* Posts by david 12

1123 posts • joined 6 Jul 2009

Page:

Bankrupt Aussie Hells Angel scoops £750k lottery jackpot

david 12
Bronze badge

Back in the day, before cash transaction reporting, you could buy a "system" ticket that covered a LOT of numbers (for proportionate cost). So people would buy $4000 lottery tickets, in the expectation of winning around $3000 back.

Then as now, everyone knew it was money laundering.

3
0

Chrome sends old Macs on permanent Safari: Browser bricks itself

david 12
Bronze badge

Re: Speaking of outdated kit

And AMD also only got SSE2 in 2003.

SSE2 only went mainstream in 2012 (when VS enabled default SSE2).

Still, even my P4 machines are XP or Win2K. It's not like I would want to put Win7 on them anyway.

0
0
david 12
Bronze badge

Re: 80s sockets isn't enough for a modern app

Also true for Windows and linux -- you have to go outside the Sockets API to do stuff not common on 1970's unix.

It would be nice if there was support for a set of common standard extenstions to the socket API, but none of the players have ever been interested.

1
0

Boffins want to stop Network Time Protocol's time-travelling exploits

david 12
Bronze badge

Re: Time NTP was upgraded(See what I did there!)

I don't think that <0.1s time is a really demanding standard. The real issue is with people who depend on time, but don't have a place for GPS receiver. Which is small security system devices. The <0.1sec statement is just an indication that their system works well enough to be useful.

2
0

Rowhammer returns, Spectre fix unfixed, Wireguard makes a new friend, and much more

david 12
Bronze badge

""WireGuard is not yet complete.". Not only "not yet complete", by design it doesn't do anything: it's a packet encryption protocol, not a Private Network (which is why it's so small). It's a VPN in the same sense that SMB is a VPN.

3
0

Europe's scheme to build exascale capability on homegrown hardware is ludicrous fantasy

david 12
Bronze badge

> If you mean Eurovision, well, they've let Australia compete, <

But, as in other areas, they are increasingly xenophobic, and there have been strong statements that Aus should not have been permitted to enter this time around.

1
0

Are your IoT gizmos, music boxes, smart home kit vulnerable to DNS rebinding attacks? Here's how to check

david 12
Bronze badge

192.168.1.xxx

"I’ve authored a proof-of-concept exploit that you can use to target these devices on your home network today. That demo is live at http://rebind.network."

The proof of concept exploit is hardcoded to 192.168.1.1/24. He should have mentioned that, and if he had, perhaps The Registers might have mentioned it -- no point expecting journalists to be subject experts in this day and age :(

I'm not on a 192.168.1.1 network, and I don't have any of the devices mentioned. so no further comment. His arttcle looks interesting though, perhaps somebody who knows what they are talking about will comment on that.

0
0

What's all the C Plus Fuss? Bjarne Stroustrup warns of dangerous future plans for his C++

david 12
Bronze badge

Re: C and C-style C++

M$ doesn't even have a C compiler. It's a commercial decision: they also don't have a FORTRAN or a PASCAL compiler.

You can use their C++ compiler to run sort-of FORTRAN, PASCAL & C (using the macro language as required, the way C++ was originally implemented), but it's not F77 any more than it's C99

2
1

Audi chief exec arrested over Dieselgate car emissions scandal

david 12
Bronze badge

Re: funny

Interesting aside: one Japanese truck firm bought out another -- and closed the diesel division. At the time there was an understanding that this was because diesel emission standards were "too difficult". Now it's clear how the other companies were meeting the "too difficult" standards.

1
0

No fandango for you: EU boots UK off Galileo satellite project

david 12
Bronze badge

> we've insisted that we leave the EU and get rid of it completely, <

I must have missed that bit.

Or no, I get it now, you're talking about the bit where the remainers were saying "if you want to leave the EU, I'm going to pretend that you want to get rid of it completely" and "if you wnat to leave the EU, it's because you don't like foreigners"

16
87

ICO smites Bible Society, well fines it £100k...

david 12
Bronze badge

Re: How is this helpful?

>This is the case for all commercial organisations.<

Commercial organisations are the same as not-for-profits? Right, I'll go tell my boss he should re-organise the company as a not-for profit. I'll tell him that "only customers and taxpayers" are affected by profits.

0
0

Have to use SMB 1.0? Windows 10 April 2018 Update says NO

david 12
Bronze badge

Re: Why?

>I still use NFS, sometimes NFSv2 or v3 depending on the use case - i'm aware it lacks security features present in newer versions<

SMB2 is not more secure by design than SMB1. The security angle is that SMB1 servers are out of support.

At Win2K, SMB1 was transitioned to TCP, and encryption was added on top. As a result, network latency became much worse (packet delays and handshaking). SMB2 was introduced to try to recapture some of the lost performance capability. By reducing the number of protocol transactions required, the effect of waiting for packet consolidation and encryption transactions is reduced.

You can, I presume, get an even better latency by using SMB2 and /also/ turning off encryption and using "NBF" (what wikipedia calls NetBEUI). You're welcome to try it :)

0
0

Stern Vint Cerf blasts techies for lackluster worldwide IPv6 adoption

david 12
Bronze badge

Re: You have to admit...

>. IPv6 pretty much makes DNS mandatory.<

And my Name Server provider still doesn't provide IPV6, and my WWW host still doesn't provide IPV6.

No reason I suppose for my host to privide IPV6 when there is no way to link to it, and no reason for the Name Server to support IPV6 when there is nothing to link to. But since that's the case, no wonder my ISP provides routers that don't do IPV6.

3
1

nbn™ CEO didn't mean to offend gamers, just brand them unwelcome bandwidth-hogs

david 12
Bronze badge

toing the party line

So if we had fibre all the way into the home, network concurrency and latency would not be a problem right?

And since the original political justification (per Kim Beasly), was "educaction and in-home medical care", clearly gaming and netflix have no place on the network anyway.

3
0

Uber jams Arizona robo-car project into reverse gear after deadly smash

david 12
Bronze badge

They're shredding the documents, and firing anyone who could testify, yes, but as far as management is concerned, it's business as usual ~ and dam the consequences.

2
0

IP freely? What a wind-up! If only Trevor Baylis had patent protections inventors enjoy today

david 12
Bronze badge

Re: Property is theft

>This article conflates and confuses 3 entirely separate property rights which have nothing to do with each other,<

It's worse than that, because the 3 legislative property rights have been stretched out of all shape to cover new ideas like software and interface design and biomedical research: stuff that doesn't comfortably sit in the old categories at all.

Done, as far as I can observe, mostly to force the new developments into the framework of international treaty protection, not because the new IP fitted the old legislation in any logical or just way.

2
0
david 12
Bronze badge

warning, Excel docs

Fun fact: the EPO website (English version) describes the files as XLS, but links to XLSX files.

0
0

S/MIME artists: EFAIL email app flaws menace PGP-encrypted chats

david 12
Bronze badge

Re: Who relies on this stuff?

Why do people use PDF in e-mails in the first place? As far as I can see, it's just a vehicle for malware....

19
0

Fixing a printer ended with a dozen fire engines in the car park

david 12
Bronze badge

Re: Had the fire brigade called to a five star hotel, in Malta....

> one of those "break grass" jobbies. <

What I hadn't realized was that it was unnecessary to break the glass: the button is carefully made fail-safe by designing it to contact when it goes IN, or OUT, and it is held in exactly the OFF position only by the glass.

As a young engineering student, I was taking one apart to examine it, while we waited for the invariably late tutor... but was fortunate enough that I was called up as the most responsible person present (!), which gave me the chance to own up and apologise before I was suspended or expelled for interfering with the alarm system :)

3
0

Africa's internet body in full-blown meltdown: 'None of the above' wins board protest vote

david 12
Bronze badge

Re: None Of The Above

>First past the post does have the advantage of commonly eliminating tiny minority parties. That tend to commonly be ethnic or religious in focus.<

And that commonly has the effect of radicalizing the disenfranchised parties, and encouraging them to work for the destruction of the system.

8
1

Windows Notepad fixed after 33 years: Now it finally handles Unix, Mac OS line endings

david 12
Bronze badge

Re: Don't like Unix text handling - not happy MS

>How about a few standards, maybe, even possibly ?.<

Not like say, unix, where they unsuccessfully tried to change the ASCII standard for line endings, then went ahead and ignored it anyway.

Look, I understand: they were in a commercially competitive situation, where their technology was different from that of their competition. They tried to capture the standards process, and when that failed they just ignored it. It's not an usual story.

2
2
david 12
Bronze badge

>The standard multiline edit box in the WinAPI has always dealt with Unix-like line endings correctly, so <

Yes, and when you use the standard multiline edit box, the product is called "wordpad". That's what wordpad is: a wrapper around the standard multiline edit box. As you could see from the MFC example of how to use the multiline edit box.

And notepad? The backward-compatible utility for Win3.11 users.

The real news? MS has dropped notepad, and used the name for some new app.

4
1

Press F to pay respects to the Windows 10 April Update casualties

david 12
Bronze badge

Re: Homegroups

>Samba appears to have had SMBv3 since 2015, so no real FLOSS requirement there.<

Which is really great for people who have no servers older than 2015.

Which is perhaps not an apt comparison to people using Win3.11 or even WinXP.

0
0
david 12
Bronze badge

Re: Homegroups

I don's see any "of course" about it. I'm sure the only reason MS maintains support for SMB1 is to attach to Open Source servers -- if they could delete support for just Win3.11-Win XP networking, I'm sure they would.

0
1

BOFH: But I did log in to the portal, Dave

david 12
Bronze badge

Re: I've been there

>HPE REFUSED to even send us a single damned install disk<

Because they didn't want to get sent to 3 years jail for providing install disks of MS software?

3
0

Legal tech startup tries to haul 123-Reg to court over 24-hour backup claims

david 12
Bronze badge

No request necessary. All it takes is one line in the robots.txt file on their own website, and the Wayback Machine blinds all history.

I shake my head and wonder who funds the Internet Archive, or what lawyer got to them.

1
0

PC recycler gets 15 months in the clink for whipping up 28,000 bootleg Windows 7, XP recovery discs

david 12
Bronze badge

Re: Rebuy Windows

> remember that years ago you had to rebuy Windows if you changed the motherboard<

I remember that years ago you had to rebuy Windows if you changed the motherboard and were ignorant and didn't know any better and didn't know what you were doing.

OEM systems were, and still are, only valid for the original equipment. More recent OEM equipment from major companies like DELL is tied to DELL licences built into the motherboard, so if you changed your DELL motherboard to a non-DELL motherboard you would have to re-licence.

I know that there are a lot of ignorant people out there. I try to build systems that work even for ignorant stupid people. In order to do that, you have to identify what the actual problem is.

3
8

Happy having Amazon tiptoe into your house? Why not the car, then? In-trunk delivery – what could go wrong?

david 12
Bronze badge

I had no idea officer!

... I didn't but that delivery box in the boot of my car. Someone else must have done it :(

1
0

OK, this time it's for real: The last available IPv4 address block has gone

david 12
Bronze badge

Oh well. Time to transition to enhanced-IPV4 now.

7
1

What Israel's crack majority-women Unit 8200 hackers can teach tech about diversity

david 12
Bronze badge

"a guy can make a remark that can make you feel so small and you don't want to talk in that meeting."

And another problem exists when, after this happens, you attribute it to race or gender.

5
1

Microsoft has designed an Arm Linux IoT cloud chip. Repeat, an Arm Linux IoT cloud chip

david 12
Bronze badge

Re: Why go with Lenix? Why not create an RTOS if you’re gonna create a new OS

AS OS /is/ an RTOS. One of the group of RTOS's based on RT forks of the Linux kernel.

7
0

Go away, kid, you bother me: Apple, Google, Microsoft, Mozilla kick W3C nerds to the curb

david 12
Bronze badge

"altruistic standards bodies "

There are no "more altruistic standards bodies". You misunderstand the nature of the beast.

5
0

It's April 2018 – and Patch Tuesday shows Windows security is still foiled by fiendish fonts

david 12
Bronze badge

VBscript is part of office? Was it traced back to Open Source?

Apparently, VBscropt os part of office. Presumably, that would be the Internet Information Server part of MS Office. Perhaps the part that is open source? Like the "remote code flaw in Windows Defender that was traced back to an open-source archiving tool"?

Or perhaps VBscript is part of Windows, and the remote code flaw in Windows Defender was traced back to a MS fork of an archiving tool.

1
1

How life started on Earth: Sulfur dioxide builds up, volcanoes blow, job done – boffins

david 12
Bronze badge

Re: Sulfur?

FYI, the UK started going metric in 1670.-- Long before the United Kingdom was joined.

International agrrement was defered in 1790 because London wanted London to be the base lattitude for measurement of length: the French agreed in 1871

And I get downvoted for suggesting that the UK uses metric measures by consensus and agreement? Evidentally any mention of metrification triggers rabid responses.

1
0
david 12
Bronze badge

Re: Sulfur?

Like you succumbed to the EU's metrification of measurments?

Or perhaps some of this is by consensus and agreement.

5
11

Gmail is secure. Netflix is secure. Together they're a phishing threat

david 12
Bronze badge

Netflix

This is an information risk because Netflix alows different people to register with only the dot difference in the first part of their mail address.

Netflix thinks that

netflix.suck@gmail.com

is different than

netflixsucks@gmail.com

Why all the hate for gmail? It's netflix that sucks.

2
8

Microsoft outlines some ground rules to prevent it from nicking your IP

david 12
Bronze badge

Re: TADAG

nm

0
0
david 12
Bronze badge

"right to be a little surprised "

I suggest that the author is trolling.

Apart from 30~40 years of documented history, Bill Gates is on record as saying that his business edge was his legal knowledge and willingness to push the edge of legal behaviour

3
0

Linux Beep bug joke backfires as branded fix falls short

david 12
Bronze badge

Re: Eh..

I was reading that wondering if somebody, in the chain or reporting, was confusing "very few computers have beep hardware" with "very few people have beep installed".

0
0

Wanna work for El Reg? Developers needed for headline-writing AI bots

david 12
Bronze badge

My AI cracked the encryption

My AI decrypted NM5DXDSG1CWGQH0WWJAHLRL9GADXAZXJEU5IX3BK to news@theregister.co.uk

I trained it using "NM5DXDSG1CWGQH0WWJAHLRL9GADXAZXJEU5IX3BK" and news@theregister.co.uk.

9
0

Super Cali goes ballistic, Starbucks is on notice: Expensive milky coffee is something quite cancerous

david 12
Bronze badge

Re: Wonderful California

Have you seen the California gender-neutral geometric restroom sign (triangle on circle)? I'm thinking that gender-neutral Californian restrooms are hazardous waste sites, if not actually radio-active....

2
1

Apple, if you want to win in education, look at what sucks about iPads

david 12
Bronze badge

>I'm going to suggest that starting with LATIN and at a young age is wise as it is a difficult language to master, but once a person has developed an understanding of LATIN then other languages seem to come more easily. <

It may surprise some readers to learn that this is not a new argument.

6
0

Uber's disturbing fatal self-driving car crash, a new common sense challenge for AI, and Facebook's evil algorithms

david 12
Bronze badge

Re: LiDAR doesn't work in the dark? WTF?

>Based on the video just of what's happening on the road<

(1) The video is not relevant to the LiDAR

(2) The reduced dynamic range of video gives a very poor representation of what the eye sees in the dark

(3) Actually, as shown elsewhere and reported by people who drive there, it's not that dark anyway: it's a well lit main road in a busy district.

(4) Because the video is so dark, you can't see that the district is actually built up, with crossings, includes places for pedestrians to cross the median.

(4a) Which explains why the woman is on foot: she's crossing as a pedestrain at a median break, so that she doesn't suprise drivers expecting pedestrians, not bikes.

13
1

Programming languages can be hard to grasp for non-English speakers. Step forward, Bato: A Ruby port for Filipinos

david 12
Bronze badge

Re: Nothing new here

>wasn't saved in an intermediate form.<

Technical note: it was saved in an intermediate form. Opening it in a localized version of Access/Excel caused the intermediate form to be discarded/marked as invalid.

I don't know why that happened: it might have been because the library calls were incompatible between the localized versions, but that's not even guessing: I really don't know why the compiled form was discarded when you opened it in a different localized version.

Side: note: between the two versions I use, going one way I always get an error message and Excel spreadsheet breaks to the VBA code on opening. No code running on opening, just part of the process of identifiying, invalidating, discarding between versions.

0
0

AMD security flaw saga, browsers broken, Lamo dead at 37, and more

david 12
Bronze badge

"tortured"

O ffs. What's next, "tortured" by being fed Marmite? "tortured" by being forced to listen to your ashole neighbours car engine tuneing and late-night music?

Manning was held naked in solitary confinement for long perionds.

Not even English has a separate word for every separate concept, but that's not an excuse for being deliberately misleading.

2
8

Developers dread Visual Basic 6, IBM Db2, SharePoint - survey

david 12
Bronze badge

I don't trust anyone.

15
0

Europe is living in the past (by nearly six minutes) thanks to Serbia and Kosovo

david 12
Bronze badge

Re: "after ignoring NTP for 25 years"

NTP was implemented in Win2K. It wasn't a very good implementation, but it's not "ignoring" NTP for 25 years -- because the 1975 date you suggest wasn't NTP, wasn't called NTP, wasn't anything like NTP as described in:

A New Fault-tolerant Algorithm for Clock Synchronization”. Information and Computing, vol.77, no.1, pp.1-36, 1988.

And where poster said "2 minutes" in the garbage post, he would have meant "2 seconds" if he had known what he was talking about.

(Recent implementations of MS NTP are aparently quite good, with milli-second syncronisation. I haven't tried..)

0
0
david 12
Bronze badge

"after ignoring NTP for 25 years"

NTP dates to c 1985. If, as you claim to believe, MS ignored it for 25 years, that would put the first MS implementation at c 2010.

The rest of your post is of similar value.

2
1

Use of HTTPS among top sites is growing, but weirdly so is deprecated HTTP public key pinning

david 12
Bronze badge

Re: I only just noticed...

--- but the https is still 256bit key, or something like that. So it's still visible in my old browser.

As it happens, I do most of my browsing in http, only doing more complex stuff (like posting) when I'm on a cumputer that supports modern browsers. This means that increasing chunks of the web are becoming invisible to me.

At the moment, forums.theregister.co.uk is still visible to me, as short-key https. When that goes, I'll be reading less of it.

0
0

Windows slithers on to Arm, legless?

david 12
Bronze badge

Re: Going from 32 to 64 bit was so simple nobody really noticed it happened

VB6 runs on Win10 64. Some Apps don't run on Win64 (It really has nothing to do with VB6, which is, after all, the VS C++ compiler under the covers).

In particular what doesn't work is some 32 bit OLE controls used by some Apps.

Given that OLE is a technology for using independent and disconnected objects, there really is no technical reason why 32 bit OLE isn't supported with 64 bit OLE. It's a marketing and support decision from MS.

1
3

Page:

Forums

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2018