* Posts by Peter 39

337 posts • joined 25 Jun 2009

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Former General Electric boss explains how he got the internet wrong

Peter 39

Immelt was only the most recent in a long line of GE managers who got it wrong.

GE was running trans-Atlantic time-sharing in the late 1960's. It was worldwide in the early 70's (meaning US, western Europe, Australia, Japan and probably a couple of others I've forgotten). The "Information Services Business Division" used email for its daily business from the early 70's - long before it was legally permitted to offer it as a service to others.

Some observant folks might have noticed that GE's class A (in old-speak) IP block is 3.xxx.xxx.xxx. That's right - the first one allocated (0, 1 and 2 were reserved). By contrast, Apple's is "17" and Microsoft is "92".

We GE folks were there in the early days and helped build it all. Then crass, stupid management pissed it all away. Immelt was not the worst, just the most recent.

You want to know which is the best smartphone this season? Tbh, it's tricky to tell 'em apart

Peter 39

Re: Phone Calls

I guess your carrier is shite. My iPhone X (in US) is solid on calls and has been so through all the s/w releases (was new in November 2017).

Peter 39

two camps

The question of "which is the best smartphone this season" is really "which is the best Android smartphone this season".

Apple does its stuff with iOS and, if you're into that, that's the way to go. No questions asked.

If you're into Android then the questions abound.

You're burning £1.2bn for what? UK spending watchdog gives digital court plans a kicking

Peter 39

Re: Trial (conviction) by Computer

Being not from UK and driving while on holiday I was nailed for one of these. I admit that it's an awkward place but I suspect that it has been left as-is to be a speed trap. A long downhill that suddenly becomes 20 mph. Doing 27 will get you busted.

So you're out £40 for the rental car company to inform plod who you are, then you get a £100 splat from plod. Which you can avoid if you attend one of the classes offered but, of course, you have to be in the UK for that. No concept of on-line class - in-person only.

Whap. Whap. Great way to encourage me to visit again.

p.s. most people like me spend more brain cycles remembering to stay on the left side of the road. By pissing us off with overly-stupid speed traps you're forcing us to spend our attention elsewhere. Be careful of the mayhem you invoke.

Peter 39

Re: True and Tried Software

Don't know about Oz but the US system PACER has mixed reviews. It does work but there are lots of issues.

A new system could and should do a lot better.

Four US govt agencies poke probe in Facebook following more 'oops, we spilled your data' shocks

Peter 39

Open ? Shmopen

"Facebook is now – finally – being open about ..."

Pure BS. They might be more "open" than before but anyone who thinks that this is 100% transparency needs to get a brain transplant.

Seagate's lightbulb moment: Make read-write heads operate independently

Peter 39

Re: '90s Called...

The 90's ... really ???

No. This is a 1960's scheme, with giant platters and one head for each surface.

Donald Trumped: Comey says Prez is a liar – and admits he's a leaker

Peter 39

"Leaker"? No !

"Comey admitted he became a leaker – giving his notes to a friend to pass to journalists"

This is NOT a leak. Comey was a party to the conversation and is entitled to report it however he wants (excluding obvious exception such as classified info, or legal advice, etc that don't apply here).

If it had been someone else's conversation that he'd heard then that would be a leak. But if it's his own then he owns it (jointly with Trump, I guess) and he's free to report it.

LTE-Broadcast has broad deployment models. What it doesn't have is the iPhone

Peter 39

SSDD - users pay, carriers save

I'm sure the carriers want to push broadcast. That'll save them shedloads in infrastructure at high-demand areas (such as sporting events).

But punters will still be charged full whack for each byte.

Soz fanbois, Apple DIDN'T invent the smartphone after all

Peter 39

Re: Of course they didnt invent it, but made is so much better

Absolutely KEY comment. Thank you.

What Apple did is instantly obsolete all the "special web page" stuff that had been previously required. "Pinch to zoom" with the multi-touch capacitive screen was the game-changer. And Apple had to have that so you could connect to the various WiFi networks that were starting to become available.

Peter 39

Re: It's the usual story.

ABSOLUTELY !!

A neighbour has a PC with a forced update to Win10. Networking was dead. Stone dead, so she called me - the "Mac guy" for help. It was trivial to plug in MacBook Pro and verify that the network was indeed alive and well. A bit of work with Mr Google released that many others were in the same sorry state because of the borked fix a month or so ago. No help from Redmond, of course.

But some suggested that reacquiring a DHCP lease might be a help but - of course - there's no way I could find to do that within any of the Control Panels. I did try for a while - total zero. Then I remembered that the command-line might help (last time I used that on Windows is longer than I care to remember) and BINGO - networking was networking again. Fortunately Redmond figured out its fiasco and applied Band-Aid#2 so I haven't been called back on this.

Then she mentioned that none of her printers had been working since the unwanted, forced update. It turns out that all the Win7 print drivers are c**p for Win10 so you have to funky-fiddle the de-install of the old ones and then manually install new ones from the vendor.

Funny, but my Apple MBP had no problem finding the printer and printing to it - although it had never seen that variety before.

So, the "usual story" is that Apple mostly gets its stuff to work, straightforward, right out of the box. If you others want to buy other stuff and then complain that *that* doesn't work - that's your problem. I choose not to spend my life doing that.

Peter 39

SOZ, El Reg. Fanbois didn't claim that

No-one said that Apple invented the "smartphone". Maybe the "smarterphone" but we quibble.

But Apple most certainly DID invent the "smartphone industry" and promptly took all the money.

SOZ, Samsung, HTC. Nokia, Microsoft. Oh, and Blackberry. I almost forgot :)

Emulating x86: Microsoft builds granny flat into Windows 10

Peter 39

Re: Cart before the horse

And for even more reference - Apple previously migrated the entire base from 680x0 to PowerPC.

That was an even more massive challenge, and amazingly successful.

Peter 39

Re: Apple's migrations were different

Apple won't do it for the high-performance machines but you should expect to see MacBooks with A-xx CPUs in the not-too-distant future.

I expect that by now Apple is capable of building a Rosetta-like tool but even if not - who do you think owns the Rosetta IP these days ?? IBM, that's who. And has anyone failed to notice the cozy relationship between IBM and Apple? Not if you're this side of dead.

x86 on ARM will happen. The fat lady has sung.

Pilot posts detailed MS Flight Sim video of how to land Boeing 737

Peter 39

the way it was ...

Back in the day (late 70's) BA had a cool fully auto-land system. It was on BAC-111 and maybe some others, although not heavies. This was a 100% hands-off landing, all the way.

Worked great through testing and acceptance and then one day the full-thick fog reduced visibility to not much more than your nose. But BA could land, and then ... LHR had to send out a blinky "follow-me" to lead him to the gate. Poor pilot could not even see the ground in order to taxi.

Landmark computer hacking archive deposited at TNMOC

Peter 39

"The Internet"

There were certainly networks available before "the Internet" and it's often difficult to differentiate the two.

Most here think of "the Internet", lately retitled "the internet" as the descendant of the ARPA/DARPAnet which was certainly available in the 80's but only for non-commercial access. CompuServe wasn't part of that in those days, but used other networks AFAIK (as did many other services, including AOL).

Verizon: We're sick of waiting for the FCC, so here's our 'net neutrality'

Peter 39

bollocks

Verizon conveniently fails to note that it is an ISP and not a transit service (although it may do some of that).

So the Netflix traffic it receives is destined for its own end users, who have paid for the delivery all the way through Verizon's network. The fluff about asymmetry is just that - fluff.

Apple finally publishes El Capitan Darwin source

Peter 39

source code actually quite useful

In one gig, access to the networking source was absolutely crucial to be able to build in-kernel network plugins. To say nothing of how different the packet handling was from the STREAMS code in classic Mac OS.

In another, we were building custom kernels with added security. Some of which Apple has incorporated (our changes went back to Apple under the open-source rules).

The disinterest might be widespread but it's far from total.

How cyber insurance actually works

Peter 39

Glad to see this

I am very pleased to see that this is becoming more common in companies. When dealing with security issues and expenditures, the bean-counters frequently reduced or eliminated security aspects of IT budget proposals. They saw it as a dead expense, completely ignoring the fact that what they were doing was self-insuring the company.

Once cyber insurance becomes commonplace, IT managers will have a way to push back against those cuts by arguing that spending on security will recede the price of insurance. Just as installing better fire protection will cut those premiums significantly.

Cyber insurance should be mandatory for businesses dealing with customer data (which is most of them) just as liability cover is required for your car. You aren't required to have full cover but you should at least have cover for customers. Why don't we have that yet ??

On its way: A Google-free, NSA-free IT infrastructure for Europe

Peter 39

Re: patriot act

I don't think that would be sufficient. After all, isn't that exactly the situation with Microsoft? There's a separate EU company (HQ in Ireland, I would guess) and it's wholly owned by Microsoft. Yet the U.S. is trying to force disclosure of the data in the EU datacentre.

I think that the EU company would have to be fully independent for the separation to work.

Microsoft to spoofed Skype users: Change your account passwords NOW

Peter 39

Yawn

Having had my account info swiped a couple of years ago while I was on a short visit to Europe, I have never been amazed at the level of pwnage going on at Skype.

If MS thinks that this is a good way to deal with mobile and social media then it will confirm all that they've done with killing the PC business.

Any company that handles web pages in the kernel deserves all this problem, and more.

Even Apple doesn’t mess with Taylor Swift

Peter 39

Apple gets cluestick

I expect that Apple is actually rather appreciative of Swift's letter.

It was clear right from the start that this was a bad decision on *someone's* part but Apple could reverse it without losing face. But after Swift's letter, they can claim that they were caused to seriously reconsider the [inexplicably poor] decision. And everyone will be happy.

Had this kept going - without Swift's involvement - then it would have become a PR disaster for Apple. They don't do this often but this is a doozy.

Google, Microsoft and Apple explain their tax tricks in Australia

Peter 39

record companies

“I just bought an album on iTunes: how much of that money goes to tax havens and how much is taxed in Australia?”

For the answer to this - they'll have to haul in the record companies. Apple takes a 30% cut but pays all the sales cost, delivery, billing etc. The 70% for the record companies stays mostly with them - the artists don't see much.

Apple Pay is a tidy payday for Apple with 0.15% cut, sources say

Peter 39

Re: This is nothing unusual

Actually this can't happen. Apple never gets any transaction detail. It down't know what you bought, or where.

Peter 39

Re: This is nothing unusual

>sorry to burst the bubble but if Apple don't know the transaction values then they cannot audit for the 0.15% fee.

I would expect that the existing auditors of the financial institution will take on this task. It'll be spelled out in the agreement somewhere - it always is. Apple certainly isn't going to do any auditing itself.

Peter 39

Re: This is nothing unusual

>Apple is a publicly traded company. It has a >>fiduciary duty<< to its

>shareholders to maximize their return on investment.

This is widely believed but is actually untrue.

Apple certainly does have a fiduciary duty to its shareholders but is NOT required to maximize their return on investment. Tim Cook made that very, very clear at the recent shareholders meeting. He was quite angry about it - the only time he seems to have ever lost his "cool".

Sysadmins, patch now: HTTP 'pings of death' are spewing across web to kill Windows servers

Peter 39

stupidity calcified

(1)Microsoft has been doing this make-it-faster-by-putting-it-in-the-kernel thing for twenty years.

Nothing has changed, nor will it change. The only way for MS to stop it is to isolate Windows into a VM on top of some non-Windows OS.

For if it is Windows, see (1)

LEAKED: Samsung's iPhone 6 killer... the Samsung Galaxy S6

Peter 39

So the new Samsung S6 is smoking' Apple.

Unfortunately for BGR, that's "smoking' " in a less-than-good way. I guess that BGR didn't take time to read the reports that the Snapdragon was way-too-hot and that Sam had settled on a less-capable-but-cooler substitute.

Ahh, facts. Such pesky things.

Blind justice: Google lawsuit silences elected state prosecutor

Peter 39

Amazon is not "Silicon Valley"

"The current US administration has been remarkably generous to Silicon Valley. Obama's administration treats Big Tech as generously as Bush's treated Big Oil. Google staffers can be found at all levels of this administration, and Google is a significant campaign funding contributor.

It's not just Google. The Department of Justice handed Amazon a very favourable settlement in its "price fixing" case against publishers. The order handed Amazon something very valuable: a retail monopoly (technically, a "monopsony")."

Uh, no. It gave Silicon Valley, Apple to be specific, a raw deal. And this was to the benefit, as you say, of Amazon which hails from Washington state. Your premise might be correct but your example contradicts it.

18 million iPHONE USERS HAVE NEVER BONKED to ApplePay

Peter 39

It apparently works in the UK if you have a US credit card.

Peter 39

slow rollout

I've used Apple Pay at a few places but most don't have NFC yet. That will change by next October because terminals have to be upgraded/replaced to support chip cards, and most will include NFC.

In some ways, a not-so-fast rollout is an advantage as it allows firms to get bugs fixed while they don't have a large impact. For example, one large hardware chain has AP working for Visa, but for MasterCard the transaction shows on the phone as "done" (i.e. "Done" with a green check-mark) and then "Declined". The account is good however and using the actual plastic works just fine.

And said chain does have chip-readers in the terminals. Just not active. Having been hacked one might think that they would have flipped that switch. But - no. Go figure.

Chinese coder's got 99 problems and getting hitched is one: Huge iPhone woo plot FAILS

Peter 39

With the gender-selection in China (and some other countries) there are lots more men than women.

She knows that she will be able to find a husband with more common sense.

Home Depot: Someone's WEAK-ASS password SECURITY led to breach

Peter 39

cobblers

Having your everyday network traffic on the same network as the POS systems makes as much sense as giving a spare key to the safe with the contract cleaning crew. In every store.

The late 2014 Apple Mac Mini: The best (and worst) of both worlds

Peter 39

SIMMs

I've read that a contributing factor leading to soldered-on memory is that there aren't any SIMMs available for the memory that Apple is using here.

Apple, Google take on Main Street in BONKING-FOR-CASH struggle

Peter 39

CurrentC from MCX has several "issues".

1. you have to provide direct access to your bank account, via either direct debit (via ACH transactions) or debit card info

2. you have to give them your SSN (social security number) and driver license info

All this goes into the database-in-the-cloud and makes an extremely juicy target for identity theft. Everything you want all in one spot !

With a credit card there are at least some consumer protections. With CurrentC/MCX there are none. It's a disaster in slow motion.

Peter 39

Re: Plenty of retailer incentives for MCX

And you'll have to upgrade your POS terminal by next October anyhow - for EMV compliance (i.e. accept chip cards). So the incremental cost for NFC will be fairly low.

LTE's backers vow to KILL OFF WI-FI and BLUETOOTH

Peter 39

Re: Going nowhere fast

My needs are not extensive but Bluetooth has worked well for me. Just a dumb user, I guess.

Gates and Ballmer NOT ON SPEAKING TERMS – report

Peter 39

>As for the man currently occupying the corner office in Redmond,

>Satya Nadella – who kicked off his tenure as CEO by announcing

>18,000 layoffs – Ballmer told Vanity Fair, "I am giving him space."

How considerate. Given the task facing Nadella, a reasonable person would instead have given him a shovel. A big one.

Peter 39

too much water ??

Too much water under the bridge with this Board ?!?!?!?

Really ?!?!

Steve, you're lucky the Board was as incompetent as it was or the water would have been a lot higher, and sooner.

Microsoft would be in better shape if you had been swept away in, say, 2002.

And immeasurably better had it not appealed the breakup order. But hindsight is 20/20.

Biz coughs up even less for security, despite mega breach losses

Peter 39

won't happen

Beancounters are beancounters. And security is a cost, with no upside.

It is very, VERY hard for IT folks to put up reasonable numbers for risk, exposure and the like. Beancounters know about buildings and fire risks, and accidents and cost of insurance against that, but nothing at all about risk and exposure for information systems.

In addition, much of the cost of breaches is NOT borne by the company. If your credentials were compromised at Target and your identity stolen - do you think they will compensate you for a couple of years of effort to straighten it out? No, they do a deal for "monitoring" at low cost to them, and this only alerts you after the fact that you have a problem. Nothing preventative at all.

So, try as they might, IT managers have little success in showing Boards the real cost of a breach (except in banks, I guess). And until that changes, Boards will spend less and less on security.

Crouching tiger, FAST ASLEEP dragon: Smugglers can't shift iPhone 6s

Peter 39

I guess many in China heard that it will be on regular sale soon, and decided not to pay the smuggler-surcharge.

Good thing too, as now it might be possible to get one at the local Apple Store. Unlocked/T-Mobile ones have been unobtainable.

Wall Street woes: Oh noes, tech titans aren't using bankers

Peter 39

cobblers

"That is, the most important reason that the tech companies aren't using Wall Street is that they don't seem to be very good at using Wall Street."

Not quite it. It's that "they seem to be very good at NOT using Wall Street".

There have been many deal in the last few years where Wall Street didn't bring much to the table but certainly took a lot off it.

First Irish boy band U2. Now Apple pushes ANOTHER thing into iPhones, iPods, iPads

Peter 39

third-party apps

The way I understand it, third-party apps CAN use Apple Pay. They can't use "raw NFC" for other things, but can do AP. Target apparently is doing its own shopping app, for example.

iPhone 6 will make you fork over with Apple Pay if you want to BONK

Peter 39

third-party usage

Remember that third-party apps can use Apple Pay. Target has already said that it will do its own app, and perhaps others will too. It's just "naked NFC" that's not allowed.

Peter 39

Re: This is normal

No - it's actually pretty normal for Apple. You do know that they have "header police" that manage what goes into header files, the naming of functions and variables, and a lot more. They are very, very picky.

And even more so with changes to an interface after it has been publicly "released" and made available to developers. That's why some APIs are known but still not permitted for use on iPhones. If your app uses a "private" API then it will be rejected.

Comcast merger-bait spinoff to be known as GreatLand Connections

Peter 39

two parts will do

One part will be the ISP assets, regulated. Possibly to include email but nothing additional.

Second part will be the media assets - TV, video, studios, the lot. And unregulated.

Too slow with that iPhone refresh, Apple: Android is GOBBLING up US mobile market

Peter 39

slave

Yet another adherent of the Church of MarketShare.

Those who have paid even the slightest attention over the past few years know that Apple has about 70-80% of the profits (depends upon exactly when you measure), Samsung has 20-30% and all the others are inconsequential (a point here and there - no traction in the market at all).

I guess there a reason why this ...

"Apple products are for those who want looks over functionality and feel good about buying expensive crap simply because it's expensive"

... is posted by "AC" rather than an actual poster. But since he/she is the self-styled Anonymous Coward then ... reason is not present.

Loss of unencrypted back-up disk costs UK prisons ministry £180K

Peter 39

bollocks

Fining these jokers is just fining the taxpayers.

The only way to solve this problem is to put some of the stupidos inside.

FCC not quite sold on Comcast TWC gobble

Peter 39

Re: ALL broadcast properties, not just NBC

Agree 100%

Split the "merged company" into two -- horizontally. Company A would have all the ISP assets and possibly be under telco regulations.

Company B would have all the media assets and be unregulated.

Uh, Obama? Did you miss a zero or two off Samsung's Chinese supplier 'fib' settlement?

Peter 39

... maybe

Samsung might indeed complain (probably would, given past performance). But DoJ would probably use its discretion and decline to do so.

It's not as though Samsung doesn't have an established legal record of lies and thievery.

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