* Posts by Ken 16

845 posts • joined 3 Jul 2009

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Microsoft Edge bug odyssey shows why we can't have nice things

Ken 16
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Linux

Re: Edge aka Trident 12. No thanks.

Actually it's grown on me. I deleted Chrome from my Windows 10 laptop a few weeks back after the last of my work required plugins started working.

I used to be generally anti-Microsoft and still use Linux for my primary machine but I like the direction they're going at the moment and I feel that they're less likely to monetise my data successfully than Google (whose Chromebooks I otherwise love).

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Shared, not stirred: GCHQ chief says Europe needs British spies

Ken 16
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more scrutiny

to ensure there are adequate safeguards on UK held data and judged as a 3rd party not an EU member with national security out outs

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Visa fingers 'very rare' data centre switch glitch for payment meltdown

Ken 16
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and having the balls to approve doing it - that probably took hours of buck passing

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Microsoft Azure Europe embraced the other GDPR: Generally Down, Possibly Recovering

Ken 16
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Holmes

I post anonymous when it bears on my day job

I find some of the best analysis comes from AC's who are obviously on the inside of the story.

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Ken 16
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Flame

That sounds like a fire to me

Subject the witch to an underlying temperature event!

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'No, we are not rewriting Office in JavaScript' and other Microsoft tales

Ken 16
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Trollface

Re: Emacs

I always counted it as one, being quite proud of never having 'coded' in my IT career.

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No fandango for you: EU boots UK off Galileo satellite project

Ken 16
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Trollface

Re: irony

That's why Boris had a Brexit bus and doesn't have a Brexit plane.

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England's top judge lashes out at 'Science Museum' grade court IT

Ken 16
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Re: Join the queue.

That's overtime hours - can't you deliver it before lunch tomorrow instead?

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UK's first transatlantic F-35 delivery flight delayed by weather

Ken 16
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Black Helicopters

Re: "It won't"

with updated engine and flight management software it would probably be very good, but why not simpler yet? Get BAe "Hawker" to combine the Goshawk naval trainer with the Hawk 200 and get a carrier capable aircraft light enough for those electro catapults to fling and small enough to pack 3 squadrons on each floaty thing.

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Ken 16
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F-18

I never saw the point of it as the F-16 did everything better, until I read why the Canadians had selected it; too many pilots dead in the ice because their Starfighters had flamed out.

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Microsoft commits: We're buying GitHub for $7.5 beeeeeeellion

Ken 16
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Windows

Never a great customer experience but

a) better than you get from Oracle

b) less likely to scrap and replace with something new than Google

c) in business for 40+ years and still making money

d) getting there on the cloudy stuff

MS are usually the 2nd best, good enough, solution across a wide range of markets and able to win by bundling licensing for multiple products and being cheaper and easier to operate than going best of breed. They probably won't make it better, but they won't kill it either and even if 10-20% developers drift to other platforms the result won't be big enough to survive long term.

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Visa Europe fscks up Friday night with other GDPR: 'God Dammit, Payment Refused'

Ken 16
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Paris Hilton

Any updates?

Surely someone has the inside story by now?

AC "heard it down the pub" anecdotes accepted.

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Ken 16
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Trollface

Should've gone serverless

No hardware, no problem.

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UK Foreign Sec BoJo asks tech firms to save endangered species

Ken 16
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Facepalm

Give him a break

This may be completely pointless, misconceived and intended purely as a publicity stunt BUT no-one was offended, jailed or executed as a result, so on balance it was a diplomatic triumph.

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Kill the blockchain! It'll make you fitter in the long run, honest

Ken 16
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Devil

A large consultancy at a tech conference this week

explained that to derive value from B**lockchain, it needed to be combined with IoT and Artificial Intelligence. The example use case was a pay per use lift, micro-charging passengers per floor rather than an up front capital investment.

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Activists hate them! One weird trick Facebook uses to fool people into accepting GDPR terms

Ken 16
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Flame

How dare you!

I manage to dodge work and avoid friends without a Facebook account

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Chief EU negotiator tells UK to let souped-up data adequacy dream die

Ken 16
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Holmes

There was some advance planning too

The Citizens Assembly heard expert testimony and deliberated for two years before making recommendations. A cross party committee sat for both houses to agree the form of words, what it meant to existing legislation and what new legislation would be proposed if the referendum passed. Then the Referendum Commission issued unbiased information on those to avoid partisan propaganda.

It wasn't just who had the biggest bus and jobs with the newspapers.

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Ongoing game of Galileo chicken goes up a notch as the UK talks refunds

Ken 16
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Facepalm

Re: Or more accurately..

You can delete #2 or end it after 5 words, it's not relevant, the EU has been sick of the UK for many years without ever suggesting that they leave.

#4 needs to redefine "sensible" and "both parties" as their opposites.

The EU is 27 different countries with a very complicated interlocking set of treaties and obligations. Change any one of those and the others are open to negotiation, which takes about 10 years to make sure that it's actually agreed by everyone and not a passing whim.

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New Facebook political ad rules: Now you must prove your ID before undermining democracy

Ken 16
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Flame

There's a referendum today, the 36th amendment to the Irish constitution

Any ad related to the topic of the referendum is political.

The same Americans who get upset that Russians are funding political ads in their country are quite happy to fund ads in other peoples and even travel over campaigning.

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Google listens to New Zealand just long enough to ignore it

Ken 16
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Facepalm

If only there was a way to run analytics on data that big

You'd think someone would have done some work on the problem by now. Are there any tech companies that have the resources to develop tools to handle it?

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The great Dell EMC storage slimdown: Giant to trim off product bloat

Ken 16
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Trollface

XtremIO and ScaleIO

Are those related to Slither.io?

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RAF Air Command to take on UK military space ops

Ken 16
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Windows

I remember those, vaguely

they had them in my local library when I was young

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Ken 16
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Trollface

Diego Valor?

he was a Commander, not a naval rank, so either Air Force or Army

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Hitler 'is dead' declares French prof who gazed at dictator's nashers

Ken 16
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Re: Death of Conspiracy theories?....not likely.

another great Discovery channel documentary

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Ken 16
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Holmes

Or they could have just looked at a calendar...

and not been fooled by his regular cameo roles on Discovery Channel*

*Deadliest catch: Nazi submarine with Pharaoh's gold edition

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Das blinkenlights are back thanks to RPi revival of the PDP-11

Ken 16
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Pint

Completely pointless

Well done everyone, beers all around!

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Eye in the sea skies: Insitu flies Scaneagle 3 UAV in first public demo

Ken 16
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does that incorporate neural networking and satellite comms to cope with adverse sea conditions?

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Meet Asteroid, a drop-in Linux upgrade for your unloved smartwatch

Ken 16
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Meh

Re: I'll wait

I'll wait until it has 10% or above market share, having been burnt by Bada and BB10.

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Serverless continuous deployment for the AWS crowd: Feeding time in Lambda-land

Ken 16
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Holmes

Before I started using the cloud, if I wanted a server...

It would take 20 minutes in Dev/Test.

If I wanted a dedicated physical server, it would take 6-8 weeks.

If I wanted a fully tested, operationally accepted server with full support model covering application to power supply THAT would take 9 months.

Guess how long the latter takes in a modern cloud infrastructure environment?

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The secret to good cloud is ... research. Detailed product research

Ken 16
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Holmes

It's OK

Someone else can do the research for you and then you pay them for advice.

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That Brexit in action: UK signs pact to let Euro court judge its patents

Ken 16
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Headmaster

Re: the UK's planned exit from the European Union

no one said "well planned"

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Ken 16
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Trollface

How many Minister for Intellectual Property*s are we licensed for

and how to they relate to Ministerial Suck Up charging?

*too few jokes are coded for Z these days

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Newsworthy Brit bank TSB is looking for a head of infrastructure

Ken 16
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Hablando en Cristiano?

Naturalmente, mi esposa esta espanola.

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Springwatch: Windows 10 spotters May have to wait a few more weeks

Ken 16
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Trollface

It looks like you're trying to completely disable Windows

Would you like me to

* Report you to Microsoft?

* Reformat your hard drive?

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BOFH: Guys? Guys? We need blockchain... can you install blockchain?

Ken 16
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Cost benefit analysis needed

Would using the headroom on virtualisation hosts to mine cryptocurrency pay for the increased power usage?

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Blighty stuffs itself in Galileo airlock and dares Europe to pull the lever

Ken 16
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It won't cost that much

Since it only has to provide location information within Great Britain + Gibraltar*

It will also provide work for all the UK manufacturers who will need to develop SatNavs and mobile phones compliant with the new Kitemarked GPS standard.

(*Northern Ireland will retain Galileo service as a backstop).

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Good news: AI could solve the pension crisis – by triggering a nuclear apocalypse by 2040

Ken 16
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Mushroom

2040 is a long way off, and who knows what computers will be capable of by then

It's only 22 years and I plan to be there - in 1996 I was working in IT, tapping away on an IBM Thinkpad booting Windows 95. It was on the LAN and had internet access. There was an IP phone on my desk. In the evenings I was mucking about with Linux.

Any recent graduate could walk into that office and, aside from cursing the speed and wondering why the desktops had such big monitors, would recognise everything there. Computers will be capable of binary arithmetic then, as now, nothing else. They'll be smaller, pervasively networked and we'll have figured out more uses for them but they're basically not that complicated and won't become so.

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New and inventive code is transforming your business – and bringing with it new and inventive ways for things to fail

Ken 16
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Facepalm

"Here's how to ensure biz continuity at your workplace"?

Clickbait from the Dept of Ursine Defecation in Sylvanian ecosystems.

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UK 'meltdown' bank TSB's owner: Our IT migration was a 'success'

Ken 16
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"be positive and just have it ready it by a prescribed date"

Brexit?

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IBM swings shrink ray from workforce to mainframes

Ken 16
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terminology

'Distributed' is my shorthand for x86 commodity servers - which provide the hosts within a virtualisation cluster so really any move to mainframe is putting VMs into LPARs (or are IBM calling them VMs too now) and I was using 'Junk' as a collective term for any useless household ornaments which have to be kept for sentimental reasons and not just thrown out.

I can see some efficiency benefits in theory but at the price of vendor lock in and difficulty in finding skilled staff.

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Ken 16
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Headmaster

Re: Why Linux on z rather than on another platform?

My analogy is different > the mainframe is a shed. If you have a shed and you have some junk around the house then you may decide to box them up and move them out into the shed. Would you go buy a shed just to host your junk or would you leave it on the shelves in different rooms?

If you don't already have a mainframe and have a linux workload you can run distributed, what is the use case for purchasing a mainframe? If you have both distributed and mainframe, what is the driver for boxing up the workloads and moving them to z?

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Ken 16
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Holmes

Re: I'd like to have an honest non-marketing answer to the question...

It is incredibly hard to find non-marketing answers to this. IBM and CA have one set of answers, everyone selling x86 have another. Mainframe techies love them.

My own answers based on reading around are;

1) Reliable - they are designed to just keep ticking

2) IOPS - they handle really high volumes

3) Security - new-ish but they do incorporate in at fundamental levels

4) Financial arithmetic - they are optimised to add decimals (not simply integers) correctly

Everything else relies on believing someone about cost/performance and, since IBM can dial that up and down at will for every contract, I'll leave it out.

I'd like to hear a good answer to why Linux on z rather than on another platform?

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Airbus plans beds in passenger plane cargo holds

Ken 16
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Trollface

Re: Glossing a commercial turd

put them in airfreight containers, swap in sleeping (drugged?) passengers for a faster turnaround?

I'm looking at you Michael O'Leary

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Death in paradise: 'Cyber attack' takes out national government's IT

Ken 16
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Thumb Up

Same

I thought it'd be a nice semi-retirement spot, live and work from the French (EU) side but take advantage of the English speaking Dutch side. It was a shame to see what Irma did to the place and I think the coverage has been woefully inadequate on European news channels.

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For some reason, you lot love 'em. So here are the many ThinkPads of 2018

Ken 16
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Windows

Re: Blast from the past

I've got a 240X, running puppy Linux now from an SSD. It's got all the legacy ports I might need (and a USB).

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BOFH: Give me a lever long enough and a fool, I mean a fulcrum and ....

Ken 16
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Trollface

Re: cellphone, mobile, handy

After working in Germany, I find 'Handy' really...useful.

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Are you able to read this headline? Then you're not Julian Assange. His broadband is unplugged

Ken 16
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Facepalm

He's only got a year left

Before that European Arrest Warrant is invalid

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Ken 16
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More useful to him if it's put on a postcard and tucked into the window a nearby phonebox.

Maybe a friendly Ecuadorian diplomat will carry it in if it advertises 'Swedish Blonde Loves Bareback"?

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Just when you thought it was safe to go ahead with microservices... along comes serverless

Ken 16
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Trollface

it's as different from micro services

as SOA is from OOP

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