* Posts by Steve the Cynic

913 posts • joined 28 Jul 2009

Page:

There is no perceived IT generation gap: Young people really are thick

Steve the Cynic
Silver badge

What's wrong with boiled cabbage?

Let's start with the last word of that sentence, which will suffice to tell you everything that's wrong with boiled cabbage: it's gdmf CABBAGE, ffs.

3
0

BOFH: We know where the bodies are buried

Steve the Cynic
Silver badge

BOFH would have to go to guerilla war, just after Shorting* their stock

*or whatever the Wall St parasitic bullshit is for making money out of betting a stock value goes down.

"shorting" is exactly the word you're looking for, short for "short selling".

You make a "short" sale (selling shares you don't have yet - a "naked" short - or that you have borrowed from your broker) and buy them in a hurry after the price drops but before you must deliver the shares you sold or pay back your broker.

Naked short selling is just barely legal, perhaps, depending on your jurisdiction, and may result in you having to "DK" ("don't know") the sell order, in essence claiming that you never made it. That gets you a bad reputation with your broker, who will terminate your account if you do it too often.

6
0

Sysadmin’s worst client was … his mother! Until his sister called for help

Steve the Cynic
Silver badge

On a more serious note, on a dos fs once you exceed 512 files in the root directory, the chances of catastrophic loss start skyrocketing.

It's more complicated than that.

On a FAT-12 or FAT-16 hard disk partition, the root directory has a specific maximum size, and that size is (wait for it) 512 entries (including the ones uses to store the UCS-2/UTF-16 "long name" characters if there are any).

On a FAT-32 partition, the root directory is, in effect, just like all the others (as it is in a UNIXish filesystem), and does not have a fixed limit.

2
0

'Dear Mr F*ckingjoking': UK PM Theresa May's mass marketing missive misses mark

Steve the Cynic
Silver badge

Re: Dear valued donor...

69 Cock Lane

For what it's worth (i.e. not very much), many years ago I lived in a house on a road called, of all things, "Lovers Lane".(1) The sign at the end was prone to disappearing from time to time, as you can imagine.

(1) In Medway, Massachusetts, if you must know.

2
0

Get the FTP outta here, says Firefox

Steve the Cynic
Silver badge

Re: "FTP sends data as plaintext and just wasn’t designed for the modern web"

@Steve: So a non-encrypted http page can't pull in stuff from non-encrypted ftp sites because security?

I said nothing one way or the other about that. I wouldn't cite, as such, security as a reason to avoid that, since the browser will normally use "anonymous" FTP (username = "anonymous" OR "ftp", password = email address) if it has to transfer anything over FTP.

However, there is a performance issue - if the "cited" item comes from the same server *by HTTP* as the non-encrypted citing page that was also fetched by HTTP, then the browser can (if using HTTP/1.1) reuse a connection, but if the cited item is FTP, it can't.

2
0
Steve the Cynic
Silver badge

Re: "FTP sends data as plaintext and just wasn’t designed for the modern web"

1. Of course it does binary.

"Plaintext" means "NOT encrypted", as opposed to ciphertext, which means "encrypted". It has nothing to do with the text/binary switch in FTP.

13
0

Jury to Apple: You owe patent troll VirnetX half a BEEELLION buckaroos

Steve the Cynic
Silver badge

Re: Good for this case but.... 8 years and it's still going...

Ask for fewer zeros at the end of your claim against them, and they'll probably just pay. I previously worked for a large supplier of financial information services, and on an internal training session on Intellectual Property issues, they explained:

* They routinely get patent demands from various people.

* Usually the demands are on the order of $500.

* At that level, the company did a minimum of due diligence (that is, pull the cited patent and see if it might be applicable and that it's held by the claimer), and then just paid for a license.

* It's not worth farking around for $500.

* Someone claiming $10K would get greater scrutiny but probably get paid anyway.

* A million dollars would be a little different, though,

* But it still isn't worth farking around for $500.

12
0

Cinema voucher-pusher tells customers: Cancel your credit cards, we've been 'attacked'

Steve the Cynic
Silver badge

(why are cheap cinema tickets such a popular "perk" for these flingers!?)

I'd say that they are expensive rather than painfully expensive.

And it's because it's inexpensive for them to offer, not prone to refunds owing to companies changing ownership, and so on. And people do still like going to the cinema. Whether that makes those people foolish is a question for another pub.

0
0

Apple store besieged by protesters in Paris 'die-in' over tax avoidance

Steve the Cynic
Silver badge

Re: Idiots

Oh, they're French. Yep. No idea how the real world works (lookout the current SNCF strikes...)

When I moved to France, before I left, I told a bunch of friends that I was going. One of them was a Frenchman (in England) himself, and he advised me to learn the meaning of one word, "grève" = "strike".

I resisted the urge to point out that I grew up in England in the 1970s, and that I was therefore well aware of what a strike is, no matter what language you use to talk about it. And yes, I would say that the UK has had its own moments of unreality in that respect. (And one could also, more recently, discuss Bob Crow's merry crew, I suppose.)

4
0
Steve the Cynic
Silver badge

Re: I've heard it all now

An anti-globalisation group peddling their message and advertising their activities of the Internet.

The greatest symbol of globalisation if there ever was one.

This reminds me of a poster I saw in Oxford somewhere just before 2000. It was advertising a "Living Marxism" conference, call the credit card hotline to book a place. I found the juxtaposition of "Living Marxism" and "credit card hotline" to be ... entertaining.

10
0

Gmail is secure. Netflix is secure. Together they're a phishing threat

Steve the Cynic
Silver badge

Re: TL;DR but what is it with ****ing developers

(Don't get me started about the space in my surname, that I have letters in my postcode and it is longer than five characters, etc. etc.)

Pfft. If I give *truthful* answers to "security" questions, I can have problems:

* My father has two middle names.

* My mother's middle name has less than five letters.

* My mother's maiden name has three common ways to spell it (two of which differ only by internal capitalisation), and I can't remember which is the right one.

* Someone posted a screenshot on TDWTF from a site that tried to claim that a surname shorter than five characters was invalid. Mine is only four letters.

At least where I live(1), post codes are five digits.

(1) France.

11
0

Linux Beep bug joke backfires as branded fix falls short

Steve the Cynic
Silver badge

Re: Eh..

They can also be useful in the event of hardware failure as sometimes a motherboard can beep the problem to you[1] - I've fixed a few machines using beep codes for diagnostics.

I've done this twice. The last time was a machine with a tendency to overheat, and it would beep out "CPU not running" when it rebooted. Cleaning the heatsink and fans resolved that one.

The other was about twenty years ago, when I flashed the BIOS on a machine and the process evidently failed. It rebooted and beep beep beep... with the black screen of nothing. I read the manual, and found out why, and how to fix it.

I got a blank floppy and downloaded the new BIOS onto it (using a different machine, duh). Then I put the floppy in the paperweight's A: drive, powered it up and waited. Beepty beep, drive seeking clunk clunk clunk ... Beep. Reboot. Machine alive.

Ever since that day I have been leery of upgrading the BIOS...

12
0

Take the dashboard too literally and your brains might end up all over it

Steve the Cynic
Silver badge

Re: Why do Mazda fake the data?

The coolant temperature gauge isn't completely fake, it will show the engine warming up, but it's set up so it only starts rising above normal when the engine is practically melting and damage is being done.

The only time I've ever seen a coolant temperature gauge go high was my old Fiesta ('86 "D" reg, Mark II). One sunny day in a traffic jam, I noticed it was pegged at the highest position. Hmm. Oh, look, I'm next to a pub, so I'll park in the car park, let the poor thing cool off.

Waited a while with the bonnet open to let some air circulate up through the engine compartment just in case there was an actual problem. Got back in, turned on the ignition (but didn't start the engine). Pegged at max. Hmm. OK, the traffic's moving, so I drove to work. In the evening, I came out. Yes, once again, after a full day to cool off, pegged at max.

Took it to a garage, got the sensor changed, no problem...

0
0

Meet the open sorcerers who have vowed to make Facebook history

Steve the Cynic
Silver badge

Re: Yolk? Seriously? I'm oeuffended!

Hey, if you want to make omelettes, you gotta break some eggs.

10
1

First there were notebooks. Then tablets. And now ‘book tablets’

Steve the Cynic
Silver badge

Re: Bootloader locked?

But can I wipe it and put a PROPER linux on there?

At which point you get a firm lesson in the validity of Linus T's swearified rants about non-discoverable buses on ARM devices.

15
1

How a QR code can fool iOS 11's Camera app into opening evil.com rather than nice.co.uk

Steve the Cynic
Silver badge

"...This leads to a different hostname being displayed in the notification compared to what actually is opened in Safari."

And this is the least comprehensible part of the whole sorry tale. Why in the name of Dog do they not use the *same* piece of code in both applications? There's this mysterious technology that might help them, called "libraries", where you can call exactly the same compiled code from two different programs. Maybe someone should tell Apple about that.

15
1

How do you make those darn code monkeys do what you want? Just give 'em a little nudge

Steve the Cynic
Silver badge

Re: Nudge + Dev Ops = The Bleedin' Obvious + Buzzword Bullshit (apparently)

"It's hard to tell a team that they may be woken up at 2am if it breaks."

Well, nobody in IT has ever expected that this might happen.

I *hope* your response is sarcasm. Not my current job, but the one before it, I had several calls from the data centre in their late evening, which of course was about three am British time since the data centre was in New York, and the possibility of such calls was part of the package. (Of course my response was normally "back it out and I'll work on a fix once I'm in the office" and it was often times not actually my fault it broke.)

1
0

User asked why CTRL-ALT-DEL restarted PC instead of opening apps

Steve the Cynic
Silver badge

Re: Feeling Old...

Who remembers the joys of setting jumpers on a 3Com Etherlink card to get the IRQ and base address set correctly.

Pfft. I had a pair (for $JOB) in 1989 that would not talk to each other over thinwire even though the IRQs and such were correctly configured. Both ends would talk to their respective cards, but there was the "other" jumper to consider.

The one that selected thinwire or AUI thickwire.

And wasn't the same on both cards.

10
0

We sent a vulture to find the relaunched Atari box – and all he got was this lousy baseball cap

Steve the Cynic
Silver badge

Re: At That Price, Who's the Targeted Consumer?

[2] Once got into a conversation with a kid who solemnly told me that "he knew all about viruses because they they were all written in machine code". Since I was (at that time) a mainframe assembler programmer I was somewhat underwhelmed..

I wonder what His Kidness would have made of the virus called "Concept". It was written in Word-Macro because it was, in fact, the very first Word macro virus, written by a guy at Microsoft who told a colleague "hey, we can use this macro system to make viruses" and the said colleague pooh-poohed the idea. So Chuckles went off to make it (as a proof of concept), and because the A/V software of the time hadn't yet heard of the idea, it spread throughout Microsoft faster than corn through a goose, as they say.

4
0
Steve the Cynic
Silver badge

Re: Reliable Atari

Come on now, I think you'll find that Commodore could out-incompetent Atari any day of the week.

Well it was Atari that had a floppy drive with a write-protect sensor that didn't actually stop the drive writing to the floppy. (520ST)

6
0

Five things you need to know about Microsoft's looming Windows 10 Spring Creators Update

Steve the Cynic
Silver badge

Re: Long File Paths ?!

If you want your application to use long paths then it needs to have this entry in the manifest:

Or, like, you know, use the Windows file APIs correctly, in the manner described in the MSDN documentation(1). Then you can go up to more than 32000 characters in a full path.

(1) It's annoying rather than hard.

8
2

Screw luxury fridges, you can now run webOS on your Raspberry Pi

Steve the Cynic
Silver badge

Aka The Tute Screw

Yup, that's the one.

0
0
Steve the Cynic
Silver badge

In the same way as you can now run Windows 10 on your PC

Or, indeed, if you get the "IoT Core" build, you can run W10 on your RPi.(1)

(1) I refuse to write this with a capital "I", since for me, RPI will forever remain "Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute".

3
0

Programming languages can be hard to grasp for non-English speakers. Step forward, Bato: A Ruby port for Filipinos

Steve the Cynic
Silver badge

Re: Nope, it doesn't work

If you send an XLS or XLSX file, the (non-macro) formulas are detokenised into the localisation that the recipient's version of Excel uses. It doesn't *store* "IF()", "SUM()", and so on, but some sort of bytecode or similar that represents those words.

(The above is based on my experience of working with Excel sheets that I myself created on Office 97 English and loaded into Office 2010 French. Totally seamless transition.)

YMWAFSV(1) for CSV files.

(1) Your Mileage Will Absolutely For Sure Vary

6
1

You must be yolking: English pub to launch eggstravagent Yorkshire pudding

Steve the Cynic
Silver badge

Re: if it makes you feel any better...

'on Ilkley moor by'tat'

There's a crushing irony in your spelling here, coupled with your question of knowledge of these lyrics being a criterion for Northernerness...

It's "baht 'at" ==> northernish for "without a hat".

Caveat Lector: Steve the Cynic was born in the N1 part of London, and has not lived anywhere north of Coventry.

Caveat Lector the second: However, his mother was born in Doncaster.

3
0

Space, the final blunt-tier: Binary system ejected huge 'spliff' asteroid, boffins reckon

Steve the Cynic
Silver badge

Re: That's as may be

Just think of it as a glot'l stop :)

A good policy, because that is exactly what it is.

And the symbol isn't an apostrophe. The correct representation is an opening single quote (while an apostrophe corresponds to a closing single quote). This rock is called ʻOumuamua, a Hawaiian word meaning "scout", and the eighth consonant in Hawaiian is a glottal stop, written with that symbol.

6
0

Techies building UK web smut age check tools: You'll get a spec next week

Steve the Cynic
Silver badge

Re: I'm assuming

There are plenty of other ways to direct your traffic to the captive portal, no matter what you set as your DNS server. (I work for a company that makes gear that can do this. I can think off the top of my head of at least four or five different ways to configure our boxes to do it...)

1
0

Office junior had one job: Tearing perforated bits off tractor-feed dot matrix printer paper

Steve the Cynic
Silver badge

Re: My foreign body story

This was very significant because, as no one under 60 (65? 70?) will know, 80 characters is the width of an IBM punch card.

Do you mind? I'm 52, nearly, which is definitely under 60, and when I was at high school in the US, we had wodges of IBM-style punch cards as part of the registration process each year.

Of course, the school *was* in Endicott, NY, "home of IBM"...

20
0

Boeing ships its 10,000th 737

Steve the Cynic
Silver badge

Re: A milestone, surely

The last I read somewhere was, there are, at any given point in the day, about 43,000 planes in the air !

I recall someone saying that during the week when everything was grounded after 9/11, the number of planes on the ground in airports was about three times what it normally is, and that finding somewhere to park them all was problematic.

6
0

16 exoplanets found huddled around 12 lightweight stars

Steve the Cynic
Silver badge

Re: "only minor obstacle is creating a warp drive/whatever else with FTL capability"

Voyager took decades to get to Jupiter.

Voyager 1: Launch: September 5, 1977, Jupiter closest approach: March 5, 1979: flight duration 18 months.

Voyager 2: Launch: August 20, 1977, Jupiter closest approach: July 9, 1979, flight duration 23 months.

So, yes, it was decades. 0.15 decades for one of them, 0.19+ decades for the other.

5
0
Steve the Cynic
Silver badge

Re: Tides

I think the metal content of the stars is more significant. More metal = more chance on a viable metallic core = a solid magnetic field

That's a nice theory, except that when astronomers and astrophysicists talk about the metal content of stars, they mean any element that isn't hydrogen or helium. Yes, that means that oxygen and nitrogen are, in stellar composition terminology, metals.

6
0

Too many bricks in the wall? Lego slashes inventory

Steve the Cynic
Silver badge

Re: ...

Do you get translucent LOX/Kero bricks to fill it?

Not as such, although the model isn't entirely hollow - there are plenty of bricks inside, and lots of them seemed to be structurally unnecessary, which leads me to suspect that they are there just to add weight and/or move the centre of gravity downwards.

1
0
Steve the Cynic
Silver badge

Re: ...

All those people buying the Saturn V for their kids... I bought it for myself because, er, well, let's just say that the Apollo launches were one of the Grand Stunts of the 20th century, and when the Lego Store about a mile from home had it in the window, well, er, how were you going to keep me away from it? (For reference, I'll be 52 in a few weeks.)

I even weighed it. It turns out to be about three quarters of the right scale weight for a fully fuelled real one. That is, if you scaled it up to the true height of the original, the model would weigh about 2250 tonnes instead of the original's 3000.

I think that might be showing off my outer geek, though.

6
0

ESA builds air-breathing engine that works in space

Steve the Cynic
Silver badge

Re: Interesting airflow

Conventional jet engines have heavy-duty compressor turbines at the front, although when flying at speed, the compressor is mostly just compressing further an already compressed stream. (Compressed by intake geometry, that is.) This thing is more like a ramjet, in that it has no turbines to compress the incoming flow, and relies entirely on the intake geometry to do so.

Note: that's why ramjets don't work at airspeeds below about Mach 0.5, of course. They rely on the air being, well, rammed in by the airspeed.

4
0

Sysadmin left finger on power button for an hour to avert SAP outage

Steve the Cynic
Silver badge

Hmm. Well, it was around that sort of time, possibly 1997 and certainly NOT 1998, that I ended up with a computer at $JOB that switched itself off from Windows 95. Possibly not full ACPI, but not ordinary pre-ATX either.

1
0
Steve the Cynic
Silver badge

Nowadays the "hold-the-button-in" trick won't work, because of ACPI, especially on a modern PC.

"A modern PC"? The first one I ever saw that had the necessary bits was in 1996. Twenty-two years ago.

7
0

Reddit 'fesses up to just a little Russian reaming

Steve the Cynic
Silver badge

@phuzz: Spot on. When I worked for ... let's just say ... a large American supplier of financial data and news, it was possible to see news feeds from all around the world, in the language(s) of your choice.

So I turned on a range of English-language feeds and dipped into them.

Oh my, that was an eye-opener. Comparing AFP (Agence France Presse), UP (United Press), PTI (Press Trust of India), an Australian one that I don't remember the name of, and the official English-language Iranian one was ... enlightening.

Events in, say, South America would be reported more or less uniformly across the five. Events in Europe would be a bit variable. Events in the Middle East? Well, let's just say that the Iranian one often looked like it was describing a totally different event, although paying attention usually showed that it was in fact the same event behind the differences in propaganda.

9
0

La, la, la, I can't hear you! Apple to challenge Bose's noise-proof cans

Steve the Cynic
Silver badge

"Who boast..." suggests that it's Sony and Sennheiser making the claim, not the author.

It's ambiguous, at best.

"X boasts that Y" is X claiming thing-Y about itself in a self-aggrandising way. ("Sony boasts that it has ...")

"X boasts Y" is merely the writer saying that X has Y. ("Sony's offering boasts a superior sound reproduction.")

5
3

Hypersonic nukes! Nuclear-powered drone subs! Putin unwraps his new (propaganda) toys

Steve the Cynic
Silver badge

Re: Little reactors?

The only way to make a 'long time' sustainable nuclear engine is for it to breathe air [or water if it's submerged, which might be a bit more practical]. That also doesn't consider the overall size requirement for the power plant and supporting systems. An air-breathing engine needs a heat exchanger that's large enough to transfer it to the propellant [in this case, air], and not melt in the process [so it can sustain propulsion].

My reading of the Project Pluto page and related stuff is that the SLAM (the missile they were trying to develop) was in essence an airbreathing nuclear thermal rocket. In an NTR, the "heat exchanger" is essentially *direct*contact* between the propellant (in this case, atmospheric air compressed by the ramjet tube to something over 300 psi) and the fuel elements. The *air* (OK, propellant, but this one's air-breathing) is the coolant for the reactor, and this, combined with the almost total absence of shielding, means that the reactor is light enough to be put in a (large) cruise missile.

And yes, an in-atmosphere nuclear thermal rocket zipping about at supersonic speeds *is* an insane idea. It spews oodles of fission-sourced neutrons wherever it goes, and barfs out significant quantities of radioactive waste particles through the exhaust, but if it's flying in circles over enemy territory, it's ...

No, it's just insane.

1
0
Steve the Cynic
Silver badge

Re: Little reactors?

The main reason that nuclear jet engines were abandoned is that they're just TOO HEAVY to be practical.

The Unreliable Source's article on Project Pluto suggests otherwise:

On May 14, 1961, the world's first nuclear ramjet engine, "Tory-IIA", mounted on a railroad car, roared to life for a few seconds. Three years later, "Tory-IIC" was run for five minutes at full power. Despite these and other successful tests the Pentagon, sponsor of the "Pluto project", had second thoughts. The weapon was considered "too provocative",[2] and it was believed that it would compel the Soviets to construct a similar device, against which there was no known defense. Intercontinental ballistic missile technology had proven to be more easily developed than previously thought, reducing the need for such highly capable cruise missiles. On July 1, 1964, seven years and six months after it was started, "Project Pluto" was canceled. (from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Supersonic_Low_Altitude_Missile)

The main reason why they abandoned Pluto was not that the (unshielded) engines were too heavy (they weren't), but that the weapon was too provocative and too unnecessary.

Shielded "crew-safe" nuclear thermal rockets that use inhaled air as propellant may well be, as you say, too heavy to be practical, but an uncrewed unshielded cruise missile is technologically possible, if marginally feasible.

4
1

Wi-Fi Alliance allegedly axed army reservist for being called up. Now the Empire strikes back

Steve the Cynic
Silver badge

Re: Why did it take so long?

I wonder how many times this happens to the rank and file and if the DoD contests all of them? Or is it just the higher ranks that get the extra protection.

Until not long after I first met her, the late Mrs Cynic was a member of the Massachusetts Air National Guard, and consequently had similar service organisations.

She had a curiously ambivalent attitude towards her service(1), but when an employer threatened to fire her if she didn't use her allotted vacation days to cover her two-week ANG service obligation, she went to the ANG's legal department. Their lawyer took it *very* seriously and told her that he would call the employer and remind him of his legal obligations and evidently he persuaded the employer of the error of his ways, since she never heard another word about it from either the employer or the ANG.

(1) Best described like this: she never *liked* being there (neither in the ANG nor in the regular Air Force from which she departed under a program called "Palace Chase"), but people who criticised her or, worse, called her a bad person simply because she was in the Armed Forces, tended to get an epic earful.

2
0

UK watchdog Ofcom tells broadband firms: '30 days to sort your speeds'

Steve the Cynic
Silver badge

You need to be retuning your algorithms - you'll get better speed and lower latencies if you do.

Sort of, maybe. It's getting 300 Mbps down at that rate, so the speed is probably bounded by the fibre's traffic shaping more than any TCP window size / RTT / ack-fraction / etc. that might be going on.

I *could* even up the rate to 500 Mbps down / 400 Mbps up, but (a) it costs enough more that I can't be bothered to pay the extra and (b) 300 Mbps is near the upper limits of the UTM's performance, and it's the fastest one the company makes that's fanless.

0
0
Steve the Cynic
Silver badge

That's a fair point, but where I am, I can get 300 Mbps downloads from servers in Paris, and 7ms ping RTT from home (Lille) to those servers. That's an hour by train, so the best part of 180 miles(1), so definitely it gets out onto the backhaul from my exchange.

(1) French high speed trains(2) actually *are* high speed, thanks.

(2) "TGV" is an abbreviation of the French for "high speed train", duh.

5
0

My PC is broken, said user typing in white on a white background

Steve the Cynic
Silver badge

Re: OK, it went most of the way in, but stopped about half an inch before it was fully in

Who's saying I didn't write it like that on purpose, eh?

And would it have been better if I had said "the floppy went most of the way in"???

10
0
Steve the Cynic
Silver badge

Not a display thing, but this was in 1987...

Yes, 1987, when 3.5" floppies were just becoming a thing.

I was a student working in an actual programming job for the summer, and the company had some sort of big contract with IBM, and we had all sorts of interesting toys to play with:

* A "bar" plotter - it took paper of the A1 or A0 sort of size (actually a size the Americans call "D"). Much fun.

* Personal System/2 machines, model 50 and 60.

* 3270 terminal emulator cards for the PS/2 machines

* other things that aren't important here.

Anyway, one of the saleswomen brought me a 3.5" floppy for a copy of the software I was working on. Those floppies had two different kinds of labels - small ones that stuck only on the front, and large ones that wrapped around the top onto the back.

And of course she, not being very familiar with what was, of course, a *new* thing in PCs, had stuck a large label entirely on the front, covering part of the metal shutter.

I'm embarrassed to have to admit that it took me several attempts before I realised *why* the disk wouldn't go into the drive. (OK, it went most of the way in, but stopped about half an inch before it was fully in.)

24
0

Wearables are now a two-horse race and Google lost very badly

Steve the Cynic
Silver badge

Re: Until battery life has improved significantly, negating the need to recharge it frequently

My experience is that an Apple Watch with WatchOS 1 would drain to 57% after one day, but with WatchOS 3+, it goes to mid-80s% or so. And it goes on charge at night when I'm not wearing it anyway.

0
0
Steve the Cynic
Silver badge

Re: Still no genuine use-case

I once would have said that now I've heard everything but I'm sure there's plenty of craziness yet to come. If you can keep your head when all about you are losing theirs...

I didn't say it was in any way *necessary*, merely that the job it does, it does well. Perhaps some people would prefer that it did more, specifically that it does interesting things that don't require a phone, but I'm pleased by how it does what it does.

On the other hand, if it dies outside its warranty period, I'll probably buy an ordinary watch rather than a smartwatch.

0
0
Steve the Cynic
Silver badge

Re: I remember Watch being laughed off at launch

Mine is Series 2,(1) but yeah, I wear it every day, and I use at least some aspect that isn't just "what time is it?" every day as well, even if it's just "how fecking cold is it out there?" before I go out.

(1) So it is allegedly 50 metre waterproof. But the original and Series 1 are both rated IP67, so should be OK in the rain or e.g. while doing the washing up.

0
0
Steve the Cynic
Silver badge

Re: Still no genuine use-case

I've been trying to find the replacement for when it eventually dies, no-one has got close.

You've nailed the essential point of a smartwatch. It's more or less not very much without a smartphone, but functions extremely well as a "remote access" terminal for the phone.

And aside from the runkeeper part and the cheaper-than-analogue part, my Apple Watch does all the other things you mentioned. (No, an Apple Watch is not cheaper than the most expensive analogue watch I ever bought. The late Mrs Cynic didn't like me spending much on watches, and quite frankly I wouldn't have spent anything like an Apple Watch's price on something that can only tell the time even if she had said it was OK.)

So if runkeeper comes in an iOS version that understands the Apple Watch (the App Store says it does), you might (if you can bear to pay the AW's price(1)) consider that as a replacement.

(1) I'm well aware that the price *is* an obstacle.

0
0

Boring. The phone business has lost the plot and Google is making it worse

Steve the Cynic
Silver badge

Re: Stock Android

Same for Microsoft Office, right up until that bloody ribbon.

You must have been using a different series of Microsoft Office releases to the one I used. Interesting things changed position on the menus Every Single Release, even before the Ribbon showed up.

(Who else remembers when "Page Setup" was on the "Format" menu where it belongs?)

19
1

Page:

Forums

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2018