* Posts by The Original Steve

525 posts • joined 24 Jun 2009

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Apple succeeds in failing wearables

The Original Steve

> it makes using the underground in London easier and safer (no getting wallet out in congested areas)

Really?

Because it's a very rare (and an exceptionally good) day when I have £300+ cash in my wallet which I then show off to all around me when I go through a turnstile.

9
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Munich council: To hell with Linux, we're going full Windows in 2020

The Original Steve

Re: StargateSg7 / Not sure about Office

Whilst I can do basic sys admin task to BSD, Linux, Windows and Android, I'm at my heart a Windows sys admin.

So whilst I think most of what StargateSg7 wrote sounds like bollocks, I can sympathise with what I believe he was trying to get across.

Being that the usability of Linux is still poor. Personally the biggest challenge is the mental names used for certain commands and even items in the various X window mangers. Names like yum, grep, sudo, apt, grub and applications like Thunderbird, The GIMP, Kate, Synapse, Pidgin etc. don't help usability.

I'm happy to use them, as I know what they do and how they work - and generally they are awesome. The tools on Linux is one of the reasons I love it so much. But for a new user, you need to spend ages learning what each command or application does as the name has little bearing.

Whilst nowhere near as powerful or flexible, Windows applications and commands like Mail, Explorer, Maps. Photoshop is a stark contrast to the names of tools and applications often found in a GNU environment.

I don't need to hear that there's alternative with more descriptive names, nor to have the examples above explained to me. I prefer to work in Linux/GNU, and I know why certain applications / commands are named that way, and I'm very happy to keep using them.

I'm merely highlighting that for someone moving from Windows to Linux/GNU there's a hell of a learning curve which I know does put a lot of people off. Rectifying this wouldn't be a be idea if trying to encourage more people from the dark side into the light.

My 2 pence worth.

17
1
The Original Steve

Re: @ Voland's right hand

Agree entirely with Access for the backend, but for a rapid, business focused, low cost front end to a real DB, Access is a reasonable product.

VBA front end, reports engine, built in packager to MSI, no licence or Access installation for runtime. Shove in a MSSQL / MySQL backend and you can have a flexible, multiuser little application without needing multiple experienced developers coding in "big boy" languages.

As a front end, power user tool for accessing business data in a real DB's it's not bad.

9
7

Thousand-dollar iPhone X's Face ID wrecked by '$150 3D-printed mask'

The Original Steve

Re: From experience though.....

"...being a £1000 phone, true enough, but a Samsung S8 is not much further behind (price-wise)..."

Um, £515 says you're wrong.

I brought a S8 yesterday evening after always assuming the S8 was up there with the iPhone an Pixel 2 price wise. The non + was brought for £515 plus it has a microSD slot so I don't need to even contemplate a higher capacity model for insane prices.

9
1

Brace yourselves, fanboys. Winter is coming. And the iPhone X can't handle the cold

The Original Steve

Re: Diversity figures are meaningless without context

"The sex and ethnic breakdown of the population is irrelevant unless it precisely mirrors the breakdown of qualified candidates"

This.

Couldn't agree more. The expectation of all jobs to reflect the POPULATION is bonkers. At a minimum we should be starting with the demographics of the local workforce, which will then at least take into account the bias of having more women being a housewife than men being a househusband. I'm no expert, but I would assume there are more potential male candidates generally than female across the board for this reason.

Your ideal of going further and basing 'diversity targets' on the total potential eligible candidates for each specific role sounds incredibly sensible.

So I doubt it'll happen.

12
3

Kubernetes bug ate my banking app! How code flaw crashed Brit upstart

The Original Steve

Where's the HA and DR?

Sure, shit can happen - although as nearly everyone else has said above - proper testing would have prevented this.

But what struck me is they have a single cluster. Is there not a mirrored version elsewhere using different infrastructure, where the changes get applied later? Sounds nuts to me that a BANK is depending on a single tech stack that they don't fully understand without a different stack running in a different environment in a different datacentre.

Like their debrief, but I wouldn't let them hold my money.

2
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The age of six-monthly Windows Server updates starts … now!

The Original Steve

Upgrading every 6 months?! No chance. But...

I must say the new hyperconverged web UI looks very tempting...

Had some excellent results in using Win 2016 as Hypercovereged platform so far. HyperV 16 and Storage Spaces Direct are actually really quite impressive for the same price we'd pay for Win Datacenter anyway for HyperV hosts. Cost for deploying hosts and storage have gone through the floor as a result.

Where's it's been lacking has been on the management tools side of things, presumably to get people to shell out for Sys Centre which unless you have 2 years and a deep loathing for yourself, your time and your life isn't viable for all but the largest of estates. Good to see improvements in this area.

Although long term the effort to upgrade every 6 months does dilute the benefits somewhat...

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Amazon, Azure, Google will eat all the IT. Google, let us be your cake fork, pleads Nutanix

The Original Steve
Stop

Is this a sponsored article?

6
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Is it the right time to virtualize?

The Original Steve

Not always

Virtualisation is no silver bullet. I probably virtualise about 95%, but there's always a fringe case.

Good example is wanting to have HA for a service rather than just for a VM. In which case you'll need application level HA. Application level HA takes the wind out of virtualising somewhat, as you'll likely gain no benefit from the VM being HA (as you'll have multiple VM's running the service), and also likely that each VM will have it's own copy of the data - meaning you're taking up a sh!t tonne of space on your very expensive SAN.

Using Exchange as an example;

Lets say you use Exchange for the application level HA via a DAG. This is great, but means we're getting very little benefit in terms of HA by running as a VM. I've got two Exchange servers running on separate VM hosts, but regardless if the VM crashes or one of the hosts dies, Exchange keeps running... Exactly the same as if I had two physical Exchange servers rather than virtual.

Now running our imaginary Exchange servers as VM's, we're now making things expensive, as each Exchange VM has it's own copy of the mailbox databases - so that's twice the data I'm storing on the expensive shared storage SAN.

Things like Exchange can eat up your storage, to the point where you may need 10TB for each Exchange server, yet your SAN is only 30TB in total. So that's 2/3rd of your SAN used up straight away, and the cost per TB isn't usually that great with the typical SAN.

All of a sudden, you take a step back and realise that it would be considerably CHEAPER, and you get the same levels of resilience if you just buy 2 x DL380's or 730xd's and use local cheap storage instead.

You then have a load of extra capacity on your virtual hosts, plus your SAN has oodles of space left on too, saving your a fortune as you don't need to ask the FD for another £20k for a new shelf on your SAN that you brought only 6 months ago.

One big benefit that the article didn't touch one was how much easier virtualisation can make backup and DR. Agentless backup solutions (like Veeam, others are available) just rock my world - if it's on the virtual cluster it's getting backed up. No agents, no tapes, super fast restores.

After providing hardware HA for a server, it's the portability, manageability and backups that make virtualisation a default choice personally - but still it's not for everything, everytime.

P.S On a side note, who the hell is working in IT in 2017 and doesn't know where to start / hasn't used any virtualisation? Seriously?!

4
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Facebook, Google, Twitter are the shady bouncers of the web. They should be fired

The Original Steve
Facepalm

Re: Some nutter says "We'll cancel student debt"

You're correct.

In the 2017 manifesto Labour said it will scrap University tuition fees.

And in an interview with NME, Mr Corbyn said that "there is a block of those that currently have a massive debt, and I’m looking at ways that we could reduce that.."

No idea why people may have thought Labour was going to scrap student debt...

3
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2019: The year that Microsoft quits Surface hardware

The Original Steve

Re: Isn't it obvious

Having to install patches as soon as your friend got the unit sounds entirely reasonable to me. I'd much rather devices are fully patched as soon as possible as the device has probably been sitting in the channel for 6 months or so.

And not wanting patches to be applied at the coffee shop - I'd suggest going to Settings -> Updates & Security -> Windows Update and click the "Change active hours" link.

You can specify what time of day you want to exclude any patching. I have mine set between 7am and 10pm, so any patching gets done when my laptop isn't in use.

8
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From slow batches to fast files, how Microsoft is luring folks into Azure

The Original Steve

Re: Still sceptical..

I agree, have an upvote.

Unfortunately, the way the cloud providers are going, particularly MS, it's not that clear cut. Have your data on prem, but use Azure for monitoring... Meets your requirements but the security, profiling and accessibility / cost risks still exist.

It's a blurry, hybrid world - or at least that's the way MS are going.

3
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Gov contractor nicked on suspicion of Official Secrets Act breach

The Original Steve

Christ, I drive past TWO RAF stations on my way into work every day.... Literally alongside the airstrip!

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How to stop Facebook and Apple taking over the mobile phone industry

The Original Steve
Joke

What will they think of next?

"...a platform for edge clouds that pushes cloud computing closer to devices themselves..."

That sounds amazing! Innovation at it's finest, what will they think of next?

Running clouds in actual offices in small rooms maybe? Who knows?

8
1

New Horizons probe awakens to receive software upgrade

The Original Steve
Go

iLO

Let's hope they remember the iLO IP and credentials... Just in case!

2
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Homeland Security drops the hammer on Kaspersky Lab with preemptive ban

The Original Steve

Re: If they do review the source code?

I'm not saying it's easy or ideal, but it's entirely possible.

I'm not familiar with Kaspersky, but most AV's have the core product, the engine and definitions split out. Checksums for the base software matching what the DHS had from their compiled version is easy enough.

Depending on how often the engine updates, it's pretty easy to do the same. Could be as simple as a special version for us.gov, code reviewed where engine updates are done by updating from a us.gov update server, where Kaspersky ping the source for us.gov to compile. Release notes and code audit is possible, just means us.gov may have delays in the latest engine, but it's certainly possible.

Definition updates are much harder to review in a timely manner, but surely have the source for todays definitions that have been reviewed as a starting point, then when a definition updates, Kaspersky send us.gov the compiled new definition, plus source, plus change notes. Us.gov compiles and checks it matches the checksum of the public definitions, and if us.gov make the same changes that Kaspersky detail in the change record and it also matches you're certain you know the source / compiled / public releases are all the same and you know it's all clean.

That plus ad-hoc full audits would probably do it.

I'm sure that's a very crude, inefficient and basic suggestion as I'm an infrastructure guy, not a developer. But if I can come up with the above - albeit crap - solution where I'm far from qualified to come up with anything, then I'm sure the brightest and best developers in Russia and US can come up with something solid. I dare say that the development inclined pros reading El Reg can come up with a proper solution in a matter of minutes.

4
0

Apple’s facial recognition: Well, it is more secure for the, er, sleeping user

The Original Steve

My 2 - 3 year old Lumia 950 XL (stop laughing at the back!) has Qi and face unlock.

Sammy nailed edge screens a couple of years ago.

So what's new other than wanky emojis?

And £1000! A fool and their money.. .

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Another reason to hate Excel: its Macros can help pivot attacks

The Original Steve

Appreciate this isn't great, but running without a firewall and with local admin is kind of asking for trouble these days.

6
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Nokia's comeback is on: The flagship 8 emerges

The Original Steve

Re: No wireless charging? No sale.

I was in total agreement with wireless charging...

Right up until my Lumia 950 XL had a USB-C port. As it can go in any way round you want, and it has fast charging I no longer bother with wireless charging.

To be fair, if I still had my previous car (where I refused to pay > £500 for inbuilt Sat Nav) then I would still need to use a holder in the car to show my phone's display for it's Sat Nav.... my holder did wireless charging which was amazing in the car and something I'd still demand if the current car didn't already have Sat Nav built in.

The advent of fast charging where wireless charging is still a trickle plus having the ability to insert a USB-C cable in without looking at the port has me thinking that wireless charging may end up similar to 3D TV - not a bad idea but the world has moved on.

8
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NotPetya ransomware attack cost us $300m – shipping giant Maersk

The Original Steve
Mushroom

Re: Easy to mitigate

"Did you forget: -Get rid of Windows?"

Did you forget - they need to be able to do work from these computers... ;)

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Horsemen of the disk-drive apocalypse will ride upon 256TB SSDs

The Original Steve

Storage tiers

I agree, but the cost for capacity SSD's are too high for SME's like us and our clients.

However using 3.5" 7200 RPM 2Tb - 4Tb drives for capacity and some decent enterprise SSD's to sit as a write cache have turned some spare Dell 730xd's into a 2 node hyperconverged SAN with performance that literally kicks the shit out of our HP Lefthand P4500 SAN which uses 15k RPM drives if memory serves.

(Literally some 730xd's, 10Gig NIC's with RDMA and Windows Server 2016 using their Storage Spaces Direct software SAN thing. It's actually incredible)

Cost 1/3 of the price for twice the performance.

Another few years when SSD will be the capacity and if you need faster you can use NVMe as the cache will be the end of spinning rust in my opinion. Certainly at scale and for new deployments.

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The Original Steve

Re: SSD is fine - while it works

I respectfully disagree.

If you're only backing up when you think your HDD is about to pack it in, then the data isn't worth backing up in the first place.

Whilst you are right that often a HDD can show signs it's on it's way out, it's far from a certain method. The analogy strikes me that I have a burglar alarm which should tell me if I'm about to be robbed, but I'd still make sure I had contents insurance regardless.

If your data is worth backing up at all, it's worth backing up regularly, regardless if you have a shiny new HDD, a mid-life SSD or if you hear noises from your old HDD. The media used shouldn't make a difference to your backup strategy.

And with the cost per gig dropping like a stone for consumer capacity drives unless you need whopping amounts of space it just makes more sense to use SSD's for anything under 500Gb these days.

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1

Britons ambivalent about driverless car tech, survey finds

The Original Steve

Re: Sunday (autonomous) driving

Oh I don't know, I've always insisted on manual transmission, but took a BMW with their wizz-bang / charge the earth "sports" gearbox and it blew me away.

I brought the car and whilst I can drop it into flappy paddle mode or use the center console stick to go ma ual I never do.

The dual turbos gets around the tradition lag on kickdowns and the sat nav is integrated with the gearbox too so incline / decline and corners are taken into account, as well as the driving mode too.

Certainly changed my mind. YMMV.

0
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Skype for Business is not Skype – realising that is half the battle

The Original Steve

Re: Skype for business is pretty sad

I have plenty of gripes about SfB as a fully telephony product ( see my previous comment / we use it as our phone system and I've put in place for many clients over the years), but nearly all of your points are about the headsets and hardware, not the application itself. Points 2, 3, 4 and 5 are crazy hardware which has nothing to do with the phone system itself.

Try Jabra headsets - great selection to fit your needs and certainly the ones we use have excellent call quality, range, LED status for battery and status and the noise cancellation is great in our open plan office.

Tweaking networking for decent quality is the same as any other VoIP system. Whilst we and my clients (one with over 3000 users) don't use / need QoS, I've had to use it for ShoreTel, Nortel and Cisco VoIP deployments. SfB uses G.711 by default from memory - it's industry standard and is NOT a SfB codec. My point is you'd have the same issues regardless of system used.

Having ALL conversations - IM, voice, conferences etc - stashed in a dedicated folder in Outlook, allowing access from OWA, any ActiveSync client as well as Outlook itself is actually something I think is a great feature. I know it seems backwards as first glance but remember this is a UNIFIED COMMS product. Means you have all the benefits of Exchange when dealing with your phone and IM records. So you can use Outlook searching to see your communications to someone regardless of medium used, admins can use Legal Hold and eDiscovery, you have a single address book and can raise conferences as simply as creating a normal meeting in Outlook.

I can't disagree with your points 1 and 7 - the UI leaves a lot to be desired. And SfB has lots of other issues too which we haven't touched on, but the rest of your points aren't - IMHO - really SfB specific issues.

2
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The Original Steve

WHY!

I liked Lync as a PBX replacement and UC system for business.

Skype wasn't bad either for free consumer stuff.

If there was great integration, a similar UI and people could move from Skype for Skype for Business then I could understand the re-brand. But Just rebranding Lync to SfB is mental considering how different SfB is from Skype.

Had some very small business clients of mine move to O365 and I pointed them to SfB. Every single one has stuck with consumer Skype as the learning curve from Skype to SfB is just too high for what they want.

Should have kept it as Lync which has some limited Skype integration IMHO.

14
0

Got a Windows Phone 8 mobe? It's now officially obsolete. Here's why...

The Original Steve

Shame but predictable

I used to recommend Windows Phone to friends and family who want the basic features of a modern smartphone but without the complexity of Android or the cost of iOS.

Shame as I genuinely thought it was a really rather good mobile platform. Shame the app store never took off.

At least Android has become easier to use over the last few years.

Was still holding onto my 950 XL with WM10 but once that packs in I'm going to have to face reality. Sad times.

5
1

Microsoft's cunning plan to make Bing the leading search engine: Bribery

The Original Steve

Only person

Swear I'm literally the sole user of Bing. I honestly quite like it. Must do 95% Bing, 5% Google.

One perk is that the rest of my team naturally all use Google exclusively, so when we're all "Googling" an error message or symptom of a Major Incident I'll often have at least something different, and sometimes more accurate than everyone else.

Diversity and choice is a good thing, particularly now Bing doesn't totally suck compared to Google,

5
2

How good are selfies these days? Good enough to fool Samsung Galaxy S8 biometrics

The Original Steve

Windows Hello

My understanding is that Microsoft's "Windows Hello" (what a crap name) does a combo of iris and facial recognition. The phones suck as they can only do iris recognition so I'd imagine have the same problems as reported in this article, however the version used on their Surface range is not only significantly faster and more accurate than their mobile efforts, I don't believe it's been tricked / hacked / spoofed yet into unlocking a device without the owner being present.

I believe that the PC version of Windows Hello builds a 3D model of your face which it uses along with an iris scan. Due to the width restrictions of modern phones it's not possible to have an array of three cameras (one infrared plus two for the 3D face scan) thus crap on phones but excellent on laptops.

Personally I'm sticking to a 6 digit PIN on my phone and Windows Hello on my Surface.

0
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Kill Google AMP before it KILLS the web

The Original Steve

Re: "But was this a story about a driving licence or visa application type copy cat site?

You're still protected under the distant selling act and debit card chargeback. If they haven't honoured the contract by failing to deliver then contact your bank who issued the debit card and ask for a chargeback due to fraud.

8
0

CLL Countdown: Doors open in 11 days, places limited

The Original Steve

Come on El Reg

Haven't you realised nobody cares?

1
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Less than four weeks till DevOps' finest assemble in London

The Original Steve

The penny finally drops.

Kept wondering why El Reg keeps pushing this hipster-like fad when clearly the readership and commentards couldn't give a toss.

Appears El Reg have some kind of mid/long-term sponsorship deal.

2
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LinkedIn U-turns on Bluetooth-enabled 'Tinder for marketers'

The Original Steve

Re: The drop was temporary

I regularly used this very reason as a means to explain why don't mind the lack of apps of Windows Mobile 10. Other than banking, maps, Plex and RadioPlayer I just pin web sites to my start screen and use that rather than the 'app', even if WM has an app. 9/10 it's faster, has all the features and less privacy invasion.

Yet it's the lack of apps that people say put them off WM...

1
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That apple.com link you clicked on? Yeah, it's actually Russian

The Original Steve

Edge

Shows the real address in Edge on W10.

9
0

Samsung Galaxy S8: Slimmer bezels, a desktop mode – and yet another me-too AI pal

The Original Steve

Nice

Been using WM for the last few years and reluctantly have accepted it's game over so looking for a non- Apple device soon...

Shame it has yet another AI and no physical camera button. Also the camera still doesn't look like it can touch the high end Lumias like my 950 XL. Although they get points for a microSD slot. Is the battery removable?

But the price is very steep...

0
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Google mass logout riddle deepens: OAuth token fumble blamed

The Original Steve

Re: OAuth vs Kerberos

Thank you for the high level explanation.

0
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The Original Steve

I'm a Infrastructure guy rather than a dev, but have come across OAuth for hybrid Microsoft stuff and SfB / Exchange integration. Seemed easy enough to make it work.

At a very high level, for someone who's an admin rather than a dev, is OAuth comparable to a sort of web-friendly Kerberos? Tickets/tokens shared rather than credentials?

0
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AWS's S3 outage was so bad Amazon couldn't get into its own dashboard to warn the world

The Original Steve

It's been a few years since I had / used my Logitech Harmony remote, but back then the tool to configure the remote is online as you say. However, who is changing macros on their remote on a daily basis? Once it's setup you normally only need to change the config when adding a new device.

Agree with the overall sentiment, but as the Harmony remotes rely on an enormous database of known devices it sort of makes sense for it to be online. (As the database gets updated daily)

2
0

Oh UK. You won't switch mobile providers. And now look at you! £5.8bn you've lost

The Original Steve

Never needed too

If your main / only gripe is price then you threaten to leave unless they match what you've seen / discounted the price etc. Most people I know have started to leave due to price hikes / cheaper elsewhere only for their current provided to match the price or even better it.

Those people (myself included) will be included in these stats (been with Orange / EE over a decade) yet I'm making the same savings that these guys are saying is only possible by switching.

Agree with the principle that signing up and never switching or threatening to leave will cost you, but most of the time retentions / cancellations will drop the price to keep you.

2
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Despite the spiel, we're still some decades from true anti-malware AI

The Original Steve

Sophos

Noticed Sophos have some anti-malware / anti-cryptolocker product, think it was called InterceptX. Asked one of their bods at IP Expo last year the question "shouldn't your AV product we already pay for do this?".

I didn't get a proper answer...

4
0

Citrix looks like it has escaped 'not dead yet' status

The Original Steve

The last 5 - 10 years Microsoft have made Windows RemoteApp a viable, cheaper alternative to Citrix which my firm and my clients have happily embraced.

What's with the u-turn? The value of Windows, IMHO is the raft of easy to deploy, integrated technologies that come with. AD, RemoteApp, Group Policy, Hyper-V, WDS etc.

Going backwards is a silly move IMHO.

1
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National Audit Office: UK's military is buying more than it can afford

The Original Steve

Silly question...

I'm sure this must be a silly question, just as it's often mentioned as a throwaway sentence in many articles, but I need to ask it anyway:

When I buy things, both personally and in the jobs and places I've worked, I know how much the thing I'm buying is going to cost. This includes services and made to order / bespoke items and even long term arrangements / contracts.

So why does our military and government buy things at "estimated" prices and then end up paying such vast sums in addition? Surely there are suppliers who would do it at fixed prices?

Genuinely curious as the reason it always seems to happen and the cost is always to the customer - us

9
2

China's Great Firewall to crack down on unofficial VPNs – state-approved net connections only

The Original Steve

SSL

Genuinely curious as to what is stopping someone renting a VPS with an SSL VPN on it that's hosted outside Middle Kingdom? How would it be any different than a visitor from abroad using their corporate Juniper SSL VPN or DirectAccess tunnel?

1
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Stallman's Free Software Foundation says we need a free phone OS

The Original Steve

Re: Sadly yes

Windows Mobile 10 is free believe it or not!

1
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Sysadmin chatbots: We have the technology

The Original Steve

Bollocks

Seriously, some people have far too much free time on their hands.

If you have the automation and orchestration layers as needed for this to work, then all of the examples could be one using bugger all commands anyway.

Plus a degree of complexity in administering complex systems is a good thing - helps to keep the idiots that only know how to do something, rather than the pro who knows how something works, out.

2
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Qumulo goes to La La Land, speeds up dreamboat Ryan Gosling

The Original Steve

The performance of SMB with RDMA is mighty impressive in newer Windows releases. Considerably faster than 10GB iSCSI at any rate.

0
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2016 – the year 3D XPoint came down to earth from Planet Hype

The Original Steve

Windows?

Surprised Server 2016 Storage Spaces Direct didn't get a mention.

0
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Evolved DNSChanger malware slings evil ads at PCs, hijacks routers

The Original Steve

Re: Best protection ?

Flash can be disabled in IE and Edge

2
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The Original Steve

DNS or DHCP?

So is this changing the DNS server IPs handed out via the routers in built DHCP? Or is it poisoning the DNS server built into the router? Or - and I guess more likely - is the virus modifying the DNS server forwarders on the routers DNS server?

For my sins I use a Windows DNS and DHCP server at home (I know - I'm a sadist) but curious if I could be impacted by having one of my DNS forwards set to the home router..?

0
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British banks chuck smartphone apps out of Windows

The Original Steve

Shame

I'm really happy with my Lumia 950 XL. Few apps I need are there (Barclays, Audible, Tado, Plex, SfB etc).

But I'm a business focused user, I have no desire for SnapChat or Tinder so wouldn't advocate it for the under 30's / blue collar guys.

If MS got their shit together with SfB and their enterprise clients on it they could revive it via marketing alongside O365. Would be marketed as a business focused device as the best client for O355 users perhaps...

Plus was a bonus that after losing mine a day before a holiday, I nipped into a EE shop and after parting with £90 and signing in I had everything back on a 650. Try doing that with an iPhone for the same money with a days notice!

8
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Living with the Pixel XL – Google's attempt at a high-end phone

The Original Steve
WTF?

Come on El Reg..

.Is this really acceptable?:

"The cutest feature of this code is..."

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