* Posts by Tom 38

3029 posts • joined 21 Jul 2009

'Clearance sale' shows Apple's iPad is over. It's done

Tom 38
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Re: Education PC seller says Apple is no good in that market

Apple might be big in the USA, but in the educational establishments where I studied / worked, they were pretty much non-existent.

Well, in the UK there is no money left after buying a couple of RM badged beauts. RM: the only company that makes Apple stuff look cheap.

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FYI anyone who codes outside work: GitHub has a contract to stop bosses snatching it all

Tom 38
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Re: Alcatel, eh?

As he wasn't employed by them, he didn't have any employment rights.

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Tom 38
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Re: Interesting, but..

You would have to find the money to challenge your employer in court, who then may find grounds for discovering that he doesn't want to promote, or even employ, you anymore. So you end up with a huge legal bill and no job.

Is this another US/European difference? Your boss cannot simply decide he no longer likes you and you are fired. You must have a reason for dismissal that amounts to Gross Negligence (so not just "AHA! You are 3 minutes late!"), or the job must no longer exist, in which case the employer must pay redundancy (and the job really has to not exist, not just pretend not exist, or the employer will get reamed in Tribunal).

Also, all complaints around this do not go to court, they go to a time limited tribunal - so your employer cannot lawyer you out of your rights.

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King Battistelli's swish penthouse office the Euro Patent Office doesn't want you to see

Tom 38
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Re: "few Greek or Spanish or Italian unemployed"

There's a reason why Battistelli last name looks to have an Italian origin, or something like that. Not a little percentage of unemployed people would like to live out of someone else money like Battistelli does

Nice bit of casual national stereotyping. Unfortunately, he's actually French, so we need to think of him as a beret wearing, cheese eating surrender monkey. Probably smells of garlic.

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Android O my god! It's finally here (for devs)

Tom 38
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there for the benefit of Google, not the [..] phone's battery life

I think that partly they are intended to be there for battery life. Instead of one monolithic application that wakes up constantly and checks 400 things, they have 400 things which mainly sleep and only wake up occasionally to do simple things.

idk that it does any good though :)

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Huawei's P10 breathing on Samsung's shoulder

Tom 38
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4 pages

No mention of whether the battery is replaceable or not (its not).

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The priest, the coder, the Bitcoin drug deals – and today's guilty verdicts

Tom 38
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Re: Not a "priest"

No, that's just the historical etymology of the word. Priest, pastor, cleric, parson - these are all synonyms of each other; the differences that each one can mean within a particular cult are only interesting to the members of that cult.

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Tom 38
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Re: Not a "priest"

What makes a pastor not a type of priest?

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Tom 38
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Headmaster

Re: Tor?

Same for "priest". Pastor Trevon Gross isn't a priest, he's pastor at the Hope Cathedral, one of the fundamentalist churches that infests the US, mostly in the South.

So what you're saying is, he's ordained by a religious institution to lead the congregation, but that does not make him a priest?

What does he need to do to make "priest" with you? Do we only consider orthodox sky fairy worshippers to be priests?

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Dr Hannah Fry: We need to be wary of algorithms behind closed doors

Tom 38
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WTF?

Re: Algorithms that sit behind closed doors

Not at all. I work for a company that uses open source software, but the algorithms I write determine weather or not you get that all important first interview for a job.

If I balls this up I can totally fuck up your career.

PS you as the person trying to get the job have no access to the code or the rules that determine weather you are selected or rejected.

Algorithms are code. Code can be either open or closed source. If the source code is inaccessible, it is closed source code, even if portions of it are open source code.

Presuming this isn't software from somewhere like North Korea, then you cannot "totally fuck up" someones career, because you are not the only people doing this. If your algorithms are bad, then you will be supplying not the best candidates to your clients, and others will able to supply the good candidates your algorithm rejected; your business would suffer, but the candidates you reject will be perfectly fine.

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Europe will fine Twitter, Facebook, Google etc unless they rip up T&Cs

Tom 38
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Re: Good luck

All of those companies are located in the United States. Do you really think they won't just cry to Congress and then watch as America craps on yet another treaty. Are you guys prepared for the equivalent of economic armageddon?

We don't really care about the US any more to be honest. We don't get our fuel, food or technology from there, and we're increasingly unconcerned about upsetting a regime that repeatedly tells us that they will use protectionism to stifle our imports.

So yes, if your companies want to operate in our territories, they will do so in the manner that we deem fit or we will fine them.

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Shine on, you crazy Eind minds: Boffins fire out 43Gbps infrared 'Wi-Fi'

Tom 38
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@DougS

Rephrase it another way Doug, what problem does this cause you that you can write paragraphs and praragraphs rebutting the usefulness of it. Why *shouldn't* we have faster wifi? Can you think of *no* situation where faster wifi would be an economic benefit?

Here's a hint: its not always about home networking, individual computers or loading a web page. There are people out there who do different things with networks than you! Please don't faint in shock.

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Ubiquiti network gear can be 'hijacked by an evil URL' – thanks to its 20-year-old PHP build

Tom 38
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Re: 20 year old PHP implementation?

I wouldn't trust a build of *any* interpreter from 20 years ago doesn't matter what you think of PHP.

I have no qualms still using csh on Solaris 2.5(?), which would be about 20 years old by now I'd have thought.

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UK.gov gears up for IR35 private sector crackdown – say industry folk

Tom 38
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Re: I've little sympathy for permies

As a contractor, more often than not brought in to do they work they either should have done, or have loused up so badly it needs redoing, I'm paid only because the work gets done.

You know the opposite is also true right? We had a contractor come in to work on an Alfresco deployment for us, as we had no-one with Java experience. He produced virtually nothing in 3 months, at which point he was ditched and we head hunted someone who could actually do it as a permie.

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Dormant Linux kernel vulnerability finally slayed

Tom 38
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Keep reading I will get to a point eventually

BSD commonly has less drivers than Linux, in particular multimedia devices and so on; fewer people using it, who care less about those sorts of things. NIC, HBA etc drivers, no problem - USB webcam drivers or TV dongles, pretty much nothing.

Linux has all these things; we looked on enviously at things like MythTV. Eventually one guy came up with an idea: Why don't we take all those Linux USB drivers and make a compat shim to use them on FreeBSD. The interesting part is how he decided to do it; he wrote a compat library that runs the linux USB driver in userspace. The library co-ordinates with a single simple kernel module, cuse4bsd, which creates nodes under /dev and copies data to/from the user space program.

This means the entire linux driver is running only in userspace, where as on Linux it is all running in kernel space. Any bugs in the driver would cause an oops on Linux, whilst on BSD you can simply restart the userspace program containing the driver.

The only kernel code is simple, easier to test and debug, and is the same for all consumers. Compared to the Linux drivers, which are often written by box shifting manufacturers simply by taking an existing driver and tweaking it, and the surface of code within the kernel is tiny.

Obviously, it's not as efficient, data has to be copied. It's a lot safer and resilient.

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Tom 38
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Headmaster

Re: Slayed?

in old English, they did differentiate by putting an accent on the 'e' and pronouncing it differently, so by those rules it would be "the bug was fixéd by the developer"

Should be an e-grave. E-acute would sound like "Fix-ay-d", whereas the archaic form would be "Fixèd", pronounced Fix-edd.

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Today's WWW is built on pillars of sand: Buggy, exploitable JavaScript libs are everywhere

Tom 38
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@bazza

You haven't understood either of my posts. I'm not suggesting anyone replace JS, or even think about replacing JS. The discussion was solely, "If JS was no more, what then for Google? Aren't they in shit creek?". Its a thought experiment, not reality.

As for not having dynamic web pages, and remote viewing any interactivity... can you give me the number of your dealer, because you are high.

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Tom 38
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Re: "Google may be OK with this but ultimately it's a big risk for them"

There are actually no replacements for Javascript for web applications, being all the others even worse

Right, but we aren't talking about reality at the moment, someone posited the thought experiment "If JS was to disappear, companies like Google would be up shit creek and they don't seem to acknowledge those risks".

It's a bad thought experiment because either there is an equivalent language to replace it, in which case a Dart-to-new lang compiler would remove the risk, or that there are no more browser apps possible, in which case Google write a Dart-to-C compiler and deliver native apps.

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Tom 38
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Google may be OK with this but ultimately it's a big risk for them. No Javascript = big increase in costs for Google. If you take Javascript away, what of Google's empire is left?

So if we assume that JS is destroyed and gone, and there is some new super safe way of doing interactive things in the browser, how much would Google be affected?

Very little. All their apps are written in Dart, which is then compiled to JS. They would simply write a different backend to the Dart compiler to compile to NewFancyLanguage.

Of all the examples you could use to demonstrate reliance on JS, google is the worst.

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Tom 38
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Re: China

So what, AC? They're still morons to use IE9.

Morons with money. My favourite kind of moron.

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Tom 38
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I'm sorry Mr Developer, but since you won't perform straightforward reasonable tasks within your area of responsibility within the company, we're letting you go and hiring someone who will.

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Tom 38
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FAIL

Re: Backwards compatiblity

Secondly, all versions below IE11 have already passed end-of-life. Nobody should be supporting or using them on the web.

Spoken like a true zealot. Hey Mr Chinese Man whose company still only uses IE 9, look I really can't accept that huge big bag of cash for accessing our website because AC said you should be using IE 11 already.

You can nudge, you can poke, you can plead, but the only time you can stop supporting shitty old browsers is when the users of your sites stop using shitty old browsers.

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Blast from the past: Mass birth of early supermassive black holes explained at last

Tom 38
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Re: @Symon

Ah, I see. I thought you were saying that he was wrong that the universe at 800,000 years was much smaller and dense, but you were in fact pointing out that "size of universe in LY" > "age of universe".

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Tom 38
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@Symon

The article you linked to says that

...you have to remember: 13.8 billion years ago, our entire observable Universe was smaller than the size of our Solar System is today!

and then has a chart of universe age versus universe radius size in light years...

I don't see what inflation has to do with this either; inflation lasted for a fraction of a second after the big bang, this is talking about effects well after that.

What am I missing?

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Scott McNealy: Your data is safer with marketers than governments

Tom 38
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What if you do want to buy pantihose

What about when your secret hearts desire is to buy all the pantyhose in all the colours and run around the house with them wrapped around your face, but you don't want anyone else to know this?

I'm, er, obviously asking on behalf of a friend..

PS: Pantihose? Pantyhose surely?

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Tech titan pals back up Google after 'foreign server data' FBI warrant ruling

Tom 38
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Re: Bullshit

So you think an email only consists of a body and that 'communications' are not metadata?

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Linus Torvalds explains how to Pull without jerking his chain

Tom 38
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Re: git shit

OP either doesn't do much change management in git or has never done much change management in other VCS. git is by far the best VCS available. I was going to say "open source" VCS, but I think its better than any commercial one I've tried (Perforce, ClearCase, VSS)

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Force employees to take DNA tests for bosses? We've got a new law to make that happen, beam House Republicans

Tom 38
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Re: @Orv

If you had a pre-existing condition, depending on the condition, you may or may not be able to get coverage. The insurance company could write a rider so that you get coverage for everything but your condition.

So if you are ill and cannot work due to a pre-existing condition, not only do you get more expensive insurance premiums, but it won't cover the thing you are actually ill for, what do you do then? Go bust and then die due to inability to pay to treat your treatable condition?

What a delightful country you live in. Your medical insurance companies make more profit than most healthcare systems cost in total. You should be proud of how exceptional America is.

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Tom 38
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Re: "They still believe in Social Darwinism of course."

Maybe. But isn't Trump of the finest Teutonic stock? I'm pleased he's not making out that he's got any British ancestry.

Unfortunately...

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'Password rules are bullsh*t!' Stackoverflow Jeff's rage overflows

Tom 38
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Re: It only makes it easier to crack...

I don't think it necessarily implies the storing of failed logins.

One possible compromise would be that if the login is not successful, just delay the rejection response for a period of time, for example, 10 seconds.

So now you are open to DoS via resource depletion. What's your next plan?

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Get a GRIP! Robolution ain't happening until TOUCH is cracked

Tom 38
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Joke

Re: someone somewhere will have to pay the tax

Too right! Smash the looms!

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Brit ISP TalkTalk blocks control tool TeamViewer

Tom 38
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Re: Which way?

Its reasonably common for an ISP to block some inbound ports. Most consumer ISPs will block inbound port 25, for example.

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Smut-scamming copyright chaser 'fesses up, will do hard time

Tom 38
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Re: No sympathy for this guy

I guess the part I don't understand is how it is legally allowed? Can I waive my rights to freedom and sell my self in to slavery? Nope.

He hasn't voluntarily waived them, he has been beaten in to doing so. The whole plea deal malarkey is contrary to natural justice, because it encourages confession to avoid punitive sentencing. In this case, it is pretty cut and dry, but there have been plenty of innocent people sent to prison because it was not worth risking a longer punitive sentence.

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Tom 38
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WTF?

No sympathy for this guy

However:

Steele has also agreed to waive his right to appeal any sentence up to five years in prison.

WTF? What kind of conviction includes stripping people of their rights of due process? What kind of appeal would not be immediately struck out for someone who has pleaded guilty to the crime? Ridiculous!

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AMD does an Italian job on Intel, unveils 32-core, 64-thread 'Naples' CPU

Tom 38
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Re: @Titter

But here in Chicago, if you want good pizza, you have a lot more options. Thick or thin, or even as a Calazone or Oven Grinder. So call me a snob.

You can be a pizza snob?! I gave you a downvote solely due to my recollection of eating a chicago style deep dish at Pizzeria Uno on Wabash, being unable to finish half a "small", and spending the next 16 hours belching from reflux due to all the cheese.

Put me off pizza for months.

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Help wanted: Uber boss Travis seeks babysitter for him and his execs

Tom 38
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Joke

Re: Advice for Mr. Travis

Rebu

It would be just like Uber, but the drivers only use reverse.

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Aah, all is well in the world. So peaceful, so– wait, where's the 2FA on IoT apps? Oh my gawd

Tom 38
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Thumb Up

Re: "Multi user systems"

I'm still not sure what happens when there's a conflict between two authorised users e.g. who want the lounge at two very different temperatures. There are probably precedents for this as well.

Presumably similar to how it happens with a manual thermostat, but with less walking?

She feels cold, checks the thermostat, tuts, changes it up, I feel warm, check the thermostat, tut, turn it back down (repeat until we go to sleep and start fighting over whether we use the thick or thin duvet)

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Tom 38
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Re: Goolge can't even get their subsidiary use their own 2FA tools

2FA doesn't require cloud or interactivity. TOTP devices (like Google Authenticator) need to be given a secret key to be paired, after which the token device doesn't need any connectivity, it just needs to be able to tell/keep time effectively.

Admittedly, anything Nest related relies on connectivity, but limitations of connectivity are not a barrier to implementing 2FA on any service.

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Trump, Brexit, and Cambridge Analytica – not quite the dystopia you're looking for

Tom 38
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Re: 'False' problem?

This method is available to every political party and leaning

..that can afford it. The more you can spend on a voter, the more you can customise what totally-not-fake news you trigger tell them

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Dyson backs Britain plc with $2.5bn AI and robotics investment

Tom 38
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Re: Import duties

It's not about tariffs! If he wants to sell vacuum cleaners in the EU, he has to manufacture vacuum cleaners that can be sold in the EU, following all the EU rules - the rules he says we should leave the EU for. Which leaves only three outcomes:

1) He keeps making all his vacuums to EU specs, but without any say at all in those specs

2) He stops selling vacuums to the EU

3) He makes two different types of vacuum, one for EU and one for rest of world

Which one of those three seems most likely?

PS: The EU is not some arbitrary juggernaut that we have no control over. We send a commissioner to the EU commission, which are responsible for EU executive action and is the only source of EU legislation. If there was something that the UK government thoroughly objected to, it would not make it past the commission. After Brexit, we have no commissioner and no say.

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Tom 38
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Import duties? Who cares about import duties? He's arguing that we need to leave the EU because their daft rules for how vacuum cleaners can be sold. This will make him free to make and market his vacuums however he wishes in the UK and outside the EU, but if he wants to sell them in the EU, he still has to play the EU testing and regulation games.

Except this time, he won't have any say in what those rules will be. Doesn't seem that smart to me.

OTOH, most of Dyson's income comes from outside the UK, most of his costs (apart from his offshored manufacturing) are in pounds, so a big fall in sterling makes his businesses much healthier. cui bono

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Post-Brexit five-year UK work visas planned – report

Tom 38
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Re: Meanwhile...

until we've trained our own doctors and fruit pickers.

Hahaha, good one.

PS: Fruit picking, not that tricky. It continually amazes me that people won't move from areas with high unemployment in the UK to work picking spuds in Peterborough, but they will from Lithuania...

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Tom 38
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Facepalm

Re: If only..

@Conrad Longmore: you are more than welcome to f--- off to another EU country if you really think their economies are doing better than the UK.

Well that's the problem, we can't. Or we can for a month, then fuck knows.

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Tom 38
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Joke

Yay! H1-Bs come to the UK!

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Finally proof that Apple copies Samsung: iPhone 7 Plus halts, catches fire like a Galaxy Note 7

Tom 38
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Facepalm

Save us from teenagers

"So my iPhone 7 plus blew up this morning. Was not even using it, literally no explanation for this." ... The next day, while it was charging, the phone started to smoke.

She has literally no explanation for this?

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Engineer who blew lid on Uber's toxic sexist culture now menaced by creepy 'smear campaign'

Tom 38
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Re: artificial scarcity

your Uber ride is heavily subsidised in order to gain market share. The only way I see that Uber could make money in the long term would be to create exactly the same kind of artificial scarcity in order to drive prices back up.

Absolutely. I think they haven't taken in to account that Uber aren't doing *anything* remotely clever, their business can easily be duplicated by competitors and so they will never get to the monopoly point where they can gouge consumers with all their market share.

So instead, look at it another way: by using Uber, you will burn through all their money quicker, and some VC twat is subsidizing your fare.

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I was authorized to trash my employer's network, sysadmin tells court

Tom 38
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Re: Inappropriate charge

Authorization to destroy anything beyond routine stuff, though, usually requires specific authorization.

Usually is the operative word there. If the non IT people simply told him to "get on with it" or "you're the techy, you can't expect me to understand this, you make the decisions"...

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Tom 38
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Re: Easy fix

Add "don't be a twat" to contracts.

But he's not arguing that he didn't breach his employment contract, he's arguing that he didn't break the law. Thankfully, breaking your employment contract is still not illegal.

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Radioactive leak riddle: Now Team America sniffs Europe's skies for iodine isotope source

Tom 38
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Re: errant missile

Perhaps you should have made it funny, then you don't need the icon.

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BBC admits iPlayer downloads are broken

Tom 38
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Trollface

Re: Bah!

If my licence payments are good enough why should the fact that I use Linux disqualify me from something I actually pay for?

Pfft, consider yourself lucky mate, think of us poor VIC-20 users, we're still waiting too!

(Because it is a horrific waste of money to spaff a disproportionate amount of it on such a small special interest group like Linux users - and I say that as a Linux user. Besides: wtf, you never heard of get_iplayer?)

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