* Posts by Tom 38

3069 posts • joined 21 Jul 2009

Wannacry: Everything you still need to know because there were so many unanswered Qs

Tom 38
Silver badge

Re: Great analysis - thanks

Because you are running custom software that's incredibly picky about OS versions[1] and patches? Because you don't have anyone that knows about WSUS or SCCM? Becuase your CxO doesn't give you any budget for anything other than getting their team the latest and greatest and certainly not for wasting time fiddling about with servers?

All of those are valid explanations why an individual techie working at an afflicted organization might not have applied the fix that would have prevented this.

None of them are valid explanations as to why an organization allows their technology to be so poorly maintained. None of them explain why CTOs across the country are not getting canned for failing to ensure business continuity.

I've no problem with people getting paid big money for CxO roles, but together with the money comes the responsibility; if you are the CTO of a hospital trust, and your policies on patching desktops led to surgeries getting cancelled, you should be cancelled.

0
1

After stiffing us with Trump, Weiner 'fesses to underage cock shot rot

Tom 38
Silver badge

Re: Guys - we've covered this before

Bet you also think the ladies don't fart or look at porn..

0
1

Wow, someone managed to make money on Fitbit stock – oh, 'fraudulently'

Tom 38
Silver badge
Meh

Re: Glad we're catching the top crooks

So if someone steal your four years old Honda, instead of a new Ferrari, it's worthless to jail and prosecute it?

Aha, so you've experienced London's finest too..

1
0

Samsung Galaxy S8+: Seriously. What were they thinking?

Tom 38
Silver badge

Don't get a OnePlus 3T!

Well, you can if you want, its just that they are currently discounting and selling off 3T stock in preparation for OnePlus 5 arriving soon, damn soon.

Having said that, you can almost buy two OnePlus 3Ts for the price of this Samsung, it's just pissing money away.

5
0

US judges say you can Google Google, but you can't google Google

Tom 38
Silver badge

Re: Really?

Hover hoovers suck though

0
0

Google DeepMind's use of 1.6m Brits' medical records to test app was 'legally inappropriate'

Tom 38
Silver badge

Re: Streams is showing real patient benefits.

"the company has no obligation whatsoever" - apart from the law, the contract they signed, etc etc..

So, this article is about them not following their contract. They were supposed to use the data to train and discard it. They are now running a service using that data.

Ignore whether it is a good or a bad thing; evidently they are not following their contract now so what happens in the future?

3
0
Tom 38
Silver badge
Trollface

Re: Streams is showing real patient benefits.

But what if it saves a CHILD'S LIFE?!

3
0

Comey was loathed by the left, reviled by the right – must have been doing something right

Tom 38
Silver badge

Re: infuriated those people who know a thing or six about encryption

If he had said "I accidentally found a kill switch but I will wait few weeks to provide details" we could accept this as part of responsible disclosure, and it would have given the rest of the world a week to plug the holes

So now we are expected to maintain responsible disclosure for malware now? What, in your mind, is the acceptable amount of time to wait before deciding that ivan@shadowbrokers just isn't going to respond and push out a fixed version of the malware before we disclose it?

Any semantic algorithmic flaw like this in malware should be discussed widely and openly, because either the code may be reused in other malware, or might be written from scratch with the same semantic flaw.

The only flaw that needs to be plugged is the one in Windows; MS released the patch in March, the vulnerability was disclosed in April, and now in May people who don't patch their systems are crying.

0
2

Japanese researchers spin up toilet paper gyroscopes for science

Tom 38
Silver badge

Re: This is hilarious

Boss: Why aren't you working yet? It's after 11!

Me: Well, I had a bacon and egg roll when I got in, but I'm still stuck trying to log in

It's like I stopped maturing at age 9

3
0

For now, GNU GPL is an enforceable contract, says US federal judge

Tom 38
Silver badge

Re: Double edge

The $150,000 per violation is actually _per work_. So it would have to be paid _once_.

Once for gs. Lets hope they didn't also build all those separate works of dvipdf, eps2eps, font2c, ghostscript, gsbj, gsdj, gsdj500, gslj, gslp, gsnd, lprsetup.sh, pdf2dsc, pdf2ps, pf2afm, pfbtopfa, pphs, printafm, ps2ascii, ps2epsi, ps2pdf, ps2pdf12, ps2pdf13, ps2pdf14, ps2pdfwr, ps2ps, ps2ps2 and wftopfa.

Isn't a software package with 20 programs in it the same as an album with 20 songs on it?

0
0

All that free music on YouTube is good for you, Google tells music biz

Tom 38
Silver badge
Joke

I think taxes on "the means of reproduction" are universally unpopular. Badda-boom-tish.

In the UK there used to be a tax on blank tapes for the same reason (thankfully gone), and the US has it for any CD-R that is explicitly marketed as being for audio (3% levy), but not for "data" ones, which is why there are no audio branded CD-Rs in the US.

1
0
Tom 38
Silver badge

I also don't think the UGC argument would work if you were making money off it.

The only people who don't make money off Youtube are those who originally produce the content. Everyone else makes out like bandits*.

*Just how do bandits make out though? Do they shave their stubble first?

5
1

10Mbps universal speeds? We'll give you 30Mbps, pleads Labour in leaked manifesto

Tom 38
Silver badge

@Mad Mike (the PS)

Well... Jeremy Corbyn promised to "democratise the internet" in his Digital Manifesto.

Technically the internet is already democratic - its where the demos (people) are.

It's worse if you take the original Greek meaning, as it means "people of a city state". Ho ho ho.

0
0
Tom 38
Silver badge

Re: Completely scrapping ADSL then

I'd also be surprised given how much money we currently bung at the railways to fund stagecoaches' sharholders - we couldn't provide the same service re-nationalising it at the same cost to the taxpayer.

Essentially, this is the main difference between voting Tory and voting Labour:

Tories believe that government is bad at running businesses because of inefficiency and bureaucracy, and that private enterprise, even if it has to be partly subsidised, will produce a higher quality of service at a cheaper price.

Labour believe that private enterprise is bad at running businesses because they are profit focused and exploit both their workers and their customers. They believe that any profits from these activities should go towards the exchequer and not private individuals, and that government funded investment will keep those businesses up to date.

If you look at Labour's (draft) manifesto, this is what they are proposing for almost everything. You can't mandate mobile coverage or broadband provision without directly controlling the enterprises that make that provision.

I don't think either are particularly right, but I remember how the trains, telecoms and power were when run by the government, not sure I'd like to go back to that.

1
1

Facebook is abusive. It's time to divorce it

Tom 38
Silver badge

Re: Such a true reflection of a sad world

I refuse to use any service which tries to treats me as a product, this is especially bad when by widely used business networking sites, like linkin, and many lazy retail sites!

But interestingly, you still read The Register. We're the products here, nice literate well educated professionals with disposable income ready to be advertised to.

7
0

Republicans go all Braveheart again with anti-net neutrality bill

Tom 38
Silver badge
Facepalm

Re: And I saw you put your tongue --

The new meaning of "bi-partisan" in use today means "Republican Party and Freedom Caucus"

4
0

'I feel violated': Engineer who pointed out traffic signals flaw fined for 'unlicensed engineering'

Tom 38
Silver badge

As pointed out previously in comments, in the UK engineering is not a licensed profession. Engineers here bang on about the fact that doctors and lawyers are licensed while engineering is not.

Not licensed? If you want to build many things in the UK, the design must be approved by someone who is a Certified Engineer in order to not fall foul of Building Standards

1
0
Tom 38
Silver badge

@fruitoftheloon

Professional standards bodies help ensure professional standards. I'm glad the roads that I use are designed by a MICE, that my GP is regulated by the GMC, my hospital consultant an MRCP, my surgeon is a FRCS...

0
0

Linux Mint-using terror nerd awaits sentence for training Islamic State

Tom 38
Silver badge

Re: USB cufflinks.

The cufflinks are cool, I have a set from Amazon from Chinese sellers, £4 each. Weirdly, they were sold by drive unit rather than as a pair of cufflinks. They didn't mention that in the description, so it meant that after waiting a month for the first to show up, I had to wait another month for the matching one to be delivered!

1
0

It's a question worth asking: Why is the FCC boss being such a jerk?

Tom 38
Silver badge

Re: Net not-so-neutral-ality?

The newer argument is that Netflix and Google will have to pay for the enormous bandwidth they use

This is what happens if you drink the KoolAid; Netflix already pay for their own bandwidth, the ISPs would also like them to pay for the ISPs bandwidth that is used by the ISPs users using Netflix.

3
0
Tom 38
Silver badge
FAIL

I would suggest the BBC if you require to vent about the left wing liberal media.

Ah, good old "biased BBC". The best thing you can say about the bias at the BBC is that the Left think Aunty is biased to the Right, the Right think she is biased to the Left, and the Liberals think they are ignored.

3
0

systemd-free Devuan Linux hits version 1.0.0

Tom 38
Silver badge

Re: They missed a trick

djb and Poettering are very different. djb is an exceptionally smart cryptographer that no distro trusts, and Poettering is an exceptionally naive developer that every distro trusts.

The only similarity between the two is that they both have the firmly held belief that they are right; when it comes to security, I'm inclined to trust djb on that regard.

3
0

That apple.com link you clicked on? Yeah, it's actually Russian

Tom 38
Silver badge

Re: an easy fix for firefox

Obviously another solution will need to be found for them, but English speakers are likely to be the target of the vast majority of hijacking attempts that use punycode domains masquerading as real ones.

No, you are only thinking of the problems that an anglophone will encounter from homographic IDN attacks, it is still a form of colonialism.

You haven't considered that due to our earlier anglophone-only internet, most of those non english speakers will actually be using a lot of domains that have english domain names, for instance paypal, google, mpay and so on. A work around that "works" for anglophones, but still allows the remaining 84% of the world to be pwned is not a valid solution.

For instance, a user in India almost certainly would want punycode on for local websites, but they still won't want to go to xn--mesa-g6d.in thinking it is mpesa.in.

4
9
Tom 38
Silver badge
FAIL

Re: an easy fix for firefox

The 5+ billion people who don't speak it as a first or second language can just go get fucked then?

4
10
Tom 38
Silver badge

Re: an easy fix for firefox

This isn't a fix, it is a work around. You fix the problem that you are not mislead by malicious IDNs, but you have a new problem that you cannot see any IDNs.

It's like someone complaining that their editor doesn't work in Arabic, and being told that the fix is to write in English.

9
3

TCP/IP headers leak info about what you're watching on Netflix

Tom 38
Silver badge
Headmaster

Not quite, maths

This test isn't entirely accurate because of the small sample size. 100 titles generated 184 million data points, and under 4 minutes of watching one of those titles can determine which of the 100 titles was watched.

Netflix have quite a bit more than 100 titles, which means a massive increase in the number of data points to consider. Let's be generous, and say their algorithm has reasonable time complexity and can be completely parallelised. What cannot be done is reduce the number of potential matches. With trillions of data points and millions of potential movies, the time that is required to give a definitive match will increase rapidly.

0
0

DevOps, Containers, and three days in May

Tom 38
Silver badge
Unhappy

£900?! How the hell do I sneak that past the PHB?

0
0

Eric S. Raymond says you probably fit one of eight tech archetypes

Tom 38
Silver badge

Re: "There are two more archetypes"

The problem is that each person thinks those two sets are disjunct.

4
0

Ex-IBMer sues Google for $10bn – after his web ad for 'divine honey cancer cure' was pulled

Tom 38
Silver badge

Your book is wrong.

1
0
Tom 38
Silver badge

Re: An interesting paper...

Two things:

1) Why would homeopathic medicine be at all expensive? In terms of ingredients, its a sugar pill imbued with the essence of something that has been diluted to the point it cannot be detected. They should cost about £1/kg.

2) If you are taking diclofenac on a regular basis, your stomach will not be long for this world.

0
0
Tom 38
Silver badge
Headmaster

Given the substance, I'd be amazed to find ONE verified death directly attributed to it, regardless of intake method.

Where did he say anything about dieing, he said you can OD on it. Not at all the same thing.

0
0
Tom 38
Silver badge

ultra-rare herb Soul of Kashmir

I normally buy this in little baggies, I never thought you get just get it in honey and spread it on toast - mind == blown.

6
0

Aviation regulator flies in face of UK.gov ban, says electronics should be stowed in cabin. Duh

Tom 38
Silver badge

Re: That was not unexpected...

The price of freedom is actually that some twat can blow you up or drive a car at you.

The price of security is eternal vigilance, snooping, barriers, restrictions. It is the opposite of freedom.

Do you realise how easy it is to blow up a train (Madrid, London)? There is not a thin blue line protecting us from nutters who want to blow us up, there just aren't as many nutters out there as the security services would like us to think.

43
1

WWW daddy Sir Tim Berners-Lee stands up for end-to-end crypto

Tom 38
Silver badge

Re: Email this to your MP

I applaud the idea, but I can't imagine that it is possible to influence an MP to vote against both their whip and lobbyists because that would require morals.

0
0

Wi-Fi sex toy with built-in camera fails penetration test

Tom 38
Silver badge

Re: Check this out

$145?!

Fuck me

3
0

IT contractors behind IR35 calculator to leave HMRC... because of IR35

Tom 38
Silver badge

Re: TAX CHEAT ALERT!

So you are taking a reduced salary in order to avoid paying tax and NIC on travel loan repayments?

Doesn't that make you a tax cheat?

No man in this country is under the smallest obligation, moral or other, so to arrange his legal relations to his business or to his property as to enable the Inland Revenue to put the largest possible shovel into his stores. - Lord Clyde, Lord President of the Court of Session

Every man is entitled if he can to order his affairs so as that the tax attaching under the appropriate Acts is less than it otherwise would be. If he succeeds in ordering them so as to secure this result, then, however unappreciative the Commissioners of Inland Revenue or his fellow taxpayers may be of his ingenuity, he cannot be compelled to pay an increased tax. - Baron Tomlin, Lord of Appeal in Ordinary

Any one may so arrange his affairs that his taxes shall be as low as possible; he is not bound to choose that pattern which will best pay the Treasury; there is not even a patriotic duty to increase one's taxes. - Judge Learned Hand (what an awesome name), US Second Circuit

4
0

New plastic banknote plans now upsetting environmental campaigners

Tom 38
Silver badge

Re: One fairly serious alternative is ...

suffice to say that a bar full of Mendocino County lumberjacks on a Saturday night can get pretty funny, if a trifle dangerous to onlookers

I'm sure jake is meaning that they are all macho and trying crazy mountain men style pranks, but all I see is...

I cut down trees. I skip and jump.

I like to press wild flowers.

I put on women's clothing

And hang around in bars.

8
0

Uber wasn't to blame for robo-ride crash – or was it? Witness said car tried to 'beat the lights'

Tom 38
Silver badge

but if it is a standard 4 way intersection with traffic lights, what is the issue?

Come to Europe, we don't really have many road junctions like that because of the aforementioned batshitinsanery of them. Far too confusing and slows down traffic flows.

We have roundabouts instead.

2
0

BOFH: The Boss, the floppy and the work 'experience'

Tom 38
Silver badge
Thumb Up

Re: Being on a placement myself...

Most in the IT industry remember that when they left University they weren't instant coding Gods, but unfortunately some belittle students trying to learn.

Oh sure, I know that now. When I actually left Uni though, I thought I could make the world spin in a different direction with my supreme programming skills, and sadly so do most of the graduates that I come across these days too.

But I give them a bit of a break, because I remember how much of a dick I must have been :)

20
0

Ubuntu 17.04 inches closer to production

Tom 38
Silver badge
FAIL

Re: Wake me up when it's .1" from production

Alumoi: (Joke about "inches" being both a verb meaning "getting closer" and a measure of distance)

Hans 1: (Whooosh)

10
0

'Clearance sale' shows Apple's iPad is over. It's done

Tom 38
Silver badge

Re: Education PC seller says Apple is no good in that market

Apple might be big in the USA, but in the educational establishments where I studied / worked, they were pretty much non-existent.

Well, in the UK there is no money left after buying a couple of RM badged beauts. RM: the only company that makes Apple stuff look cheap.

10
0

FYI anyone who codes outside work: GitHub has a contract to stop bosses snatching it all

Tom 38
Silver badge

Re: Alcatel, eh?

As he wasn't employed by them, he didn't have any employment rights.

0
0
Tom 38
Silver badge

Re: Interesting, but..

You would have to find the money to challenge your employer in court, who then may find grounds for discovering that he doesn't want to promote, or even employ, you anymore. So you end up with a huge legal bill and no job.

Is this another US/European difference? Your boss cannot simply decide he no longer likes you and you are fired. You must have a reason for dismissal that amounts to Gross Negligence (so not just "AHA! You are 3 minutes late!"), or the job must no longer exist, in which case the employer must pay redundancy (and the job really has to not exist, not just pretend not exist, or the employer will get reamed in Tribunal).

Also, all complaints around this do not go to court, they go to a time limited tribunal - so your employer cannot lawyer you out of your rights.

2
0

King Battistelli's swish penthouse office the Euro Patent Office doesn't want you to see

Tom 38
Silver badge

Re: "few Greek or Spanish or Italian unemployed"

There's a reason why Battistelli last name looks to have an Italian origin, or something like that. Not a little percentage of unemployed people would like to live out of someone else money like Battistelli does

Nice bit of casual national stereotyping. Unfortunately, he's actually French, so we need to think of him as a beret wearing, cheese eating surrender monkey. Probably smells of garlic.

7
2

Android O my god! It's finally here (for devs)

Tom 38
Silver badge

there for the benefit of Google, not the [..] phone's battery life

I think that partly they are intended to be there for battery life. Instead of one monolithic application that wakes up constantly and checks 400 things, they have 400 things which mainly sleep and only wake up occasionally to do simple things.

idk that it does any good though :)

3
0

Huawei's P10 breathing on Samsung's shoulder

Tom 38
Silver badge

4 pages

No mention of whether the battery is replaceable or not (its not).

4
0

The priest, the coder, the Bitcoin drug deals – and today's guilty verdicts

Tom 38
Silver badge

Re: Not a "priest"

No, that's just the historical etymology of the word. Priest, pastor, cleric, parson - these are all synonyms of each other; the differences that each one can mean within a particular cult are only interesting to the members of that cult.

1
0
Tom 38
Silver badge

Re: Not a "priest"

What makes a pastor not a type of priest?

1
0

Dr Hannah Fry: We need to be wary of algorithms behind closed doors

Tom 38
Silver badge
WTF?

Re: Algorithms that sit behind closed doors

Not at all. I work for a company that uses open source software, but the algorithms I write determine weather or not you get that all important first interview for a job.

If I balls this up I can totally fuck up your career.

PS you as the person trying to get the job have no access to the code or the rules that determine weather you are selected or rejected.

Algorithms are code. Code can be either open or closed source. If the source code is inaccessible, it is closed source code, even if portions of it are open source code.

Presuming this isn't software from somewhere like North Korea, then you cannot "totally fuck up" someones career, because you are not the only people doing this. If your algorithms are bad, then you will be supplying not the best candidates to your clients, and others will able to supply the good candidates your algorithm rejected; your business would suffer, but the candidates you reject will be perfectly fine.

5
0

Europe will fine Twitter, Facebook, Google etc unless they rip up T&Cs

Tom 38
Silver badge

Re: Good luck

All of those companies are located in the United States. Do you really think they won't just cry to Congress and then watch as America craps on yet another treaty. Are you guys prepared for the equivalent of economic armageddon?

We don't really care about the US any more to be honest. We don't get our fuel, food or technology from there, and we're increasingly unconcerned about upsetting a regime that repeatedly tells us that they will use protectionism to stifle our imports.

So yes, if your companies want to operate in our territories, they will do so in the manner that we deem fit or we will fine them.

2
0

Forums

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2017