* Posts by Terry 6

2422 posts • joined 31 Jul 2009

Leeds hospital launches campaign to 'axe the fax'

Terry 6
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That being said, while I used fax a lot till recently, I used a scan of my signature on both media. (Faxes were more often than not documents printed on my MFD to fax and ma never have seen any paper)

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Terry 6
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No. No one says you don't have email as well or that you shouldn't replace fax machines over time. as they fail. Images from high tech devices get emailed or transferred electronically. Letters to a named person get faxed. Perhaps from a printer. But while the fax works, is secure and the information pops up on someone's desk it may be better than being in a list of 500+ email messages about everything from trust directives about the latest changes in curtain material to arrangements for Doreen's hen night.

But to spend money replacing functioning fax machines wholesale is a different matter.

The newest and latest tech doesn't have to be adopted immediately just because you can.

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Linux kernel's Torvalds: 'I am truly sorry' for my 'unprofessional' rants, I need a break to get help

Terry 6
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Re: @Steve Davies 3 Don't let the namby-pambys run the Kernel, Linus!

Sounds like a fair point. He's got the results. Ultimately his developer community will do what it does because it wants to. And what will happen will happen.

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Terry 6
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Re: Congratulations

And..

He's not going to be around forever. At some point the great ctl-alt-delete will get to him too. If the project is balanced on the single point of one person bullying it along it is doomed.

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Terry 6
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From the outside looking in..

The man's behaviour, over the years, has been appalling by normal standards.

But since he's in a reasonably safe place, society wise, being neither a politician nor a businessman (as such), maybe his behaviour is just something that has to be accepted. You don't have to work alongside him. But that's like seeing the development world as a kind of digital Wild West.

The above comments that say in effect "if you get abused it's your own fault" can only apply if abuse is at least proportionate. And. If too many good programmers choose not to work alongside him, then he is damaging the project. Also if people argue, as they would out in the rest of the world, that no abuse is appropriate ( as would I) then that has to be taken into account too.

The danger is that otherwise you get into the "If you don't want to sleep with the producer don't go into acting" kind of argument.

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Amazon probes alleged bribery of staffers for data on e-tail platform

Terry 6
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You pay peanuts

And you know the rest.

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Security procedures are good – follow them and you get to keep your job

Terry 6
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Re: Powershell & Snippingtool?

In this rather muddled article there is no differentiation between named software/officially sanctioned software/IT staff using own unauthorised software/ general staff using their own.... software

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Terry 6
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There are some problems with this article

First, the fact that it's people who are the risk is nothing new.

However,

1.) if these people can install random bits of software on a company system then the system can't have been tied down properly

2.) If they want to install this software they must have a reason. If they have a reason (other than personal, possibly entertainment, software ) then they are being asked to perform tasks that the company hasn't given them the tools for. So the company would deserve all it gets.

3.) Where staff circumvent the actual security procedures of the company for reasons of productivity - which was the implication of this article before it got tied up in dodgy software installs, the question is then posed; What are they being asked to do that can't be managed within the procedures? And if this, why is the management is not factoring in its own procedures when setting tasks?

This makes the image of a speeding driver totally inadequate.

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Microsoft accidentally let encrypted Windows 10 out into the world

Terry 6
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Re: The last time I ran a Windows beta

Older, more innocent days.

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Terry 6
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Re: Does anybody here remember...

I don't like rollercoasters, either. But some people.....

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Terry 6
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Re: What is the point of the login screen image at all then?

Is it to be a blurred showing of a real image or jus a blurry image. If the latter it can be changed. If it blurs real images specially, who knows. Microsoft's habit of removing functionality for no good reason is pretty remorseless in this regard.

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Terry 6
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Re: Does anybody here remember...

I could imagine people with test systems (pros/tech journalists/hobbyists) doing this for the interest and preparedness.

Anyone putting it on a system needed to do stuff is just a looney.

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It's been 5 years already, let's gawp at Microsoft and Nokia's bloodbath

Terry 6
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Re: Phone? What's that?

Whoa there....

I could have said the same ""99% of calls from numbers not already on my contact list ...are junk" twenty+ years ago. Anyone who ever received a call from out of the blue from an unknown number was getting junk. Except once upon a time it was wrong numbers (they used to be very common) now it's PPI/Scammers

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Terry 6
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Re: "Nokia was toast from the moment Elop was made CEO"

It's more that Microsoft's mobile strategy seemed to be built around bullying rather than user friendliness. Trying to bully users to accept a Desktop OS that would tie them to a mobile OS. And trying to bully them into either over priced or cheap cut-down to-the-bone (so still over priced in effect) models when something middle of the road with good features ranges was needed ( e.g having a single crappy camera when Androids were all starting to come out with two decent cameras, or having no compass etc)

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Terry 6
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Re: You could equally say that about France, Germany, Algeria and Argentina

It may be apocryphal. When there were bomb attacks in Vienna Americans cancelled trips to Australia.

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Terry 6
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In content, not in, er syntax.

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Terry 6
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Re: Nokia was a phone company that couldn't make the transition

LDS

I think your comment "People like Nadella like easy challenges and quick returns, they will run away from difficult ones," is telling.

Commitment to a product, getting the product right and supporting that product. Where did these basic concepts go?

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$200bn? Make that $467bn: Trump threatens to balloon proposed bonus China tech tariffs

Terry 6
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Re: The cost of theft

But how much of that stuff is assembled from imported bits. Bits which may become more expensive with high tariffs?

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Terry 6
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Re: Obamacare === Medicare? Not!!

As I understand this, explained to me by a cousin who is American and a lawyer with skills in this area, Obamacare is indeed a pretty awful scheme - just far better than not having some kind of affordable care scheme.

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Terry 6
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Re: You can always count on the GOP!

Who in the world sees USA's Democrats as "Lunatic Left"???

They're barely a sliver away from the GOP. If that.

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Terry 6
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Re: "socialism ultimately fails because it runs out of "other people's money"

Americans ( and many others) have been taught that Socialism = Communism.

It does not. This may, according to the definition used, be a matter of degree. But they are not the same. And of course some extreme political parties - of extreme left and extreme right- have adopted the word, on the basis that it implies something much more moderate and friendly than they really stand for. But it doesn't make them socialist and it doesn't make socialism what any of them stand for.

Communism is, in simple terms, the central ownership of everything on behalf of the people.

Socialism is the direction of resources so that incomes are spread equitably among the people.Which could mean communism. Marxist thinkers would define Socialism as a step on the path to Communism. As would the conservative right; though with much less appetite.And both Communists on the left and radical free-marketeers on the right would both have you think it is the same. Both have a vested interest in diverting society away from any system that manages the economy to be more equitable.

In a sense the extreme right and extreme left have a convergence of views. Because neither can bare the thought of a fair and equitable society. (And arguably the top echelon of both are just the same as each other anyway. See Orwell's Animal farm).

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Terry 6
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Re: The cost of theft

The Chinese probably have noticed that the West got its wealth through similar and worse tactics. We stole people as slaves for a start. And we stole land that we worked with slave labour. And we stole the produce of the land and the minerals below it. We even fought wars so that we could make them let our drugs in for sale. Noticeably against China itself

From Wikipaedia

The Opium Wars were two wars in the mid-19th century involving China and the British Empire over the British trade of opium and China's sovereignty. The clashes included the First Opium War (1839–1842) and the Second Opium War (1856–1860). The wars and events between them weakened the Qing dynasty and forced China to trade with the other parts of the world.[1][2] The victorious British were successful in inducing an opioid crisis in China, which seriously undermined Chinese society[citation needed].

...In 1820, China's economy was the largest in the world, according to British economist Angus Maddison.[3] Within a decade after the end of the Second Opium War, China's share of global GDP had fallen by half.[4] .......e. China was the largest economy in the world for many centuries until the Opium Wars.[3] In China, the period between 1839 and 1949 is referred to as the Century of Humiliation.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Opium_Wars

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Terry 6
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Well actually AC there are plenty in the UK and USA etc. trying to level that playing field. The ones who want to abolish minimum wage, job security and health and safety rules. Those who encourage zero hours contracts and welfare "reforms" that push people to destitution if they don't accept poverty-level pay.

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Terry 6
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I think, from what I've been reading, constant growth is not a demand of modern economics ( which hasn't really changed that much) but of modern commerce . i.e. bean counters who value companies on an index of growth rather than earnings.

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Y'know what? VoIP can also be free from pesky regulation – US judges

Terry 6
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Yup Jamie Jones, got it in one.

Where I live (London) UK the streets were cabled by a small company given the local franchise - Cable London. Competing with BT as the only other ( national ) carrier. But Cable London got vacuumed up by ( I think this is the order) Cable and Wireless, who were vacuumed up by NTL who were vacuumed up by Virgin Media who were vacuumed up by a faintly anonymous bunch (Global something or other - that the subscribers have probably never even heard of). And if there wasn't regulation it would eventually be one company. Didn't the USA have something similar with Bell? Unregulated market capitalism just means the biggest fish takes control of the whole pond. Can Bob, I wonder, really imagine Amazon letting anyone else sell anything if they had their way? And once they had monopoly we'd all be serfs and share croppers, buying at the company store.

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Terry 6
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Logic and politics

At some point in time the USA decided that important utilities had to be protected. Phones being one such. It's the role that this service played that was being protected, not the technology. I much doubt that the legislators knew or cared the first thing about the technology. The internet has come along in a different time; one in which "free market" deregulation rules.

In logical terms VoIP serves the same role as POTS- i.e. letting someone here speak to someone not here. But maybe with other functions, though that could have been said since at least the invention of Fax.

In political terms it's a way to wriggle the service for speaking to someone away from being a protected service into a fully free market service.

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Pluto is more alive than Mars, huff physicists who are still not over dwarf planet's demotion

Terry 6
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Re: Get over it???

I didn't give you either of those two dvs. Done by the time I got here - but they still put you over the line. :-) Funnily enough I only got 2 dvs, at the time of writing. If one was yours the only other was probably the "Get over it"er.

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Terry 6
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Get over it???

As soon as I see those words I recognise someone who hasn't got an argument. It's the logical equivalent of "Yah Boo sucks to you!"

Go ahead, downvote me.

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A flash of inspiration sees techie get dirty to fix hospital's woes

Terry 6
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Re: Upsetting non-techies can be hard

There were and are too f-ing many bits of Windows that do this. Stuff happens, because a random key combination gets knocked and there is no visible way of getting things back to normal. Ideally there ought to be a button that reveals status of various options, so that users can see what has been set.

BUT, mostly the real problem is that Help in Windows is and has always been total crap. Usually if you go and search for anything unusual that's happening it won't actually be mentioned. These are settings ffs.

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I've seen the future of consumer AI, and it doesn't have one

Terry 6
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Re: FIRE ! FIRE ! FIRE !

Yes

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Terry 6
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FAIL

Re: Smash the spinning Jenny!

AC - Trolling here is really a waste of time. We ( not all old folk) have pretty much all seen it all.

And FWIW we, old and young, do know the difference between worthwhile new tech and meretricious crap designed to separate the gullible from their cash.

But hey! If you want to troll, go ahead. And if you want to buy this stuff, please do. It's gainful employment for someone - if only a marketing droid or two.

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Terry 6
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Re: FIRE ! FIRE ! FIRE !

As noted. Because it has a timer switch.

When my kids were small we used "ping!" as a synonym for food.

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Terry 6
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Re: An "AI powered cooking assistant"?

My main use of mobile phone in the kitchen is to translate between those cooking temperatures in degrees F (or at least C) into the gas numbers on my cooker.

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Terry 6
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We're theproduct...

The point of a "smart fridge" is that we're not the customer, we're the product. The fridge would identify that we have run out of our Amazon supplied, bland, over-priced, generic cheddar and send us some more. It'd remove the option ( and the will) to shop around or try a new product - unless it was one they were promoting to increase their profit margins. If they had their way our branded, Amazon supplied SmartFridge would have fixed slots for a range of standardised items. ( A bit like those hotel mini-bars with every item in it's own sensor checked slot, that try to charge you if you move their over-priced booze out of the way so that you can bung in a carton of milk ).

This would tie us in to their retail outlet, selling us a smaller range of standardised products and charging us without us even knowing what we're buying and how much it costs us. We'd just pay our bill at the end of the month, probably automatically.

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Terry 6
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Re: We've seen this before

we're all now really pleased that the suits persisted and the techies ultimately delivered portable computers that could be held in the hand and connect wirelessly to the global telephone system and the Internet.

Err? Nope. Use the stuff yes. addicted possibly. Would I be at a loss without most of it if they hadn't invented it. No.

A phone you can use out of the house is useful. Beyond that, it's like ironing. If some idiot hadn't gone and invented it no one would be any the worse without it.

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Terry 6
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Re: An "AI powered cooking assistant"?

Olaf

we're not too good at storing the ring binders. So we tend to print a recipe when we need it, not too often. Possibly not as wasteful as it sounds, since only the ones that we need to use get printed, and short ones can be read off the device. But is there any AI involved or needed? Fuck All.

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It looks like tech-savvy drivers will have to lead connected car data purge

Terry 6
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Users?

consumers also have to get into the habit of removing their data and dissociating their smartphones when they sell on their connected cars.

FFS Most users struggle to work out how to connect the fucking things and make them work properly. Does anyone realistically think that they'll know how ( or even why) to wipe themselves off?!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

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Thousands of misconfigured 3D printers on interwebz run risk of sabotage

Terry 6
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More real* Can you be arrested if your insecure 3d printer is hacked, badly misused by a script kiddie or equivalent, setting your property on fire and killing the people who live in the flat upstairs?

*They would have to get physical access to the gun.

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Fast food, slow user – techie tears hair out over crashed drive-thru till

Terry 6
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Re: "educate the caller"

No Alan Brown, that doesn't read as lack of common sense. It reads of a sense of entitlement and an arrogance that says he/she doesn't think they need to take notice like other mere mortals do.

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Terry 6
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Re: Ahhh, memories...

Not just you Helldesk guys..

"My internet isnt working" was common when I was supporting colleagues as the IT lead. Except that "My internet isn't working" frequently turned out to mean "My whole fucking computer isn't working". Not being tied to a remote IT desk I quickly learnt that it was quicker to pop up/downstairs to their office than try to resolve issues over the phone. Luckily, though it meant stopping my own work to do it, that usually saved much more time than it wasted - even allowing for all the other diversions and delays on the way.

Whereas "The email isn't working" did often mean that the internet connection was down. Oh, and sometimes "The computer isn't working" meant that the printer had gone offline when they needed it. I never got to the bottom of that, even standing next to the fully working computer with them, looking at the error message from the printer. And once, when this happened, the user pointed to the error messages on the screen and said "See, it isn't working".

I assume we've all been through dealing with users who think the monitor is the computer, and the box is just the "hard drive". As in "Is the light on the computer on? "Yes." . When in fact only the monitor is.

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Terry 6
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Re: Do you want fries with that?

This is the thing. McD and the like pay rock bottom rates to people who only have to perform very simple tasks. And it's done by script. They are not expected to think for themselves. A sensible IT support system would have a camera they could point at the problem and a headphone to talk to the support dept. So you could say, " Look down to the right. Can you see that grey wire in the back of the box. Press the top of the wire where it goes into the box and pull it out. Now can you see the black wire......"

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Good news, bad news, weird news – it's the week in networking

Terry 6
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Joke

Re: Oh, great: civil aviation wants to route messages over the Internet Protocol

See Icon

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Terry 6
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Joke

Oh, great: civil aviation wants to route messages over the Internet Protocol

I wanted to be the first to write..

What could possibly go wrong.

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No, eight characters, some capital letters and numbers is not a good password policy

Terry 6
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Re: What's so difficult?...

Three?? With both a username and a password to try and recall. And with several dozen accounts in your life?

It can take two or three goes just to get the right username. And then there are the password choices ("Did I use that one with the battery and staple or whatever they were or is this the one that's my mother's middle name plus my golf handicap and did it have to have a special character....?" With the best will in the world you have to expect most users to need >3 attempts at least once or twice a month at least if they aren't logging in every day.

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Terry 6
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Re: It's just a mental trick

You don't need to "counter" and it doesn't need a bad memory ( or recall, which is more to the point) just a loss of self-confidence within the task will do. Anyone trying to remember a list of random objects with no contextual cues is going to either muddle them or panic and be unable to recall them. Someone who doubts their ability to recall the list even more so. At best correct/horse/battery/staple is going to elicit some kind of "was it a staple or was it a needle?" type or response from a large chunk of the population from time to time

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Terry 6
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Re: Layers...like an onion

I'm not seeing through this clearly. Clear desk, to the point that there are no post-its or anything else means clear desk.

Tidy desk sounds a laudable aim, but isn't relevant to this discussion.

No secure documentation left on the desk is a dead end in this regard if, a.) they are prepared to keep a written password ( already out of bounds everywhere, but pretty much everywhere does it anyway) or b.) the premises are meant to be secure so what difference does a filing cabinet make...... (And if that's just complacency - it probably is- that's a different issue anyway) or c) they aren't convinced that a written down password (inside their "secure" office) is a problem

And, as I pointed out already, people will still find other, probably worse ways round it. And yes, I have seen a password written on a lunch box in a staff fridge. Everyone else who had an identified lunch box had their own name on it, one person pointed out that theirs was the one with an identifying string, which was their "log in" (his words). And I've heard staff groups discussing what password to use that month. As in them looking at the table and someone suggesting 4icedbuns because there were 4 iced buns left on the plate. Or, slightly better, saying to a colleague/group " my password is..... Just in case I forget." and them sharing/writing down each others' p/w. And no, management won't support IT staff unless it's a really egregious breach - because these are valuable staff who get the organisation's work done.

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Terry 6
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Re: Layers...like an onion

Pretty much every infosec pro I've spoken to or worked with

Probably though not the best policy for Bill in Orders, Freda in marketing or Betty in HR who like and need to work in a human environment with familiar cosy items round them and the paper manual with the stuff they need to type no more than 3 inches away. Ultimately they are the organisation and Infosec are the defences. Yes they have to be responsible, but they also have to be able to do their jobs in an effective and comfortable way. And the organisation has to be able to retain them - which means not putting their backs up too much.

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Terry 6
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Re: Layers...like an onion

clear desk policies as a best practice.

Best practice???

By whose definition? Probably not that of the people doing the work of the place, who like their stuff around them, feel comfortable and work well that way. i.e. real people getting results for the organisation.

Work place has to be a human environment, not a machine environment, for most people. And that means photo of the dog/child/car/spouse, potted cactus, furry toy, and some well thumbed documentation.

Oh, and btw if there's no space for a post-it with the password on the desk they'll probably put it in a wallet or lunch box - or even agree to share one. ( Shouts across the room, "Hey Fred, what's the password this month?")

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Windows 10 July update. Surface Pro 4. Working fondleslab. Pick two

Terry 6
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Re: July Update "fun"

Microsoft "experts" have all told me the same info found on the web that doesn't work.

If you were consulting any officially recognised Microsoft forum the only answers you will get will be from MS shills and fanbois who just parrot the MS creed. This usually means a piece of advice that bares no resemblance to the issue you are experiencing and is based on the idiotic assumption that nothing has gone wrong and you just weren't doing it right.

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Experimental 'insult bot' gets out of hand during unsupervised weekend

Terry 6
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Re: screw ups

At school that was our (real) challenge. Punch cards had to be stacked and sent off to a distant computer centre, returning a week or so later with the errors to be corrected. But whatever our official project the real aim was to hide code that put the distant machine into a loop, without the code being picked out and intercepted before it was run.

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