* Posts by Steve the Cynic

767 posts • joined 28 Jul 2009

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Microsoft Azure ████ secret ██ █████ ██ US govt's ███ ███ centers

Steve the Cynic
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Re: "Secret" isn't a very high classification level

"It sounds very important of course, but isn't."

Correct. My late wife, when she was in the USAF (and later the Mass. ANG) had a Top Secret (with SCI, no less) and she had a sort of spitting contempt for people who thought that a "Secret" clearance was a big deal. (For complicated reasons, at one time she had one of those as well.)

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Yes, British F-35 engines must be sent to Turkey for overhaul

Steve the Cynic
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"most modern fighter aircraft rotate a whole "fin" in the tail or a whole canard (not a flap on its end) for control purposes"

Mostly because it prevents extra shock waves at the elevator hinge, but also as a means of reducing control forces at supersonic speeds.

The Unreliable Source has a readable description, although I refuse to guarantee its accuracy.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stabilator

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Combinations? Permutations? Those words don't mean what you think they mean

Steve the Cynic
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"IEEE-754 "long double" (80-byte floating point)"

Of course I needed to proofread that before I posted it. 10 bytes or 80 bits, not 80 bytes!

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Steve the Cynic
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"Factorials get out of hand REALLY quickly - 21! won't fit in a 64-bit number, for instance, and just 69! is enough to exceed most calculator's display capacity (even with exponents up to 10^99 and complete loss of accuracy). And something like 449! is an incredibly difficult-to-handle number (> 10^999)"

Factorial can, for large enough n, be approximated by sqrt(n)*pow(n,n)/exp(n).

pow(n,n) gets very large very quickly. 1, 4, 27, 256, 3125, 46656, 823543, ... In particular, it gets very large much faster than exp(n) (e to the power n).

And the IEEE-754 "long double" (80-byte floating point) can handle exponents of 10 beyond 4900. Of course, modern compilers tend not to support it since SSE floating point is much faster than x87 NPU floating point, and SSE does not understand long double. If you can track down a copy of VC++6, though, you're in business.

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Didn't install a safety-critical driverless car patch? Bye, insurance!

Steve the Cynic
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"Argument ran - "All my other post has been and is delivered satisfactorily, the ticket cannot have been sent correctly as it was not received." Judgement was that the ticket was not correctly served in accordance with the law and case was thrown out."

That's fascinating. In English civil cases, "proof of posting" suffices for "proof of service" for legal documents that are allowed to be served by post. (My experience with the English civil courts involves the small claims court(1), a statutory demand and a creditor's petition for bankruptcy - I was the creditor, thanks, so no comments from the audience please. I had to serve lots of paper.)

For certain classes of paper (notably the statutory demand itself), postal service doesn't count *at*all*, and the paper must be served in person, although you are allowed to hire a local to do it for you. Private detectives do a roaring trade in this kind of thing Failing that, it is also permissible, in the words of the bloke who explained what was needed, to nail it to the other party's door provided that you swear an affidavit to that effect. He chuckled when I protested that I wasn't Martin Luther...

(1) This doesn't actually exist as a separate thing. That type of action takes place in the same County Courts as non-small claims. The correct term is "Small Claims Track of the County Court".

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Linux kernel community tries to castrate GPL copyright troll

Steve the Cynic
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Re: Nah. He sounds just like a leaching parasite. Nothing more.

"Don't you mean leeching? The imagery evoked by "leaching" is just a little too gruesome for my taste ..."

Leaching: leaking of chemical components of something into a surrounding liquid. Example: Storing drink for long periods in lead-crystal containers causes leaching of the lead from the glass(1) into the drink.

Leeching: that which is done by leeches, by which, in context, we usually mean the hematophagous varieties, the ones that suck blood.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leech

(1) Although we call it "crystal", it's actually glass. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lead_glass

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Windows Fall Creators Update is here: What do you want first – bad news or good news?

Steve the Cynic
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Re: Have they fixed the decades old bug in File Explorer ?

"NTFS parser can not handle it"

NTFS itself handles it just fine. The system path parser that understands how to resolve ".", ".." and other oddities, as well as transforming forward slashes into backslashes, and also converting relative paths into absolute ones? No, it can't handle it on ANY file system.

Using the APIs correctly allows your program to handle it just fine.

Specifically, taking *just* the example of CreateFile (which *also* opens existing files, but ...):

* CreateFileA (MBCS version that works with "narrow" characters) cannot do it.

* CreateFileW ("Unicode" or "Wide character" version) *can* do it.

* Specifically, your filename must be fully parsed (so the *system* parser - it has nothing to do with NTFS as such - cannot handle it, you are right), with no elements being "." or "..", and all separators being backslashes and no stars or question marks, AND it must be an absolute path.

* Then you must prefix the fully-parsed absolute path as described above with backslash backslash dot backslash. And yes, that means that if the absolute path is a UNC path, you end up with three backslashes in a row.

If you do all that, you can access paths up to 32K-1 wide characters long. It's annoying, but overall the main annoyance, from the programming point of view, is having to work in wide characters.

That Explorer doesn't use these APIs like this *could* be regarded as lazy programming, or it could be regarded as a deliberate decision to protect the user from feebleminded software that doesn't know how to handle super-long paths. (Notably, I'm not sure how CreateProcess and ShellExecute handle these paths.)

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The Google Home Mini: Great, right up until you want to smash it in fury

Steve the Cynic
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Dollars and pounds

"$49 (and £49 because in the tech world the dollar and pound have 1:1 parity"

They *do* have 1:1 parity, or sort of vaguely close to it, after you add 20% VAT to the dollar price.

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New coding language Fetlang's syntax designed to read like 'poorly written erotica'

Steve the Cynic
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Re: SEX @ Voyna i Mor

Could be worse. Could be 80x86 assembler, where the opposite of CLI is STI.

But yeah, I remember 6809 assembler well, wuth SEX and BRA (rather prosaically, this was just BRanch Always, and yes, it had an instruction BRN - BRanch Never(1)).

(1) I mean it. All the position-independent branches were conditional and came in pairs. One member of each pair would branch if the condition was true, and the other would branch if it was not true. And one of the conditions was "true". BRA branched if true was true, and BRN branched if true was not true. That didn't happen very often.

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ISIS and Jack Daniel's: One of these things is not like the other

Steve the Cynic
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Re: As a resident of Switzerland myself...

It's a major diplomatic faux pas to fly a row of national flags and have any of them, especially your own, be higher than the others, apparently. Of course the JD flag *isn't* a national flag...

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Steve the Cynic
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Re: Justifiable concerns

"But surely you'd plough a very short furrow with a lead (Pb) blade?"

It occurs to me to suggest a confusion between lead and lead. That is between a metal in the same group as carbon, and a verb and its associated words meaning to be in front or in charge, with other things or people following. I suspect the latter is meant. It's the blade that "leads" the actual ploughshare.

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Commodore 64 makes a half-sized comeback

Steve the Cynic
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Re: Choice of games

It was, but it was converted for the 64. Come to think of it, I may have been thinking of the VIC version. My bad.

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Steve the Cynic
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Re: Choice of games

They call it a collection of C64 retro games, but Radar Ratrace isn't there! Pfft.

Nor Tales of the Unknown, Volume 1. You probably know it by its subtitle: The Bard's Tale.

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MH370 final report: Aussies still don’t know where it crashed or why

Steve the Cynic
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Re: planet is surrounded by spy satellites

May I draw your attention to XKCD's What If on looking at objects from space?

https://what-if.xkcd.com/32/

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Is this cough cancer, doc? No: it's a case of Playmobil on the lung

Steve the Cynic
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Re: @Dave

I think the law actually bans all kinds of thing with non-food inside food, so the answer to the question relies on what part of the outside of a Hershey bar is food. I mean, presumably it's 100% non-food, so there isn't any food on the outside for the non-food to be inside.

And the law also, in this case, probably takes a ... broad ... interpretation of what constitutes "food". Hershey bars might *taste* like they are made of concrete and/or lethal poisons, but they *aren't* concrete and/or lethal poisons. Every one of the molecules in a Hershey bar is allowed to be contained in food. It's just that there isn't any actual food along with them.

Hmm. I think I'm repeating myself, but I might just be saying the same thing in different words.

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Dyson to build electric car that doesn't suck

Steve the Cynic
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Re: Popcorn

"the wiring loom in a 2017 conventional petrol or diesel car is one of the most expensive components"

That made me think of my own adventure in car repair.

The car was a 1986 D Mark II Fiesta, with the 1.1L petrol engine. I bought it in 1995 when I got a better job and (a) could afford to buy a car and (b) needed to buy one to get to the job and (c) even had more money after paying for the car in the new job than I had had without the car in the old one.

In around 1997-8, the sticky-out bits on the ends of the wiring to the right-hand front indicator bulb housing broke off, so there was nothing to hold the wiring in place.

Ford service manager: Hmm. Well, that housing is actually part of the wiring loom - it's not meant to be replaced separately.

Steve: How much would that cost to replace?

Manager: About 500 quid just for a new wiring loom and ... a lot ... for the labour to replace it.

Steve: (hard look) Just to replace the bulb housing?

Manager: Let me talk to the lads in the back.

(time passes)

Manager: Good news. If you go to the Ford Truck and Van Repair Centre at (gives directions) you can get a spare housing for a Transit - it's mechanically compatible with the socket for the housing - and splice some spade connectors onto the existing wires to connect it up.

Steve: Cool, thanks.

...

FT&VRC sales attendant: That'll be eight ninety five, thanks.

Yeah, from half a grand plus labour to under a tenner. I'll take that.

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EasyJet: We'll have electric airliners within the next decade

Steve the Cynic
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Re: Well....

"the passengers could start peddling"

Probably better if they started pedalling, but sure, it creates an interesting image: propelling an airliner by hawking cheap tat street market style...

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Shock! Hackers for medieval caliphate are terrible coders

Steve the Cynic
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Re: C'mon, ElReg.

"Daesh-bags is probably fine."

I prefer "Desh" for the organisation. I play the MMORPG Star Wars: The Old Republic, and desh is the crappiest lowest-level metal crafting component you can find, good only for the lowest of the low tier crafted weapons and armour, salvaged from piles of scrap metal in the criminal neighbourhoods of the two capital worlds.

And the "Islamophobia" accusations are misplaced, at least against me. I oppose Desh mostly because even on the scale of barbaric behaviour they are uncivilised, and it doesn't matter what their motivation is. There have always previously been collections of, if you like, rules of warfare for terrorists. Concentrate more on military targets, try to give at least some warning of bombs since the *terror* aspect is not diminished by there being enough warning to evacuate a place, and so on. The particular sort of barbarism practised by Desh doesn't respect even those rules even if they were often evident more in the breach than the observance.

Yes, the hard men of Northern Irish terrorism sometimes blew people up with no warning, but it *is* necessary from time to time to demonstrate that they *do* have the will to go through with threats. The hard men of Desh haven't grasped that lesson, whence lorries in crowds and similar.

And no, low intelligence isn't automatically a requirement. The key characteristic is a high susceptibility to fanaticism. Yes, that probably clusters in lower intelligence groups, but certainly not exclusively. (Translation: don't underestimate your opposition.)

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Hotter than the Sun: JET – Earth’s biggest fusion reactor, in Culham

Steve the Cynic
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Re: "The fission process turns two forms of hydrogen"

> Is it the neutrons that can generate power, or the the helium too?

The neutrons pass out of the magnetic fields because they are neutral, and strike atoms in the lining of the torus. These then undergo radioactive funtimes and release heat that's used to generate electricity.

Well, that's my understanding of the technology, anyway. And it does mean that running a De/Tr test makes the interior of the torus radioactive, yes. It's one of the reasons the research is *expensive*.

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Falling apart at the seamless: Inside Apple's LTE Watch fiasco

Steve the Cynic
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Re: Thanks for the explanation

"It would be very annoying if your watch 'rang' every call you got if your phone was next to you."

It does that anyway. And no, it isn't annoying, once you decide to treat the Watch as an extension of the phone that sits on your wrist and also tells you the time rather than a separate device in its own right.(1)

That is, it's no more annoying than hearing the land-line phone in the bedroom ringing at the same time as the one in the living room because they are on the same line.

The current (pre-iOS11) idea is that you can use the Watch to see who is calling (it shows that information on its display) and decide to answer or to reject or whatever and then if you answer, you take the call on your hands-free that you're already using. The hands-free sets I've used have all had no (obvious) way to *reject* a call, so without a wrist display you're left listening to it ringing and wondering who it is (because the caller doesn't have a per-contact ring-tone attached for whatever reason and the phone is stuck in your pocket).

(1) A Series 2 has enough extra hardware (notably a GPS receiver) to have a limited independence(2), but it's still essentially an extension of the phone.

(2) You can go open-air swimming with it without having to find a way to carry your phone in the water, and you can still get a GPS track from the swim time. As I said, *limited* independence.

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Google's Big Hardware Bet: Is this what a sane business would do?

Steve the Cynic
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"Even Microsoft are better at hardware than Google."

Yeah, but don't forget that Microsoft have been doing hardware for nearly 40 years.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Z-80_SoftCard

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Quebec takes mature approach to 'grilled cheese' ban

Steve the Cynic
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Re: Comfort food!

"But, just to confuse us right-pondians, a US grill is also a sort of flat, hotplate where things like eggs and bacon are fried."

Or burgers. In the student cafeteria where (and when) I was at Uni, they could generally coax a four foot high sheet of flame out of a couple of burgers(1) on such a grill. It made ordering lunch a bit more entertaining than you'd normally expect.

(1) I'm left wondering if that makes them flambéed rather than fried, but no brandy(2) was involved.

(2) For solid amusement value, watch an expert making Crêpes Suzette, especially if he can hold the pan in one hand and light the brandy without using the other hand and *without* putting the pan down.

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Red Hat pledges patent protection for 99 per cent of FOSS-ware

Steve the Cynic
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Joke

"or even list them all - there are too many"

Presumably the Patent Office lists them all?

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Sysadmin tells user CSI-style password guessing never w– wait WTF?! It's 'PASSWORD1'!

Steve the Cynic
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You need an entirely different sort of prowess if you're looking to wow non-IT staff.

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Bill Gates says he'd do CTRL-ALT-DEL with one key if given the chance to go back through time

Steve the Cynic
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Re: Brilliant idea

"3-key combo requiring both hands"

Yeah, but one-handed Ctrl-Alt-Del has been possible on PC keyboards (some of them, anyway) since 1987, when the first 101-key PS/2-style keyboards were released. Left hand. Thumb on Ctrl, little finger on Alt, index finger on the non-keypad Del.

No. Scratch that. They weren't PS/2 *style* keyboards. They were *actual* PS/2 keyboards. On Personal System/2 machines. That sort of PS/2. But it was 1987, and the keyboard finally had both Ctrl AND Alt on both sides of the spacebar.

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Itching to stuff iOS 11 on your iPhone? You may want to hold off for a bit

Steve the Cynic
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"You can force your phone to require a PIN to unlock rather than a fingerprint"

I don't understand this comment in the article. My phone uses a PIN to unlock rather than a fingerprint. I have an iPhone 7 on iOS 10.3.3. I have *never* used a fingerprint. OK, my first iPhone was a 4,(1) but I went from that to a 5S and from that to a 7, and never turned on fingerprints, and so I use a PIN to unlock.

(1) This may be why, of course, since I've managed to migrate the settings every time I upgraded EITHER the phone OR the OS.

And I checked my list of not-64-bit apps. Nothing I'll miss. I'd say that pretty much all of them were last launched a couple of years ago, if not longer. That sort of "I won't miss it". So when the phone decides to let me know about the OS upgrade, I'll pick a time to do it, but not until then.

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Downloaded CCleaner lately? Oo, awks... it was stuffed with malware

Steve the Cynic
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Re: So...

"Any tips on how to get rid of it?"

Corporal Hicks: I say we take off, nuke the site from orbit.

[looks to Ripley]

Corporal Hicks: It's the only way to be sure.

'Course the neighbours might not like that...

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Jon Hamm of Mad Men to lend his lungs to bounty hunter Boba Fett

Steve the Cynic
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Greedo didn't shoot.

And, according to the novelisation of ANH, the other customers in the cantina returned to their drinks with no more than a shrug because they thought he got what was coming to him for not insisting that Han kept his hands on the table where Greedo could see them.

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Noise-canceling headphones with a DO NOT DISTURB light can't silence your critics

Steve the Cynic
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Pint

Re: Warning

"active mouse cancelling"

"passive mouse blocking"

"reduce the ambient mouse"

"fit that reduces mouse"

Using autocorrect does not reduce the need for proofreading. ;)

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Steve the Cynic
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Re: That eight hour flight...

"Thankfully gas turbines tend to have peak efficiencies at high-end of their power range"

This is because the compressors consume terrifying amounts of power over almost the entire range, even at idle. At cruising thrust levels, something like two-thirds of the output power of the engine core is consumed by the compressor.

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Fancy that! Craft which float over everything on a cushion of air

Steve the Cynic
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Re: Dover

My own experience of hovercraft includes three:

* Some time in the earlier part of the 70s, when there was a tourist-y hovercraft service on the Thames in London, including drinks served.

* Sometime a bit later in the 70s, an SR-N6 on the Solent, where there were NOT drinks served owing to a lack of 30mph speed limit coupled with a lively response to sea state.

* 1996 at a bash to celebrate the initial release of our new ATM switch. The company threw a big party and among the activities for a bunch of hardware and software engineers were:

** Blindfolded driving a Land Rover with its steering geared backwards (turn the wheel inside left to turn the wheels outside right) and the other team members calling directions.

** Archery

** laser clay pigeon shooting

** AND, the prize one for me, little one-man hovercraft that we could drive.

And yes, all the comments here about turning are correct. You turn the rudders and the craft rotates on its axis. Actually following a curved path takes a little longer. And left to themselves, if the ground isn't level, they drift downhill.

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SpaceX releases Pythonesque video of rocket failures

Steve the Cynic
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Re: The best one there was

" get in to space, me thinking of 'space' as high up above the karman line, my friends thinking it (probably quite correctly) as orbital velocity"

XKCD pointed out that it's easy to get into space (it's just a matter of altitude), but hard to get there in a way that lets you *stay* up there. The latter is a matter of speed more than altitude, although if your perigee is less than a couple of hundred miles, you'll eventually find yourself contemplating the virtues of aerobraking.

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Hubble catches a glimpse WASP-12b, an almost pitch-black exoplanet

Steve the Cynic
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Re: WASP-12b is about two times less reflective than the Moon

"I was going to quote one or two of the obvious howlers in this article "

Like the point that at 2600°C, the surface is getting towards hot enough to boil iron(1), so glows rather more brightly than "slightly red like hot metal".

(1) The analytical part of my brain knows this is possible, but the other bit gibbers somewhat at the thought.

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Chrome to label FTP sites insecure

Steve the Cynic
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Re: FFS, stop the nannying

> we already know the username, it's "anonymous"*

Just to be difficult, and because it's easier to type, I usually use "ftp". I have yet to find an FTP server that didn't treat it as a synonym of "anonymous".

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Why the Apple Watch with LTE means a very Apple-y sort of freedom

Steve the Cynic
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Re: Battery life

"The reason why the Apple watch has such a terrible battery life ... WiFi radio ..."

Pretty much this. OK, a Series 2 with WatchOS 3 is heaps better than the original Watch with WatchOS 1.X and 2.X, but at least some of that is because of WatchOS 3. And because my utilisation has settled down into a less-thirsty pattern.

The main advantages of the WiFi are:

* I can be in WiFi range but out of Bluetooth range, and the watch can still find the phone.

* If I'm doing some sort of large sync task, it can use WiFi instead of 3 Mbps = 375KBps(1) over BlueTooth.

(1) YMMV if you use binary Mbps and KBps.

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Boffin wins (Ig) Nobel prize asking if cats can be liquid

Steve the Cynic
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Re: Peace prize

"I'd have thought that was pretty self-evident - no sleep, so no sleep apnoea for anyone within a hundred yards,"

You might think that, and there is some justice in the implied accusation, but...

There's actually a practical aspect to it: there's some evidence that among the causes of sleep apnoea, you'll find poor muscle tone in various parts of the airway, and playing ... difficult wind instruments, especially e.g. harmonicas and didgeridoos, where a great deal of muscular control is required(1), helps develop better muscle tone in those areas, and may, therefore, act to mitigate the sleep apnoea.

(1) The key is that for both these instruments the airway helps shape the sound of the instrument, so the musician must learn better control over his airway in order to get better control of the instrument. This is especially true of 10-hole diatonic harmonicas, where there are missing notes in the "nominal" range of the instrument, especially in the bottom octave, but these notes can be played by getting both reeds of the relevant hole to sound. *That* requires the musician to manipulate the shape of his mouth and throat, and *that* requires increased muscle control and tone.(2)

(2) I actually damaged a reed in my harmonica when I was trying to learn how to do this.

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Steve the Cynic
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Re: hmm

"What does this mean?"

It means they found two gynaecologists who said something positive about it. The other 98 thought it was the stupidest idea going.

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Linus Torvalds' lifestyle tips for hackers: Be like me, work in a bathrobe, no showers before noon

Steve the Cynic
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Re: Last time I tried to work in a bathrobe...

"curse for the millionth time that you need coffee to be conscious enough to make coffee"

Do what I do: I have a filter-coffee machine with a Thermos jug for the coffee. Run that the night before, and leave one mug's worth in the jug. In the morning, pour it and nuke it for 30 seconds or so to get the temperature back up.

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Users shop cold-calling telco to ICO: 'She said she was from Openreach'

Steve the Cynic
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Re: BT franchise and research

'Anyone else noticed how "pressing 8" to be removed from the calling lists is singularly ineffective?'

Oh, it does indeed remove you from *that* list. And puts you on the "this number gets answered" list.

It's like they used to say about spam with a "Click here to remove" or "reply with 'Remove'" line: they removed you from that list and put you on a list of known-valid email addresses. The only viable policies were "black hole" or "bounce".

On the subject of phone calls: I have two numbers, one mobile and one nominally fixed-line.(1) I give the fixed-line number to NOBODY, so if it rings, it's someone trying to sell me stuff, so I ignore it.(2)

(1) It's a fixed-line format number (French 03 for north/east France), but arrives on my Internet connection now that I have fibre and was able to cancel the actual fixed line. Unexpectedly, they transferred the fixed-line number to the Internet connection instead of deleting it and keeping the 09-format phone-by-Internet number.(3)

(2) It's provided with my Internet service, otherwise I'd get rid of it.

(3) The first call I answered after my provider switched me to fibre was from them, trying to sell me fibre.

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Steve the Cynic
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Re: Accounts overdue, too

For maximum fun, check the filing history: they dodged being mandatorily dissolved a couple of years ago.

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Microsoft fixing Windows 10 'stuttering' bugs in Creators Update

Steve the Cynic
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Re: Fast startup? No thank you

Fast Startup is actually a sort of semi-hibernate, so most of its weirdness happens at shutdown. Except that there are probably many drivers that don't properly handle it. And probably some of those faulty drivers come from the company formerly known as Bill's Boys, then Monkey Boy's Crew.

And thanks for reminding me to check to see if it is still off...

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F-35 firmware patches to be rolled out 'like iPhone updates'

Steve the Cynic
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Re: @Voland's right hand

"and fingers crossed the ejection seat will still operate."

Given that the ejection seat is the one part of the plane that *must*, almost by definition, function when the plane is completely without any sort of power,(1) I'd say this isn't as such a worry, or at least not for the reason implied.

(1) It must work in the circumstance where the engine has stopped and the hydraulics and electrics are busted and it wouldn't matter anyway because the ram-air turbine didn't deploy like it's supposed to, so there's no thrust, no hydraulics, and no electricity either. You pull the handle, the rockets fire mechanicomechanically, and the canopy goes bye-bye.(2)

(2) In a pinch, just because the seat fires directly through it, but in most planes it is ejected or shattered by explosive means.

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User demanded PC be moved to move to a sunny desk – because it needed Windows

Steve the Cynic
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Re: Oh dear

"no it doesn't as a lot of them go in to politics!!!"

Surely that makes it *worse*, no?

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Fruit flies' brains at work: Decision-making? They use their eyes

Steve the Cynic
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Re: Time flies like an arrow.

"colourless green dreams sleep furiously?"

I see your grammatically-sound semantic hash and raise you an eight-word sentence where all the words are spelled the same:

Buffalo buffalo Buffalo buffalo buffalo buffalo Buffalo buffalo.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Buffalo_buffalo_Buffalo_buffalo_buffalo_buffalo_Buffalo_buffalo

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France to tack weapons onto spy drones – reports

Steve the Cynic
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Re: Geneal Atomics Reaper drone

Hey, don't diss 3000-tonne spacecraft! Up Goer Five tipped the scales at 3000 tonnes on the launchpad ready to go!

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Facebook claims a third more users in the US than people who exist

Steve the Cynic
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Location data...

The final paragraph of the article mentions the question of location data. It's entirely possible that they *aren't* using your location data as derived from a phone or internet connection. You "Like" things in a particular area, or you are *already* friends with people who said they are in a particular area (probably your local area, maybe), and they can conclude that you are probably there.

That being said, I get recommendations for potential friends in several areas (subjects or geographical) that don't really apply any more, if they ever did:

* Artists and gallery operators from various places, because I have a FBFfriend who's an artist

* Assorted ordinary Americans because of a couple of old old friends that I made over there years and years ago who later became FBFriends.

* A wide selection of people in Regina, BC, because one of my FBFriends moved there and posts incessantly.

* Various martial artists who know some of my other FBFriends from my days as a student of jujitsu.

But, returning to the context of the article: I have one account that I use sparingly, and I post things almost never.

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Boffins prove oil and water CAN mix – if you do it in a gas giant

Steve the Cynic
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Joke

Re: Lucozade vs chicken soup

"Being addicted is a bitch."

Pfft. The worst addiction is the one we all have. Dioxygen. Try going cold turkey on that. It won't end well.

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India responds to internet shutdown criticism... by codifying rules to make it legal

Steve the Cynic
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"In what universe can public safety be enhanced by disabling communications?"

One where "public safety" means "safety from the public" in much the same way as "fire safety" means "safety from / in the presence of fire". That is, as a means of ensuring that members of the government are safe from members of the public.

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Dell's flagship XPS13 – a 2-in-1 that may fatally frustrate your fingers

Steve the Cynic
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Re: Lack of indicator lights and ports

""Is W10 like W7

Don't get me started about W10's "fast startup" option, which is actually a sort of semi-hibernate. It does weird things to the shutdown process as a result. Specifically, it switches off the display about half-way down, then continues running, I think while writing out the semi-hibernate data to disk. But it's a bit spooky, watching the screen switch off while the machine is still clearly doing something.

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Well, debugger me. Microsoft's BSOD fixer is getting a makeover

Steve the Cynic
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Re: Know your market

"ODT? Maybe. Others with slightly shorter memories (but more memory) might prefer SDA or even XDELTA."

Back in the day, when I was maintaining a particularly touchy VXD for the old 9x line(1), I used Soft-Ice. Sadly, it's no longer with us, but I really liked it.

(1) File-access interceptor for an on-access virus scanner, if you must know. My manager worked on the equivalent thing for NT, and he also used Soft-Ice.

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