* Posts by Terry 6

1802 posts • joined 31 Jul 2009

If you need to replace anything other than your iPhone 8's battery or display, good luck

Terry 6
Silver badge

Re: It doesn't matter...

Millenials are not idiots. The parents are (always) to blame. It's we who brought them up to think that stuff can be treated as disposable. It's we who insisted on their having all the newest thingies. (Take a look at any kiddies' birthday party/Christmas presents etc.) It's we who developed their sense of entitlement.They didn't learn this anywhere else. All they're doing is taking our example to its conclusion.

0
0
Terry 6
Silver badge

news and consumer programmes

@teahound

Not infrequently there are little news items and consumer programmes that feature someone who lost all their family photos, "their life", etc when their phone was lost/stolen/broke. Or indeed small businesses with everything on a computer hdd. And I just can't feel my usual level of sympathy - because no kind of back up. Today there was some person on "Pointless Celebrities" ( OK I'm getting old) talking about how she wrote her books by hand, and when asked about the risk of the paper being lost/ruined she was being slightly smug because of knowing people who had lost everything when their PCs died. Well she should have been making copies and they should too ( they're called back ups). I just don't have time for people who rely on a unique version of something so precious to them when making a safe copy is so easy.

1
0
Terry 6
Silver badge

As I've whined in these pages several times recently, I've just replaced my trusty Windows 640 with a One Plus 5. because there just wasn't a WinPhone to buy. One of the things I miss ( along with being able to Bluetooth handsfree voice to text in my Honda) was the tough glass on the front and a replaceable battery.

0
0

Don’t fear the software shopkeeper: T&Cs banning bad reviews aren’t legal in America

Terry 6
Silver badge

Re: So don't review them

JulieM

Do you, really, in all honesty think that the many users of software would know what to do with source code, or that it even existed. Or was it just trolling? Even techie purchasers of infosec software are probably not likely to have the time or skills to examine vast pages of code, assuming that said code is even sufficiently clear to be followed.

I actually agreed the first paragraph. The whole "apps" business is built on users clicking through Ts&Cs that say " we will copy all your data, sell your family into bondage and rent out your house to foreign businessmen for use as illicit love nests". (Or they might for all anyone knows).

3
0

Downloaded CCleaner lately? Oo, awks... it was stuffed with malware

Terry 6
Silver badge

I have been using it to delete as much as possible the stuff that Microsoft dumped on to the computer in Win 10 and disable automatic start ups.. The tools had both these functions and made the job easy. But that's not a good enoug reason for me to keep them now. Nor will I keep Avast.

5
0

Unloved Microsoft Edge is much improved – but will anyone use it?

Terry 6
Silver badge

Re: You realise Google own YouTube

It's an advert. Only an advert. Or do you think TV companies, like UK Gold, shouldn't tell you about their sister companies? Or Classic FM (Global) not be allowed to mention what is happening on their local pop channels, if they should want to?

2
1
Terry 6
Silver badge

@TheVogon As noted in previous topics. I've reluctantly dumped my once loved Winphone for a Plus One 5, because there just wasn't anything to buy.

Also,

" all you need to do is hit F12, click the "Emulation" tab " And how many real users ( i.e. not techies) would even come close to that route.

0
0
Terry 6
Silver badge

Re: Seen in the wild!

Sadly, when all the moaning about Microsoft is done and dusted, one things stays hanging. Instead of drawing customers in with attractive, easy to use, rewarding, functional, friendly, efficient software they fill their OS with trip wires and pot holes to try and trap the unwary users. It's compulsion and trickery instead of a desirable offer.

10
0
Terry 6
Silver badge

Re: Memory Utilisation

PALE MOON!

Each time El Reg has a browser thread the usual Chrome/Firefox/Opera alternatives come up. What have you guys got against Pale Moon?

10
3

User worked with wrong app for two weeks, then complained to IT that data had gone missing

Terry 6
Silver badge

Re: TBH

I think in this thread we need to distinguish between testing a newly minted bit of programming and trying out a bought-in package. I've done both,over the years. In the first it's about saying what works or doesn't. In the second it's more about whether the package is suitable for us. You can have a modified "test" version if it's still in Beta or earlier,and worry about interface details when the actual working code and basic interface is sorted out. I can't thin of an example where a new version of software, using the same data, would be so radically different it would need live user testing. But the query is, are we looking at an early version to see if it works in real life,or a later version to test interface detail (font, colours, etc ).

0
0
Terry 6
Silver badge

Re: In my experience ...

Public sector sized budgets.....

Really! The public sector might, in total, be big, even very, very big. But that doesn't mean there is a penny to spare. Do you not read the news? Have you been living in a cave? No council spends more on back office work than is less than it needs.

14
1
Terry 6
Silver badge

TBH

Sorry, it doesn't sound to me like the user was wrong, nor a " cretin". Users, unless particularly tech aware, are not tuned in to the finer points of tech. The "cretin" is the person who allowed the test version to be "customised" to look like the live version.

Think what happens when you log into windows safe mode. Absolutely no mistake. It tells you. A test version should have the words "test version" clearly imprinted round the border, or something of that sort. And if it was customisable, then there should have bloody well been a limited range of colours, maybe even striped or something. It's not rocket science. It's not even unique to IT. People do dummy runs of all sorts of processes, and they make it clear that this is a test run.

94
20

Boffins fear we might be running out of ideas

Terry 6
Silver badge

Re: Because

It's also one of those weasely disingenuous arguments even taken at the face value. Graduates also pay taxes -if the argument holds any water they pay more than non-graduates because they supposedly earn more. And VAT/Corporation tax etc provide a pretty major part of the tax base too ( though maybe not Google's share).

3
0
Terry 6
Silver badge

Re: I suggest an immediate...

It is being done. It's called philosophy and Universities are full of people doing it. But maybe not as full as they used to be, since that requires funding. And within the field there's even History of Ideas, which tells us how we got where we are in our approach to science etc.

2
0
Terry 6
Silver badge
Unhappy

Re: Or is it becasue...

Which is a bit like saying that we will only fund our top sports talent in sports that already have medal winners. And we wouldn't do that, would we?

5
0
Terry 6
Silver badge
Angel

Re: Another factor

Ah yes, I'd forgotten that. The Sainted M.Thatcher, who's early career was working out how to get more air into ice-cream! (No irony icon).

5
0
Terry 6
Silver badge

Re: Because

This was my thought. Is it a decline in original ideas, or a decline in support for originality. We no longer value education or research for knowledge's sake. Whether it's about the content of school curricula, arguing that students should have expensive loans and not tax funded grants, because "Why should the people who don't go to university fund those who do..", academics having to show "productivity" in terms of numbers of papers published rather than originality or power of what they do produce or journals accepting only papers that will help them to sell copies and adverts. We've devalued academic study and replaced it with training.

21
0

Microsoft fixing Windows 10 'stuttering' bugs in Creators Update

Terry 6
Silver badge

FFS

Microsoft fixing bugs? Hmm

They haven't fixed the bug in using different icons for the recycle bin.

They haven't fixed networking so that all the computers on a simple SOHO little network appear in network places, on every machine, every time.Both been an issue since XP days. And these should be pretty simple things to do.

5
2

Google rushes to curb Oreo's massive appetite for your 4G mobile data

Terry 6
Silver badge

Re: You can see how they'd miss this

Not that they'd ever be "Evil" of course.

0
0

Remember when Lenovo sold PCs with Superfish adware? It just got a mild scolding from FTC

Terry 6
Silver badge

Normalisation

Because Google built a business model on supplying services while targetting adverts and then built that into an operating system that most phone makers supply it has become the de facto accepted normal behaviour in consumer computing at every level even when it's not the companies' primary business model. After all, if it's OK for Google to do this, why shouldn't everyone else put their noses in the trough? (Microsoft gets a well-deserved kicking in these pages often enough, even when it's not even about them - but in fairness they do it because, in the normal Microsoft fashion, they are just copying a lead that others have provided.)

3
2

Smart meters: 'Dog's breakfast' that'll only save you 'a tenner' – report

Terry 6
Silver badge

Re: Benefits

You would say that, wouldn't you.

0
1
Terry 6
Silver badge

Re: Benefits - *cough* 1972 *cough*

Exactly. Not many people ever think "I'll go with what the majority decide" except for choosing lunch,maybe(?). But lots of people think, "It's not going to happen" until it does.

1
0
Terry 6
Silver badge

Re: I have one because ...

Tariffs may have changed, but, we used to have a day/night tariff. In theory it made sense. Electricity supply is at a surplus in the dead of night, so making it cheaper then is a win situation. Yes? No, apparently not. Making sure that our really heavy use machines,the dishwasher and washing machine only went on during cheap hours wasn't nearly enough to counter the ridiculously higher day time costs, for the small items that draw current in the day. (usual stuff lights, TVs, Kettle, fish tank, pump for the boiler, computers). Had the day time tariff been closer to normal costings it would have been worthwhile for us and everyone benefits. But no.

2
0
Terry 6
Silver badge

Re: Benefits - *cough* 1972 *cough*

No? We have a system of representative government. Since the 1972 join vote there were plenty of elections,and the elected governments made the incremental changes to our membership. But this Brexit vote was carried by a minority of the population who wanted to leave. n.b. Non Voters might not have been bothered, or whatever, but they did not choose to change.the staus quo.

11
10
Terry 6
Silver badge

Re: Benefits

Isn't that what all the years of Brexit agitation have been doing? Didn't Farage say that this was what they would do if they lost.

So when Leave win by a tiny majority of those who voted, on the back of a lacklustre Remain campaign fought by politicians frightened of Ukip oiled by frankly lies and misinformation, that can't be challenged? Even when the reality is already starting to bite.

18
5

Memo to Microsoft: Keeping your promises is probably a good idea

Terry 6
Silver badge

Re: I'm finally ready to jump ship to Apple...

This relates more to the whole "PC sales are down" business. Most home or SOHO users have little or no need for a proper computer. To visit web pages/FB/etc, do a few letters and keep a simple spreadsheet any old tablet or "phablet" will do the job. For Gaming - there's the consoles. There are groups who need something more meaty - a proper keyboard and screen if you are doing lots of office desk work, reasonable amount of power and storage if you are handling lots of graphics or data managing. But for Joe the Grocer, or the average home user a cheapo machine is plenty. Most adults over the age of 21 (i.e. once they've finished studying) can get by quite well without a PC.

1
0
Terry 6
Silver badge
Devil

Losing the Winphone

I'm jumping ship at last. I've clung to my 640, because I actually liked it. A lot. But it's getting increasingly left behind. I've never been bothered by the limited number of "apps". But the ones I do want to use are either disappearing from Winphone or the version is much poorer than the iOS/Android version. And even the ones I use haven't been updated or improved for a long time. Yet at the same time the one advantage of not using Google-Android, the spying, has been lost.

Even when I got the 640 it was slightly reluctant. I wanted to spend a bit more on a bit better Windows phone. But the choice was low-end and not being quite as good as I wanted, or high-end that I couldn't justify buying. And there was nothing available in the mid-range that I really wanted.

13
1

Microsoft sets the date for Fall Creators Update

Terry 6
Silver badge
Unhappy

Re: Ya'll missed it by a mile...

The lust for money response I'd agree. If Microsoft weren't seeking money ( and power?) they'd be stupid and irresponsible. More interesting is whether the approach they've taken, of copying methods that other companies have already made a success of is a good one - when they arrive at the docks after the boat has sailed, and then jump so hard that they might end up sinking it. I write this as a Winphone user, in transition, who would have loved to stay with the platform. See previous posts galore.

1
0
Terry 6
Silver badge

Re: Fall, Creators! Update.

Punctuation means a lot.

It's the difference between knowing your shit and knowing you're shit!

3
0
Terry 6
Silver badge

@updraft102

Yes, except

have been pushed on to 10

FTFY

And also, the "improvements" generally don't seem to make usability better. Sometimes they remove an aspect that ought to be improved, like taking the start menu out of Win 8 when all it needed was to be made more user friendly. And they brought it back less user friendly because they confuse simplicity with usability. And those invisible, charmless "charms" that only appeared when you didn't need them. As with the ribbon, they seem to think that making everything visible, like it or not, is the same as making it easier to use ( except with the "charms" they were also invisible if you did need them.). They also seem to think that making some piece of crap compulsorily available will make us want to use it. It's testing on the users, but then a terrible inability to understand what the users want, or indeed to know who to listen to. I'd lay a bet, if I was a gambler, that they don't listen to office staff, directly. The people who are using this stuff daily.

There's a basic set of common sense rules that they don't follow. Have things that people need most close to hand in a place where they expect to find them. Remove distractions and allow people to store away out of sight stuff they seldom or never need, but make it easy to find them when they need them. And the Start menu breaks all those rules. It has items in alphabetical order, by the name of the product, whether users are likely to remember what the thing is called or not and makes it difficult to group them by function to narrow down the search. And it adds in items that can't be moved or removed at all, to make searching even more difficult and it allows installation programmes to add entire folders full of extra crap instead of just a single programme link, often listed by the stinking publisher's idiotic, meaningless name, not even the programme name.

As to hardware, the whole phone phiasco tells the story. I loved my Winphone, but as noted in that thread, am replacing it this week, for an Android.

4
0
Terry 6
Silver badge

Re: Maxing out the CPU

I'm just curious. What proportion of (home) Windows users are Gamers, in the sense of wanting and needing to be able to use every ounce of system resources to play games. Keeping in mind the availability of dedicated devices consoles and the like for game fanatics.

6
0
Terry 6
Silver badge

Re: Everything, except what we really want

Poor use of argument. Reduction to absurdity. Choice in the sense of realistic, practical, offered choices. Not Hobson's choice,forced choice or suicidal choices.

11
2
Terry 6
Silver badge
Devil

Nah!

Poxy 3d crapola. I want the start menu made usable, adverts and compulsory programmes removed and the bugs sorted, e.g. You still can't use a pair of custom bin icons without editing the registry.*

Not f***ing gimmicks and even more unremovable programmes that no one needs or wants.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

*For any user who wants to and doesn't already know - though on this site I assume most of us do;

add ,0 after the icon names in HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Explorer\CLSID\{645FF040-5081-101B-9F08-00AA002F954E} Note, it's a ,0 ( comma nought ). Usual warnings apply.

19
0

Connect at mine free Wi-Fi! I would knew what I is do! I is cafe boss!

Terry 6
Silver badge

Re: Smart intercoms/bells are a good idea, that are usually badly implemented

Well yes. Simple wireless door bells are common. Ideal if you have a sprawling house, small kids, long gardens etc. Since you can have multiple, portable, bells - and so carry one with you down to the shed, up in the loft, or whatever. Getting back to the front door in time is another matter. But these new-fangled smart door bells are there so that you can see who is at your door, even when you aren't at home. Maybe the smartphone generation will take to them. (?). But the same problem is still there, just worse. Not only would you have to rush to the front door if it rings while you are out doing the weeding, but if you were further afield you'd be powerless to deal with a delivery, unexpected visit from the aged aunty etc. while helplessly viewing them on your phone. I suppose you could call the police if there is some dodgy character hanging round the front door.

0
0
Terry 6
Silver badge

Re: Just another attempt

As for creating an account to use free wifi. So far typing a fake email addy and Robert's your mum's brother. I've never had to verify it, and can't think of a way it would work - not everyone has access to their email account, So it's something like wdfdwfdwf@gmail.com everytime. (My apologies to Mr. wdfdwfdw by the way. Sorry about all the spam).

And why I would want it? Mostly boredom - checking the news etc.

3
0

We experienced Windows Mixed Reality. Results: Well, mixed

Terry 6
Silver badge
Devil

Re: Doomed to fail (again)

Meanwhile, they've put the "mixed reality" icon in the start menu as yet one more unremovable bit of the detritus that makes the whole f***ing thing a total pig's arsehole. Maybe it's time for them to start getting the basics right. I wanted my start menu back, when they took it away in Win 8.x. But not this pile of cr*p with all its sh**ty unremovable icons for unwanted cr*p programmes.

18
2

User thanked IT department for fast new server, but it had never left its box

Terry 6
Silver badge

Re: Credit for something I didn't do?

ALWAYS ask the secretary about the Boss's knowledge

FTFY

8
0
Terry 6
Silver badge

Re: Praise or accusations of work not done?

Way back in the 70s or thereabouts there was a lot of work in Industrial/Occupational Psychology on this sort of thing. Some of it in staff canteens if my memory serves me correctly. In one study in the canteen there were a lot of complaints about the food. So the canteen was tarted up but the food wasn't changed . The level of complaints dropped to insignificant levels.

14
0

Couple fires sueball at Amazon over faulty solar eclipse-viewing goggles

Terry 6
Silver badge

Re: Optional

If I'd paid my money to the Bluewater Metro Centre then YES, I would consider them to be responsible. When Amazon stops taking payment and directs customers directly to a retailer for payment they can be absolved from some of the responsibility. But even then not all, if they are publishing the claims for the product.

3
0

UK council fined £70k for leaving vulnerable people's data open to world+dog

Terry 6
Silver badge

Re: Every one in the council is fined 3 months pay

The council's premises are probably cleaned by a contract company, anyway. Come to that, who created this "portal"?

3
1

Two million customer records pillaged in IT souk CeX hack attack

Terry 6
Silver badge
Devil

Re: When a store asks for my mail or phone...

I now walk away from sites that require me to confirm the email address I've given to them- unless they have a really good reason to have my ID. Sometimes even when I wasn't even planning to use a fake email address.

0
0

Minnesota Senator calls out US watchdogs: Why so cozy with Amazon?

Terry 6
Silver badge

Re: What I want to know

Strange that. Here in the UK Amazon orders made at the same time, for similar items, often come in separate oversized packages, full of packaging materials.

2
0

Bombastic boss gave insane instructions to sensible sysadmin, with client on speakerphone

Terry 6
Silver badge

Re: PST

Well, this is the thing. Purely in an amateur, user sort of way. ( I'm sure these things are discussed in Comp Sci courses) it seems to me that data should be stored in a database. But documents should be stored in folders. Which to me would suggest that an email programme's database should be there to index the emails; but the emails should be in a folder. If the database falls over the emails, or at least a backup folder of the emails, would still be there.

1
0
Terry 6
Silver badge

PST

Being no more than a semi-professional tinkerer ( since the 1970s though) this business of PST ( and Thunderbird "profiles" ) has me very puzzled. Why did the industry choose to package email messages into a single file - for which read single point of failure. If a message gets corrupted you've lost a message. If a profile or PST get corrupted you've potentially lost the lot. The whole kit and caboodle down the Swanee.

8
0

PC sales to fall and fall and fall and fall and fall for the next five years

Terry 6
Silver badge

Re: Astrology

As it happens, for my big August birthday I got a new laptop. Old one was creaking and falling apart. Which was the only good reason to replace it. As old as it was ( by computer standards) it could still manage pretty much everything I needed and was still working totally reliably. And I'd be very surprised if there was a high proportion of the population, individuals or businesses, who could make a case to replace a computer before the external bits (battery, connectors, USB slots etc) started to fail, like mine. And frankly, how many ordinary people ever need a proper computer anyway. We now have tablets and phones that do all the stuff that most people want to do. If the smartphone had somehow been invented first the home computer and even small business machine would probably never made to the market,

So that prediction may turn out to be correct - if only by accident.

1
0

Mozilla ponders making telemetry opt-out, 'cos hardly anyone opted in

Terry 6
Silver badge

Re: This user has visited one or more of these sites today

Yes, there's simple telemetry. For most people probably pretty reasonable that real-world problems are reported back to the developers automatically. There's performance telemetry, stuff like how the software performs under various conditions. Which might seem a bit to close to watching what we look at. And then there's plain spying on users. Unfortunately the various companies have chosen to use the first of these as a way to gain access to the third. Most aggressively, but at least openly Google, who supply genuinely no-cost software in exchange for this. Most egregiously Microsoft, who replaced ( upgraded arguably) for a "free" that excluded the possibility of not accepting it our existing ( and paid for if only indirectly) OS - and also charge for new retail copies - with an OS that claims to be collecting collecting telemetry, but is used to serve adverts built into the operating system of our computers.

Mozilla is approaching an edge that has been very blurred.

3
0

Skype for Business is not Skype – realising that is half the battle

Terry 6
Silver badge

Re: Who needs to see a face?

Just normal human communication is better with sight of the person. Most communication is not in the words. Voice tone and facial expression carry much of the meaning (combined together as well as discretely)

1
0

Forums

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2017