* Posts by Smooth Newt

802 posts • joined 6 Jul 2009

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Boffins suggest UK needs an 'AI council' but regulation is for squares

Smooth Newt
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Meh

Artificial "intelligence"

Calling it AI is a bit premature but calling it "automated algorithmical processing of data" is a bit clumsy.

How about "self-optimising pattern recognition algorithms". That's what neural networks, support vector machines etc boil down to.

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UK.gov: Who wants £25m... *cheers*... to trial 5G? *crickets chirping*

Smooth Newt
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Re: What's the point?

The point is a positive press release - ministerial announcement that the Government is "determined to be one of the first countries in the world to use <insert sexy buzzword here>".

It is the service seen by the customer that counts, not how sexy the back end technology is.

Perhaps a threat to invest £25m in investigating the tax compliance of whichever mobile phone company is found to have the shittiest coverage in six months time would be better value.

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DeepMind now has an ethics unit – which may have helped when it ate 1.6m NHS patient details

Smooth Newt
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Meh

"explore and understand"

For a legal department this might be a synonym for "learn to drive a coach and horses through". Call me cynical, but for an ethics unit like this, it could mean "shape the public debate". Whatever becomes the established consensus of what is or is not acceptable in the world of AI ethics is clearly something which could have a big effect on the future profitability of Google. So why wouldn't they want to set up some well funded big hitter that could nudge the goal posts in the direction that they want.

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HPE coughed up source code for Pentagon's IT defenses to ... Russia

Smooth Newt
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Re: Did I understand this right?

IBM sold to the Nazis ????.....please explain more

Perhaps rather than expecting other commentards to do your research for you, you could try using a search engine yourself?

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Drunk canoeing no longer driving offence in Canada

Smooth Newt
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Re: sounds like a joke but...

There is a justification for discouraging drinking and canoeing, although not necessarily through fines. About a quarter of all adult corpses pulled out of the water have alcohol in their bloodstream. http://www.rlss.org.uk/about-us/campaigns/dont-drink-drown/

There is much scientific evidence that alcohol consumption is a major risk factor for drowning, e.g. http://injuryprevention.bmj.com/content/10/2/107.short

The problem explained to me when I was learning scuba diving it is that even quite moderate amounts of alcohol attenuates the gag reflex and so taking water into the lungs becomes much more likely.

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Dome, sweet dome: UAE mulls Martian city here on Earth ahead of Red Planet colonization

Smooth Newt
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Re: Only $500k...

$500K to spend 9 months in a small box cleaning yourself with wet wipes. Not that it will be that cheap.

There certainly won't be the payload capacity for hundreds of boxes of wet wipes. You'll get one wet wipe and have to make it last the whole trip.

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The UK isn't ditching Boeing defence kit any time soon

Smooth Newt
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Re: Pot... Kettle ... Black... hmmm I know there's a sentence in there somewhere...

If Bombardier collapses, then Boeing will probably be in line to buy up the remains for the patents and intellectual property associated with the C Series jets. That would be a win-win situation for them, i.e. Boeing wins twice.

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UK.gov lays down rules for cross-Whitehall data slurps

Smooth Newt
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Re: "Consultation" my arse.

I didn't see a link to them in either the article or the Government's cover note. They are at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/consultations/digital-economy-act-part-5-data-sharing-codes-and-regulations

They do ramble on a lot. e.g.

"You must be transparent about your use of the powers so citizens can understand what data is being shared, the bodies that are disclosing or receiving data, and why. Unless there are particular national security or other sensitivities which would outweigh the public interest in disclosure, information about information sharing agreements should be published in a searchable electronic public register. You must also adhere to the ICO’s codes of practice such as the one on privacy notices."

Whereas they could have just written

"You must dream up some reason why your information sharing agreement needs to be kept secret."

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Mini-Heartbleed info leak bug strikes Apache, airborne malware, NSA algo U-turn, and more

Smooth Newt
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Meh

"There are quite a lot of people in NSA who think their job is to subvert standards"

There are quite a lot of people in NSA who's job is to subvert standards. It doubtless says so in their job description, and like the Stasi and the KGB before them, they harm their fellow citizens with the religious zeal of someone who believes they are performing a patriotic duty.

There is no point blaming these moral simpletons though, as they work for a thoroughly poisonous organization whose priorities are set by the political leadership. And we know what ethical characteristics you need to get to the top of that greasy pole.

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Kebab and pizza shop owner jailed for hiding £179k from the taxman

Smooth Newt
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Not being funny, but this is the low-hanging fruit, surely?

Definitely. Anyone who has ever run a business will tell you that "profit" is a flexible fiction that can be manipulated for whatever tax purposes you want, because Profit = Income - Costs, and you can always crank up costs. Particularly if you have an imaginative company structure where one of your companies leases the premises to the other and pays a third to maintain them etc.

The only reason a business ever needs to make a profit is to pay dividends, which can only be done out of profit, as a tax saving measure since you don't have to pay National Insurance on dividends.

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Shock: Brit capital strips Uber of its taxi licence

Smooth Newt
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Re: 40,000 drivers out of work

If you are so cock sure report it to the Police and relevant authorities...your local MP and councillors would certainly have it investigated.

Not sure who the "relevant authorities" are, but the Police are far too undermanned and busy to bother with non-violent crime these days.

And I fear you are one of those poor benighted fools who believe that non-cabinet MPs and councillors have some sort influence on anything or even give a shit.

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BoJo, don't misuse stats then blurt disclaimers when you get rumbled

Smooth Newt
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WTF?

2 percent

People make a big deal out of £350 million a week, or as I like to think of it, about a fiver a head. £350 million per week would be a lot of money if it was your personal income, but its not, it's in the context of public spending. It is a drop in the ocean in public spending terms, and I don't see why people get worked up about it. The Treasury estimates total public spending will be £814 billion next year. £17 billion is 2% of that, i.e. not very much at all. Would you turn your life upside down for a 2% pay rise?

It isn't even 2% more for the Government to spend (or, more likely, fund corporation tax cuts) anyway, since lots of things that the EU pays for out of this - like scientific research and various agencies etc - will have to be replaced, plus the extra costs for increased customs personnel etc. The Government could "choose" not to spend it on these things, but in reality there is no choice - for example, who is going to approve new drugs if there isn't a shiny new British agency to do that (and ditto all the other EU institutions which will have to be replicated), the Government have promised to continue funding existing structural and investment projects, scientific research and farming subsidies, and all these extra border guards and customs people aren't going to work for nothing.

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UK attorney general plans crackdown on 'trial by social media'

Smooth Newt
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Re: A friend of mine was doing Jury Service recently

It must take a pretty special kind of idiot to ignore the instructions.

Usually ones with time on their hands, like the unemployed, the retired and what the Americans call homemakers. Because if you have a serious job then jury service will cost you serious money. So you will probably do all you can to get out of it. You can claim up to £64.95 per day in lost earnings, i.e. about half UK median earnings, less than the amount witnesses can claim under similar circumstances. So, you get to appreciate your status from the fact that the only person in the court who gets less than you is the defendant.

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Hubble catches a glimpse WASP-12b, an almost pitch-black exoplanet

Smooth Newt
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WASP-12b is about two times less reflective than the Moon

You mean half as reflective?

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Smart cities? Tell it like it is, they're surveillance cities

Smooth Newt
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Meh

Re: "the city administrator's interests are not necessarily the same as the citizens' interests."

And probably never will be. They want orderly, regulated behavior at all times forever. Normal humans doing this job know this is impossible, but the can bet the job will attract the more "neurodiverse" who (literally) don't get it.

They also want to stay in power, and mass surveillance is an essential tool for identifying, tracking and containing the people who oppose them. The connected cities conference in Shanghai is particularly pertinent as the Communist Party of China rules the country precisely because they can do that. Mass surveillance isn't so much the enemy of liberty, as the article suggests, but the enemy of democracy.

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UK council fined £70k for leaving vulnerable people's data open to world+dog

Smooth Newt
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Joke

Re: Every one in the council is fined 3 months pay

You'd fine the bin men for the failures of management and IT?

On the upside, those managers and IT people responsible probably won't get their offices cleaned properly or their bins emptied ever again.

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US watchdog alert: Don't fall victim to crapto crypto-coin cons, people

Smooth Newt
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Re: Wait, What?

There is a lot similar between fiat and crypto. Both are electronic and can payments are made electronically. The difference is in where they come from.

A fiat currency is one without intrinsic value but whose value is backed by the government that issued it. Crypto-currencies have no intrinsic value but also lack any serious guarantor. That is the difference.

Small runs are contained by speculators, but when a large run occurs there may be individual owners of vast amounts of the crypto-currency ("elites") who will buy them on a freefalling market to maintain their value, but their enthusiasm and ability to run up stupendous losses is a lot less than a government's. Additionally, since their sole goal is to preserve their own personal investment, if they can't quickly stop the crash then they will simply add to it by cashing out. You can see the lack of a central bank in crypto-currency volatility, and ultimately there isn't much to stop a big run wiping their value out almost entirely. You may not like Dollars or Euros so much, but at least there is someone who can, and certainly will, step in to borrow ten trillion Yen to maintain their value when they need to.

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Smooth Newt
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Re: Wait, What?

People are already looking back and saying "I wish I had mined BitCoin in 2010, I'd have £10,000,000 by now". Those people are now investing in Crypto. Those saying Crypto is a scam will in 20 years time be saying "I wish I'd got into Crypto"

The point is you only know with hindsight.

It is possible to make a lot of money out of short term fashions which aren't sustainable in the long term. The long term problem with crypto currencies is that they are a zero, or even negative, sum game, and the longer you are in a zero sum game, the greater the risk that you will be left holding the very expensive baby at the end. BTW Anyone wanna buy some tulips? https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tulip_mania

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VW engineer sent to the clink for three years for emissions-busting code

Smooth Newt
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Re: There's nothing illegal in writing the code

There's nothing illegal in writing the code. The illegal act is selling the car that cheats the emissions standards. How is an engineer supposed to know the law anyway - this is what the company's legal department and product managers do.

If instead of providing some software, the engineer provided a physical tool for someone to use in a burglary, or even lent them a vehicle to use as a getaway car, would they be committing a crime? I don't see that software is fundamentally different - it is just another tool. In most jurisdictions whether the engineer had committed a crime in any of these cases would depend upon whether they knew that what they provided was to be used in carrying out the criminal act. If they did then they would be an accessory.

As for whether or not the engineer has to know that the act was a criminal one, in most jurisdictions ignorance of the law is not a defence ("ignorantia juris non excusat"), although sometimes it can mitigate the punishment. How is an engineer to know the law? In the same that the rest of us have to. We all have to understand criminal law. Engineers don't get special dispensation.

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Biometrics watchdog breaks cover, slams UK cops over facial recog

Smooth Newt
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Meh

No strategy is a strategy

Back on the subject, not having a strategy IS their strategy, that way it is impossible to make them answerable to misuse.

You are right. Not having a public strategy has served the Police very well in other areas. I am sure there is a strategy, just not a public one and either not even written down and existing by tacit agreement in the minds of some senior officers, or written down in a protectively marked document.

Not having a public strategy worked very well for automatic number plate recognition, where the Police quietly assembled a massive national system under cover of the occasional meaningless statement about "denying criminals the use of our roads".

If our political system wasn't so dysfunctional, Parliament would already be discussing these issues in an intelligent way, but that isn't going to happen anytime soon ever.

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Can North Korean nukes hit US mainland? Maybe. But EMP blast threat is 'highly credible'

Smooth Newt
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Meh

Telecommunications cables

The telecommunications cables that make up the communications backbone of the US, and the world, would also be extremely vulnerable.

Twenty years ago perhaps, but most trunk cables are optical now.

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Smooth Newt
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Re: Never understood the obsession with ICBMs

Better yet, don't use nukes, just send 2,000,000 norks in groups of 50 in little boats and only arm one in 5 boats.

The world gets to see the us navy killing 500,000 unarmed starving people.

I don't think that would happen because the North Korean government rules by terror and is doubtless loathed by most of its population. Instead virtually all of those people would immediately ask the nearest US naval vessel for political asylum.

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British snoops at GCHQ knew FBI was going to arrest Marcus Hutchins

Smooth Newt
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Meh

Special Relationship

So this is what the 'special relationship' amounts to, is it?

Many British people imagine there is Special Relationship between the UK and the US. It didn't originally mean that at all, it was a phrase from a speech by Winston Churchill accepting an honorary degree from an American college, where he talked about "a special relationship between the British Commonwealth and Empire and the United States", i.e. not just the UK, but the self-governing dominions of Canada, Australia, etc along with what was the Empire - India, Nigeria etc. But when the British talk about the Special Relationship they just mean with the UK. However, the US don't view that bit of misremembered history in quite the same way - to them the UK is just another client state.

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Sorry, but those huge walls of terms and conditions you never read are legally binding

Smooth Newt
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Re: The trouble is..

Why would you need to be a multi-millionaire?

A defendant in a criminal case is entitled to legal aid (or a public defender if you prefer to call it that) if he can't afford to pay for representation.

Only a small proportion of the adult population are entitled to meaningful legal aid. In the UK, you are entitled to legal aid covering your full costs in criminal cases if your income is no more than £12,475 and you have assets (including your car, any equity in your home etc) of no more than £3,000. It tapers down quickly and e.g. you won't get anything at all if you have more than £8,000 in assets.

If it is a complex case, which it would almost certainly be for the Appeal Court, you will need experienced counsel at around £200 per hour for a solicitor and double that for a barrister, and you will probably have several of each. So you can easily be looking at a bill of £50k if you lose, plus the Crown Prosecution Service's costs, probably a similar amount. So, unless you are either very poor or wealthy enough to be able to bet £100k on the outcome, then the Appeal Court is probably out of reach to you.

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Smooth Newt
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Re: The trouble is..

Did they not have appeal courts back then?

I am sure they did, but they probably also had clients who weren't multi-millionaires too.

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Q: How many drones are we bombing ISIS with? A: That's secret, mmkay

Smooth Newt
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Joke

Re: I counted them all...

"I'm not allowed to say how many planes joined the raid, but I counted them all out and I counted them all back."

If Brian Hanrahan was alive today, perhaps he would be reporting "I'm not allowed to say how drones joined the raid, but I counted it out and I counted it back."

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Smooth Newt
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Re: Interesting stuff

What I don't get it why does it matter?

Because it is an embarrassingly small number, like 0 or 1.

"Prejudicing the promotion or protection by the United Kingdom of its interests abroad" means that various troublemakers will start questioning what sort of capability £50 billion a year on defence should actually be buying.

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Defra recruiting 1,400 policy wonks to pick up the pieces after Brexit

Smooth Newt
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Stop

Re: Brexit

You get it [British citizenship] back once just by asking, if you try the same game again it gets harder, of course. The Home Office only wants a say if you're not a full British citizen at the time you renounced it, i.e. if your citizenship was obtained by some other way than birth in the UK to British citizens. Read the official form, it is quite clear.

It is indeed quite clear. The Government website says "In some cases it’s possible to resume your British nationality after renouncing it."1 which doesn't sound like "just by asking" to me.

It costs £321 to renounce British Citizenship and then £1163 to apply to get it back and the application form is 10 pages long.2 It asks detailed questions like "do you have any criminal convictions in the UK or any other country or any civil judgements made against you (including traffic offences)?" - so that's the 9.2 million people in the UK who have criminal records who may be screwed, and civil judgements include someone successfully suing you, evicting you or even just divorcing you. And then there are several "what the fuck does that mean" questions like "Have you engaged in any other activities which may indicate that you may not be considered a person of good character?"

As for your characterization of British citizens not born in the UK to British parents as not "full British citizens", I guess that means that people like the Duke of Edinburgh and indeed our illustrious Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs aren't "full British citizens". Has anyone told them?

1https://www.gov.uk/renounce-british-nationality/resume-your-british-nationality

2https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/417594/rs1_form_mar_2015.pdf

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Smooth Newt
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Re: Just wondering

Not that I want such a job but I wonder how many commentards would be qualified.

Beyond warm and breathing, that is.

Well, some of us know a little bit about agriculture, at least what chickens coming home to roost looks like.

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Smooth Newt
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Re: Brexit

= jobs for the boys!

If they can find them e.g. try and hire 1,400 Java programmers overnight, and those are relatively common folk. And some other HMG departments, such as the Department for Business, Energy & Industrial Strategy are probably in a similar pickle and also trying to recruit.

Maybe Theresa May has a magic policy wonk tree that we don't know about, especially as I imagine non-UK EU nationals aren't invited to the party in case their insecurity and status as a Brexit bargaining chip doesn't give them a sufficiently positive attitude towards slow motion train crashes.

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Creepy backdoor found in NetSarang server management software

Smooth Newt
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Meh

Re: QA != shit

Perfection is a fool's dream.

They were up against an intelligent attacker not a random zluttz.

I'm not sure their customers want perfection, but something they can rely upon to do what it says on the tin would be nice. And since this particular tin says "Secure UNIX/Linux connectivity solution", I think their customers have the right to be angry.

Since this is hardly the first time that backdoors have been incorporated into products and firmware in the supply chain, it is high time that hardware and software manufacturers took this sort of issue more seriously in their QA processes. And I think those that don't will soon be seeing the consequences on their bottom line.

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Police camera inaction? Civil liberties group questions forces' £23m body-cam spend

Smooth Newt
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WTF?

the Civil Liberties of a thug

There is a certain kind of person that studies Civil Liberties, the same kid of people that want to give paedophiles protection and radicalists rights to stay in the UK

And yet you would be grateful for the rights they have fought for if you were accused of a crime.

Or perhaps you think that, for example, you should be thrown into prison for the rest of your life without any sort of hearing, and until that happens that any random thug should be allowed to come and beat the shit out of you if they feel like it.

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UK publishes Laws of Robotics for self-driving cars

Smooth Newt
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Re: But but but...

The supposedly tight, technical specs around emissions testing and compliance didn't prevent car companies trying to find ways around it and any eventual prosecutions in Europe will not simply be about not meeting the specs (which is sort of proven), but about proving an intent to defraud.

But they only found way around it by, allegedly, breaking the law. If the regulations had vaguely said that "nitrogen dioxide emissions should be managed appropriately" then the law would be so vague that any prosecutions would be impossible.

The principles need to reference subsidiary standards so that we know what, e.g., "sufficiently secure" means. As it stands, "Sufficiently secure" means absolutely nothing, since "sufficiently" is just a matter of opinion, and what happens if a manufacturer thinks, e.g. DES encryption, is "sufficiently secure"? Standards mean you have to justify what you are going to do in advance if you want to influence the standard, rather than "screw it, let's do it" and only worry about the consequences when someone gets hurt.

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Smooth Newt
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Stop

Re: But but but...

The communication must be secure? But the government wants to ban encrypted communications!

Fortunately (for the Government), the whole document is so packed full of weasel words that it is pretty much meaningless. The document looks designed to give you a warm feeling, but not actually do you any good, a bit like when you piss down your leg. What do you think "sufficiently secure", "managed appropriately", "where possible" etc actually mean below. This is the entire text of the Principle 7!

"Principle 7 - the storage and transmission of data is secure and can be controlled

Principle 7.1

Data must be sufficiently secure (confidentiality and integrity) when stored and transmitted so that only the intended recipient or system functions are able to receive and / or access it. Incoming communications are treated as unsecure until validated.

Principle 7.2

Personally identifiable data must be managed appropriately.

This includes:

what is stored (both on and off the ITS / CAV system)

what is transmitted

how it is used

the control the data owner has over these processes

Where possible, data that is sent to other systems is sanitised.

Principle 7.3

Users are able to delete sensitive data held on systems and connected systems."

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Autonomous driving in a city? We're '95% of the way there'

Smooth Newt
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Re: Strong push?

Really makes me wonder why government and megacorps are willing to throw so much money, time and effort at something unwanted by the masses, unless there is an ulterior motive they have not told us about, but will benefit them immensely at our expense.

Fashion is a strong driver. Corporations and governments invest in these things because other ones are doing so, so they feel they will be left behind if they don't. Anyone want to buy a supersonic airliner or an advanced gas cooled reactor? On the other hand personal computers and mobile phones were technology pushes that worked out.

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Facebook's freebie for poor people under fire again

Smooth Newt
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Stop

Facilitating exploitation

The interesting thing is that to make money out of very poor people you have to enable them to make money.

That's not true. There is plenty of money to be made by providing facilities and information to the people that control, exploit and impoverish them.

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Cyber arm of UK spy agency left without PGP for four months

Smooth Newt
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Re: Source

"Why don't they just buy critical kit from strategic allies like the US?"

Because allies are not friends. Do not put all your eggs in one basket.

I don't think the "eggs in one basket" analogy works here. The proper analogy is about how many people have "keys to the kingdom". Minimising the number of people who can potentially damage your infrastructure is surely the good thing to do, not maximising it.

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Smooth Newt
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WTF?

Re: Source

Is it uniquely Huawei whose kit they are using without source? Or might they also use other Usual Suspects like Apple, MS, Samsung, etc on the same basis?

Which makes one seriously wonder why they bother with this HCSEC nonsense? Why don't they just buy critical networking kit from strategic allies like the US?

After all, virtually every personal computer in the country runs closed source operating systems produced by American corporations and even our nuclear warheads are mounted on American missiles. Buying American network kit for critical national infrastructure wouldn't make us any more vulnerable than we are now. Is Huawei kit really so much cheaper/better than Western stuff?

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Brits must now register virtually all new drones and undergo safety tests

Smooth Newt
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Re: Chicken gun

Ahaha you fell for the chicken gun story. One of the oldest urban legends on the internet.

I hadn't heard that version before. The one I am familiar with is that the chicken punched right through the engine/train/airframe etc and out the back of the vehicle because they had bought a frozen chicken and forgotten to defrost it.

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Smooth Newt
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Dog licence

HM Gov will make a bollocks of this like they do with anything else.

It will just mean that criminals will steal drones for prison drops that are registered to someone else.

Or buy them second hand. Or give false details when they buy them. Or buy them from someone who will not bother with the registration malarkey for an extra twenty quid. Or perhaps just pull the sticker bearing the serial number off.

There might be a wider incentive to do this, as it will be implemented with the usual profitable PPI inefficiency and price gouging by the contractor, and the Government will doubtless view this as a perfect revenue raising opportunity too.

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Another Brexit cliff edge: UK.gov warned over data flows to EU

Smooth Newt
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Re: @ Dan 55

Yup. Definitely seeing the error of your ways. I am not even sure where to start if your world view is that far wrong.

Perhaps the Chinese will just buy various additional goods and services from us instead of whoever they are currently buying these things from, because We're British Dammit. Or perhaps because they like paying more for them, what with China having so much lower labour costs. Plus, unless you are already selling into China, your business's sales force etc won't speak Chinese, won't understand the Chinese market, and your company's products won't be designed for it or conform to their regulations.

The economic consequences of Brexit might be relatively painless if it was spread over a generation or so, but not if we have just 618 days, 6 hours and 46 minutes.

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Smooth Newt
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Re: @ Dan 55

Nobody will want to trade with us. Oh no. Erm wait. We might even end up with a trade deal with China before the EU get one!

I cannot see hundreds of British companies just rocking up to China on 30 March 2019 and opening hundreds of widget shops or whatever which instantly displaces most of the existing competition selling widgets, and who may have spent decades building up their market share.

How long do you think it takes to build up significant market share from zero in the face of existing competition and a mature market for your product, because in most cases that is what they will face?

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Smooth Newt
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Re: @ Dan 55

You can't compare percentages like that, the EU is a tad bigger than the UK.

UK exports to EU, 44% of £550bn = £240bn

EU exports to UK, 16% of £1800bn = £290bn

so to answer your question, the EU loses more.

But the effect is far less significant to the EU than the UK because the EU is substantially larger. e.g. the UK loses about £4000 per head of its 60m population in export earnings, whilst the EU only loses about £640 per head of its 450m population (540m less the 60m British). So I'll take a £640 pay cut if you take a £4000 one...

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Smooth Newt
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Facepalm

Re: @ Dan 55

If the EU decide to be petty and make outrageous demands then our side just need to laugh and walk out.

The EU represents 44% of the UK's current export market, and at the UK represents 16% of the EU's "export" market. So who do you think loses the most if the UK delegation walks out?

And whilst we are on the subject, what are you going to live on for the decade or two that it will take the UK to replace nearly half of its export market with markets outside Europe. Markets for which many UK products and services are not designed, and which in any case are already saturated with foreign competitors who already have market share that the UK would need to displace.

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Hackers able to turbo-charge DJI drones way beyond what's legal

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WTF?

Ferraris don't have speed limiters

I don't really understand why this is the drone manufacturer's problem. e.g. Car dealers sell cars which are easily capable of exceeding the maximum permitted speed on UK roads, and normally even register it for use on these same roads as a standard part of their standard service.

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Blighty watchdog Ofcom has a butcher's hook, clocks spectrum for 5G

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Re: Brexit Imperial Wavelength of 16.89inches

But doesn't the United States use inches? You must mean 0.085 perches, surely.

Although I expect we'll be getting North America back along with the rest of the Empire, once Brexit has happened.

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