* Posts by Def

1296 posts • joined 8 Jul 2009

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Surface Studio 2: The Vulture rakes a talon over Microsoft's latest box of desktop delight

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Re: Hmmmmm!

Interestingly the Microsoft page that CNET article links to still claims only 1GB is needed for the 32 bit desktop version of Windows 10. I suspect Microsoft backtracked and updated that page closer to the release date.

Regardless, how long ago did anyone actually have a PC with only 1GB of memory?

As others have pointed out, the base line specs for Windows have been stagnant for a very long time. I remember bitching to friends who worked at Microsoft back in 2005/2006 about how each new version of Windows was basically pushing the requirements to help Intel shift new processors (which they denied, obviously). I, for one, am glad to see that that is no longer the case.

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Re: Hmmmmm!

Citation needed.

64 bit Windows 7 has always needed 2GB of RAM. Just like 64 bit Windows 10.

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Re: Hmmmmm!

So that's why the recommended base specs for Windows 10 are identical to those of Windows 7, huh?

Or in other words: The recommended base specs for Windows haven't changed in nearly a decade.

Fun fact: GPS uses 10 bits to store the week. That means it runs out... oh heck – April 6, 2019

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Pint

The full quote from Dirk Gently's Holistic Detective Agency is:

He had extracted himself from the Cambridge one-way system by the usual method, which involved going round and round it faster and faster until he achieved a sort of escape velocity and flew off at a tangent in a random direction, which he was now trying to identify and correct for.

Jammy dodgers: Boffin warns of auto autos congesting cities to avoid parking fees

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Re: Eh?

My point was if the alternative to paying for parking is to make it drive around town all day, surely sending it home would be the better option. Or at least send it part way where parking is cheaper or free. (Which is surely the best option - out of town multi-story (underground) self-service car parks only for self-drive cars with prices that make them the most attractive choice.)

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Eh?

If you must take a car to work, why wouldn't you just send it home during the day instead of making it drive around and around and around?

Worried about Brexit food shortages? North Korean haute couture has just the thing

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Joke

Re: The Rule of Threes

3 hours without Internet.

FTFY. ;)

Arm wants to wrestle industry into a seat on the UK.gov's £70m hardware security train

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Coat

Re: Wonderful

...to the point that they couldn't really discuss it!

That sounds pretty secure to me. :D

Whats(goes)App must come down... World in shock as Zuck decides to intertwine Facebook, Instagram, WhatsApp

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Re: Strange

Taking Facebook as an example, I use Events for larger things, but if I just want to meet some friends in town, I just add them to a Messenger group and we chat and arrange where to meet - or if people are running late/joining later we just update the group chat saying where we're going as we go.

The major benefit this has over email is you can quickly see if someone has actually read the message, not to mention being able to chat in real time. Email is a dinosaur that has its uses, but this isn't one of them - trying to follow a conversation by email where a dozen people are chatting is impossible.

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Re: Strange

Or maybe you'd just be annoyed if you were included in anything.

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Re: Strange

I can guarantee you they contact each other much more easily. I have a few friends who have either ditched or never enrolled in social media. It's annoying as hell to include them in organising something with a group of people.

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Re: Some people have lots of friends, and their friends have friends.

I have just over 550 friends on Facebook. I would guess maybe a dozen of those are people I've never met in real life. (And maybe a couple of dozen more I expect never to meet or bump into again at some point.)

Microsoft delivers a second preview of Visual Studio 2019 (a Redmond thing we actually like)

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Re: That extra space...

Yeah, I don't care about the title/menu bar. I already have the tools I need appended to the menu bar. As long as they don't break my ability to keep my current layout in that respect I don't care.

But I voted and commented on the linked issue. Thanks for that - finding stuff in the feedback app is next to impossible.

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Re: On my wish list

Ah, I always hide the news section in the start page - it's not like I'm going to ever read it. :)

It's strange your recent projects list takes so long to populate though. My projects aren't even on the SSD and I rarely notice having to wait for them to appear.

A cold boot on my laptop takes about six seconds to start Visual Studio and another second and a half to get the start page ready for use. My desktop machine is ready for use in about three seconds.

Thinking about it though, I did have a similar issue some time last year where the whole thing would freeze on start up for about 10-15 seconds. I think that might have been related to validating the account for the licence. I can't remember though whether I changed some setting somewhere, or whether the problem disappeared when I upgraded Visual Studio (I'm currently on 15.9.4).

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Re: Still using Visual Studio?

Clang parser has turned the tide

LOL

If I ever miss programming in the 90s, I'll be sure and check out KDevelop. :p

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That extra space...

It's a nice gesture, but would be totally unnecessary if each tool window didn't have a title bar, a toolbar, and a row of tabs at the bottom. The first versions of Visual Studio (and Developer Studio before) had way more space for code and ancilliary windows than the current versions have.

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Re: On my wish list

Visual Studio 2017 takes less than 10 seconds to start on my aging desktop machine. It's quite possible the SSD system drive helps there, but if you don't have one of those already you should re-evaluate your life choices. ;). Seriously though, it's possible you have an extension that's taking more time than it should to organise itself and start in a timely manner.

UC Berkeley reacts to 'uni Huawei ban' reports: We unplugged, like, one thing no one cares about

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Headmaster

Re: RE: Chunky Munky

200 million is the actual number.

(And despite the article already being updated, I still managed to misread it.)

Dear humans, We thought it was time we looked through YOUR source code. We found a mystery ancestor. Signed, the computers

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Coat

...though the "immortal man" movie has already been done with "The Man from Earth".

Which was excellent. Too bad they decided to follow it up with a rather mediocre sequel and the promise of a third to complete the set. :/

And then someone will have the idea of making a set of prequel, The Child from Earth, Attack of the Neanderthals, and Revenge of the Romans, and then JJ Abrams will get involved, and we'll all be doomed.

Looming EU copyright rules – tackling Google news article scraping, installing upload filters – under fire from all sides

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Google doesn't want to pay copyright fees ? Fine, but then it can't put ads on pages containing copyrighted content.

Wouldn't it be better for ad revenue to be passed to the copyright holder instead, and give Google, et al. a 15% cut? (The 15% gives the host some incentive to still keep such material in the first place.) That would effectively turn take down requests on ad supported content into royalty invoices.

Are you sure your disc drive has stopped rotating, or are you just ignoring the messages?

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Whether we would have or not, we should have. The EU has brought countless benefits to the UK.

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WTF?

Then you give these people a second referendum and claim it has significance

Yeah, because allowing people the opportunity to change their mind once all the facts are known would be totally insane, wouldn't it?

Real-time OS: Ordnance Survey gets snuggly with Intel's Mobileye

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Coat

Real time tracking of...

Manhole covers?

I always assumed those things moved too fast to be tracked. I guess this just proves how far we've come, technologically speaking, as a society.

Nobody in China wants Apple's eye-wateringly priced iPhones, sighs CEO Tim Cook

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Re: Its worse than he is making out.

And yet China is still Apple's third largest market after the US and Europe. I guess it depends where you were too. I remember seeing a lot of iPhones in Hong Kong when I was there.

The Great British Curry: Put down the takeaway, you're cooking tonight

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Re: Cooking Basmati

...no starchy water down the sink...

If you have water leftover when the rice is cooked, you're cooking it wrong.

Pan, meet rice. Rinse well. Add water to cover the rice by about half a centimetre. Pinch of salt. Insert lid. High heat to get the water almost boiling, and then lower to low heat for 10 minutes until the water has been absorbed. Eat.

Also, non-stick rice is for pussies. ;)

On the first day of Christmas, MIPS sent to me: An open-source-ish alternative to RISC-V

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Re: Interesting

Isn't MIPS the architecture that actually executes the instruction following a branch due to pipelining issues?

The fastest, most secure browser? Microsoft Edge apparently

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Coat

Re: I have a clock that tells the time correctly...

Technically speaking, it's only correct twice a day if you only look at it twice a day when the current time is exactly equal to the time the clock is displaying. If you look at it at any other time then it's wrong for each of those times.

Additionally, if you only look at it when it is correct you clearly know what time it is already, so why are you wasting time looking at a broken clock?

Finally, is it beer-o-clock yet? :)

Official: Voyager 2 is now an interstellar spacecraft

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Re: Science 50 years old

"a spin around the solar system" ohh, so they are stationary in space somewhere and earth "flies by" every year, then ?

Well, if they were stationary in space the Earth would never fly by ever again. ;)

So here's a question for the bored-at-work: If it was possible to remove all gravitational influences on an object on the 1st of January, 1970, and leave that object at rest in space in close proximity to where the Earth was at that time, how far away would it be now?

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Re: Science 50 years old

I doubt that any of the stuff I bought will be around in 50 years (or even 20). Except for my Harmann Kardon amp...

I still have the stereo I bought back in '92: Pioneer A400 amp, Pioneer PDS901 CD player, and a pair of Mission Cyrus 781 speakers. Still all going strong - the only thing I've had to repair was gluing the lens back into its housing in the CD player. I've gone through numerous other small stereo systems since then, but these components are still going strong after 26 years. (Admittedly I've not taken them for a spin around the solar system - yet...)

Privacy, security fears about ID cards? UK.gov's digital bod has one simple solution: 'Get over it'

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Re: UK already has ID cards, just soft fuzzy ones

Which car rental company was that? Asking for a friend...

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Re: another iteration

FFS, please someone introduce a minimal level of understanding prior to appointment to cabinet posts.

Even a minimum IQ requirement before being allowed to run for election in the first place would be a start. Either that, or a candidate's IQs should be visible on the ballot paper and any publicity leading up to the election.

It's official. Microsoft pushes Google over the Edge, shifts browser to Chromium engine

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Re: "What's next? Windows 11 will be based on 7 UI?"

We have, or ought to have, a very clear and precise worldwide standard for HTML, agreed by all, and equally precise and unambiguous rules for how it is rendered...

hahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahaha

Thanks for that. ;)

Yes we do. Sort of. Too bad it's a fucking hacked together piece of garbage. Have you read it recently? It's a fucking mess that's never going to get fixed. Like pretty much everything the W3C produces it's a way-over-the-top botch job designed by people who have no clue how to architect systems or understand even the most basic of things about how to engineer such things. HTML 1 was a bad joke and each successive version has built on earlier mistakes.

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Re: WebAssembly & Blazer

...and web-developers are not developing for it...

Err, given that Edge is more standards compliant than either Firefox or Safari, I'm really not sure what you mean by that.

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Re: Good for memory makers

Opera just uses Chromium these days too. As does Vivaldi.

Basically if you want to browse the Internet in 2019, you will have to use the bloated garbage from Google, or write your own. (Something I would quite happily do if I had the time.)

Microsoft polishes up Chromium as EdgeHTML peers into the abyss

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Re: Microsoft middle(nuisance)ware.

I use Windows because I develop Windows applications.

I'm a software engineer. :) I spend most of my time in Visual Studio. Aside from that, all other tools I use regularly are pinned to either the task bar or the start menu. My personal machines are my work machines, so it's Windows all the way for me - along with my ageing Mac and half a dozen iOS and Android test devices that is.

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Re: Microsoft middle(nuisance)ware.

That's easy to do in 7. Just drag them into place at the top of the list. I think once you move your first one you have a line appear, above which is the stuff you want there

Yep, and I did use that, but it was a bit limited space wise. Currently I have 30 applications pinned to the start menu in Windows 10, grouped and organised according to use and/or function. (Mostly - there are a few bits and pieces I haven't bothered organising fully, but it's got everything I need on a day to day basis within easy reach.)

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Re: Microsoft middle(nuisance)ware.

I use both every day, and I can't deny that Windows 7 is far easier to use than Windows 10.

I guess it depends what you're actually doing all day, but I tend to run the same software most days and the OS doesn't get in the way of me doing that. I've heard it opined that Windows 10 is a little faster and a little less resource heavy than Windows 7, but I have no solid evidence to back that up. I noticed virtually no difference in my day to day work when I switched to Windows 10. (I won't say the procedure was totally pain free, but it was a lot less painful than most macOS updates.)

If anything, Windows 10 is slightly nicer to use - being able to layout the applications I use the most (that aren't pinned to the task bar) the way I want in the start menu is way better than the constantly reorganising recent programs list of Windows 7, and the applications list is infinitely better than the All Programs menu from earlier incarnations of Windows.

The *one* issue I do constantly hit is that the Fn key is right next to the Windows key on my laptop and more often than not I hit the wrong one and suddenly enter Windows Tiling Mode instead of going to the start/end of the line. I should probably figure out how to disable the Windows shortcuts, but well... I'm lazy. :)

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Facepalm

Re: Microsoft middle(nuisance)ware.

If only Windows 10 could be as usable as Windows 7.....

Not sure what you mean here. I use Windows 10 every day. I also used to use Windows 7 every day. Never had any problems with either.

And why does MS think it's a great idea to put a useless overlay on stuff like "setings"? There was nothing wrong with the Control Panel, so let us add another layer of obfuscation!

Yeah, I'm totally with you here. I really hate having settings panels that can be resized and don't rely on a thousand fiddly tabs and dialog boxes to control everything. I just don't get what they were thinking. Clearly the design team should be given a good talking to.

European fibre lobby calls for end to fake fibre broadband ads

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Re: Where to draw the line?

Isn't that also true if it's fibre to your modem and GB ethernet from there to the PC? Or even when it's fibre to the PC and copper across the motherboard? It's never 100% fibre.

It's not true if the last leg of the journey is over WiFi though.

And I'm not paying a monthly charge to use the cabling inside my house. I can upgrade that whenever I like.

Millennials 'horrify' their neighbours with knob-shaped lights display

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Re: "It's deeply offensive" says 53 year old man

I took it to mean it's offensive to God botherers who think Christmas and the associated garish decorations are important.

Either that, or he's just got a bit of size envy, but rather than admit that he falls back on the "I'm offended" card.

OneDrive is broken: Microsoft's cloudy storage drops from the sky for EU users

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Re: Ah the Cloud

But, does it ever rain in Spain?!

Constantly, if my recent off-season vacations are anything to go by.

Consultant misreads advice, ends up on a 200km journey to the Exchange expert

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Re: "click" with the sound the mouse makes...

Ironically many of the "flat" buttons in Windows 10 do actually change in a looks like they are being pressed way if you click on them.

The way they push in also changes according to where you clicked, or if you moused out and back in, where the mouse re-entered. Click on the left and the left side is pushed in more than the right. Re-enter from the bottom and the bottom is pushed in further. Re-enter from the top the top is pushed in further.

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Happy

Re: Spoilers in Tech Docs!

When visiting friends, do you click the doorbell or do you press it?

I usually have to call them to get them to open the door because they're too lazy to write their name on a piece of paper and stick it next to the button for their apartments.

Mobile networks are killing Wi-Fi for speed around the world

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Not in Norway.

Big Falcon Namechange for Musk's rocket: BFR becomes Starship

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Re: Yes

I think the downvotes are amanfrommars worried we might be coming over soon.

Washington Post offers invalid cookie consent under EU rules – ICO

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Re: re: EU presence (or not)

It is likely that the WP has a UK or at least an Eu bureau...

I'd find that highly unlikely, actually. About as likely as the Daily Mail having an office in the US.

And if they did, I'm sure the UK watchdog would have found them by now. Which would have made half of this story redundant. ;)

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If they took money from a single EU citizen / EU-registered card to access their site - then they are trading in the EU and need to offer EU-compliant services. Yes, it's complicated in the modern era, but that's how it works. If you are taking EU money, you need to abide by EU law and - also - pay EU tax.

That's sort of true. A US corporation that has no physical presence in the EU wouldn't have to pay corporation tax in the EU. I don't know if that's the case for the WP, but regardless they do have to collect VAT from EU customers at the customer's local rate, and declare and pay that VAT either in each country individually, or collectively in a single EU country. Which isn't really a tax on the company, it's a tax on EU citizens.

Holy moley! The amp, kelvin and kilogram will never be the same again

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Re: SI

England gets it worse than in the US because it's farther north; the winter solstice really stinks up there

You think England is bad, you should come to Norway. ;)

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Re: SI

Yeah, I know where base 60 comes from. Our reasons for continuing to use it are still only out of tradition. :)

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Re: SI

(Urgh, time ran out when editing the above. You really should stop the clock when someone clicks the edit button, El Reg.)

As for why mks, it seems there IS some natural coherence between the units, particularly when you mesh electrical phenomena to physical ones. In fact, this is why the kilogram was used versus the gram: the relationships didn't fit with the g but did with the kg. In fact, modern science notes a lot of interrelation between mass, energy, and time. That's one reason for the redefinitions. With the second defined as it will be, one can redefine the kilogram in terms of the Planck constant (which uses time), redefine the ampere in terms of the elementary charge (which uses time), and redefine the Kelvin in terms of the Boltzmann constant (which uses time, mass, and distance which is unchanged).

That sounds a bit suspect to me. In fact, reading into it a little bit, it seems a bit dodgy to me that a lot of science is based around arbitrary base-60 measurements of time. I can accept that the concept of the Planck constant (and what it represents) can be universal, but its value certainly can't be constant if it depends on the length of a second.

Oooh, is that a can of worms? How nice... ;)

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