewhere and their response has been to try to buy a late ticket. But then they seem to have a knack of messing it up.

The Windows phone is actually pretty good. But they tried to sell it at a budget price point without the toy-shop apps and some essential features ( front facing camera for example) that Android users and fashion buying iusers wanted, and at a premium price point that didn't offer anything for the extra money that couldn't have been in the budget jobbies, was too late to just be fashionable and couldn't stand up against the high-end Androids or iPhones on saleability. For an ordinary person wanting a good, medium priced device with some useful and solid apps there was bugger-all on offer for ages.

Stupidities like the Ribbon or those hidden "charms" that only appeared when you didn't want them have all the hallmarks of being someone's pet idea, that should have been shot down at the committee stage - presumably kept in because of someone's power and influence within the corporate hierarchy. Removing the Start Menu ( in response to criticisms of it that just needed fixing) then bringing it back as an unwieldy beast that the users can't control without use of serious technical skills is just further evidence that the suits don't understand the users.

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Terry 6
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Re: Mixed Reality?

Yes, the drive to get us using the "store" and the names "creators" and "Fall" are all indicative of some kind of silo mindset that fails to understand what people outside might want/like/need/think.

The store is, as stated, modelled on devices that sell pocket money "apps" not grown-up programmes. As is the whole Modern/Metro/Universal-whatever-it-is-today interface. The "Creators" and "Fall-----" updates seem named for some kind of fantasy world made in Microsoft's own image: The former because of some, irrelevant to most users, 3D capacity, and the latter because they apparently don't know that this only makes sense to Americans.

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WannaCrypt: Roots, reasons and why scramble patching won't save you now

Terry 6
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Back ups - still underrated

When I was working full time and responsible for our data alongside general IT support, alongside my real job, I'd assumed that things would go wrong, somehow, so I made lots of backups, pretty much ad hoc, that were not all stored on the network. But when I tried to get the fully professional IT dept to organise off-site storage for properly organised back ups it just wasn't seen as a priority. Until the volume of data made it impossible to collect it all and data protection made taking data discs home a no-no. Suddenly they started to take it seriously. Didn't come up with anything proper for a long time, but at least they swapped a series of external hard drives round each week and kept the recent one in a safe.

But somehow, if updating OSs is a poor relation, then back-up systems are the dodgy uncle that nobody ever mentions.

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Mozilla to Thunderbird: You can stay here and we may give you cash, but as a couple, it's over

Terry 6
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Re: Email Server Required

The email filtering works much better with the quickfilter add-on to speed up making new rules and merging more complex rules or rules that catch a lot of related messages, otherwise it's rather unwieldy, but that's just my opinion. It's a while now since I used OL too. But I was able to set up some pretty complex rules in that, which TB can't manage as well. In that sense, it's too simple.

I guess, from that point of view, filtering is either too simple or not simple enough. Which to be fair might be a good compromise.

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Terry 6
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Re: Email Server Required

Thunderbird just works. In an age in which it seems as if the suits have a firm belief that any software which works well has to have all the useful functions removed and new, but unneeded, ones put in their place, that's very welcome.

TB does need a bit of work - just nothing too radical. Folder management is just rather strange. And it needs an add-on to get automatic message filtering. Things that Outlook does rather well.

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Terry 6
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Re: It's the 21st Century: Outside of Work, Email is dead

While FB etc is good for palsy chatter, and Wattsapp makes a better texting system than using contract limited, pay to add a picture SMS messaging it's email that serves the purpose best for proper, and particularly business-like communication. I don't just mean for the work/job/office. I mean communicating with the retailers, services and organisations or family members (especially overseas) that we would once have sent a letter to. It's email all the way if you have to explain something properly, or add a few pictures or a quick sketch. It's like sending a letter except that there's no stamp, no walk to the red box and usually no delay or "lost in the post". (And from that point of view, even better than FAX).

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Terry 6
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Re: It's the 21st Century: Outside of Work, Email is dead

@R Soles I would say that FB and Twitter etc. have a strong vested interest in creating an image in which their messaging services are seen as more fashionable than email. Because they make money from users that way. Systems like Email ( and FAX for that matter) just work. They do a good job, functional, efficient, effective. But no one can exploit them to sell on to advertisers.

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Terry 6
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Re: Can someone give me an idea of what sort of money is involved?

Pale Moon

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Terry 6
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Yup. I used to use Outlook. Moved to TB a year or so back.(Not reliant on OL calendaring anymore, - always the big problem in the past). All my OL emails are still available if there are any I missed transferring- on my HDD, and in the backups too.

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Microsoft touts next Windows 10 Creators Update: It's set for a Fall

Terry 6
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Re: Microsoft still giving us everything except what we really want

Imagine if you asked your son to cut your grass. When you come home from work, he'd sold the cat, sandpapered the cars and dug up the floors.. And he'd he sprayed herbicide on the grass. Would you be pleased?

FTFY

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Terry 6
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Ho Hum

Just Ho Hum.

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A bleary-eyed Microsoft wakes up after its cloud, IoT party, clears throat: 'Oh yeah, so Windows...'

Terry 6
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Chasing the dream

Ever since Microsoft failed to notice the internet and had to play catch-up they seem to be in a state of desperation to jump on the new bandwagons, whenever these appear. No rhyme or reason is deemed essential to that process. So it all has to be 3D, cloudy, adserving, whatever.

Being userfriendly or innovative seem not to be important.

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Try not to scream: Ads are coming to Amazon's Alexa – and VR goggles

Terry 6
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Credibility gap

Advertisers seem unable to see the difference between "we can" and " we should". Everything that can be exploited will be. Whether there is any appreciable gain for them is irrelevant to the agencies, but apparently also to those who pay the agencies for transmitting these ads.

My guess is that the target isn't the consumer, but the financial industry- doing this stuff makes the brands seem active and aggressive etc. and so keeps share prices higher.

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Bot you see is what you get: The cold reality of Microsoft's chat 'AI'

Terry 6
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Devil

And they want to make sure their customers aren't calling them over the phone.

That's the thing

By and large this is not about developing useful new technologies: It's about beancounters seeing customer service as a cost centre to be reduced ( to as close to zero as possible).

We already see contact details hidden, obfuscated, redirected to FAQs. With messages and calls ( if you do manage to find a contact number or real email address) being ignored, bounced back to the same pages of FAQs, or passed through script monkeys who can't resolve issues.

Bots are just intended to be one more barrier to getting customer service.

The big companies have made a decision to scale up sales without scaling up service.

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$6,000 for tours of apocalyptic post-Brexit London? WTF, NYT?

Terry 6
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Yup, most of the "foreigners" buying properties and leaving them empty, buying football teams and leaving them in debt or buying factories and leaving them in tatters aren't from the EU. Whereas the "foreigners" keeping the NHS running often are, as are the ones picking veg in our fields and the ones serving in our hotels. Jobs which the UK born don't seem to want, preferring instead to aim to get on the X-Factor and become famous. Or at least not work for a living.

The sooner we're out the better - then we'll see the pigeons coming home to roost.

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Crooks can nick Brits' identities just by picking up the phone and lying

Terry 6
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Irony

On the rare occasions that I do get a call from my bank, requesting my personal info to identify myself, it's invariably turned out to be from their marketing dept.

As in;

"This is xyx Bank here, Mr. ZZZZZZ. Could I take you through security...! ..... Thank you. This is just a courtesy call to see if you would like to accept one of our over-expensive loans secured on your granny's life..."

And yes, if it's not a call I'm expecting then these days I do go down the route of asking "How do I know it's you...etc" It's a matter of principle TBH.

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Terry 6
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Re: 'Security' questions?

And so might everyone else.

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Realistic Brits want at least 3 security steps on bank accounts

Terry 6
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Re: Stop using your mobile 'phone

It would help if bank marketing departments didn't send emails or televise ads that looked like Scams. I've had legit emails that had a "click here" link to access new features. And that Halifax/Thunderbirds ad where Parker wins a lottery he didn't seem to have entered would be good starts.

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It's Russian hackers, FBI and Wikileaks wot won it – Hillary Clinton on her devastating election loss

Terry 6
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Fundamental flaw

It seems to me, though this is purely opinion, that there is an issue about having the choice of commanding leader being made or narrowed down to 2 challengers by a pair of in-groups before there is an election. In effect the American public who supported one party or another were not allowed to choose who they wanted for president, only to choose between the alternative party machines' choices. Those who wanted Democrats with Bernie Saunders, or an alternative for Republicans, got shafted. As did Tory voters in the UK who didn't want May and Labour voters who loath Corbyn

I'm not proposing a solution, there may not be one. After all Labour definitely widened who could elect a leader, but don't seem to have provided one that the country's natural Labour voters would vote for.

In the UK it was the system ( theoretically at least) that after the commons had been elected it was the person who could command the support of a majority (of both houses ) who would be invited to form a government. But now the winning party leader just gets taken up the Mall and invited to become PM

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Today's bonkers bug report: Microsoft Edge can't print numbers

Terry 6
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Re: "Surely true black can be rendered in RGB, with a value of 0,0,0?"

Also, a good few years back MS decided that for home users Publisher wasn't to be included in the Office bundle. Why, God alone knows. I'm not sure Microsoft did. I equate this with the point where they stopped taking any notice of what customers would want. But for SoHo users not having Publisher meant using Word instead. And also there was a host of budget DTP offerings that could be used to create a church or club flier, or a quick poster, or a birthday card and so on. And of course the home users who then found themselves needing to knock out a bit of quick DTP when they were at work didn't go to Publisher, if they were used to using Word. I wouldn't be surprised if many of them even got their employers to buy Serif's offering even though they had Publisher already.

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Terry 6
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Re: And all the students that get stuck with Windows S!

Err @Pompus Git, anyone stuck with the new Win 10 S(h*t) who might have reason to send an image to PDF.

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Terry 6
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@Sampler

Until I read your comment I'd just thought, "Who cares" and "Why would you even want to".

But you've hit nail on head here.

Because the new Windows S**t version will tie users ( read "victims") to whatever Microsoft allows, making things like using Edge to create a PDF more likely.

Currently there are probably more ways to create a PDF of anything than there are ways to create the original content.

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We are 'heroes,' says police chief whose force frisked a photographer

Terry 6
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Re: Again?

Obstructing the highway is a very useful(?) catch-all. If you are parked anywhere on the highway you are obstructing it.

I remember many years ago I was with someone who was given a ticket for obstructing, because cars couldn't get past. She pointed out that the other side of the street had been clear, with plenty of room to pass when she'd parked there. Another car had then come and parked on the other side, leaving no room to get past. She still had to pay the fine.

And in fact, though not fair in that instance, it is probably necessary. A few years back I was driving along a narrow road behind Highgate school during their school run one evening. The road only had enough space to allow cars in one direction at a time, but there were a few spaces that drivers were using to give way to each other. The car ahead of me pulled in to one of these spaces, the oncoming car moved forward, expecting the driver to then carry on into the space behind him. It's what the previous pairs of cars had all done, slowly allowing all the cars to weave past one another. But this one didn't. Instead of moving forward into the space created she calmly got out of the car, locked it and walked off -leaving the entire road locked up. She should have been. There's never a copper when you need one.

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Windows 10 S forces Bing, Edge on your kids. If you don't like it, get Win10 Pro – Microsoft

Terry 6
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Bing?

Edge they might get away with; I doubt many users even fully realise that there is a thing between the computer and the internet. All that changes is the border round the screen.

But Bing?

Goggle- whether you Loath it or Hate it, does at least produce useful search results more often than not.

Whereas ask Bing anything uncommon and it still seems to fall back to trying to sell you something. (Though it has improved !=anywhere good enough yet).

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Don't click that Google Docs link! Gmail hijack mail spreads like wildfire

Terry 6
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Re: I got mine

Re: AC I sort of agree. I started blocking ads only when they became intrusive. I'm wary of the likes of Google collecting too much data ( to sell), that's a step too far beyond showing me ads for stuff. And I feel aggrieved that they are able to do so by having command of the mobile phone business.

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S is for Sandbox: The logic behind Microsoft's new lockdown Windows gambit

Terry 6
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Re: S is for Subsidised

Amazon have a small scale version of this scam. Buy a Fire tablet and they'll throw irritating ads at you until you fork over an extra fiver that you didn't want to pay when you bought the thing.

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Windows 10 S: Good, bad, and how this could get ugly for PC makers

Terry 6
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Re: Oh dear

1 step forward 2 steps back

FTFY

(from a one time MS fan)

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Microsoft sparks new war with Google with, er, $999+ lappies for kids

Terry 6
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Re: Microsoft is trying Windows RT all over again

"....to run real Windows programmes

FTFY

"Apps" are those silly little programmlets that Google encourage people to use in place of proper software, on their over-priced info-slurping adservers.. And to be fair, are probably all they need.

The concern I have about these 10 S machines is that they'll tie users into Microsoft's pet programmes - in cut-down app versions or silly priced subscription versions, instead of them escaping to LibreOffice or equivalent.

And for the undergrads that could mean keeping them for life, once they get to that stage.

And yes, for a teacher, a Chromebook - no hassle, no frights - is going to be the best option. Faced with a room full of stroppy kids, no means of escape and several weeks hard work on a dodgy laptop is a nightmare that no one wants to face.

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40,000 Tinder pics scraped into big data service

Terry 6
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Devil

Re: Side issue

Years a go my late mother bought a new handbag in a department store. When she brought it back to our house, and looked in it, at the bottom of the bag, under the packaging, there was a ring. It had a large and judging by the scratch it made on some glass, genuine diamond. Being honest we took it to the police station, and explained where it had come from. And they explained that if it wasn't claimed within 3 months it would become ours. It got claimed.

The person who collected it didn't even leave a message to say 'thanks'. Which doesn't really add anything to this thread. I just wanted to say it. To add to the sum total of human cynicism.

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'I feel violated': Engineer who pointed out traffic signals flaw fined for 'unlicensed engineering'

Terry 6
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Re: Self description

Which effectively designates "engineering" there as a legally sanctioned "closed shop" rather than as an accepted qualification. Like working in "the print" or a Belfast docker used to be.

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iPhone lawyers literally compare Apples with Pears in trademark war

Terry 6
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Re: Does anyone remember ...

FozzyBear

Marketing consultants?

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Terry 6
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Re: I am not a lawyer but...

Because they want to be first (why the f*ck they think that's important/significant God alone knows). But haven't worked out that standing in a queue doesn't get it to them quicker

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Terry 6
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Re: Dear Apple.

Pirate Dave. That's so unfair. They move the air towards and over warm people/CPUs and so remove heat.

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Terry 6
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"Or the sort of people that think chips come from McDonalds.."

There's somewhere else?

Damn, who'd have thunk it.

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Terry 6
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Re: Does anyone remember ...

I checked mine to make sure it's not an Apple and Raspberry Pi

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Terry 6
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Re: Dear Apple.

companies have to defend them, as that is the law

No it isn't.

It's the law that they can defend them. Even that they might need to - for example if a company was placing a picture of a half-chewed tree fruit in its cheap lap tops.

Bu they don't have to. That's a choice.

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Terry 6
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Re: Dear Apple.

Don't blame the patent office. Blame the morons who have oversight of the office and don't put the brakes on. Those are the people who tell the clerks and lawyers what to do. The employed staff are just trying to do what they're told and keep their jobs.

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Don't install our buggy Windows 10 Creators Update, begs Microsoft

Terry 6
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Re: Another day

Pale Moon?

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Terry 6
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Re: Another day

I read somewhere that this review settings page is the one and only chance you get to protect as much privacy as it will let you, all in one place. After that it's a mishmash of settings locations ( worse than the current version!).

So I'm telling people to delay letting it do the update until they have time to go through that properly.

And frankly, since I see no advantage to this update for anyone who doesn't want to wear 3d goggles - it can wait as long as they damn well want.

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Come celebrate World Hypocrisy Day

Terry 6
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Re: It ought to be.

Purely from my observation, I could be very wrong, there is enormous support for IP when it's your stuff or people you approve of) and less so when it's stuff you want to get for free, or belonging to people you don't like.

And the big corporations. make that worse, because that's exactly what they do themselves.

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Don't stop me! Why Microsoft's inevitable browser irrelevance isn't

Terry 6
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Pale Moon

Pale Moon.

No Google spying.

No MS spying.

No adblock whitelisting

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Uber sued by ex-Lyft driver tormented by app maker's 'Hell' spyware

Terry 6
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Black Helicopters

Re: "Unlike Lyft, Uber changes the tokens it uses..identify drivers, to prevent such tracking."

Phukov Andigh

Well, if you've ever watched "Who framed Roger Rabbit" this would be no surprise..

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0096438/synopsis?ref_=ttpl_pl_syn

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Terry 6
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Re: Disruptor

Or expensively funded vapourware, maybe.

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