* Posts by Tom 38

3323 posts • joined 21 Jul 2009

Someone tell Thorpe Lane in Suffolk their internet sucks – they're still loading the page

Tom 38
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Re: Average of one household perhaps?

So you'll know then, no-one gives a fuck about the Trimleys. They're on the Felixstowe exchange, so its a straight line 5km to the exchange, and they were built with the shittiest copper available.

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Tom 38
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Re: Call that slow?

For over three years BT have been unable or unwilling to fix the 256/512Kbps broadband at Seething observatory in Norfolk.

Ahh, nominative determinism at play.

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Royal Bank of Scotland culls 1 in 4 branches, blames the interwebz

Tom 38
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Re: Is RBS run by Montgomery Burns?

Due to workers rights and tax years, Christmas is basically the only time to legally do layoffs. Not terribly well thought out, was it?

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Elon Musk finally admits Tesla is building its own custom AI chips

Tom 38
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Re: ...existing drivers pushed to unemployment

Who gives a fuck? Maybe they can then do something more useful/interesting than driving other people around?

We don't worry about the lack of openings for gong farmers and chimney sweeps

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Former US State Department cyber man: We didn’t see the Russian threat coming

Tom 38
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Re: “Tech people need to tell policy people about the next coming threat.”

"Put your sword back in its place," Jesus said to him, "for all who draw the sword will die by the sword"

If he can put the sword back in place, then he has already drawn it, no? And if he has already drawn it, then his death by sword has already been confirmed, so what is the purpose of putting it away again, the damage has been done.

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OK Google: A stranger with stash of pirated films is spamming my Google Team Drive

Tom 38
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Pirate

Cynic

I suspect the obvious fix for them breaks things elsewhere, which is why they can't deploy it,

It's google. the first fix is to work out why the ads aren't showing, and the second is probably to upload it all to youtube.

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Lap-slabtop-mobes with Snapdragon Arm CPUs running Windows 10: We had a quick gander

Tom 38
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Re: Linux?

Why bother with getting an ARM machine, when a four year old laptop with an SSD upgrade will be faster, more useful, and most importantly for linux, there's a chance some of the hardware might be supported.

Show me this mythical 4 year old laptop with a 20hr battery life.

And why "can we Linux"? Lets see:

* Cheaper SKU if we don't have to buy wiindows

* No need for on-the-fly code translation

* No restrictions on what we can run on it (You can only install Chrome on the pro SKU? GTFO)

* Its what we actually use in day to day life

Sorry if this bores you, I'm a tech guy, I use Linux for my work, Linux on my phone and Linux on all my home machines, please forgive me for being interested in whether this new device can actually be useful for my needs.

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Denied: Uber's request to skip to UK Supreme Court to appeal workers' rights

Tom 38
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Re: Convicts Next

Why not, Anglian Windows use them in call centres

I think you will find it is working in an Anglian Windows call centre that turns people to crime.

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Tom 38
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One of them will finish it fairly soon. There's already driverless cars on some streets in the USA.

I think the important thing is that Uber will not have self driving cars first. If Uber don't develop the technology themselves, they won't be able to have a monopoly, which kinda fucks their endgame.

My endgame is taking cheap cab rides subsidised by the idiot investors who believe that Uber will ever reach their nirvana like promised land of monopoly profits.

My feeling, if self driving cars are good enough, we replace municipal buses with municipal Johnny Cabs, so no-one will be getting rich off this apart from car manufacturers.

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What on Earth is Terraform: Life support for explorers of terrifying alien worlds

Tom 38
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Re: Too much thrashing around.....

I don't think there is that much to grasp:

* vagrant builds your VMs

* terraform creates provider agnostic infrastructure to run those VMs

* apps are developed to run inside docker

* kubernetes is used to manage deployment of containers, and to make the services provided by those containers available

* Puppet/chef/Ansible are less relevant these days; deploy new containers/vms rather than update existing ones, and docker is used to compose container images

If you are a sysadmin, you are using vagrant to produce some images to run kubernetes, terraform to build the infrastructure that will actually run it, and kubernetes to manage that running infrastructure. If you are a developer, you are using docker to build and package your application (ideally from CI), and kubernetes to release/rollback. (And obviously, if you are doing devops, its a bit of both)

vagrant is less important these days, because most VMs are simply kubenetes nodes rather than specific application VMs

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Boffins foresee most software written by machines in 2040

Tom 38
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Warning: scientists

Warning: there is a mahoosive generalisation coming up.

Scientists of all disciplines suffer from being very smart, but generally focused on one single sphere of science. The combination of this extreme expertise in one sphere, and general smartness leads them to underestimate the complexity of tasks that are from other spheres - particularly coding (a scientist that can actually program is a rare thing).

Since the 90s, scientists of all spheres have had to write more and more code. Almost universally, they hate it - they know their field and model perfectly, so why won't the stupid computer do it? - and they resent that they need real developers to help them, and they are protective of the code they wrote, even when it is a pile of dung.

To these people, the "problem" of programming is just an extension of <some problem from their sphere>, and the "boring, rote work of programming" will be a solvable problem.

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Tech giants at war: Google pulls plug on YouTube in Amazon kit

Tom 38
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Re: One winner

Amazon will swiftly learn that a device is only as good as the content it lets you access.

Seriously? Fire gives you access to Prime video, where you get curated 4k HDR video with no ads, whilst youtube gives you deliberately badly cropped video - I think to avoid copyright complaints - and 5 ads in a 30 minute show, and that is when the piece is not geoblocked and is actually the thing you are searching for and not some clip show of content designed to pull in ad impressions.

Youtube might have (mostly) everything but its quality is dire.

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Tesla reveals a less-long-legged truck, but a bigger reservation price

Tom 38
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Re: The value of Tesla and Musk

as Musk is a minority investor in Tesla its mostly other people's money (and dreams) at risk. You think that makes him a visionary?

Structurally unprofitable means that it is unlikely to make any money any time soon. I don't see how that is relevant.

PS: Your link that you say refutes him as a visionary has this text:

Chanos conceded Musk’s vision was ahead of rivals and called the flagship Model S “sexy.”

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Looking for scrubs? Nah, NHS wants white hats – the infosec techie kind

Tom 38
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Re: What do they need this for?

3. is most of the problem. Lots of 25+ year old proprietary stuff that either no patches exist for, or the patches that DO exist break other things. Hospital systems are a horrible, horrible mixmash of ancient tech, brand new tech, and duct tape.

It's no different to corporate IT. We recently "upgraded" to a new outsourced HR solution. It doesn't tick any of the boxes that IT "required" of it (federated SSO, 2FA, device independent, no activex), but it's the choice of the the HR VP so that overrides any other concern.

Actually we could have had the federated SSO and 2FA, but the beancounter vetoed the extra £3k pa that would have cost us in license fees. Still wouldn't make it work in ¬(IE > 6, IE < 11).

When your hosted solution requires ActiveX to draw a calendar on a webpage, you know you've made a wrong technical choice...

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Team Trump goes in to bat for Google and Facebook

Tom 38
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Re: Funny isn't it

selling Uranium to the Russians in exchange for hundreds of millions of dollars to the Clinton foundation.

How much do you think the Clinton Foundation had to bung the nine government agencies that signed off on the deal without any official intervention from Clinton?

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Pokémon GO caused hundreds of deaths, increased crashes

Tom 38
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Re: Presumably, Danny 14 ...

“They say that 'Guns don't kill people, people kill people.' Well I think the gun helps. If you just stood there and yelled BANG, I don't think you'd kill too many people.” - Eddie Izzard

(Yes, I couldn't help quoting my favourite British transvestite comedian commenting on US gun control. Try not to explode Big John)

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China plots new Great Leap Forward: to IPv6

Tom 38
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Coat

Pravda (Правда) which translates as Truth was the official newspaper of the party. Or to be more exact, it became after Stalin went there with his goons in October 2017 to ensure that it tows the party lines and is printed on time.

All must flee from zombie-Stalin!

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Permissionless data slurping: Why Google's latest bombshell matters

Tom 38
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Re: Are we surprised?

I remember when that serial killer was on the loose in Ipswich, the police said they'd collected 80,000 hours of video material in a week. For one, small city town.

FTFY. City are those uppity northern farmers wearing canary yellow.

And yes, if you're from Suffolk, people from Norfolk are northerners.

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Loake Shoes admits: We've fallen victim to cybercrims

Tom 38
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Re: One step forward...

Please! PR are people too you know? Stop acting like jack booted thigs!

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HPE CEO Meg Whitman QUITS, MAN! Neri to replace chief exec in Feb

Tom 38
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Re: Whitman did the right thing

I'm sure you consider yourself "intelligent" and "witty"

My mum says I'm handsome too.

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Anonymized location-tracking data proves anything but: Apps squeal on you like crazy

Tom 38
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Re: Don't worry

Apologies cbars, apparently some people need sarcasm pointed out to them.

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OnePlus 5 x T + five short months = Some p*ssed off fanboys

Tom 38
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Still in love with my OP2

It has the capacitive buttons and fingerprint sensor on the home button. It could do with a new screen and battery, but otherwise its still great.

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Openreach fibre plan for 10m premises coming 'before Christmas'

Tom 38
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Re: Openreach FTTP creates a monopoly for BT

OK, it's a VoIP solution with a UPS.

It's a VoIP with a UPS and access to emergency services. To replace it with COTS VoIP devices you would need UPS on your switch/AP as well.

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Tom 38
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Re: Paying more

Her Majesty Correctional Facility Adastral Park

Snigger. I don't agree with your post, but that is an accurate representation of Martlesham Heath :)

It was much better when it was BTRL.

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Tom 38
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Re: Isn't Wifi/5G a viable and cheaper option

So how do they manage to get Wireless solutions working so well in the likes of train stations etc where there is a very heavy concentration of people, watching videos/tv/facebook etc.. Is it simply the fact that there are many/many antennae nearby

This answer is in two parts:

a) lots of antennae

b) it still doesn't work correctly.

Eg, when there is an event at the stadium near my house, 3G/4G data service is basically impossible nearby. This leads to things like trendy pop up retailers (there's a cracking bar in a canal boat by the stadium) who take payment by the ubiquitous iZettle suddenly can't process any payments, which leads to confused hipsters and much stroking of beards.

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UK Home Sec thinks a Minority Report-style AI will prevent people posting bad things

Tom 38
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Headmaster

Re: Statutory Offence

A statutory offence is one that's definde by statute (ie law that's been passed by parliament).

Yeah but OP clarified that he wasn't sure if that was the correct term and explained what he was searching for, which is actually called a strict liability offence, in which mens rea is not required.

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Openreach boss says he'd take a burning effigy on the chin

Tom 38
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Re: £7Bn Pensions defecit?

I truly don't understand how any company is allowed to run a pension deficit.

Pension funds are in deficit when their holdings will not purchase sufficient annuities for their liabilities. Annuity rates depend on many things; interest rates, economy etc. These pension funds were not in deficit before the financial crisis, but now you need significantly more money to purchase those annuities and so the funds are in structural deficit.

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Tom 38
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Re: Synchronous vs. Symmetric

my spanking new FTTP connection (when they've repaired the main cables - 3 weeks and counting) will be 330Mbps down with "only" 30 Mbps up.

This pissed me off so much when I got my new flat. I have an openreach box inside my comms riser that has been permanently lit with the exchange at a lovely synchronous 1.2Gbps. What will BT sell me? 330/30! The box splits the connection in to 4, so I can have a separate BT subscription for each bedroom, the living room and the kitchen..

Unsurprisingly, I went with the other FTTP provider in my flat, which offers synchronous gigabit for £10 less than BT wanted.

PS: Yes, I know how lucky I am, but it highlights the problems. I have this connection choice in London, but 1 hr drive to my parents, and you're back to 2Mb intermittently working DSL

PPS: It's not "luck". Why do you think I got this place and not another?

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US government seizes Texas gun mass murder to demand backdoors

Tom 38
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Re: If more guns equals more safety *

FBI agree; they have approved double ROT-13 as the new security standard.

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User asked help desk to debug a Post-it Note that survived a reboot

Tom 38
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The problem is critical thinking. We tried to educate users to root cause analysis using the "five why's" . Now, as non technicals, they won't get down to the 5th why, but even if they think a little about it, they might get to the first or second why.

Of course, some users cannot be improved, so you will still get "can't print" instead of "can't print; out of paper", but sometimes you get "can't print; out of paper; we use 4x as much paper at end of month"

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Tom 38
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Facepalm

Re: PBKAC

I once spent an hour trying to work out why a PC wasn't working, until I noticed the contrast wheel on the CRT was at 0, making the entire screen jet black..

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ATM fees shake-up may push Britain towards cashless society

Tom 38
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Re: My partner hates me..

It is not possible to disable contactless,

My bank kept sending me contactless cards, but they all turned up cut down the middle. Weird, huh?

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Tom 38
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Re: Surely thats phone banking?

Your wrote " overheard a woman on the train doing her online banking"

So, unless she was talking to her phone screen

I have literally heard this monologue on the commuter trains:

"Hmm, what is the 6th letter of my security code?"

"p-a-s-s-w-0 ... 0!"

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Tom 38
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The benefits go to you. Your bank has to pay for your access to ATMs that do not belong to it, and the LINK network sets out various interbank charges that apply for various services.

Ever used a non bank ATM, and found it is hard to get cash out without also seeing your balance at some point? The operator of the ATM receives something like 75p for each balance statement, which is sufficient to make these ATMs quite profitable, leading to every newsagents having one of these shitty ATMs inside.

The aim of these charges was to make it promote ATMs in rural/remote areas, but has actually lead to an increase of ATMs in built up areas where there is already adequate supply. By reducing the interbank charges it makes these ATMs less profitable and will reduce both the number of ATMs in high density areas, and the cost to banks for servicing their clients cash needs.

You would hope they will also replace the higher charges for subsidies for ATMs in rural/low ATM density areas.

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Tom 38
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Re: Also, in an increasing surveilance society

I believe there's some shizzle about legal tender which is supposed to prevent this sort of thing. And IIRC, I believe the 20p or was it £1 coin was never included in the appropriate Act, thus making it legal tender to settle, say, Amazon's tax bill in coins.

Any coin with a face value below £1 has limitations to the quantity that can be used as legal tender.

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Alexa, please cause the cops to raid my home

Tom 38
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Facepalm

How to piss off your neighbours

One Friday at uni (still living in halls), I popped off for a weekend in Glasgow with friends, and set a very loud alarm on my CD player (welcome to the 90s) to play Terrorvision's "How To Make Friends And Influence People" at 5pm so I wouldn't miss the train. Like, deafeningly loud.

What I forgot was that the CD player did daily alarms, so it went off again on Saturday and Sunday. For an entire hour. I got back to so many notes on and under my door telling me quite how much I had influenced them (It didn't make any friends at all)

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Osama Bin Laden had copy of Resident Evil, smut, in compound

Tom 38
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Headmaster

Re: Probably gone down

corps: a main subdivision of an army in the field, consisting of two or more divisions

corpse: a dead body

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Tom 38
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Headmaster

Re: Hey look, a three-headed monkey!

Do you think the NWO will insist on grammar lessons?

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Tom 38
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Black Helicopters

@Khaptain

Why didn't they use the body as a propaganda tool, or at the very least try and study its DNA in order to establish if there were scientific reasons behinds acts etc

Shoo! Back to the Victorian era for you.

I personally don't know how to determine what is truth from fiction.

Aaah, it all becomes clear.

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Tom 38
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Re: Malware

1. How on earth could someone notably that paranoid about being online manage to have a Steam account or let anyone near him have a Steam account? (Half Life came out on DVD with no need for Steam, remember.)

2. What's Steam slurping from computers which means that Valve were able to identify him?

* Who says it was his PC? It was a PC in the compound.

* I don't think his email for steam was "binladen+steam@gmail.com"

* He's not playing HL, he's playing counterstrike (he likes de_dust)

* Torrenting popular films and playing counterstrike is a common use of a PC, particularly in Pakistan

What would be more shocking is if the end of round screenshots show that whoever was using the PC only played CT.

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Server retired after 18 years and ten months – beat that, readers!

Tom 38
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Re: substantial rework

So I can well imagine some code well into its second decade on FreeBSD not compiling out-of-the-box.

FreeBSD has jails, unpack the old release ISO and make it a jail, everything runs. If you don't need to compile it, and it is built statically, you don't even need the jail.

You don't have to imagine it if you know it exists and did it last week.

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Donald, YOU'RE FIRED: Rogue Twitter worker quits, deletes President Trump's account

Tom 38
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Re: Good luck

And then deported.

You make this sound like a bad thing, but after being deported you're no longer in America.

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Tom 38
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Mushroom

Does this mean Twitter could cause the end of the world as we know it?

In the beginning, no-one was sure of the legitimacy of the Donald's twitter outbursts, until it was confirmed that these are presidential statements, so a guy made a bot that turns them in to correctly formatted White House Press Office releases.

So - Yes.Icon is what it will lead to.

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Ex-Facebook manager sues biz after getting 'Zucked out of overtime'

Tom 38
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Re: Oh, skirting correct payment happens everywhere

I've never had a job in the UK that hasn't started out on the first morning with a meeting with an HR doid, a piece of paper with the working time directive opt out, a pen, and no way out of the room without quitting or signing the piece of paper.

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Vietnam bans Bitcoin as payment for anything

Tom 38
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Re: dodgy dealings

If you had a business that only accepted BTC and you were then able to use that "money" to buy all your worldly needs, it would be untraceable and therefore untaxable.

Do you understand what the blockchain is? It contains every transaction ever made in bitcoin, from any party to any other party. The idea that bitcoin is untraceable is laughable.

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Tom 38
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Re: Tulips again

Bitcoins and their volatility are nothing like tulips and tulip mania. For starters, if you have a tulip bulb, in 6 months you can have many tulip bulbs, and no-one was using tulip bulbs as commodity to facilitate trade, the trade was in tulip futures.

Bitcoins are more like gold. There is a quantity already found, and with ever increasing mining costs, we can find a few more. Gold mainly is only worth something if other people desire it; its value mostly depends on whether investors

Bitcoin is mainly used as a transaction aid - people buy bitcoins in order to pay people in bitcoins, people receive bitcoins in trade and convert to fiat. In this scenario, volatility is irrelevant, because both buyer and seller immediately convert to fiat.

For this sole reason, bitcoins will always have utility in trade, which makes them desirable, which gives them value. The only way it could be a bubble, and thus collapse, is if either they suddenly become non desirable, or if more are produced than expected.

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Car trouble: Keyless and lockless is no match for brainless

Tom 38
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Thumb Up

Re: A Peugeot...something or other

Its well known that all tapes left in a car for more than about a fortnight metamorphose into 'Best of Queen' albums.

Can we have a Pratchett icon please?

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Tom 38
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Angel

Re: Daft indicator switch

I like to think that the indicators in BMWs and Audis are only hooked up to the dash. Peace and tranquillity.

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Tom 38
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Re: You ended up with a Nissan Puke? Unlucky!

Anyone remember the original Fiat Panda 4x4?

That's actually an epic little car, they still use them in Italian and French ski resorts as police cars, very light and nimble and 4wd enough to handle the tracks and snow,

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Man: Just 18 Bitcoin babies and my home is yours

Tom 38
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Re: This bit always confuses me....

Of course, that's a country where ATMs give you hundred franc bills (£75), which you have no problem using to buy a pack of chewing-gums at newsagents.

Sometimes you only need one note too.

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