* Posts by JetSetJim

1270 posts • joined 4 Jul 2009

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Revealed: The billionaire baron who’ll ride Elon’s thrusting erection to the Moon and back

JetSetJim
Alien

Re: This counts as _not_ going to the Moon

>This is basically a re-enactment of the Apollo 8 mission.

As long as it's not a re-enactment of the Apollo 13 mission

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I've seen the future of consumer AI, and it doesn't have one

JetSetJim
Boffin

Re: An "AI powered cooking assistant"?

I suspect they're fighting to form the beach-head in the domestic "software helper" market. Whether you need an AI to do it though, hmm...

I could see a market for something that does the following:

a) user does meal plan, software produces shopping list from it's defined recipes (whether user defined, or server defined + user tweaks is moot) and the known remaining items in storage

b) s/w brokers deal with supermarkets/other grocery vendors, arranging deliveries and shelf-life expectations for the items being delivered - ordering from multiple stores if necessary/desired.

c) meat-sack receives delivery and does the manual labour of putting it on shelves/into cold storage. Probably need some mechanism to update s/w with shelf lives - e.g. embed use by date in an RFID/barcode that is easy to scan as you unload

d) s/w can then (re-)organise what you're cooking on a daily basis to minimise what you throw away, as well as perhaps suggest additional recipes based on what's in your cupboards if you're running out of inspiration (perhaps where the AI comes in)

e) when cooking, app can then send simple commands to devices such as the oven to set the temperature correctly, and do the timing

Barriers to entry:

a lot of this is simple to do in your head, or on a piece of paper - personally I might find it useful for something to warn me that stuff is going off in the fridge, as I don't remember the dates very well, but the market for this might be small

Scanning stuff in so that the s/w knows everything you have is not going to be easy as it probably requires food suppliers to create and adhere to a single standard of labelling that is easy for the consumer to use. RFID seems the best option here as you can read it from a phone, but some items such as fruit/veg don't have any packaging, so a solution to this would be needed. Barcodes can already be done (e.g. various apps that monitor your food intake by scanning the barcodes), but I think that's far too clunky a solution at the moment.

Overall, it can probably be achieved. Not sure it needs to be integrated into your fridge/cooker though - it should be a standalone app that can interrogate/control *all* the different brands.

I'm sure someone will try and do it with Blockchain Technology (TM) next...

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Space station springs a leak while astronauts are asleep (but don't panic)

JetSetJim

Re: How did they find it?

Oddly there's no detail on the various space sites that I can find, although there's an earlier article on RELL that is an external scanner that has been used to isolate leak locations before.

Also, there's this article on using sound to find leaks.

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JetSetJim
Holmes

Re: How did they find it?

My guess:

Step 1: seal each compartment, monitor each compartment for pressure. This identifies the compartment the leak is in.

Step 2: Option 1: Float something really light and non-damaging to anything in the compartment around the walls of the target compartment. A leak should induce a slight current towards the hole. Follow this to the hole. I vaguely remember some S-F story that had balloons filled with gunk deployed in the event of a breach - they'd get sucked to the hole and then burst over it - the balloon material providing some of the seal, the gunk being the glue. Good enough for a temporary fix and to identify the area in need of attention.

Step 2: Option 2: If some sort of remote camera is present outside, look for the air venting out. Manual inspection to then find it on the inside.

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UK getting ready to go it alone on Galileo

JetSetJim

> So either the magic money tree really does exist, or our government is hiding away in its shelter

Perhaps the tree does exist, and at a later point in time we'll be told of the massive amounts of money printed by the Bank of England to get us through the "initial rough patch*" that is the Brexit fallout.

(*) - May last several decades...

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That's the way the cookies crumble: Consent banners up 16% since GDPR

JetSetJim
Mushroom

>It gets more difficult when they list all 7000 third party cookie providers for you to select each and everyone, one a time.

I usually browse to the Dilbert website for a daily dose of corporate vs engineering irony and clicked on their "configure" to be prompted with a similar set of options, all with one-by-one selection. Additionally, the list seems to change between visits, naturally with all the new one's being set to "on" by default.

Can't tell if it's Scott Adams being more satirical of the situation or not, but I now have mixed feelings about browsing.

If only the "do not track" option in the headers was legally binding

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Ecuador's Prez talking to UK about Assange's six-year London Embassy stay – reports

JetSetJim
Coat

Re: Preferred Option

> It's called Yakety Sax

And this is how you dance to it:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8pQAWOCofXo

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Shock Land Rover Discovery: Sellers could meddle with connected cars if not unbound

JetSetJim
Stop

Re: New owner must be able to disconnect seller immediately from the vehicle

> Enabling the current person in the car to disable this kind of defeats the purpose.

Push and hold button for ten seconds, car connects to server. If not registered, follow existing procedure. If registered, fire emails/phonecalls to current registered owner to get confirmation of account deletion. No response, do nothing. Repeat attempts generates intervention from a meat sack to work out what's going on (e.g. if previous owner has died, and other edge cases)

When you buy a 2nd hand car, just keep pressing the button every day until it registers. If I just had to 'click here to login and confirm', it would be easier than remembering where I put the booklet with the URL in (probably the glove box anyway).

Sure, there's still the case where a thief nicks your phone and keys, but I'm sure the existing tracking can cope with that.

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Form an orderly queue, people: 31,000 BT staff go to Openreach in October

JetSetJim
Joke

Re: Dates?

We'll all be on 6G by that time, so expect 10Gbps to the handset by then, rendering fibre truly redundant except for the exceedingly fat pipes needed to every base station, of which there will be about two dozen per 100 yards of street.

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Here's why AI can't make a catchier tune than the worst pop song in the charts right now

JetSetJim

Aiva

Surprised no mention made of this "ArtIst" Aiva

It's in the classical domain, but the example at the end of the article seems a rather pleasant auditory treat. It's also apparently officially recognised as a proper composer, somehow.

I also seem to recall reading that the most prodigious composer of music is a chap who has a computer do it for him - he now holds somewhere in the region 100k-200k musical copyrights from the computer generated music, but can't find his name this late in the day and can't attest to their quality..

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Submarine cables at risk from sea water, boffins warn. Wait, what?

JetSetJim
Paris Hilton

> And sometimes, "redundant" routing isn't

much more common than that. Fancy fibre network with redundant links between two nodes. Unfortunately they were laid in the same ducting, so links not redundant when someone else trenches the street without checking what's in the ground...

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At last – a use for AI! Predicting an England World Cup victory

JetSetJim
Coat

Re: Sir, the odds of successfully negotiating a football field are a million to one

> "So you mean there's a chance?"

Million to one chances crop up nine times out of ten. 's true, I heard it on the clacks

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'Plane Hacker' Roberts: I put a network sniffer on my truck to see what it was sharing. Holy crap!

JetSetJim

Re: So... who pays for the 3G/4G data connection?

>I can see where Wayland is coming from with that comment, but it doesn't cover vehicle use on private land - you don't need a licence for that, so driving *isn't* illegal without a licence.

Perhaps he is about to mount a legal challenge to the Under 17 Car Club and other such organisations

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JetSetJim

Re: So... who pays for the 3G/4G data connection?

The SIM used is highly likely to be filtered onto a special APN, either via a custom MNC, or by IMSI filtering. That APN *should* be configured to only allow access to specific car manufacturer/insurer servers (depending on who supplied it), and so the SIM should be useless for other purposes.

When a manufacturer sticks these in the cars, they've normally negotiated a "zero-cost APN" with the operator, and so for the expected lifetime of the car (or perhaps just the warranty period) all usage of that SIM by the car will not cost a penny/cent.

Now, in the case of a car manufacturer doing this, I'm sure permission for data capture is buried in the T&Cs of whatever "service" you've bought that requires this embedded SIM (e.g. proper traffic updates rather than the useless ones embedded in FM transmissions).

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Priceless: The cost to BT for bothering you with spam? 1.5 UK pence per email

JetSetJim
Mushroom

Pfft, £300 seems a better reward, although you'd have to pay a £30 filing fee to make the attempt

Icon: a more suitable punishment, and possibly the only way

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Brit mobile phone users want the Moon on a stick but then stay on same networks for aeons

JetSetJim

Re: more for a mobile package that has either more data volume or higher speed

It's possible to do it even on 3G by restricting the RAB combinations available to a user via policy (limits could be 64, 144, 384kbps, IIRC). Early UMTS did this at least until it became ubiquitous

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Facebook Android app caught seeking 'superuser' clearance

JetSetJim
Windows

Re: Oh Sorreee! Sorree!

I fail to understand why it even needs an app - it's just a view into the web pages. The only thing FB won't let work in the mobile web page is messenger, which is no great loss to me, but equally I bet could still be done in a mobile web page. The only reason for the app is to slurp your data, so I didn't bother installing it.

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We've found it! A cloud-and-AI angle on the royal wedding

JetSetJim
Pint

Re: Bet it won't ID me correctly

I can't wait for it to inevitably mis-identify people in an hilarious way (perhaps now is a good time for the visitors to the area to invest in print-outs of celebrity heads to crowd-source this), cos obviously I'll be watching the coverage avidly and not enjoying the (currently forecast) nice weather.

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Blighty: If EU won't let us play at Galileo, we're going home and taking encryption tech with us

JetSetJim

Re: NAVIC

And the Indians are brown, Daily Mail readers will be up in arms

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ZTE now stands for 'zero tech exports' – US govt slaps 7-year ban on biz

JetSetJim

Re: It's not just ZTE

> One of the first Androids I messed with was an ancient Samsung S2 from T-Mobile and it had a bunch of "analytic" settings enabled by default sending data back to T-Mobile.

That's probably the case with all carrier OS'es - read up on CarrierIQ - the info is used, for the most part, to improve the network. How much the info gathered is abused, I don't know...

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As Zuck apologizes again... Facebook admits 'most' of its 2bn+ users may have had public profiles slurped by bots

JetSetJim

>He could always try "not selling it".

At the very least they could not keep fucking around with privacy settings and defaulting everything to 'let them sleep from the blood of the masses'. Thought I had my Facebook locked down but turns out the was another set of settings that allow contacts apps to sleep their friends data. That was never there when I first started to get protective of my data, and I doubt I was informed of it unless it was printed in a microdot on page 34 of some updated ts&C's.

Fuckers, e lot of them. It would be nice if this buries FB, but I doubt it as the are too many sheeple in the world

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Happy 100th birthday to the Royal Air Force

JetSetJim
Pint

Re: Britain had an empire before the RAF.

> Phantom - Jag write up here.

I prefer the ACs version above your link

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10Mbps for world+dog, hoots UK.gov, and here is how we're doing it

JetSetJim

Re: One can only hope...

It would be cheaper for 3rd party providers of fibre to run them on BT poles for a nominal rental than to dig a trench, yet it's only recently that anyone is making Open reach do this:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-43168564

Thames Water as there's always been mutterings of running fibre up the sewers for an easy duct to every property.

True, there's not much duct in villages, but the poles and sewers are there and would probably be much less effort to use than digging trenches.

I built my house and, despite having a BT pole right outside my plot, Openreach couldn't get the install right (never showed up to two installation appointments, then cancelled it claiming they could only install fttp despite that not being enabled on my exchange). Gigaclear said "yeah, we'll do it tomorrow" and did.

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JetSetJim

Re: One can only hope...

> The only sensible way forward is to provide LTE/4G/5G facilities. Must be cheaper than digging.

The most likely first 5G use-case is to provide domestic broadband services using highly directional base-station antennas and massive-MIMO technology.

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JetSetJim

Re: One can only hope...

> As for trenches, while I agree I do quite a bit of work for a company that digs those trenches for open reach gigaclear and virgin... New trenches will be a last resort, they will either use existing duct (which is still ok because they can shove fibre down there) or overhead cable to keep costs down.

"Last resort" aka "normal operation" cos BT/Thames Water et al. won't play nicely. I have a BT pole on my property but Gigaclear had to trench cos there's no way BT will help out. Not aware of Gigaclear being able to use other ducting from any of the pics they put up on their twitter feed of installs going on in villages (perhaps there aren't any?)

Regarding suppliers of FTTP, BT do offer it on demand in some areas (YMMV, naturally):

https://www.openreach.co.uk/orpg/home/products/ultrafastfibreaccess/fttpondemand/fttpod.do

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HPE burns offering to Apollo 6500, unleashes cranked deep learning server on world+dog

JetSetJim

Tesla the car company send to predate the Nvidia GPU by a few years, but it's just a coincidence of naming.

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BT: We're shuttering final salary pension scheme

JetSetJim

Re: As could be expected.... @Steven Jones

That's the point I was trying to make - the article seems written from the perspective of the entire pension being transferred to something with a lesser benefit for the members of the scheme, rather than closing it to new contributions and members and putting into place a plan to close the £14bn shortfall while pushing current contributors onto a new scheme which royally shafts them in terms of defining the benefit they will receive on retirement (although it's still better than a completely defined contribution scheme with absolute minimum contributions from the company, at least).

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JetSetJim
Headmaster

Re: As could be expected....

The CEO bonus may be well deserved if he's managed to convince the slaves to accept a £14bn write off of their pension value. :)

I always thought that when you had a DB scheme in place you couldn't convert to different terms without the employees permission as that seems to be what my previous employer is trying to do. The worst you should be able to do is close it to new entrants and not accept more contributions. You could certainly offer to transfer it to another scheme, but the employee should not be under any obligation to do so, however big the funding shortfall is.

Although if the shortfall is big enough to sink the company (e.g. Nortel), then perhaps taking the transfer is a good idea...

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Hackers create 'ghost' traffic jam to confound smart traffic systems

JetSetJim

Re: All I want...

> The main road through Slough[1] had, at one point (and my do still) had linked traffic lights that were supposed to enable traffic at 30mph to pass though all of them at green.

The newish "Northern Orbital" road in Swindon had that, so, at first, a lump of traffic would go all along it's length at 40mph, through about 9 sets of lights that spurred off into the new residential roads which also had the "if something approaches from the side, find a suitable time soon to allow it to join the carriageway by changing the lights".

Then they broke, and it would cost a fortune to repair them, so they are now left so that traffic joining from the side effectively triggers a gap in the main traffic, which then triggers the next lights to change for the traffic joining there - leading to stop-start all the way up the road for the main traffic. Unless you went at 60 in a 40mph zone.

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JetSetJim

Re: Spoof traffic entering the Intelligent Traffic Signal System

> It's not really user generated data; it's data generated by the vehicle system,

Isn't it "crowdsourced", and therefore trendy?

It needs some anomaly detection routines to detect the spoofers.

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JetSetJim

Re: Braking News !!! :) <==== NOT a Typo !!!

I've been wondering for a while how easy it is to spoof the location data the phones are always sending to Google to see how it impacts the traffic layer on the maps. Want to get a few people off the road in front of you? Then spoof a few "slow cars" in the system ahead of you to bump up the traffic weight in the Google navigation world, hence getting redirects. No idea how many devices and throwaway accounts you'd need for this, though - and at the moment the effectiveness is limited as I suspect only a small percentage of drivers are using it.

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HP is turning off 'Always On' data deals but won't say why

JetSetJim

Re: Three Data sims

> three give you free roaming in a load of other countries, including most of Europe and United states - was handy for my last holiday.

I think they all have to do "free" roaming nowadays - certainly within the EU (while we're in it). If it's in your mobile package at home, then it's also available to you in the EU

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-40281013

Annoyingly it's one of those rules that hasn't been enshrined in law here, so Brexit means back to high roaming charges unless something changes :(

4
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Microsoft says 'majority' of Windows 10 use will be 'streamlined S mode'

JetSetJim

Win 10 Stupid Edition

Yes, it's dumb. Yes, the user can switch 'back'. But this option puts all the dumb users default configuration into one that pushes them into Microsoft controlled revenue generators Bing and the store

72
5

April Fool: FCC finally bothers with Puerto Rico as chairman visits

JetSetJim

Re: Embarrassed to be American

>>4.3%" sounds - pretty low, actually.

>Try: nearly 1 on 20 of people in your country can't phone for fire / police / ambulance

is it population coverage or land-mass coverage? And what was the coverage before the storm? For example EE claims 75% geographical coverage for 4G, 99% for population

Not that I'm excusing it - the graph looks pretty poor, as is Pai's position on a lot of things.

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4G LTE pried open to reveal a slew of new protocol-level attacks

JetSetJim

Re: Hardly surprising

> That's just a radio right?

Yep, that's just the radio, and you also need a controlling PC that is a bit better than a $200 Chromebook. And you'll need to buy the right antennas ($10-20). And ideally a GPS antenna to ensure a good frequency lock in the SDR (<$20). And perhaps you want to house the circuitry in a sturdy box for another $50.

The software, however, can be completely free and there's even other free and open options like this and this.

These may not be commercial grade implementations, which also exist to purchase from places for prices in the low $'000s, but they cover the essentials within a 4G eNodeB.

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JetSetJim

Re: Hardly surprising

> I'm not sure if the protocol spec is publicly available

Yep, they are. Get them here. Enjoy wading through thousands of pages of technical jargon

> Setting up a private LTE base station or base station simulator isn't something the typical person has the financial resources and technical ability to do

Takes about $1.2K, plus a laptop, but yes, non-trivial technically (other solutions are available, possibly cheaper too)

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JetSetJim
Stop

Re: A rhetorical question: Is it better or worse to have your own service provider hacking you

> That term "malicious node" did not seem to be well explained in this article.

A "malicious node" is a fake base station. You can buy the hardware off the shelf for around $1k, connect it to a regular PC/laptop and run open source LTE code to provide a base station - I've done it with Open Air Interface, and have connected that up to an open source core network to actually make a full 4G network broadcasting with a test license at low power.

The trick needed here is to convince an operator network to let this node actually connect to it - something I find hugely unlikely as they are usually on their own private network, connected via protected links (IPSec probably). Determining the IP address of the MME & SGW that you'd need to connect to, then getting them reconfigured to allow connection from a new IP address (and knowing which are available to use) is a moderately high bar to jump. The malicious node would then start getting reported in statistics to the operations centre, which should ring alarm bells. All of these network elements are usually explicitly configured to say that "box A with name X at IP xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx can connect to box B with name Y at IP yyy.yyy.yyy.yyy" - which is a right pain in the arse to manage across the whole network, but possibly a better solution that allowing open access.....

Overall, not something even a technically aware black-hat could achieve easily without getting detected.

OTOH, perfectly simple for a govmt sponsored agency to achieve with cooperation from the operator

1
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Spotify wants to go public but can't find Ed Sheeran (to pay him)

JetSetJim

How do the NOIs appear in the accounts?

If someone were to magically update the copyright office database to be current, what total liability would Spotify incur to pay them? Would it sink Spotify?

24
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4G found on Moon

JetSetJim

Re: Stupid

> There are better solutions.

Possibly, but they might need extensive designing. This is off the shelf, plus some radiation hardening, so probably a bit less effort

> LTE is designed to suit patent holders,

Meh, Nokia is part of this, and the specs are in FRAND, so doubt they'll owe much. Equally I doubt this is vanilla LTE - probably rather cut down protocols as they don't need to worry about authenticating their users. Plus a core network in a box to do the local switching/routing to the right base station

> the issues of terrestrial channel size,

What issues? You can do carrier aggregation up to 6x20MHz, at least, plus MIMO and beam steering. Loads of capacity for each rover if they want

> handovers between bases etc.

Possibly a useful feature if the rover, you know, moves about

Definitely good PR though :)

7
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Putting the urgency in emergency: UK's delayed emergency services network review... delayed

JetSetJim

Re: handset repeater

There are two radios that can operate independently in most decent handsets nowadays, so this function is merely a software problem to include for ESN. It certainly was a feature of TETRA and I remember it causing a little bit of a kerfuffle when it was stuck in the requirements for eTETRA, but I believe it was accepted (I've been out of that arena for a few years to)

1
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Brexit to better bumpkin broadband, 4G coverage for farmers – Gove

JetSetJim

> Er ... don't we keep giving large amounts of money to BT to get them to provide rural broardband?

Yes, we do, but it's not much, and the cash is running out. I guess all he's saying is that he'll put a little bit more money in the pot - I imagine his quote of "spending billions of pounds to improve rural broadband" will get diluted to "spending a few more million quid" in the long run.

https://www.ispreview.co.uk/index.php/2017/11/government-extends-uk-2mbps-rural-better-broadband-subsidy-scheme.html

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Kentucky gov: Violent video games, not guns, to blame for Florida school massacre

JetSetJim
Facepalm

Re: What a load of Trump...

"There are 300,000,000+ guns in circulation. Legislation won't make most of them go away"

Stop the sale of ammunition (or regulate it heavily), then there's 300m paperweights in circulation.

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Who wants dynamic dancing animations and code in their emails? Everyone! says Google

JetSetJim

Re: how to turn that shit off

If you have to use Google search, use encrypted.google.com instead - I see no AMP (thanks timecop1818)

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JetSetJim

Re: Ends-Means

>Know what's even faster than that? Google simply not permitting advertisers to deliver dynamic content- that no user, in the history of the world, has ever wanted or needed to see- in ads.

The user is not the customer, though, the advertisers are. Google will implement features that advertisers want until the consumers walk away.

2
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TalkTalk to splash £1.5bn laying full fibre on 3 million doorsteps

JetSetJim

I'd be surprised if they had any significant overlap, as then there would be less incentive for take-up.

What I'd like is for Ofcom to finally start slapping BT for calling their Superfast Broadband "fibre" when it's FTTC, rather than FTTP.

9
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What did we say about Tesla's self-driving tech? SpaceX Roadster skips Mars, steers to asteroids

JetSetJim

Re: It was never going anywhere NEAR Mars

> Jeez, tough crowd! ;-)

*If* the aim was to get into a particular orbit, then this is an epic fail on the part of the control systems to be so far off. Unfortunately that seems to be how it's being reported (or at least reports I've seen, but I haven't tried hard to read it all)

*If* the aim was to burn the rest of the fuel to exhaustion just to kick the car as hard as possible, then this is not a fail.

Still fricking awesome to watch.

13
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I see you're writing a résumé?!.. LinkedIn parked in MS Word

JetSetJim
Headmaster

Re: I knew there was a reason

> removing myself from Linkedin

I assume you got confirmation that all copies of your profile were deleted, backups and history of changes included?.

Colour me cynical, but I wouldn't be surprised if a lot of such account deactivations fall in this bucket, and the bucket where your data is actually deleted is a lot harder to get into. From the account deletion page:

Closing your account means permanently deleting your profile and removing access to all your LinkedIn information from our site

Then further down is:

You can reopen your account in most cases if it's been closed less than 20 days, but we're unable to recover the following even if you reopen your account:

Endorsements and recommendations

Ignored or pending invitations

Followings (Influencers, Companies, etc.)

Group memberships

Which effectively states that they are not deleting *any* of your personal data, just not showing it on the interwebs. They still have that data to use for whatever internal purpose they desire - be it training AI to write CVs, or any other research purpose. Add to which they probably store the account history changelog, so it probably doesn't really impact things if you first change all your data to junk like "Professional Human Cannonball" before requesting the account termination.

Local data protection laws may override this behaviour in some jurisdictions - perhaps worth asking them what they have on you now that your account is terminated (assuming they are obliged to answer and can't wriggle out of it by transferring the info to a separate legal entity that's in a different jurisdiction that isn't subject to the same rules by some legal loopholing - IANAL, YMMV, etc...)...

2
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Google kicks itself out of its own cache when serving AMP pages

JetSetJim
Pint

encrypted.google.com

Ta very much, have an upvote and a pint. Much nicer now.

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JetSetJim

Re: AMP is garbage and should be killed, not "improved"

Possibly because it doesn't work inside chrome, but good first effort. There's a few user script apps out there, but not sure my confidence in them is high

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