* Posts by david 12

1044 posts • joined 6 Jul 2009

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Intel drags Xeon Phi Knights Hill chips out back... two shots heard

david 12
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Why linux not BSD?

All my friends were BSD and Sun types. What is the overwheliming advantage of the linux kernel in the area?

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Linux 4.14 arrives and Linus says it should have fewer 0-days

david 12
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Re: "an automated vulnerability-checker that scours kernel code for issues."

>I wonder if they do?<

It's effectively a third-party test system which does whole-of-system testing with multiple inputs.

So no, comparatively few developers get third-party testing, and comparatively few projects have to integrate multiple sources, and a big chunk of those projects that have to integerate multiple sources are not permitted to allow third-party testing.

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Telstra drops nbn™ in it as it wears compo for broadband speed ads

david 12
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3 this would require

This would require posters to recognise that it's not the FTTN that's the problem.

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Woeful NBN services attract ACCC's attention

david 12
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It's Beazley-ware!!

Thanks Kim.

Not.

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Vodafone's NBN plans may include voice-over-WiFi, virtual landlines

david 12
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Our voip provider took our ported landline number, and connects it to landline, mobile, deskphone or voip client. Presumably any other provider of business voip services does the same.

So I guess Vodaphone is wondering if they can make a business out of doing the same for home/personal phones.

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NHS could have 'fended off' WannaCry by taking 'simple steps' – report

david 12
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Repeated repeated repeated warnings

So they had warned people about patching, but their warnings were hidden/disguised by the noise about getting rid of XP.

Ironic that it happened in the NHS, given that the medical system is well aware that warning overload leads to people ignoring warnings. Most drug-interaction AI systems are turned off because they generate so many drug-interaction warnings. More obvious to the lay-person, walk through any hospital and count the beeping patient monitoring systems.

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nbn™'s problems were known – in 2008, a year before its birth

david 12
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Re: Something's up...

So know that we know what the problems are, and where they are located (in the interface between NBN and the retailers), and now that we now what the NBN is really for (TV, not medicine or education), and now that we know that the original budget and timescale were fantasy, and now that we know that the NBN is being left behind by wireless interenet -- in other words, now that we know everything that was bleeding obvious 10 or 20 years ago -- there are still people pretending that the node-to-house copper wiring is a relevant issue.

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What the fdisk? Storage Spaces Direct just vanished from Windows Server in version 1709

david 12
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Re: Pay for? Or severe bugs?

The only reasons they'd remove something like this...

1) The storage team lost a political fight

2) The storage team lost a political fight

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Joint Committee on the NBN splits, as National Party member sides with opposition

david 12
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Privatise the profits, Socialise the costs

Country Party policy since the party was first formed.

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It's September 2017, and .NET lets PDFs hijack your Windows PC

david 12
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Re: Just say no to software developed using unsafe languages like C/C++

>I wonder when people are going to wake<

Not anytime soon judging by the voting pattern here...

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Everyone loves programming in Python! You disagree? But it's the fastest growing, says Stack Overflow

david 12
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Re: Usefulness

> but it would be so much better if they'd just use some { }.<

After a while, I realized that one of the reasons I prefer Pascal and BASIC is because I'm a left-handed touch-typist.

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Crowdfunding scheme hopes to pay legal fees for Marcus Hutchins

david 12
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Still looks like a DOS attack against a security white hat.

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IT worker used access privs to steal £1m from Scottish city council

david 12
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Can't happen again. Now. WTF were the doing for the last 10 years? Where's the asset recorded against the expense? Who's checking the double-entry book keeping? Do they think that self-authorized theft is a new invention? That gambling-related theft is a new thing? Did they think it all?

Was this amount of money so small compared to management wages that they didn't think it was important to follow up?

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nbn™ blames cheap-ass telcos for grumpy users, absolves CVC pricing

david 12
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Yes, it's a mistake. The NBN is talking about using FTTDp to replace "longer twisted pair runs" required by.FTTN where the node is too far away...

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david 12
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Re: Oh FFS

This "fantastic infrastructure plan" was bullshit from moment it was announced. It was specifically exempted from any kind of economic evaluation, and it was justified on the basis of "education" and "tele-medicine"

The initial pricing promises from the government were wildly inaccurate: they went to tender and nobody was interested. The "education" idea was predictably just as realistic as the previous ideas that TV, Film, Radio, Telephone and Telegraph would revolutionise education. And the idea that you would use the high speed internet to get medical interventions in your own home was sheer fantasy.

Yet that was the justification offered, and for years their supporters believed that BS. At least most people have now come around to the realization that was obvious even then: the high speed internet was going to replace Free To Air TV, and the bandwidth would be released for mobile data.

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10 minutes of silence storms iTunes charts thanks to awful Apple UI

david 12
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Re: Not limited to iPhones

>baked into whatever mass produced Chinesium<

It's baked into (American) Apple software licensed to the people who build cars.

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Disgraced US Secret Service agent coughs to second Bitcoin heist

david 12
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Silk Road, Bitstamp... Mt Gox was under investigation by the same people when the money disappeared and it went bust. Has anyone asked him about that? He might already have enough salted away, even after giving up the Bitstamp profits

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The future of Python: Concurrency devoured, Node.js next on menu

david 12
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Re: Async not always easy

>Alongside shell scripts, Perl, and the occasional C language external utility, it's a nice addition to a computer that's used to "get things done".<

And it would be even better at that if it had resumable exceptions.

Resumable exceptions make speed optimisation more difficult (not impossible, but more difficult). On the other hand, resumable exceptions enable finely-grained exception handling for i/o-bound exception-prone multi-threaded asynchronous processes that spend most of their time waiting anyway.

And once you've written your first application with a separate try/catch block for every single line you've learned why resumable exceptions are not universally a bad idea.

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Windows Subsystem for Linux is coming to Windows Server

david 12
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Note that word “currently.”

>It could be loose language or it could be a clue to future developments. <

It's absolutely typical MS product announcement. "Windows 10 includes a Graphical User Interface". "Windows 10 does not currently include Nuclear Fusion".

MS never admits features existed in past products, and since the vapourware scandals of the 1980s with the possible anti-trust implications, MS has been very careful about anouncing only actual products.

But I've always suspected that it's because the people writing the PR/press/documentation have no idea at all other than what they are told.

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CMD.EXE gets first makeover in 20 years in new Windows 10 build

david 12
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Re: Bah

>Have those idiots figured out most of us have monitors that can display more than 80 columns?<

Yes. Have they figured out how to make idiots stop complaining about the absence of features that have been there for years? No.

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david 12
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Re: But can I get a login/command prompt ...

>a login/command prompt ... on a dumb terminal plugged into a serial port <

On every version of Windows I've used since DOS 2.11

Only up to Win7: I haven't had a need to try since then.

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david 12
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They did port one of the unix shells over. They called the system "xenix". DOS was more popular.

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Your top five dreadful people the Google manifesto has pulled out of the woodwork

david 12
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Re: Assuming They Don't Post Anonymously

>First, if there was anyone complaining to HR it was in fact Mr Damore<

Well, obviously /someone/ complained to HR, because Mr Damore got fired.

And yes, I did read at least that far. Since I'm not here looking for long-form articles, I was slready stretching at that point, and that bit of carelessness indicated to me that you were too.

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One.Tel to finally die in November, 16 years after collapse

david 12
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IT content?

Actually, another company death due (partly) to software failure: Billing system never completed and didn't work.

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Linus Torvalds pens vintage 'f*cking' rant at kernel dev's 'utter BS'

david 12
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>that only he seems to find acceptable.<

I take that to mean "that no editor would find acceptable", and I take that to mean "in published print, although it would be normal in some newsrooms"

As such, it's a perfectly reasonable (though strangely ignorant) opinion of a journalist.

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Firefox doesn't need to be No 1 – and that's OK, 'cos it's falling off a cliff

david 12
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Still using 3.6.28

Cause it's faster and smaller.

And it has better menu/buttons/layout

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Now here's a novel idea: Digitising Victorian-era stamp duty machines

david 12
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Re: +1 for HMRC

>- Browser based (well worked in Chrome, so assume Firefox and IE would work too) <

Chrome is currently the most popular browser in use, and is the default browser for many jobs. Most sites work with any modern browser, but of those that don't, Chrome is the only browser certain to work.

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It's an important ID, so why isn't the Medicare card chipped?

david 12
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Re: 2 factor authentication

Signature is not really part of your ID. It's your argreement that you will pay charges made to your credit card. Retailers used to, of course, check that you actually agree to pay when you bought something using a credit card: this requirement has been relaxed by CC companies.

Your agreement to pay CC bills is not the same as using your CC as points to authenticate your identity when opening a bank account, getting a passport, drivers licence etc.

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david 12
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2 factor authentication

For the most part, the medicare system already has 2 factor authentication: you need to have the number for the rebate, and you need to be physically present for the examination. Adding a third factor (chip and pin) addresses a small number of situations. Chip and Pin is NOT, for example, used when you present a credit card to authenticate your identity.

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Medicare data leaks, but who was breached?

david 12
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Re: AUS Medicare and US Medicare

>I'm just wondering who the stupid blokes who actually purchased some 60+ of these are.<

Drug abusers getting repeat prescriptions on false ID, but mostly drug abusers getting medicare rebates (money from the government) on a false ID.

For these purposes, the medicare card is (??was ??) the accepted and required form of ID.

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Who botched Oz cancer registry rollout? Pretty much everybody

david 12
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To be fair..

>nine Department of Health officials handling the project didn't disclose that they held Telstra shares<

That is a lot like saying that "9 officials didn't disclose they ate food" on some food related contract.

People who own Telstra shares are mostly / disproportionally people who don't know anything about shares, have no other shares, have no interest in shares, and don't know anything about the company results.

Also, Telstra is a big company, and this is a tiny unimportant part of the company with no effect on the share price.

You could argue that these people have a political bias towards Telstra, and against private charities, but in that case "owns Telstra shares" is redundant: you've already said that they are public servents, and the rest follows from that.

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'Janus' resurfaces: I was behind the original Petya. I want to help with NotPetya

david 12
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"An antidote might yet be developed"

?? Like this ??

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/technology/2017/06/28/security-researcher-creates-vaccine-against-ransomware-attack/

Or is there confusion about which attack is which?

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Cisco and McAfee decide users just can't be trusted not to click on dodgy attachments

david 12
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This is new?

I'm not sure I'm following. Is tha article saying that McAfee has just added a feature other systems have had for years, or is there anything actually new in this press release?

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Report estimates cost of disruption to GPS in UK would be £1bn per day

david 12
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Re: Fun with Glonass

GPS started working in 1995. The program was launched by Reagon after 1983. Which is 12 years of non-secret development of a civilian system for civilian purposes. The period 65-85 saw a complete revolution in electronics and satellite technology: "GPS" was not based on obsolete military technology, and the technology it was based on was not secret.

In the USA, the "military budget" got used to develop lots of civilian technology. It was used as a method of trade protection ("Free trade! (except for military contracts)") and as a method of pork barreling ("No government intervention in the market! (except for military contracts)").

The military does, of course, have an interest in navigation, just like the rest of us. Their proposals for navigation systems would eventually have seen civilian use, if the civilian system based on new technology hadn't been developed and funded.

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david 12
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Re: Fun with Glonass

>GPS was top-secret US technology.<

GPS was a system disigned, implemented, funded and politically justified for civilian use. The military-industrial complex got a free ride on the civilian infrastructure.

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david 12
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Re: That's why the EU has started Galileo...

>...which prompted the Russians and the Chineese to do the same,<

The Russian systems long predate Galileo, and the Chinese system is an ordinary bit of pork barrelling for local industry. -- Something that anyone directly involved with Standards would understand.

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Grenfell Tower -- IT angle

david 12
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Grenfell Tower -- IT angle

Not meaning to offend, but I was driving and thinking about this, and my IT experience broke through, as I drearily thought to my self, "Well, if they were serious about fire safety, they would have done a run-through where they actually /burned out/ a flat to test their system/"

'cause that's what you do.

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Software dev bombshell: Programmers who use spaces earn MORE than those who use tabs

david 12
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Left handed touch-typist

So keys under the RH little finger are annoying for me. Including the ubiquitous {} keys.

And I absolutely understand why Right-Hand coders would not have made the connection to why they think that the tab is <just wrong and stupid>.

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david 12
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Re: Tabs are inconsistent...

>I suspect most printer driver filters for text files are hard-coded to 8 spaces for a tab, <

I suspect that only a person who doesn't use tabs could believe anything like that.

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It's 2017 and someone's probably still using WINS naming. If so, stop

david 12
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Re: "Bet that's not what they said when they introduced it."

>avoiding the "broadcast" messages"

So now we have mDNS and LLMNR instead.

Massive bloated software stacks and continuous broadcast storms that do the same thing, only with shining levels of complexity..

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Gordon Ramsay's father-in-law gets six months for hacking sweary super-chef's computer

david 12
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Re: Something seems off

>I'm thinking Windows and SMB shares... Do a 'dir', a couple copies, read those a bit, then another 'dir' might have to reauthenticate, and so on. That kinda thing?<

No. That step does not require "reauthentication". What it requires is re-checking the file permissions. You can watch this stuff happening if you turn audit logging on, which is presumably what the external security consultant did.

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Apple appears to relax ban on apps fetching, running extra code – remains aloof as always

david 12
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My reading of this is...

My reading of this is watching a 1950's analysis of Soviet Russia.

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The open source community is nasty and that's just the docs

david 12
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Re: Have they surveyed other groups?

It is nastier than other communities. Agree that claiming the open source community is nasty is like saying that the sun rises in the East, but back in the day there was an obvious diffence between the MS newsgroups and the OS newsgroups.

It wouldn't have come as a surprise to anyone that the BSD newsgroups were denigratory and abusive: like Linus, they had that reputation and were aware of it. But it did come as a surprise to see that members of the Python mailing list thought that it was friendly, helpful and supportive!

I'm not talking about swearing: I've never haunted mailing lists where swearing was common. And I'm not talking about moderation: although spam was removed, non of the groups had moderators removing postings just for being unhelpful or wrong.

The MS newsgroups I read and contributed to had regular, expert, volunteer contributers who politely and correctly answered basic repetitive questions without insulting anyone, and who didn't make dispariging comments even when they didn't understand the question or the subject matter..

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Microsoft Master File Table bug exploited to BSOD Windows 7, 8.1

david 12
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Re: XP not affected

One reason XP is not affected is because on XP, remote (SMB) files are not locked on execution. You can "start" $MFT as many times as you like: if it's on a "share", it's not going to be locked.

There are other differences between the locking behavior of Win 5.x and Win 6.x, so there may be other factors involved as well.

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david 12
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Re: So easy to trigger

>start c:\$MFT\123<

Yes, this was the second error in the report. "accessing" a file doesn't lock it. On Windows, "locking" a file locks it, and "running" a file normally includes locking it (and is more likely to do so on Win7 than on XP). .

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Microsoft founder Paul Allen reveals world's biggest-ever plane

david 12
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Re: Not Maetric not interested

It's not "Imperial measurements". Those are "International measurements", from the international yard, adopted by the USA in 1933 / 1959. And the United Kingdom went off the "Imperial Standard Yard" in 1930 / 1963, so you aren't using Imperial measurements either.

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Windows is now built on Git, but Microsoft has found some bottlenecks

david 12
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Re: GVFS sounds super dumb

>Powershell is the bee's knees. I was late to come around to it, but I'll never use cmd.exe again.<

And look how many keystrokes I can save by typing 'cp' instead of some verbose COBOL crap like 'copy', intended to make scripting 'easy', so that 'you don't need to be a dev to do scripting'.

As if making readable scripts ever worked. That's the problem with readable scripts: it makes people think that anyone can do it.

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Fat-thumbed dev slashes Samba security

david 12
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Not a bug, that's a feature!

But it doesn't obviously make sense. A Samba client should be calling CreateFile or TransactNamedPipe or CallNamedPipe. A Samba server should support those calls.

Assuming that the server accepts "CreateFile" for a named pipe that is actually the name of an executable, and that pipes are implemented at the server end through the same mechanism as file access, it should be doing CreateFile, not Execute File.

And "CallNamedPipe", in spite of the slight ambiguity of the name, is supposed to Call the Named Pipe, not Call the OS. That is, it is supposed to read and/or write to the Pipe/File. Again, why would reading or writing a file at the server cause it to execute?

On the face of it, it looks like there might be deeper problems that are being fixed in the short term with a quick simple patch?

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Ransomware hits Australian hospitals after botched patch

david 12
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Unpatched PC's ?

Wannacrypt patch requires an up-to-date OS. (On XP requires SP3). Perhaps they hadn't been patching, and had to roll out a lot of patches at the same time?

On Win7, windows update can get into a broken state that does not complete -- which is difficult to differentiate from the normal state where it just takes an unknown amount of time thinking about it.

From the broken state, manual patching of the Update client can take more than an hour, with frequent reboots to be sure that everything is correct.

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Orbital boffins cut four years off NASA mission to shiniest object in the Solar System

david 12
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Orbiting the object?

Object is big enough to put the satalite into a useful orbit?

Or they plan to 'circle' the object instead of 'orbiting' it?

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