* Posts by The Original Steve

495 posts • joined 24 Jun 2009

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Less than four weeks till DevOps' finest assemble in London

The Original Steve

The penny finally drops.

Kept wondering why El Reg keeps pushing this hipster-like fad when clearly the readership and commentards couldn't give a toss.

Appears El Reg have some kind of mid/long-term sponsorship deal.

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LinkedIn U-turns on Bluetooth-enabled 'Tinder for marketers'

The Original Steve

Re: The drop was temporary

I regularly used this very reason as a means to explain why don't mind the lack of apps of Windows Mobile 10. Other than banking, maps, Plex and RadioPlayer I just pin web sites to my start screen and use that rather than the 'app', even if WM has an app. 9/10 it's faster, has all the features and less privacy invasion.

Yet it's the lack of apps that people say put them off WM...

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That apple.com link you clicked on? Yeah, it's actually Russian

The Original Steve

Edge

Shows the real address in Edge on W10.

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Samsung Galaxy S8: Slimmer bezels, a desktop mode – and yet another me-too AI pal

The Original Steve

Nice

Been using WM for the last few years and reluctantly have accepted it's game over so looking for a non- Apple device soon...

Shame it has yet another AI and no physical camera button. Also the camera still doesn't look like it can touch the high end Lumias like my 950 XL. Although they get points for a microSD slot. Is the battery removable?

But the price is very steep...

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Google mass logout riddle deepens: OAuth token fumble blamed

The Original Steve

Re: OAuth vs Kerberos

Thank you for the high level explanation.

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The Original Steve

I'm a Infrastructure guy rather than a dev, but have come across OAuth for hybrid Microsoft stuff and SfB / Exchange integration. Seemed easy enough to make it work.

At a very high level, for someone who's an admin rather than a dev, is OAuth comparable to a sort of web-friendly Kerberos? Tickets/tokens shared rather than credentials?

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AWS's S3 outage was so bad Amazon couldn't get into its own dashboard to warn the world

The Original Steve

It's been a few years since I had / used my Logitech Harmony remote, but back then the tool to configure the remote is online as you say. However, who is changing macros on their remote on a daily basis? Once it's setup you normally only need to change the config when adding a new device.

Agree with the overall sentiment, but as the Harmony remotes rely on an enormous database of known devices it sort of makes sense for it to be online. (As the database gets updated daily)

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Oh UK. You won't switch mobile providers. And now look at you! £5.8bn you've lost

The Original Steve

Never needed too

If your main / only gripe is price then you threaten to leave unless they match what you've seen / discounted the price etc. Most people I know have started to leave due to price hikes / cheaper elsewhere only for their current provided to match the price or even better it.

Those people (myself included) will be included in these stats (been with Orange / EE over a decade) yet I'm making the same savings that these guys are saying is only possible by switching.

Agree with the principle that signing up and never switching or threatening to leave will cost you, but most of the time retentions / cancellations will drop the price to keep you.

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Despite the spiel, we're still some decades from true anti-malware AI

The Original Steve

Sophos

Noticed Sophos have some anti-malware / anti-cryptolocker product, think it was called InterceptX. Asked one of their bods at IP Expo last year the question "shouldn't your AV product we already pay for do this?".

I didn't get a proper answer...

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Citrix looks like it has escaped 'not dead yet' status

The Original Steve

The last 5 - 10 years Microsoft have made Windows RemoteApp a viable, cheaper alternative to Citrix which my firm and my clients have happily embraced.

What's with the u-turn? The value of Windows, IMHO is the raft of easy to deploy, integrated technologies that come with. AD, RemoteApp, Group Policy, Hyper-V, WDS etc.

Going backwards is a silly move IMHO.

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National Audit Office: UK's military is buying more than it can afford

The Original Steve

Silly question...

I'm sure this must be a silly question, just as it's often mentioned as a throwaway sentence in many articles, but I need to ask it anyway:

When I buy things, both personally and in the jobs and places I've worked, I know how much the thing I'm buying is going to cost. This includes services and made to order / bespoke items and even long term arrangements / contracts.

So why does our military and government buy things at "estimated" prices and then end up paying such vast sums in addition? Surely there are suppliers who would do it at fixed prices?

Genuinely curious as the reason it always seems to happen and the cost is always to the customer - us

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China's Great Firewall to crack down on unofficial VPNs – state-approved net connections only

The Original Steve

SSL

Genuinely curious as to what is stopping someone renting a VPS with an SSL VPN on it that's hosted outside Middle Kingdom? How would it be any different than a visitor from abroad using their corporate Juniper SSL VPN or DirectAccess tunnel?

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Stallman's Free Software Foundation says we need a free phone OS

The Original Steve

Re: Sadly yes

Windows Mobile 10 is free believe it or not!

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Sysadmin chatbots: We have the technology

The Original Steve

Bollocks

Seriously, some people have far too much free time on their hands.

If you have the automation and orchestration layers as needed for this to work, then all of the examples could be one using bugger all commands anyway.

Plus a degree of complexity in administering complex systems is a good thing - helps to keep the idiots that only know how to do something, rather than the pro who knows how something works, out.

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Qumulo goes to La La Land, speeds up dreamboat Ryan Gosling

The Original Steve

The performance of SMB with RDMA is mighty impressive in newer Windows releases. Considerably faster than 10GB iSCSI at any rate.

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2016 – the year 3D XPoint came down to earth from Planet Hype

The Original Steve

Windows?

Surprised Server 2016 Storage Spaces Direct didn't get a mention.

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Evolved DNSChanger malware slings evil ads at PCs, hijacks routers

The Original Steve

Re: Best protection ?

Flash can be disabled in IE and Edge

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The Original Steve

DNS or DHCP?

So is this changing the DNS server IPs handed out via the routers in built DHCP? Or is it poisoning the DNS server built into the router? Or - and I guess more likely - is the virus modifying the DNS server forwarders on the routers DNS server?

For my sins I use a Windows DNS and DHCP server at home (I know - I'm a sadist) but curious if I could be impacted by having one of my DNS forwards set to the home router..?

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British banks chuck smartphone apps out of Windows

The Original Steve

Shame

I'm really happy with my Lumia 950 XL. Few apps I need are there (Barclays, Audible, Tado, Plex, SfB etc).

But I'm a business focused user, I have no desire for SnapChat or Tinder so wouldn't advocate it for the under 30's / blue collar guys.

If MS got their shit together with SfB and their enterprise clients on it they could revive it via marketing alongside O365. Would be marketed as a business focused device as the best client for O355 users perhaps...

Plus was a bonus that after losing mine a day before a holiday, I nipped into a EE shop and after parting with £90 and signing in I had everything back on a 650. Try doing that with an iPhone for the same money with a days notice!

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Living with the Pixel XL – Google's attempt at a high-end phone

The Original Steve
WTF?

Come on El Reg..

.Is this really acceptable?:

"The cutest feature of this code is..."

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Desktop budget wrangles: Whose device is it anyway?

The Original Steve

Re: In research...

@TRT

I could not disagree with you more.

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Yahoo! halts! email! forwarding! to! outside! email! addresses!

The Original Steve

Only push, not pull?

I know when I've moved my own as well as others, most modern mail platforms will "pull" content in via IMAP or POP3 from the old platform to the new shiny.

At least Outlook.com and GMail allow this. I'm assuming Yahoo! haven't disabled POP3 access - which means that people can still move off their ghastly email system to something marginally better.

Fuckers regardless though.

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Security bod to MSFT: PowerShell's admin-lite scheme is an open door

The Original Steve

Explaination?

I'm a bit puzzled by the first example.

First I've heard of JEA, so probably a lack of understanding on my part...

But - it sounds a little like the PowerShell environment is locked down to a subset of "approved" cmdlets...? Is that right? If so, then if you delegate access to the "Add-Computer" cmdlet, I don't see how it's a security flaw / bug if the delegated admin attempt to connect the machine to a different domain which has a different set of GPO's applied to it. In that scenario you'd need a malicious DNS and network access to the bad domain so the machine can connect to it.

Is my understanding correct, or have I missed something important and probably obvious? :)

If I am getting it, then I think it's a bit of a stretch to say that it's a big security issue. IMHO of course!

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Breaking compression, one year at a time

The Original Steve

@ J. Cook

To be fair to Microsoft, I don't think their general purpose x86 server OS is trying to take on NetApp SAN's that costs 10x the price of a Windows solution.

I've had mainly good stories to tell when using Windows Storage Spaces, Scale Out File Servers, Continuously Available File Shares and DFS-R; plus the new deduplication and tiered storage features in R2.

BUT - I'm using those for small and medium sized deployments. Using a couple of JBOD shelves with two HBA's plumbed into two 2012 R2 Scale Out File Servers works really rather well as a storage pool for about 80-odd VM's.

4 x Hyper-V hosts connecting to the scale out file servers with SMB (rather than iSCSI!) over 10Gbps is running surprisingly well (in production use for nearly 8 months now).

In truth, I would suspect that a decent NetApp, EMC or HPE array would kick the crap out of it in terms of resilience, features and probably performance too. However we got change from £14k for the storage side of things (shelves, drives, HBA's and two servers). Adding another zero for traditional "enterprise" storage just couldn't be justified.

Biggest weakness with using Windows 2012 R2 as a storage backend is - as you rightly point out - SAN grade replication. Should I want to remove the JBOD shelf as the sole SPOF Microsoft don't really have a decent answer as far as I can make out.

But for nearly 10x less cost I think it's a little unfair to complain of the lack of feature parity to NetApp, HPE and EMC really.

P.S. I'd suggest looking into CAFS and possibly DFS-R in your scenario. Good luck!

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Microsoft disbands Band band – and there'll be no version 3

The Original Steve

One of the best features was the band worked on iOS, Android and WinPho.

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BA check-in system checks out: Staff flung back to cruel '90s world of paper

The Original Steve

Re: BA FLY Software

In this particular instance the printer is USB attached. Also the issue occurs when we use site-to-site as well as a client-to-site VPN. Fraid it's not routing - it's just that the way the application tries to print is essentially, shite.

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The Original Steve

BA FLY Software

I can vouch for BA FLY being a total piece of shit. I didn't realise this is a "new" application until today's issues.

I work for a small MSP, where one of our client s a private executive charter European airline. (Think footballers, Princes etc.). Have been looking into complaints from their Cambridge FBO (mini-terminal for VIPs') where nobody can print from BA FLY to any of the standard, networked HP LaserJets.

This software requires a VPN to work and has no native ability to print to Windows printers. At all. Apparently, after 4 months of talking to "BA IT Support" (in India) we need to install some 3rd party "CUPPS" software that acts as some abstraction layer between BA FLY and the Windows Printer Subsystem.... Because it's not like Windows has an API for that sort of thing...

After months of complaining on behalf of my client, it still doesn't sodding work. Latest is that when you do print from BA FLY the job is sent to the spooler and printer queue, but just errors out. The best bit is that their "new" software sends the print jobs as SYSTEM - not as the user who is attempting the print. Now as these jobs never print, the queue gets blocked up for all other users attempting to print from exotic applications like Word and Chrome....

What do you think happens when a standard, non-admin user attempts to cancel a print job that was created by SYSTEM....? Yeah - we have a bunch of happy users! Who the hell writes software like that?!

You know it's excellent software when the "new" printer BA sent us to print off the boarding passes consisted of:

Boarding pass thermal printer with RJ-45 connector -> RJ-45 to RS-232 adapter -> RS-232 adapter to USB -> USB to desktop for check-in.

Just wow...

I can only imagine how much of a joy this new BA FLY software must be to use just by the excellent state of their integration with windows printing and cabling to thermal printers...

Sure outsourcing is totally irrelevant to the quality issues. Must be.

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Samsung intros super-speedy consumer SSDs, 'fastest M.2s ever'

The Original Steve

Scary

Thinking back just a few years ago.... A consumer drive today has higher IOPS than entire shelf's of disks in an enterprise SAN costing £60k.

Can't even imagine what an array with these in could run. Incredible stuff really.

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Electrical box fault blamed for GS2 data centre outage

The Original Steve

I don't understand

Do Claranet and their clients not have UPS's in the racks? Few ms shouldn't cause service down.

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Biz phones 'n' broadband bods Gamma suffer a network TITSUP

The Original Steve

Looks like they've fixed it at last. We have some very unhappy clients - even those with a HA cluster of SBC's at Gamma's end were impacted!

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Microsoft promises free terrible coffee every month you use Edge

The Original Steve

@franwick

"Edge is not a universal app. Yes, it is on all Win10 devices, but it's part of the OS install itself, not a UWP."

You have been misinformed. Edge is a universal / UWP app. It's just not updated or listed in the store.

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The Original Steve

Re: outlook.com is fine

Total, utter bollocks.

The search in Outlook and Gmail are both very good. Nothing between them.

Drafts are saved in Exchange, so I can start on a desktop and finish on my mobile.

You're confusing a company buying something and them using it at scale. A large college we support has 2 Chromebooks, but over 10,000 students. Your comment would include them, but 98% of their estate is traditional Windows and they aren't looking further at Chromebooks. Another large company we support flirted heavily with Google, pitching them against MS. Created a few accounts with GAFE etc. Opted to stay with on premise Exchange but got MS to toss them free O365 for hybrid stuff. Again your "figures" would included these as people buying and moving towards Google, but that's a spurious claim at best.

Like saying "over 80% of businesses have deployed Windows 10". Maybe factually correct, but all that means is 80% of businesses have deployed ONE copy of W10 for testing only to decide it's shite.

At best your information is severely outdated or you're simply talking nonsense. The last two versions of Exchange/Outlook stored drafts server side rather than client side, the last three versions (at least) do server side indexing and searching. Suggest you push your employers to invest in more modern versions of Exchange, or compare like-for-like by comparing Gmail (cloud service) with Office 365 (cloud service). Both have excellent search, server-side drafts, integration with various cloud storage providers etc. Biggest difference is around scanning the content of your emails and the user interface. Oh, and Google do that weird "Inbox" feature, although I personally don't like it.

Source - 16 years working for enterprise and education sectors directly or via a MSP deploying Exchange and O365 whilst comparing and competing with Google's offerings.

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Tim Cook's answer to crashing iPhone sales: More iPhones

The Original Steve

Re: Suggestion

Have you considered a smartphone from a different manufacturer.. maybe?

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Not an Oracle user? You're probably in an Oracle database anyway

The Original Steve

I rarely use chain coffee shops but popped into a Starbucks today and noticed "Micros" PoS kit - even had "ORACLE" displayed on the Chip and Pin LCD display. Assume that'll be all Starbucks transactions included in this dataset then...

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Azure wobbles

The Original Steve

Re: Azure

Wow.

Seriously - you need to speak to a MS partner, MS directly or hire someone in. The woes you speak of are not normal and point to config issues. (Other than OWA having a separate page for calendars - which is true, but no different to how the full fat Outlook client has always done it).

Images and names not matching is literally a badly configured system. Just because someone else hosts the tin and OS doesn't mean you don't need a professional to manage the applications.

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BBC detector vans are back to spy on your home Wi-Fi – if you can believe it

The Original Steve

Re: How to fek with WiFi scum.

Like the sentiment.

However I fear at least some people will want other RF to come in such as mobile phones and radio...

Know what you're thinking - just no dedication some people!

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Windows 10 Anniversary Update: This design needs a dictator

The Original Steve

Re: My only wish

Odd.

On my two W10 devices - a Dell laptop on insider slow and Surface Pro 4 on insider fast - I can't replicate the same problem. When I pin C:\Users\Steven.Original to Quick Access I get Steven.Original in all the views.

Not suggesting it's not something that's probably broken - the OS is half baked regardless of what build or version of Windows 10 you use. It's very nature is that it'll never be done.

Would like to replicate it though...

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Going! going! pwned? 200! million! Yahoo! logins! leaked! allegedly!

The Original Steve

@Lee D

Couldn't agree with you more about your password strategy.

I've always wondered why something akin to the below isn't more popular:

- Take a two word or more phrase. E.g. Peanut butter

- "Peanut butter" is your "weak" password. Used on El Reg forums, things not very important

- "P3anut Butt3r!" is for email and other medium security services

- "P3@nuT_8utt3R!" is for banking, PayPal, high security services

Every year or so, come up with a new phrase and replace your password on anything you STILL USE TODAY.

Just take a phrase, add three layers of complexity with logic rules. So capitals for the start of every word of tier 2, as well as e's for 3's and a exclamation mark suffix. Tier 3 is the same as tier 2, but a's are @'s, capitalise the first and last letter of the words, underscore for spaces, and swap the B for 8.

Not saying it's uncrackable, particularly the weakest password (although as it's a phrase then it has lots of characters and a basic dictionary attack would take a while as it's more than one word) - but it does give some defence in depth and it's not too taxing to remember as long as you can recall a phrase and a couple of rules based on your tiers.

Or is it just you and me?! ;)

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300 million pelicans? Pah. What 6 billion plastic bags really weigh

The Original Steve

Niche scenario - but annoying regardless

I applaud the objective - I recycle like a good citizen, use energy efficient bulbs and white goods etc.

But until the NHS decide that I can have a new knee, I'm restricted to carrying goods from the supermarket with one hand. The other is keeping me from toppling over via a sturdy solid wooden cane.

Which means that if like many people I know I happen to forget to bring a bag and there's more than one or two items I have to buy a bag.. I can't carry more than a couple of things as I can only use one sodding hand.

So financially I'm at a disadvantage via my disability. True, this is very much a first world problem, and I'm fortunate enough to be in a position where the 5p's don't tot-up enough to have a real impact. But it's bloody annoying when you just pop into the shops for a loaf of bread and some milk only to have to pay 5p + just because I have a bloody walking stick! Sure I should remember, but lots of people don't, and if they are just grabbing a couple of things they have the option of not buying a bag. People using disability aids don't have that choice and now must pay a surcharge.

Am I the only person who can't understand why we can't just have truly disposable bags free of charge? E.g. recycled paper bags. In this day and age it can't be beyond our technology or economics to provide a bag that won't murder a million turtles if it ends up in landfill by mistake?

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IPv6 now faster than IPv4 when visiting 20% of top websites – and just as fast for the rest

The Original Steve

Re: About 6to4

"Meanwhile, the router in use (Apple AirPort Extreme 802.11ac) which is a premium one ..."

You're confusing "premium" with "expensive".

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Really Scary Telecoms Stuff? Nah – telephony's just an app

The Original Steve

Even run your own PBX as a hosted solution!

Just to add something else into the mix...

I work for a small MSP with a slant towards MS products. Over the last 3 years or so there has been an explosion in requests for Lync / Skype for Business across the industry as a whole.

Most of the time, we've installed SfB as a single VM (standard edition) using SIP trunks (although sometimes we needed to stay with ISDN so needed a SBC to get that plumbed in), or for larger clients that need HA and even DR for telephony, we've deployed the full enterprise edition of SfB (so 12 VM's for no spof's / HA, and then the same again in another site for the DR element).

Customers love it, with the biggest challenge being the culture shift. I disagree about the need for DDI's. A lot of modern, SIP focused PBX's these days have phone numbers as a simple abstraction layer to the user's actual SIP address. Nobody in our office has a DDI (other than me, for testing naturally!). Everyone call out, and each department has it's own response group (e.g. hunt group) that people can call in for. We also have a IVR where you can pick your department.

Users expect:

- A dial tone

- A ring-ring noise when a call is holding in a hunt group

- Phone numbers for each phone

- That physical handsets are where the number lives

The above are all perfectly reasonable, as that's how traditional PBX's operate. But in the world of SIP, and in particular SfB (but most other modern PBX's) things work a little different:

- There is no dial tone

- When holding in a hunt group, you get music or whatever audio file the PBX admin has specified

- Phone numbers aren't a real thing. They are simply a way to map a number to the real SIP address that's really used

- SIP addresses (e.g. phone numbers) are mapped to a user, not to a device

That last one is a real cultural shift for end users, and one of the hardest parts of a deployment. User centric services is where IT has been heading for years, but telephony has traditionally been somewhat behind the times. Getting users to understand that when dialling a number (SIP address!) the phone system is attempting to reach YOU - the end user - NOT the device. Which is why your handset, mobile app and softphone can all be ringing at the same time. The person calling you is after YOU - the fleshy bit - they caller isn't trying to call a particular endpoint.

Anyway - back on topic...

A satellite office for one of our larger clients based in Zurich has about 15 users and needed a new phone system. Building SfB wasn't financially viable, nor was buying a traditional PBX. We therefore put them onto a hosted SfB platform by a company called AlwaysOn. They sent out some awful SNOM handsets and once they had internet access they were working. The reliability and support was truly terrible. After 9 months the client demanded something else as they rely on telephony and this "cloud" solution sucked massively.

Technically, I couldn't see any reason why it wouldn't work - it's just that the supplier sucked massively, rather than the wrong technology.

So, I built out a new SfB Enterprise Edition (e.g. no spof HA) platform in our Cambridge datacentres on a shiny new AD domain dedicated to this client. Sent out some decent Polycom phones and a load of Jabra headsets for softphones and 12 months later the client is still loving it. The connection is over the internet from Zurich without QoS or MPLS, with all traffic over the edge servers.

Essentially it's a dedicated, private hosted SfB.

The client was so happy with it in their satellite office, the head office in Cambridge wanted to move to it as part of a large office move, giving the platform a total of 280 users.

As we as the environmental (2 x datacentres, UPS + diesel gen, access control, N+1 AC etc.), physical (Hyper-V cluster, HP SAN's) and application (SfB enterprise edition / clustered) layers all having security, reliability, performance and capacity all baked in as part of the architecture, as the author rightly points out there's no point having all of this but no SIP trunks. Our SIP trunk provider (PureIP if anyone is interested - they're amazing!) has given us two SBC destinations to point our calls to, with each SBC in a different datacentre running as an active/active pair. The same applies for inbound calls - either SBC can send the calls to either of our meditation servers. So should a whole datacentre fail with our telco then there is zero interruption of service.

With all of this, we've essentially created our own dedicated hosted SfB platform for one of our largest clients.

I'm aware that SfB can operate as a multi-tenanted configuration, although I haven't tried it. Our client is delighted with the system they have with reliability and also feature set (visual voicemail, IM and presence, conferencing, whiteboards and screen sharing, file transfer, telephony (inc, delegate, IVR's, hunt groups, private line, 2nd line etc.) voice access to their mailbox, enterprise chat rooms etc.), but as it's hosted by us there is no real capital cost involved. Our main cost is licensing, which is 3 x SfB server licences that we brought via SPLA (so about £240).

I put a similar system in on premise for another large client, but also wanted DR (so the above x 2) which cost around £90k. Compared to the hosted option I have to say it looks like the writing is on the wall for on premise PBX systems.

With Office365 including SfB Online - and MS now offering Cloud PBX / PSTN Calling (MS provided SIP trunks), combined with the insanely expensive capex needed for on premise, I really can't see many companies opting for on premise in 5 - 10 years time.

Hence being rather proud of the work we did to get this private hosted system in place. If nothing else it clearly demonstrates that it can be done with good results, and I think the market very much has an appetite for it.

Sorry of the long and rambling post. After reading this article as well as the ISDN to SIP article I got all passionate again about the SfB projects I've done in the last 2 years and simply wanted to talk codshit about it!

TL;DR

The market wants hosted. If you're a IT service provider / MSP then it may well be worthwhile looking into YOU creating a multitenant IP PBX system yourself and selling it directly to your clients.

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Microsoft's 3D Jedi phone explored

The Original Steve

Re: Wave your hand and hope....

That'll be the BMW I would have thought.

Exactly the same thought went through my head when I was test driving a few. The 5 and 7 series have it (or as an option) but you should still have the same physical controls as before.

I think the same of ripping out all of the main console and replacing it with a single large touchscreen. When driving you rely on tactile feedback. As you rightly point out, switching a station or changing the volume can be done without even moving your eyes with traditional dials and buttons. Soon as you need to press a precise small section of a 8" plastic screen you're going to need to take your eyes off the road ahead. Same if wiggling a finger in the air at the right place - but now it's in 3D rather than the 2D touchscreen.

How that's progress I have no idea. Hardly a technical innovation, just a gimmick in the more expensive cars as far as I'm concerned.

All of that said, I would have liked the OPTION of what this phone appears to have on my phone. Seems like a nice optional extra. The last two words in that sentence are key.

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SCADA malware caught infecting European energy company

The Original Steve

Re: Impressive analysis, but infection vector not apparent

Good point, although just cat and mouse.

A lot of SCADA kit needs special legacy hardware keys to run via parallel or RS232 ports, and often needs its own special 'NIC' to talk its own special protocol to the rest of the SCADA network.

Tried to virtualize the control systems for a large crisp manufacturer a few years back. Got about 2/3rds done, the rest I couldn't for the reasons above.

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BMW web portal vulns pose car hack risk – researchers

The Original Steve

Re: VIN Confused

Not on my BMW. Was actually bloody annoyed that I had to pop the bonnet to be able to set up the connected drive services. Why the on board computer (iDrive) can't display it I have no idea.

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Microsoft's Windows 10 nagware goes FULL SCREEN in final push

The Original Steve

Re: Over 300 million people...

True, I'd imagine consumer activations will drop significantly after the free upgrade stops. Guess it will go to the same sort of trend that previous relases have had.

Although traditionally businesses don't normally kick off large deployments for at least a year after RTM, so I'd guess business deployments will start to increase after the August update.

(P.S. Seriously, downvoted for clarifying what the vendor said?! Christ, I was hardly praising it - just repeated what I've read from other MS annoucements about their target.)

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The Original Steve

Re: Over 300 million people...

Believe it's 1 Billion within 3 years of release.

So 30% of the way there after 30% of the time.

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My plan to heal this BROKEN, BREXITED BRITAIN

The Original Steve

Re: One of my US suppliers increased prices twice yesterday.

"If you are an SME or on the small end of a large organisation and you have pricing agreements with Oracle. Microsoft or Adobe that stops them putting up the price of goods where no prior purchase contract exists or you are supplied fuel from xyz and they have agreed a fix fuel costs for the next x years then I would be very sceptical."

Or just buy in advance. You know, like a fixed price 3 year Office365 contract or when buying your software via volume licensing (of any size business) then pay extra for software assurance. Current Sterling wobble has zero impact on me adding another 200 users or whatever to our licensing - not at least until renewal time but even then I can back off / forward by a month or two to take advantage of what the markets are doing then.

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Google enlists Microsoft VoIP partner to unseat Office 365+Skype

The Original Steve

Re: Between the lines

Shame you didn't have time to qualify your opinion on Skype for Business being "rubbish as a replacement for the telephone".

I can't comment on the cloudy version, but on premise is, in my view an excellent VoIP platform. I've deployed it with HA and DR for a large college (10k+ students), a large facilities management firm (3k staff, business is based around telephony and they work 24x7) and literally this week finished off a HA SfB which we're hosting in our "cloud" for a large private aviation firm.

Oh - and of course we use it as our phone system too.

Very little need to drop to a CLI, very simple deployment model, loads of features, integration with Exchange is excellent. Always better to deploy with SIP trunks than needing SBC's and ISDN30 breakout's in my view.

If you have a well managed network (e.g QoS and not massively over contended) and someone's done a decent job of installing and configuring SfB then I'm not sure what there is to dislike from a technical point of view.

The three clients I mentioned above all moved to SfB in the last 18 months and continue to give feedback on how much their users love it and how much easier it is to administer compared to "normal" phone systems.

Need someone to review your deployment reply back and I'll see if we can do a special El Reg Reader Discount! ;)

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Samsung: Don't install Windows 10. REALLY

The Original Steve

Re: If proof is needed...

"I don't see why Samsung should spend craploads of money just to..."

Seriously? So the worlds most popular desktop operating system has been out a year, and you think it's fine for SAMSUNG to not bother updating their drivers for it..? Then who should?

Additionally, I'd wager £10 that the chipset has a driver, but sammy hasn't gotten around to repackaging it with its latest crapware application yet.

Put W10 on a 7 year old Dell Latitude that shipped with Vista. Drivers worked fine out the box, other than SD slot. Used the Vista driver and.... It worked!

It worked because it was just a driver, written properly.

There's few drivers that were certified against Vista, 7 or 8.x that won't work on 10 - same driver architecture. Seems that Sammy haven't written them properly in the first place (they look for a particular version of NT kernel for example), or they package drivers with 3rd party apps that they haven't updated yet.

I'm a firm believer in vendors writing drivers properly, and do not contain applications.

32
9

VMware flushes Windows vSphere client and Adobe Flash

The Original Steve

Hosts?

Couldn't agree more that Flash should die - no problems. Like there's what should be a reasonable WebUI now instead - great.

But - and maybe it's because I'm getting older - I seem to hark back to a golden age where there was full fat clients for managing systems. Where I can troubleshoot log files with ease, package applications up and not have to worry about browser issues.

And touching on the above comment - what about directly managing the hosts? Should vCentre be having one of it's bad days (says a VM is on, we all know it's not etc.) then how do you directly manage a host via GUI? Will this be embedded on all hosts as well as the vCentre server?

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