* Posts by -tim

575 posts • joined 10 Jul 2009

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AI is cool and all – but doctors and patients don't really need it

-tim

AI expensive?

Some AI is expensive but most is not. The skin tumor detector will get very cheap as its rollout scales. Back in the 80s AI was used to find traits, then that was reversed engineered to determine just what it was looking for and that reduced to a simple algorithm. All that modern AI has over the stuff from the 80s is that we now have far more compute power to make the initial findings.

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Men are officially the worst… top-level domain

-tim

Run your own DNS servers

If you run your own DNS server, don't use the typical root hints but use it for .com, .net, .org and country codes you care about. Then all the others just go away. It is amazing how much stuff gets blocked using this technique.

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Worst. Birthday. Ever. IPv6's party falls flat

-tim

Re: Follow the $

"It's probably worth pointing out, in a 'Captain Obvious' kind of way, that a /64 is BIGGER than the entire IPv4 address range"

That is the type of thinking that isn't helping IPv6 rollouts.

A /64 is the IP equivalent of the class C network in old IPv4 networks. A /64 is ONE network that happens to allow a nearly infinite number of hosts on it. In my talks about IPv6, I tend to describe a /32 as a Class A and a /48 to /56 as a class B. Nearly every host in the world should be on a IPv6 /64.

0
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BlackBerry Key2: Clickier, nippier, but how many people still want a QWERTY?

-tim
Unhappy

Still missing some buttons...

The thing needs a red and green physical buttons.

1
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BOFH: Their bright orange plumage warns other species, 'Back off! I'm dangerous!'

-tim

Re: Yellow vs Orange hi-vis

I was speaking to a retired tailor who was looking for a project for a apprentice tailor when the question of orange vs yellow came up. I was hoping to get a nice custom tailored suit made. If the jacket is orange, should the shirt be yellow and the tie reflective? Just how thin should the reflective pin stripes be?

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Waiting for 100 Mbps NBN on wireless? Errr, umm, sorry about that

-tim

Re: They got 100Mbps wireless in Iceland (country)

jonfr,

One of the odd things about Aussie spectrum is that when the commercial and military bands were set up by NATO after WWII, they were split so the US and Canada military used European commercial frequencies and the European militaries used the US commercial frequencies so when NATO was activated, they wouldn't step on each others radios any more than usual. Australia managed to get parts of both and fast forward 50 years and there is a complete mess with things like most of the 4G is following European practices while the rural areas are following the US practices. That means things like half of the 900 mhz band is used for mobile phone coverage even though it is the only cheap frequency to run very rural wireless internet with. By very rural, less than 50 customers within 50 km of the tower.

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You love Systemd – you just don't know it yet, wink Red Hat bods

-tim
Coat

Those who do not understand Unix are condemned to reinvent it, poorly.

"It sounds super basic, but actually it is much more complex than people think," Poettering said. "Because Systemd knows which service a process belongs to, it can shut down that process."

Poettering and Red Hat,

Please learn about "Process Groups"

Init has had the groundwork for most of the missing features since the early 1980s. For example the "id" field in /etc/inittab was intended for a "makefile" like syntax to fix most of these problems but was dropped in the early days of System V because it wasn't needed.

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IBM bans all removable storage, for all staff, everywhere

-tim
Trollface

Terminology?

Perhaps its time to make some USB memory sticks with a "USB DASD" on them and charge a small fortune for them.

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Leave it to Beaver: Unity is long gone and you're on your GNOME

-tim
Coat

Re: New Linux poweruser here ...

In the early days of unix there was a script called /etc/rc.init that started everything else. init's job at that time was run rc.init or a shell and clean up after programs that ended. Then run levels (single user/admin mode) were introduced by AT&T after the AT&T/BSD/AT&T split/fork that created System V. IBM's AIX included an early concept of having a program doing smarter things that the early init and scripts and that was considered heresy by the greybeards. The init system in Solaris 10 also caused a great deal of strife and caused a number of people to abandon it or stick with Sol 8/9 (which are still supported as containers under 11.3).

Systemd was intended to fix the init problems of the laptop while the old init.d (/etc/rc2.d and /etc/rc3.d) were much better for dealing with older larger servers which would hardly ever reboot and didn't have their hardware disappearing and new stuff reappearing all the time. Most of the major critics of early systemd (and Solaris svcs) were sysadms who just ran servers. The system V init (like solaris) for the sun comparable laptops made by tadpole was an absolute nightmare as it needed to make use of run-levels a,b and c to deal with going in and out of power saving or sleep modes and it didn't have to cope with usb devices showing up. The dependency tree of a modern init system is exceptionally complex and there is current research in the field. The SysV inittab had names for the purpose of a makefile like dependency tree but wasn't properly used showing this problem goes back to at least 1983.

What I expect will happen is that one of the BSD groups will figure out how to do more modern init system correctly for the range of hardware between tablets and servers, have their init work with the existing rc.d/init.d/svcs/systemd config files. Then systemd will get relegated to something like the contract manager under solaris and in time disappear.

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Apple grounds AirPort once and for all. It has departed. Not gonna fly any more. The baggage is dropped off...

-tim

Re: One of their best products.

Just how am I to use a wireless keyboard in any industry that requires security audits? I pointed out to my former bank that the wireless keyboards that let them type in account numbers and PIN could be picked up outside their building.

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Ozzie Ozzie Ozzie, oi oi oi! Tech zillionaire Ray's backdoor crypto for the Feds is Clipper chip v2

-tim

Re: Making Non-compliant Encryption Illegal

"2. Designing a secure encryption algorithm (especially one that is provably secure) is hard; many, including skilled cryptographers, have tried and fallen short."

The scary part of that statement is designing secure encryption is the easy part of what governments want.

Moden encryption uses new keys very often and generation, transfer and selection of those keys is a far more difficult problem than the simple block ciphers. The key escrow techniques used way back in the days Clipper wouldn't be considered anywhere outside of a high school programming class or congress.

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Oracle pledges annual Solaris updates for you to install each summer

-tim
FAIL

I guess its time to dump sun hardware forever

Not only are the older systems out of the running on 11.4, it now appears they have less than a year of useful life left on 11.3. This includes systems that they were selling new less than 6 years ago. The last patches for Solars 9 were 3 years ago and that would run on hardware made in 1995. Solaris 11.3 was back to the point of being useful as a server after the Solaris 10 mess and the ZFS stuff is far ahead of what is running in Linux today.

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They're back! 'Feds only' encryption backdoors prepped in US by Dems

-tim
FAIL

They don't understand that Clipper has sailed

Everything ever encrypted with the Clipper chip can be decoded by non-gvoerment types. Yet the politicians won't think of the real risks.

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Let's go to Mars, dude: Euro space parachute passes maiden test

-tim
Boffin

Re: not a fluid dynamics expert but...

Austin Meyer, the author of the flight simulator X-Plane set it up to simulate flights on mars:

http://www.x-plane.com/adventures/mars.html

The synopsis is that it is hard. Inertia problems are compounded by low gravity and thin air. It requires massive amounts of energy to take off and arresting gear to stop.

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Apple, if you want to win in education, look at what sucks about iPads

-tim
Coat

Never underestimate students with hardware.

A group of students were talking on the train about a few IT problems and solutions for them. They were virtualized the locked down school system so it looks like the machines hadn't been tampered with.

These students who appear to have been about 12 years old also found a way around the anti-plagiarism software by simply including the entire assignment notes into their work. Since every student is doing it, the scores started showing every student was about 30% plagiarized and if they included direct quotes from the teacher they could get that score into the 70% range where the instructor simply ignored the score.

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Super Cali goes ballistic, Starbucks is on notice: Expensive milky coffee is something quite cancerous

-tim
IT Angle

Wonderful California

They require a specific sign designs for restrooms that seems like it was intend to troll the visually impaired. Nearly every sign in the world has a triangle dress shape for women and not a triangle for men. California goes and does the reverse. Apparently the signs were designed by an IT person as well.

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'Tis the season: Verizon first in line to flog Palm phone resurrection

-tim

Re: Great Stuff!

My palm pilot can do phone calls. Unfortunately only via the land line modem module while plugged into my phone line or else I might be using it today.

I'm hoping that the Raspberry Pi 4G hats start to get cheap. I expect iPhone and Android's days would look numbered if we could get real hackable phone hardware into the hands of lots of creative people. Too bad the price of a 4G embedded module tends to run around £250.

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We need to go deeper: Meltdown and Spectre flaws will force security further down the stack

-tim
Boffin

More to come?

There are people who have exploited this to read the entire details of the hidden "security" processors and they are busy writing papers for the next next security conference or selling 0day exploits. If you can get data into L1 cache and can convince a second core that it needs the data real bad, it will get scribbled back to RAM and that makes it game over particularly if the cache line has the permission tables for the master virtual memory table.

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Galileo, Galileo, Galileo, off you go: Snout of UK space forcibly removed from EU satellite trough

-tim
Boffin

Why not use the Downunder system?

I expect the day before Galileo goes live with a full constellation, someone might announce the Antipodean version that uses pulsars that are already out there as the main clock ticks. Such a theoretical system would use far more complicated maths but what is the difference between a 12th order 3d polar polynomial and an 18th order when it also works on the moon as well as Proxima b?

The very ironic thing for the Galileo consortium is the fact they tweaked Dr Parkinson's Navstar (aka US GPS) system just enough that the chipsets have to isolate the pulsar pulses in hardware lest they get confused. Those pulses have been used to measure RF energy patterns from pulsars to map parts of distant stars down to about 2 meters. There is also the real world issue that it is very hard to jam signals that smart phones can pick up inside even with something on the order of -450 db signal loss.

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Bitcoin's blockchain: Potentially a hazardous waste dump of child abuse, malware, etc

-tim
Facepalm

Still no malware?

So why hasn't some BOHF included the EICAR virus test file yet?

0
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Seen from spaaaaace: Boffins check world's oceans for plastic

-tim

Re: Remember back in the day...

There are serious medical issues related to people handling food and recycled containers. Check out levels of hepatitis in Columbia Missouri (which has a can deposit) vs the areas around it which don't. There have been documented cases of MRSA being transmitted though recycling schemes and the grocery store staff just aren't trained enough for it not to cause health problems.

Around here cans and glass bottles pay for the rest of the recycling. Cardboard can be profitably recycled if there are enough cans and bottles to pay for the expensive sorting machines. If you remove them from the cash flow, nothing else is going to get recycled without great expense that the tax payers won't put up with. Everyone who is willing to deal with plastic bottles wants the cans and glass and those require not having a bottle deposit rule. Modern sorting equipment is very good at dealing with the standard plastic coke bottles and sorting the milk ones into a second process but the raw plastic isn't worth much except as a fuel. The bulk systems are far more efficient than the vending machine used in Norway and can cope with far more types of recycling.

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Reg man wraps head in 49-inch curved monitor

-tim
Angel

Re: Still only 1080 Vertical

"I'd say about twelvety"

About 9.5 would give you 360 degrees but at 1.8 meters away they are sort of short. If this thing had a radius of 700 mm to 1000 mm, I might consider it but for now I'll stick with several monitors. I have a pair of 24 inch curved samsung displays and I figured the curve was just a bit of a gimmick, but they do reduce eye strain even though they have the same 1800 mm radius curve.

If they came on a 1m radius, I could see mounting them on a turn table that physically rotated them around me maybe using something like plane rudder foot pedals. I could set the background to yellow and have a halo like in the icon.

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BOOM: Server shipments up as huge clumps of white boxes suddenly fly off shelves

-tim
Unhappy

Yet I still can't find what I want

I'm looking for a 1RU AMD Ryzen Threadripper, not an EPYC, yet no one seems to have one on offer. I would like just a basic box with one CPU module, 4 to 8 ram slots, 4x3.5" or 8x2.5", dual power supply and enough video to install and OS.

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Australia joins the 'decrypt it or we'll legislate' club

-tim

Re: Sigh ... Oranges are not the only fruit.

USENET already has lots of encrypted data flowing around. At least as long as it last as there are now only 647 usenet servers listed in the "top 1000".

Decades ago I needed to reduce bandwidth so I wrote a program that would take images and drop them to 6 bit gray at about 100x100 and then checksum that to see if it had recently been seen. There were a bunch of images that reduced to the same checksum but had different checksums on the original images. On group of them had single color borders about 20 pixels thick but the encoding of the image wasn't typical of "make the next 1000 pixels light blue" but was more like "5 pixels of light blue", "2 pixels of the same light blue" and so on so somehow someone was encoding data into those images or they had the worst image encoding library ever.

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-tim
Facepalm

Clipper chip sails again

Yet another attempt at the Clipper Chip nonsense.

I've been tempted to come up with the "King James Bible Encryption" and hack it into openssl. It would use AES but split the encrypted data stream into 14 bit chunks and then looks up a Bible verse and sends that along. So if AES would produce binary 0000 0000 0000 00, the packet would contain "In the beginning God created the heaven and the earth." That will let the lawyers argue religious freedom vs bad laws about mathematics.

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Oracle open-sources DTrace under the GPL

-tim
Coat

Re: Methinks ...

"NOTHING that they were talking about had anything at all to do with the decisions about CPU design changes that were already in the works at Intel, AMD etc."

About that time CPUs were getting fast enough that the average program was doing enough system calls that the multitasking interrupt was no longer the major cause for the kernel to shift things around. Sun had already announced their newer processor and it included lots of performance improvements for doing things like flushing page tables and switching between system mode and user mode and between cores. Intel at the time was still trying to catch up in the server market and introduced their solutions to those problem about 3 years latter. At that time Intel was trying to break into the server market and at least one of the people in the thread did architectural work at Intel.

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-tim
Boffin

Re: Methinks ...

Some of what they were debating in that thread 2 decades ago resulted in the Meltdown/Spectre mess we have now.

There are also some other interesting things in that discussion. The Linux TCP stack was faster than the SunOS one at the time because Sun used a modular network stack based on isolated layers of the Streams concept while Linux allowed for anything that worked fast to be in the Kernel. Oddly enough the instance of preserving the modular layered nature of the Linux file system layers is why the Linux ZFS port is behind other operating systems and still would be even if Oracle reopened the source for that.

That "ancient thread" has a large number of familiar names that are still active.

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A computer file system shouldn't lose data, right? Tell that to Apple

-tim
Boffin

There are other very serious bugs

It appears they have installed another layer in the file system starting around 10.10.

I have a FAT formated USB stick and from the command line this often happens:

$ cd /Volumes/RED8/

$ ls

.

Opps all the files are gone except they aren't. Things like "ls -s | sort" won't work at all sometimes yet ls -s sometimes does. There are plenty of online complaints about this but most seem to think it is related to the shell which it isn't.

I don't know what that extra layer does but I expect it might help protect flash drives from being pulled out without being turned off first or related to their new file system but that is pure speculation. Maybe Apple should have used some of its huge pile of cash to by Larry a new boat and then roll out ZFS properly.

1
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nbn™'s HFC fix will see connections tested from March to July 2018

-tim
FAIL

HFC = Cable TV network

We had the overgrown Cable TV network connection installed at the office and the speed was about half the speed of the ADSL. They couldn't switch it back and they couldn't fix it. I ordered a new ADSL service via Internode's online system and once that was installed, I canceled the HFC. At least there are some options for going back even if they powers that be claim there aren't.

0
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Australia's new insta-pay scheme has insta-lookup of any user's phone number

-tim
Alert

No Privacy Payments?

So a hacker has to send 100 million request to enumerate all phones in the country?

If their API can talk over the phone network, that would nearly use a months data on most of the lower end prepaid plans. Without a rate limit and a good network (say a Not Built Network 1G plan), that should take a few minutes.

Why is there so much ignorance about side channel attacks? So they have a rate limit. My bank card also has a rate limit but if someone hacks a grocery store, all they have to do is try all cards with pin 1234 the 1st day, 8520 the next day and in 30 days they will have 30% of all card PINs without hitting the rate limit on any card.

1
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From July, Chrome will name and shame insecure HTTP websites

-tim

Re: Let's encrypt?

@Alain,

You seem to be one of the few that looked into certbot and I see you have your own reasons not to run it on your systems. I don't like the idea that the default install can update the script and replace it with something else running as root. While there has been care to make that harder to MITM, anyone who can get a bad cert installed in the system CA chain might be able to p0wn the server. It is a big enough target surface not to have thousands of people working on that right now.

On my virtual host servers, I use dehydrated which is a simple shell program running as its own user.

I trust all CAs equally but see them as a necessary evil. As soon as I find one that doesn't have a spook or former spook high up in their management, I might trust one more than the others.

1
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nbn 's CVC discounts worked - ISPs splashed for 38 per cent more bandwidth

-tim
Unhappy

Still way overpriced?

Perhaps someone from El Reg should look into why the CVC pricing model isn't more like a peering point exchange than and old school ISDN link? IX-Australia now provides 1gb for $350/mo or you can opt for the 10gb plan also for $350/mo but that is only in data centers. The NBN is still charging a link cost in addition to over charging for the CVC by a factor of about 500 and they are effectively a distributed peering exchange.

3
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Tall, slim models are coming to take over dumpy SSD territory

-tim
Coat

Where is the backwards compatibility?

For some odd reason, there seems to be some very odd backwards compatibility in hardware formats. For example 8x 3.5" drives will fit nicely in an 8" disk drive case yet 8 inch floppies were very hard to find by the time the 3.5 inch drives were introduced. Some of the ill fated 2ish and 3 inch drives could fit four in a 5.25 half hight drive bay.

While the Intel ruler format is long, it still is about a connector width shorter than the old 8" drives which happens to be about a nano-light second.

/mines the one with about a million 1 x 2 x 3 mm drive chips lost in the pocket.

1
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Trump White House mulls nationalizing 5G... an idea going down like 'a balloon made out of a Ford Pinto'

-tim

Just like the Aussie Not Better Network?

Having just one group building a shared network should be more efficient, quicker and cost less. Reality says that doesn't happen. See Australia NBN as an example.

5
0

Security hole in AMD CPUs' hidden secure processor code revealed ahead of patches

-tim
FAIL

BIOS updates? What BIOS updates?

I have a stack of machines that will never ever see a BIOS update again. Anything over about 2 years old won't ever see one either.

Anytime someone says something will be fixed in the BIOS, it means it will never be fixed on at least 99% of the machines that have the problem.

What happened to BIOS initializing enough hardware to load the boot block and then handing everything else off to the OS which should reset everything and start from a blank slate. The OS is much easier to patch and it should be able to do anything the BIOS could.

88
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Meltdown, Spectre: The password theft bugs at the heart of Intel CPUs

-tim
Facepalm

I will get worse...

If you can play two cores off of each other, there will be a way to convince the inter-cpu cache controller to write the cache line back to ram after it has been modified depending on the architecture. I'll call that hack "psychopathic breakdown"

1
0

We translated Intel's crap attempt to spin its way out of CPU security bug PR nightmare

-tim
Facepalm

Old is new again?

Theo from OpenBSD had a rant about Intel and similar problem in 2007. https://www.theregister.co.uk/2007/06/28/core_2_duo_errata/

And people say I'm crazy for using SPARC.

56
2

Kernel-memory-leaking Intel processor design flaw forces Linux, Windows redesign

-tim
Facepalm

Re: Crap indeed

A problem seems to be that the data is feed into the data pipeline (and L1 cache?) via speculative execution. To simplify the problem... if you have some code like:

if(false) {

x=some data that shouldn't work

} else {

do something slow

}

y=some data that shouldn't work

The x= gets the data loaded into the cache while the slow code is slow enough to make sure it gets there. Then the y= pulls data that is in the cache (and whatever makes up the other 64 bytes in its cache line) and that might not be checked against the permission bits in the virtual memory tables. I can't think of any situations where the x86 does speculative writes that would hit memory so this should be limited to reading data. The trick might work to slow down memory sharing on multi-core systems. x86 I/O sometimes is read based so that reading a memory location could resets a counter or buffer and that would be a problem limited to some i/o device. If someone can come up with a way to have the speculative data being read and then written back through the cache, the security game is over.

1
1

Oracle swallows sales spurt from one of its niche categories: Cloud

-tim

Leased hardware?

"Most of what is in our revenue base did not come from our on-prem user base," Hurd said. "We are hopeful we will start to see a higher percentage of Oracle's user base moving."

So they want to lease hardware in place of selling it?

Their lowest SPARC offering today is 4.4 million percent faster than what was using when I first built a version of the current systems for my employer. Even though the new machine is a quarter of the price, I simply don't need that kind of performance. What I do need is a small telco ruggedized server appliance. While I would love to have the new SPARC processor's features like encryption and compression between the CPU and RAM, I don't Need it.

0
0

As Apple fixes macOS root password hole, here's what went wrong

-tim

Can this be used to set a password?

Does this mean after a fixed number of tries, the password might be able to be set to something and then if the patch only works if the encrypted password hasn't been set, it means someone could have added a backdoor that won't be detected or fixed?

0
0

Vodafone's NBN plans may include voice-over-WiFi, virtual landlines

-tim

Why no wifi phone? We are the customer

Phones don't have the wifi phone features simply because end users aren't the main buyer of phones. The major buyer of phones in most places in the world are still the carriers who still see their land line business as part of their core and wifi as a threat to that. There is more than a decade of solid evidence showing that land lines are going the way of the dodo and yet they persists. Even companies like Vodafone who have no land line business at all in many countries seems to operate the same as all the other phone companies. Fixed cable TV and Fixed line phones are dead, it isn't a matter of if, but how soon. They need to start treating data networks as data networks and not over grown phone companies or cable tv operations.

1
0

Mauritian code-cutters to help deliver TLS 1.3

-tim

Re: Broken by design then.

Its also broken by design so that users can't plug in their own block cipher, hash or public key encryption. The days of enumerating a few options just to save a byte in a startup packet are long gone and the concepts of plug in ciphers are well known and offer options once something falls to the crypto gods. If my client and server want to do AES512 with 20 rounds, the protocol should allow me to add a config line saying prefer "AES512_20rounds-GCM-SHA512_160rounds" without breaking anything. Right now, the client and server software need to be hacked, and ID type that will conflict in the future will need to be added, the crypto libraries need to be updated and then everything has to be recompiled. That process is why there are so many broken systems out on the web today.

0
0

Security pros' advice to consumers: 'We dunno, try 152 things'

-tim

Email - why html?

It is amazing how clear scammy email is when you use a very old email program that only does text. Things like Pine are great for that. Even old school mail isn't going to get p0wned but it is so clear.

1
0

How to make your HTML apps suck less, actually make some money

-tim

If only ...

Had some smart people figured all this out in 1970s and published a book about how humans cope with slow interfaces, all this would have been avoided.

Its almost like a mythical man microsecond just magnified 32 billion times.

0
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nbn™'s problems were known – in 2008, a year before its birth

-tim

Re: NZ vs Aus

If you discount any square KM that has 0 population, the population density argument goes away as the rest is more densely populated than the USA, Russia or Canada if you use the same metric. Australia is a very densely populated area with large amount of nothing in between. The nothing in between is cheap to cable.

8
0

Oracle users meet behind closed doors: Psst – any licensing tips?

-tim

Dear former Sun:

I need you to get a pair of T8-1 in every major IT department in every university in the world.

A stripped down T8 on the cheap would be great too. Can you do a T8-.0001 for under $2k?

Thanks,

One of your real customers.

0
0

BOFH: Oh dear. Did someone get lost on the Audit Trail?

-tim
Flame

Shredders?

The base I worked at had a paper shredder model number 007. I've seen a hard drive shredder that started out life tearing apart some sort of military equipment as it started out crushing, then shredding followed up with a few hours of incineration. That thing would cope with a 14 inch disk pack complete with the cake cover.

4
0

Q. Why's Oracle so two-faced over open source? A. Moolah, wonga, dosh

-tim
Coat

Closed vs open source email server costs?

When the US Govt decided they needed a standard for email in about 1990, they came up with a X.400/X.500 based thing covered under a butchered standard called GOSSIP. Those systems in 1992 costs about $50,000 for the license and another $20k just to find someone who could drive the thing. The $100k worth of VAX, Sun or other hardware was on top of that. Much of oddness in Microsoft exchange was a result of them trying to comply with the odd changes to the X.400 protocols. Open source SMTP was allowed as a migration strategy and most places shifted to that and never looked back.

6
1

How bad can the new spying legislation be? Exhibit 1: it's called the USA Liberty Act

-tim
Big Brother

Some WWII refugees welcome

It wasn't just the rocket and nuclear scientists that the US government worked very hard at importing during and after the war. The FBI had an entire group of people who had been involved with the collection and correlation of information on people from European countries. The OSS and DIA were formed with a number of people who had worked for other countries gathering intelligence on their citizens.

7
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Home Sec Amber Rudd: Yeah, I don't understand encryption. So what?

-tim
Facepalm

How hard can it be?

Even Caesar understod a cipher.

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