* Posts by JetSetJim

1216 posts • joined 4 Jul 2009

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Yes, Britain has an urban-rural 4G schism. This is what it looks like

JetSetJim
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Re: Any point?

> streaming audio, maps, mail, Slack, Skype, news, weather, Google, basic browsing

Until you get into the demands of streaming video, if you're not really worried about latency, then 3G (assuming that includes the decent flavours of HSPA) is probably sufficient. Although I think you must be a very patient person because whenever I drop down to 3G websites can be very slow.

LTE should offer sub 10ms access times even after a bunch of timeouts have fired to free up network resources, 3G access times can get much longer as the basic access procedures are much more involved.

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JetSetJim
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Re: internal vs external

> Is this internal or external signal reception

You won't know. All these organisations are reporting are the outputs of their apps, that are installed on a subset of subscribers of each network. The apps just sit in the background and sip the RF measurements from the phone, and perhaps also occasionally perform throughput tests if they are configured that way (i.e. the user doesn't care about their mobile data usage!). The phone doesn't have any inkling as to whether it is indoors or outdoors, although I'm sure you could possibly frig a reasonably accurate metric together based on GPS measurements (i.e. if the mobile is stationary and not on a road, or if there are no measurements available, then it's probably indoors).

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UK emergency crews get 4G smartmobes as monkeys attempt to emerge from Reg's butt

JetSetJim
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Re: Goodbye Moto...

Motorola split into Motorola Mobility ( handsets) and Motorola Solutions (network infrastructure). Two separate companies.

Motorola Solutions fragmented with bits being sold off and all that's left in that company is the TETRA stuff. It bought Airwave in 2015, I think, so yes, win-win for them there (barring any penalties EE can foist on them, which I doubt). At the time, Airwave were suing Moto over the award of the contract by HMG to Moto - I've no idea what the merits, or even facts, of their case were, but there are plenty of news reports to read.

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JetSetJim
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Goodbye Moto...

> At least Motorola didn't manage to crowbar their way into the handset contract

Different company entirely and has been for a while (early 2011). The Motorola supplying the ESN is the last remnants of the company which used to make all sorts and then basically got chopped up into unprofitable/dying bits.

There used to be a chipset manufacturing bit, now that's Freescale.

There used to be an automotive bit, sold to Continental a long time ago

There used to be a "Wireless Infrastructure Division", but this was internally fragmented into IDEN & CDMA for the (at the time) lucrative N. America market, TETRA (lucrative) and "proper" mobile phone networks (GSM, UMTS and LTE). IDEN was taken out the back and shot. The "proper" mobile infrastructure bit plus CDMA was gradually eroded by Huawei and eventually bought by Nokia before being shuttered, that left the TETRA bit. This became "Motorola Solutions", which is what is supplying ESN.

There used to be a handset division that made a lot of money out of the RAZR, but due to sheer shortsightedness then died due to too many platforms to support, plus no new products (thanks Ed Zander) resulting it becoming a tiny player that then got sold off for IPR to Google and then (less the IPR) to Lenovo.

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JetSetJim
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Re: Just curious

> The Airwave systems is an old and creaky thing that works

I agree, but the <STOP> was for "just flick a switch and turn TETRA into LTEish.

The bells and whistles added to LTE for ESN are more along the lines of adding stuff that they do in the existing system into the LTE spec for these purposes - e.g. PTT, and the ability for handsets to talk directly to eachother if there is no (working) infrastructure around that they might normally use - perhaps useful when emergency services are trying to get somewhere moderately inaccessible (by foot or by radio wave). Not entirely sure about the status of these features in the new equipment as it's been a while since I looked at them. My understanding of what was intended (originally!) was that they needed feature parity from TETRA to ESN, plus add some high bandwidth data bearers for funky things like video feeds.

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JetSetJim
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Stop

Re: Just curious

The Airwave system is an old creaky thing that runs the TETRA system. The system they are moving to, eTETRA, runs on a modified LTE specification that adds the bells and whistles that the emergency services need. Chances are the TETRA system is not running with Software Definable Radios which would enable such a switch-over as it would have been built on fairly specific hardware with similarly specific processors and whatnot, none of which is compatible with the new system. Add to which the system may well be on a different frequency band, which may well require different antennas at the transmitting sites.

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JetSetJim
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Maths

isn't £210million / 250k devices equal to £840 per device?

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Permissionless data slurping: Why Google's latest bombshell matters

JetSetJim
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Re: Are we surprised?

In all honesty, I'd assumed Google was doing this anyway and wouldn't be surprised if Apple were doing it too.

Doubt I'd ever been asked by Google, and I wouldn't be surprised if the "fix" Google might apply is to merely add one more step to the Google account login you do when you power up the phone, possibly with a "no" answer binning you out and nothing works on the phone from then on - i.e. a requirement of having a google account is to allow location tracking by any means.

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Level 5 driverless cars by 2021 can be done, say Brit industry folk

JetSetJim
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Re: @AC @imanidiot

> Ever tried driving in heavy congestion with adaptive cruise control turned on? Do it and I bet you'll turn it off again in very short order because the ride is just f'ing annoying

I suspect ACC is getting better and better. I just got a new car with it and it's perfectly ok in congestion and I suspect is at least trying to maintain a gap proportional to the speed as in slow traffic it closes the gap to a few feet. Equally it's wary of undertaking with a large gap in front of me, but less concerned if there is a small gap in front. It's pretty good in city traffic, too. The only annoying bit is in mild-to-heavy traffic on multi-lane as it starts to slow down quite early with a slower moving vehicle in front, meaning you have to pull out a lot earlier than you might normally do, but it does seem to take account of relative velocity when pulling out behind a faster moving vehicle, so it doesn't instantly brake.

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So what does EE's 5G test really signal?

JetSetJim
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Re: Not a single mention of the word 'fibre' or fibre backhaul in the article.

The same statement is also true of 4G - an LTE site running *at capacity* should be throwing out 150mbps easily (a 5MHz system should get you around 15-7mbps usable data in a single cell - most deployments are 20MHz multi-cell (usually triple) sites), and that's before you consider LTEadvanced with carrier aggregation) . But there is a fair wedge of fibre out there - I wonder how much of it is designed to have lots of breakout points for these cells though...

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80-year-old cyclist killed in prang with Tesla Model S

JetSetJim
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Re: RE: JetSetGim

That may well be the case, but equally (or possibly less likely) it may well also be that the movement to avoid the pothole was excessive. Other possibilities include the cyclist undertaking in traffic and swerving, or some other irresponsible action.

Don't get me wrong, I'm not trying to pin blame on the cyclist, the driver or the Tesla autopilot, there are lots of ways either party could be at fault, but because it's a Tesla - with their claims that their driving software has a stellar safety record - it makes headlines before anyone knows any facts.

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JetSetJim
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> It is unknown at this time if the Tesla driver was using any self-driving technology when the incident occurred.

It is also unknown as to what the cyclist was doing prior to being struck, even if driver aids were in use by the Tesla.

It will be interesting if there is information in the telematics of the Tesla regarding the movements of the cyclist in the few seconds leading up to the incident. Did it make a sudden movement - e.g. to avoid a pothole - or was the victim moving in a nice predictable straight line? Doesn't Tesla own the data for this and doesn't necessarily hand out the raw data?

A cyclist being killed in a collision with a car is a terrible thing, but blame *could* be on either party. But now we're into the murky uncharted waters of if the self-driving systems are active, how do you judge whether either the meatbag or the computer programs were capable of avoiding the incident, or even if avoidance was possible.

Certainly the driver has responsibility of keeping an eye on the road constantly and assuming control to attempt to prevent/avoid/minimise the collision.

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The day I almost pinned my tushie as a Google Maps landmark

JetSetJim
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I was a bit stunned at reading that you have to send your photo to FB for it to be hashed by them, and then they look for that hash in photo uploads to block it.

Wouldn't it be better to hash it client side and just send them the hash of photos you don't want other folks uploading? I dunno, perhaps invent some new and exciting way of creating the hash at image creation time as part of the camera software

No doubt some naughty peeps would then hash various news photos to prevent their dissemination, but perhaps some mechanisms could be used to minimise this.

There's a Grauniad article which states:

In the Australian pilot, users must first complete an online form on the e-safety commissioner’s website outlining their concerns. They will then be asked to send the pictures they are concerned about to themselves on Messenger while the e-safety commissioner’s office notifies Facebook of their submission. Once Facebook gets that notification, a community operations analyst will access the image and hash it to prevent future instances from being uploaded or shared.

Facebook will store these images for a short period of time before deleting them to ensure it is enforcing the policy correctly, the company said.

which seems to imply a human will be looking at each of these images..... Yeah, that's a good idea

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UK Land Registry opens books on corporate owners

JetSetJim
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Re: May I introduce you to...

I always liked the "I before E except after C", and then QI ruined that by saying there are more exceptions to that rule than words that obey it

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JetSetJim
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Headmaster

Re: Private Eye

Easy to check, the "information about yourself and accept the terms of use" is not that onerous, or even checked. Name, street address (not other details of address required), phone numbers and email address (neither verified) and that gets you the 5MB CSV file.

There are 99,344 records, and the top 20 companies based on number of titles are:

WALLACE PROPERTIES LIMITED 2071

PROFITABLE PLOTS PTE LTD 1205

SOLARFAIR INVESTMENTS LIMITED 1181

SALMON REAL ESTATE LIMITED 980

SALCON POWER (HK) LIMITED 763

BNP PARIBAS SECURITIES SERVICES TRUST COMPANY (JERSEY) LIMITED 554

ADRIATIC LAND 2 LIMITED 540

WESTMINSTER BRIDGE HOLDINGS B.V. 479

STONEGATE PUB COMPANY LIMITED 478

ANDERTON ESTATE INVESTMENTS LIMITED 416

HOMESELECT FINANCE (NO. 3) LIMITED 388

LIDL UK GMBH 363

RBC TRUSTEES (CI) LIMITED 359

LINK HOLDINGS (GIBRALTAR) LIMITED 345

THE GOVERNOR AND COMPANY OF THE BANK OF IRELAND 334

FENLAND LIMITED 316

KLEINWORT BENSON (GUERNSEY) LIMITED 292

SARUNAS PROPERTIES LIMITED 288

WINOCA LIMITED 271

ADRIATIC LAND 3 LIMITED 269

Intriguingly, there are very few "price paid" records, the top 5 companies have no data at all

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JetSetJim
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Re: The interesting one will be how much land around the UK is owned by the big builders.*

It's already 2 years out of date (although perhaps it doesn't churn as often), from the website:

"Access the free dataset

The free dataset contains every title registered to an overseas company up to 31 October 2015. This dataset will not be refreshed or updated"

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Why are we disappointed with the best streaming media box on the market?

JetSetJim
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Re: The exciting future of ... personalization

I agree - I made the mistake of watching a few bland war films on Netflix and now it's difficult to find anything other than war films

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AI is worth learning and not too tricky – if you can get your head around key frameworks

JetSetJim
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Presumably this was a while ago. Nowadays AI & ML is all very trendy, with lots of conference speakers foaming at the mouth with these buzzwords, typically including "big data" & "deep learning". A quick search on Monster shows the first job in the region of £70k-120k for a data scientist. Not too shabby.

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Elon Musk says Harry Potter and Bob the Builder will get SpaceX flying to Mars

JetSetJim
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Re: Colonist motivation

> What's really needed is an economic reason to go. I want to go but it's hard to see how you can get a job on Mars when anything you could do out there could be done much more cheaply here.

Nah - I'd do it for the props, not the money. There are other motivations than currency. Others may do it to avoid nuclear fallout from when General Trump has a hissy-fit and pushes the other red button on his desk (however likely that scenario may or may not be).

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JetSetJim
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Boffin

I'm sure all you need to do is adapt RFC2549

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Equifax: About those 400,000 UK records we lost? It's now 15.2M. Yes, M for MEELLLION

JetSetJim
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Re: Post

Almost as legit as the email I got, allegedly from my company's HR dept, saying that we were getting a years credit monitoring for free - just click on this link that looks like it has the company name in it, but is actually on the wrong domain, and it's been leet-ified and so looks like myC0mpany.mp2.io domain.

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New coding language Fetlang's syntax designed to read like 'poorly written erotica'

JetSetJim
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Re: OK, so if there are any coders

I see your MHEG-5 and raise you Malbolge, where the "Hello World!" program is (apparently) written as:

(=<`#9]~6ZY32Vx/4Rs+0No-&Jk)"Fh}|Bcy?`=*z]Kw%oG4UUS0/@-ejc(:'8dc

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Shock: Brit capital strips Uber of its taxi licence

JetSetJim
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FAIL

Re: Ben Hur Moment.......

> you are perfectly allowed to do any speed you wish under the limit provided that a) it's safe to do so and b) you are overtaking someone in the middle lane.

It is demonstrably not safe to be in the outside lane doing 22 while everyone else is doing 50 - so you most certainly won't be overtaking anyone, and no-one can undertake.

A long while ago a mate was stopped for driving too slowly. Turns out he was over the limit, too, and didn't have a full license (just a provisional), and basically a bit of a twat for those two reasons, but the original reason was because he was slow.

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Equifax UK admits: 400,000 Brits caught up in mega-breach

JetSetJim
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Re: Say what?

>but I doubt we'd find out unless we search some of the more insalubrious areas of the Internet and buy it ourselves

Oh no, you'll find out soon enough. You'll receive an email from equifax@hotmail.com informing you of your data loss, and it will include a handly link which, when clicked on, will allow you to verify your information once you've typed in your credit card details. Totally legit, I've just done mine.

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Fancy that! Craft which float over everything on a cushion of air

JetSetJim
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Re: A word can be patented ?

> So the question in the FIRST SENTENCE of this article was - and remains - nonsense ? :

> "Did you know that the word “hovercraft” was once patented? "

Perhaps it was merely an extension of Betteridge's Law

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Giant frikkin' British laser turret to start zapping stuff next year

JetSetJim
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> The laser reportedly drew 10kW during its 2010 trials, with MBDA claiming 50kW would be possible with extra funding.

By charging another £10M and just changing the fuse to a higher rating?

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Apple's adoption of Qi signals the end of the wireless charging wars

JetSetJim
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Re: Race over? I doubt it

I doubt it, it's probably "just slightly different". Intel have longed to get into the handset (and base station) market which QC dominates - to the point of attempting a partnership with Apple to supply chips to at least one model of their iPhone (sadly not as well performing as the QC variant, perhaps because of missing IPR that helps QC with their performance in LTE).

Cars are all starting to be configurable with a wireless charging pocket/hole, which is infinitely preferable to fiddling with cables on entry & exit. If only their was better adoption of the screencasting-type connection to get (suitable) phone apps on the car display - e.g. your satnav of choice rather than the shite that is usually bundled with the car.

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London Tube tracking trial may make commuting less miserable

JetSetJim
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Re: One thing I always failed to understand....

> The system looks at which SSID's your device is trying to connect to

No, no, no - RTFReport:

"When a mobile device such as a smartphone or tablet has WiFi enabled, it will search for a WiFi network to connect to. This involves the device sending out a probing request that contains an identifier specific to that device, known as a Media Access Control (MAC) address. If a WiFi network is

found that is known to the device, it will automatically connect. If the device finds unknown networks, it lists these in the device settings so the user can decide which, if any, to connect to.

During the pilot, if a device was near one of the 1,070 WiFi access points in the designated area, and it had WiFi enabled, we would have collected the request(s) to connect, even if the device did not subsequently do so."

Every mobile with WiFi enabled transiting through TfL's system will be probing their APs, even if they don't register. This leaves a MAC address record in the AP, which is harvested with a timestamp. This happens in shopping malls and airports (at least) for footfall analysis and is a fairly standard feature in the boxes. TfL have merely put the information together from their many APs in a useful way.

Last year TfL held a hackathon and exposed a wide variety of data feeds to the entrants (traffic light timings, road status information, traffic queues, ...). For all their flaws, they're being quite good at attempting to find ways to embetter their service offering.

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JetSetJim
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Happy

Re: Sounds promising

I can recommend the 3rd party "Tube Assistant" app - although not sure if it can take advantage of live arrival information (if that's in any feed from TfL).

It's very good at telling you the different route options and how long each route *should* take, plus where to sit/stand to minimise your travel to the exits from he station.

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Give a boffin a Xeon and a big GPU, get a new big prime number

JetSetJim
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Facepalm

arse, hadn't appreciated that if could be a composite of primes greater than your biggest prime in your set - case in point is {2,3,5,7,11,13}, which would result in 30031 when you use the multiply and +1 method, and 30031 = 59 * 509.

Perhaps I will graciously let them off and concur that what they are doing is really hard :)

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JetSetJim
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I quite agree, but I don't think you need to go that far to get to a set that, when multiplied together, has more than 22 billion digits - if fag packet calcs are moderately accurate, the first few billion primes should do the trick and there's at least one website with over 37 billion in a list (that I think claims to be complete)

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JetSetJim
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Well, you can make massive jumps quite easily, but slowly incrementing is possibly harder, particularly as this seems to be looking for Generalised Fermat primes, rather than just a regular prime.

I'd have thought it would be relatively easy to beat this number as the "largest prime" given a sufficiently large and complete set of primes. If the current largest prime has 22+ billion digits to it, then you just collect a sufficiently large set of primes, multiply them all together and subtract 1 - bingo.

I suspect it may be more complicated than this, though... :(

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Smart meters: 'Dog's breakfast' that'll only save you 'a tenner' – report

JetSetJim
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Re: I want a smart water meter

A modern washing machine uses 40-50 litres of water per wash, apparently. A flush is 5 or 7.

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JetSetJim
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Re: Benefits

...Both for rules and for reduced costs

Those would be the rules that are going to be instantly ported across from EU law into UK law by the Brexit act?

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JetSetJim
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Re: Really, that Much?

...Apparently they did not think through the issue of people switching suppliers!

Apparently they began the roll out of smart meters before the standards for that aspect were finalised, later smart meters should support this (although I don't know from when this would be)

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Ice-cold Kaspersky shows the industry how to handle patent trolls

JetSetJim
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Thumb Up

In two minds...

Yes, it's good to stick it to the troll, but I'd rather have the patent invalidated - this still leaves others open to nuisance suits.

Not that it's Kasperky's problem - it's a problem with the system of "patent first, litigate later".

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EE!? The sound customers make when the interwebz don't work

JetSetJim
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Windows

This can bork a Mac attempting to connect to a subsequent wifi network later on unless that DNS is explicitly linked to the domestic wifi AP. After my ISP's DNS fell over, I updated my home machines.

Later on, we had to take eldest rug-rat to hospital. The local hospital wifi does a redirect to an internal address to insist you accept the T&Cs before letting you loose on the internet - if you have a DNS specified on a Mac, the redirect fails/is blocked, and you cannot get on to the system. First you need to delete the custom DNS (or I think you can associate one with a specific "location", but I'm a Windows user, not a Macophile).

Took much cursing to figure that one out on a recent trip there

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VW engineer sent to the clink for three years for emissions-busting code

JetSetJim
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Re: "Only an engineer"?

...some commentards got no further than the sub-heading before posting

Isn't that the usual MO round here?

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JetSetJim
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Re: Dangerous precedent

Rtfa, he's the most junior of 8 on trial, but he was in charge of the engineers, which means the others are manglement. The code monkeys aren't on trial, although I'd imagine they're being creative about what they did at VW on their CV now

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JetSetJim
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...I wonder what actual evidence exists to make the case.

Possibly quite a lot. If imagine there's a system architecture document pointing to high level requirements, suitably decomposed into lower level requirements for use by individual teams. As they code, there will be code reviews and modifications, plus development of tests (unit and system) to ensure it works as planned. Reviews of tests, gating documentation to ensure it has reached a commercially deployable state. All documented by project management and reported.

This is a German organisation, expect paperwork trails.

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UK industry mouthpiece wants 'near-universal' broadband speeds of 30Mbps by 2020

JetSetJim
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Re: Use cases please?

> That's my point, the vast majority of the country don't live in shared student digs, or have 4 teenagers at home. For them, a reliable 30Mbps will be more than adequate. Landlords of HMO student digs can pay extra for FTTP and flog it as an extra benefit.

640K was more than enough RAM for anyone (Bill Gates [1]) and there is a global market for, at most, 5 computers (Thomas Watson, IBM [2]), and there is certainly no reason for anyone to want a computer in the home (Ken Olsen, [3])

Currently, perhaps it is only the "premium" users who feel the need for more than wet-string between themselves and their local green box, but isn't that how the world works? People will find uses for it, and service offerings that use more bandwidth will become more affordable - even if it's just to watch ultra-HD cat videos. Kids are being brought up using devices that have more compute power in than was available to the whole planet 50-60 years ago (or some such number).

FTTP should be made to be the norm for *anything* new, and funds should somehow be made available (taxes / subsidy via subscription / ...?) so that non-fibre folks can upgrade.

I've seen a document showing that Openreach's new copper cables are in fact copper around a fibre core, so they've got that box ticked, and I'd guess that the copper could even provide a little bit of power to guarantee the ability to make a call in the event of a domestic power outage. All they need is to swap out DSL cabs with FTTP cabs (yes, they have lots of cabs, so it won't happen overnight, but then nor is their "superfast" FTTC upgrade rollout).

If BT don't do it, other folks like B4RN and Gigaclear will, and BT will lose customers, as will Openreach as they migrate onto competing fibre networks. Bye-bye BT, it was good to talk.

------------------------

[1] - meh, probably fake, but excellent urban legend

[2] - probably over-interpreted, allegedly only speaking about a single model of a single computer on sale at the time, but the spin applied since then makes it a juicy quote

[3] - over-interpreted remark, although current IoT moves are bringing it more into context, IMHO, if the discussion on http://www.snopes.com/quotes/kenolsen.asp is anything to go by

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Re-identifying folks from anonymised data will be a crime in the UK

JetSetJim
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Exceptions proving the rule

You expect there to be no exemptions along the lines of "except where authorised and enacted by legitimate law enforcement/security agencies".

No doubt there will be the usual clause where MPs are completely inviolable, also.

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Got that syncing feeling? Cloud's client-side email problem

JetSetJim
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WTF?

Frickin' synch

It would also be nice if s/w would notice that a file hadn't actually been changed before determining that it needs to synch it. Outlook has the irritating habit of flagging PST files as modified (in OneDrive's view, anyway), even if all it's done is open them, triggering a 1.5GB synch for each of the (currently) 6 annual files I keep for SWMBO. But I can't just take a static backup as SWMBO might muck around with it.

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Look out Silicon Valley, here comes Brit bruiser Amber Rudd to lay down the (cyber) law

JetSetJim
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Re: Why doesn't she talk to Trump?

Please don't give her ideas (in the unlikely event that she, or one of her minions, read this rag).

It's a shit idea, nuff said.

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Snopes.com asks for bailout amid dispute over who runs the site and collects ad dollars

JetSetJim
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Re: Facts are... hard

Any repeating decimal can be expressed as a/b, i.e. is rational. The others are irrational. Lambert proved that pi was irrational 250ish years ago.

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Microsoft hits new low: Threatens to axe classic Paint from Windows 10

JetSetJim
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Paint.net

Paint is good for cropping, but so is paint.net and it does other stuff reasonably well (for someone as untalented as I)

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Games rights-holders tell ZX Spectrum reboot firm: Pay or we pull titles

JetSetJim
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Thumb Up

Re JetSetWilly

That was a great title! Hours of fun

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Disney mulls Mickey Mouse magic material to thwart pirates' 3D scans

JetSetJim
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Re: Workaround

Although I wonder if the 3-D scanners are also scanning paint colours, in which case painting over it before scanning may not be the best solution - might make it a 2-step process, though...

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BT's Ryan Reynolds helicopter Wi-Fi ads 'misleading', thunders ad watchdog

JetSetJim
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Re: Max power

My understanding is that they're using MIMO technology to boost the gain, not transmit power. Unfortunately this adds cost to the routers, which (I'd guess) Sky, Virgin et al. haven't been doing in the past, but may well be doing now.

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JetSetJim
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FAIL

They're still running radio ads that have Ryan running around a putative large house extolling the bigly-bars on his wifi signal.

>The ASA ruled that this was OK despite admitting: "The device had been connected to a testing tool that generated network speeds faster than those that BT's own broadband network was capable of."

that would no doubt be around 1.3mbps, then

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