* Posts by AndyS

814 posts • joined 23 Jun 2009

Page:

EU: No encryption backdoors but, eh, let's help each other crack that crypto, oui? Ja?

AndyS
Silver badge

Re: Refreshing

> the pyrrhic victory of "no deal"

Ah yes, the "stabbing yourself in the head just to prove how independent you are" victory.

9
2
AndyS
Silver badge

Re: Refreshing

> How very refreshing to hear this from the EU...

If only there was some way we could benefit from the relative sanity of this massive, powerful union, standing up to the sort of nonsense that May and Trump spout. Oh well.

15
4

Aviation industry hits turbulence as Airbus buys into Bombardier’s new jetplanes

AndyS
Silver badge

Re: Missed a point...

I presume the "country of origin" has to add a certain amount of value to a product. Final assembly of an aircraft fits that category - there is a huge amount of work, and a very significant percentage of the value of the final aircraft, added during assembly and finishing. Assuming major air-frame components continue being manufactured in the same locations as currently (NI, Canada, China and the US, and sub-assemblies from all over the globe), if the aircraft is then assembled in Alabama, the only reasonable country to name on the "made in" label would be the USA.

9
0

'There has never been a right to absolute privacy' – US Deputy AG slams 'warrant-proof' crypto

AndyS
Silver badge

Re: Actually, I think he is right

> I've learned from firsthand experience that edge cases don't stay edge cases and that truth is stranger than fiction (see Edward Snowden).

OK, so what happens when someone has a super-encrypted message which can save the world if it's delivered to the right person, but he's arrested by an enemy state who have the back-door keys to the encryption protocol?

See, typing nonsense scenarios doesn't help an argument. What helps is to look at the history of how things have actually happened and, very roughly, it has gone like this:

1. Government can snoop on specific people, with a court order.

2. Communications go digital. US government (imitated by many others) discovers it can freely ignore law and intercept all communications of everyone, everywhere.

3. Snowdon leaks reveal extent of illegal government spying. Government does nothing about it.

4. Tech companies and consumers move to apps and platforms which encrypt communications by default. Back to step 2 (via bugs, covert software, and hardware attacks against specific targets)

Most likely, any attempt at banning encryption will be entirely unworkable. Either in the physical sense (and it will be ignored), or the legal sense (and courts will rule against it).

Additionally, people who are going to commit attacks still will, either using unencrypted platforms (as per the Paris attacks, which were discussed and coordinated over SMS) or, if they are going to take serious planning (eg 9/11 attacks), over proper secured channels. Or even in person.

8
0
AndyS
Silver badge

Re: Actually, I think he is right

> What about ongoing black projects which have to be denied they even exist, whose revelation could bombshell major government relations if not start a war?

You like your bullshit hypothetical situations, don't you?

The whole point of a suggestion like this is to prevent a scenario like you describe. So, don't get your "democracy" doing things which could bombshell relations and start a war when they become public. Because, you know, a democracy should be working for the people, not against them? And since it often needs pointing out, "people" isn't limited to "Americans".

Or maybe, as per your other comments, you're a masochist?

22
1
AndyS
Silver badge

> It used to be the case that in the physical world, using warrants to force physical access (backed up with coercive force where required) was a well-worked out system with checks and balances that (mostly) worked well to balance privacy and law enforcement concerns. Encryption technology has borked that balance...

I would agree with most of this, but actually I believe the wide-spread use of encryption isn't what has borked the system. That was the wide-spread use of domestic spying, tapping every phone line in the world, eves-dropping on every conversation, and data mining every single electronic communication.

Wide-spread use of encryption has been a direct reaction of the tech companies to that (following the Snowdon leaks), and has not broken the balance, but helped to restore it. Remember how the spooks still managed to break into the single iphone, in their physical possession, in the San Bernando case? That is how things used to work, and is clearly acceptable.

Nobody every opened every single envelope to read and catalogue every bit of physical mail sent. Why should they have the right or ability to do that now?

52
0

Rattled toymaker VTech's data breach case exiting legal pram

AndyS
Silver badge

Re: Long ago

I have 3 young kids, and absolutely hate VTech, with a passion.

Cheap, nasty, hard plastic, blaring out non-stop noise, continually. The sort of "Why aren't you playing with me any more? I'm a train, come and push me on the track" attention seeking crap that actually destroys creative play.

We have a few which slipped through the net, but I took the batteries out. They're still hard, nasty, cheap plastic rubbish, so as soon as the attention grabbing noise stops, the kids almost instantly lose interest, and they can be reassigned to the box in the attic as soon as possible.

5
0

Overdraft-fiddling hackers cost banks in Eastern Europe $100m

AndyS
Silver badge

> the average amount around $5m (in cash)...

> In all cases, the theft took place using normal withdrawals from various cash terminals outside the bank's originating country.

Where does one find cash machines which can hand out this much cash? Aren't most limited to around £300 (or the local equivalent) per day, or at least per transaction?

1
0

BAE confirms it is slashing 2,000 jobs

AndyS
Silver badge

My heart goes out to anyone losing their job.

But rejoices that, in this case, it appears to be because the world is buying fewer machines for killing people. Long may that trend continue, and the best of luck to those affected in finding new, more morally productive, work.

I wonder what the ratio is of people killed by each Typhoon to those employed building it?

7
3

How many times can Microsoft kill Mobile?

AndyS
Silver badge

Re: Dutch East India company, GEC, TWA, Pan Am, Sperry, DEC, Kodak ...

FYI, you're using the word "whom" wrongly.

"Who" is a subject, "whom" is an object. In both cases, you've used "whom" as a subject. It's the same difference as "I kicked the ball" vs "me kicked the ball."

4
0

You may not have noticed, but 'superfast' broadband is available to 94% of Blighty

AndyS
Silver badge

Re: Just FYI

Fivemiletown is in Ulster. And it is in Northern Ireland. That's OK.

Donegal is in also Ulster, in the bit that is in Republic of Ireland. That's also OK.

I know people love to get offended, but this is more than a bit silly.

Still, the Reg has removed all references to Ulster, so I guess everyone can put away their pitchforks until something else offends us all.

14
0
AndyS
Silver badge

Re: Just FYI

Aye, whatever. Fivemiletown is is in Tyrone, which is in Ulster.

Sadly Dundrod (Antrim, Ulster) chugs along at a regrettable 600kb/s or so on a good day.

4
1

German Firefox users to test recommendation engine 'a bit like thought-reading'

AndyS
Silver badge

Re: Get real Mozilla! There are more important things to fix:

I would humbly suggest that blocking all images is such an unusual install case that changing an obscure setting as a one-off after install is, in fact, perfectly acceptable.

6
1

MH370 final report: Aussies still don’t know where it crashed or why

AndyS
Silver badge

Re: Conspiracy theories @ Mi Tasol

It is possible to have systems which cannot be disabled from the flight deck, but not always desirable. In fact it was such a system which led to the search area - the engines had an independent coms system which performed a satellite handshake once an hour. Although it exchanged no data, the time it took for the signal exchange allowed a rough calculation of how far away it was from the satellite at each hour.

A much more complex system, exchanging GPS location and flight parameters etc, would almost certainly need to be designed such that it could be disabled from the cockpit. It's impossible to say if the systems were actively turned off or failed through some catastrophic event, and even if they were deliberately turned off it's impossible to establish malicious intent, but it seems likely that, in the case of MH370, a more complex sat-com system would also have been disabled at the same time as the other systems.

0
0
AndyS
Silver badge

Conspiracy theories

This is an absolute tragedy, but also an illustration of the limitations of the technology we have available.

Sadly, the publication of this report will pull all the conspiracy theorists out of the woodwork (as already in this thread). The truth is probably much more boring. It had all coms turned off and lost presurisation, (probably related, perhaps malicious), and flew on until fuel exhaustion.

Since nobody is monitoring the centre of the oceans, and the satellite coms were mostly turned off or disabled from the aircraft (except the hourly handshake direct from the engines), we don't really know where it is.

The reality, sadly, is that this could easily happen again, since nobody is magically going to start actively monitoring remote oceans, and systems can always be disabled from onboard the aircraft. Remember, it's not that we COULDN'T know where the aircraft was, it's that the system for locating it was turned off (or broken).

12
0

'Dear diversity hire...' Amazon's weapons-grade fail in recruitment email to woman techie

AndyS
Silver badge

Re: ???

> So this statement is either claiming that women and minorities are MORE competent than white men, or (more plausibly) that you can pay equally competent women and minorities less for the same work.

Debate the figures if you like, but this is a false dichotomy. The reason for increased profits is that a diverse workforce makes better, more balanced decisions. To push the stereotypes, men take more risks than women, so having an all-male board means a higher chance of bankruptcy.

More generally, a workforce (and particularly management) which reflects the target customer market is more likely to be successful within that market. Do you think, for example, that Snapchat would release Blackface filters if it had more black employees who understood the offence that would cause? Or that Instagram would release facial recognition that doesn't work on black people if they had a few kicking around to test it?

8
13

IKEA flat-packs TaskRabbit to crack assembly code

AndyS
Silver badge

@ Prst. V.Jeltz

> Complaining about other people's literacy levels

> Writes "skillz"

Tell me, what were you talking about again?

0
4

NASA, Roscosmos: We're building a lunar space station!

AndyS
Silver badge

> that refuelling diagram broke my brain...

Yes, slightly crazy mission. It was clearly a show of strength, designed to demonstrate that the UK could penetrate the Argentinian air defenses and reach the Argentine mainland if required. Each mission used a million litres of fuel, for a single effective 450 kg unguided bomb to actually hit the target (21 bombs carried, and dropped in a line across the target each time).

I guess it helped that Argentina probably didn't know, at the time, just how unreliable the aircraft being used actually were.

3
0
AndyS
Silver badge

I guess you can use as many rockets as you like to stock the station up there, and then one rocket can make it from there to Mars and back. So the rocket that carries the life support system, the crew, the vehicles etc doesn't also need to carry enough fuel to get it all from Earth to Mars and back.

A bit like how an aerial tanker can extend the range of a mission. In extreme cases, you can have fleets of tankers to refuel the tankers which provide fuel to the tankers which refuel the mission aircraft multiple times along its path - Operation Black Buck illustrates this nicely, along with a handy diagram showing how the fuel flowed between the aircraft in flight.

11
0

EasyJet: We'll have electric airliners within the next decade

AndyS
Silver badge

Re: Small steps...

> (3) using some form of chemo-electrical reaction to create the electricity needed. No idea what, I'm not a chemist.

Using some sort of magic fairly dust to keep the plane in the air for free. No idea what, I'm not a magician.

29
3

Welcome to the future: Bluetooth jackets you can only wash 10 times. Gee, thanks, Google

AndyS
Silver badge

Re: @Martin 33

> and why do millennials compromise by getting an Android device instead of an iPhone?

Oh look! A troll! There, under that bridge!

6
1

Insteon and Wink home hubs appear to have a problem with encryption

AndyS
Silver badge

Re: What do we care ?

> If some of these do get cracked, they probably won't blame us, if they do we will just send out our press release blaming ''the bad guys''

Remember to include the phrase "we take security very seriously."

15
0

Australia commits to establish space agency with no budget, plan, name, deadline …

AndyS
Silver badge

Re: How difficult can this be?

I suggest Australian Research and Space Exploration. Or maybe the Australian Space Society.

10
0

Sputnik-1 replica used to test the real thing goes under the hammer

AndyS
Silver badge

> it demonstrated that the Soviet Union was more technologically advanced than the United States

Oooh, controversial! Just wait, you'll be getting angry tweets from the Idiot in Chief.

3
1

Wanna get started with practical AI? Check out this chap's Rubik's Cube solving neural-net code

AndyS
Silver badge

Plateaue

So if after training on 10 moves, it plateaued in it's ability to solve at around 6 to 7 moves, does it logically imply that training to a higher number of moves will improve the ability to solve from a higher number?

I'm not sure it does. If it can't solve reliably beyond 6 or 7, then what difference would training for 12 or 13 moves make over 10?

Also I don't know much about neural networks, is there a way to "deepen" the network, to allow more analysis or computation time, to improve reliability with further training?

2
0

You lost your ballpoint pen, Slack? Why's your Linux version unsigned?

AndyS
Silver badge

> Comic Sans?

This has my vote.

Reg, pretty please, can you implement the use of Comic Sans when quoting any obviously-bullshit canned statement in the future?

6
0

Ducks ding dongs in face of stiff competition

AndyS
Silver badge

Re: Sounds a bit like Liverpool on a Saturday night.

Sounds like an ideal solution to a Saturday night in Liverpool.

4
0

SpaceX releases Pythonesque video of rocket failures

AndyS
Silver badge

> Must have taken determination and deep pockets to keep on sending up the rockets until they had worked it out

The primary mission, of each and every flight, was to deliver the payload into space. The secondary mission was development of the return.

So, despite the fireworks, each and every one of these landing RUDs was actually a successful mission, and presumably profitable - previous attempts, after all, simply dropped the vehicle into the ocean after the flight.

11
0

Five ways Apple can fix the iPhone, but won't

AndyS
Silver badge

Re: Sound

Why on earth would you link, without comment or explanation, to a Chinese (Japanese? Korean?) website on a UK-based, English language news forum? How many people do you really think that is going to be useful for?

46
0

Twitter is just randomly deleting people's lists – and no one knows why

AndyS
Silver badge

Re: A decade of work stored on Twitter?

> It's funny, isn't it, how a human twitter aggregator can call themself a journalist without any shame or irony.

Right, I don't use Twitter, and can't really be bothered with it, but is it beyond comprehension that journalists would use it as a tool to gather information?

If a journalist read a book on a topic, would you complain that all they ever do is regurgitate published works?

5
1

Dude who claimed he invented email is told by judge: It's safe to say you didn't invent email

AndyS
Silver badge

Re: 1971 ....

To speak to someone?

11
1

Futuristic driverless car technology to be trialled on... oh, a Ford Mondeo

AndyS
Silver badge

Re: Nominet

I guess the car probably has a fair amount of on-board coms and connections, so maybe having someone who knows about networking makes sense?

0
0

Korea extends factory automation tax break, is accused of levying 'robot taxes' anyway

AndyS
Silver badge

Re: Robots don't pay taxes...

AC, those are interesting stats, care to share where they are from?

2
0
AndyS
Silver badge

> the former Microsoft man wondered why human labour is taxed but robotic replacement workers contribute nothing to government coffers

That's an interesting question, but I guess it's missing the point slightly. Tax is levied on exchanges, so the purchase, maintenance, leasing payments, spare parts etc required for automation will all all be taxed. The idea of taxing a tool would be obviously ludicrous - what, fundamentally, sets apart a hammer, a tractor, and an automated riveter?

3
0

Google has some sort of plan for not favouring its own shopping service

AndyS
Silver badge

Re: Off topic, but...

Thanks AC, interesting response.

1
0
AndyS
Silver badge

Off topic, but...

...I am always curious about these legal deadlines.

Is there someone sitting waiting in an office, staring at their phone, waiting for Google to call? Do Google have the number of the exact person, and does that person never sleep?

What is the advantage of leaving submissions of this sort to the last minute, and what is the incentive for the party (in this case the court) to allow submissions out of office hours?

4
0

Terry Pratchett's unfinished works flattened by steamroller

AndyS
Silver badge

He ensured that in this new no-disk world, there will be no new disk-wold.

31
0
AndyS
Silver badge

How appropriately poetic.

I do wonder, though, if he considered the Guardian philosophy of destroying hard-drives? I assume the intention is for the data to be fully destroyed, but what are the bets that, somewhere, there are backups waiting to be discovered in a few years' time?

4
0

We're not the 'world leader' in electric cars, Nissan insists

AndyS
Silver badge

Re: ASA has no legal powers

> Just like the Portman Group for booze.

Ah yes. And our favourite Scottish brewery has shown exactly how sharp their teeth are, with statements such as:

On behalf of BrewDog PLC and its 14,691 individual shareholders, I would like to issue a formal apology to the Portman Group for not giving a shit about today’s ruling. Indeed, we are sorry for never giving a shit about anything the Portman Group has to say, and treating all of its statements with callous indifference and nonchalance.

13
0

How does Apple chief Tim Cook's package look now? Like $89m

AndyS
Silver badge

Tax?

> Cook had previously dismissed the case as "political crap" in an interview with the Irish Independent.

That's interesting, because most of the civilised world had categorised Apple's behaviour as "tax-dodging bullshit."

20
1

Chrome wants to remember which Websites to silence

AndyS
Silver badge

> I even hate the Adobe ad that's flashing away in a deliberately animated, eye catching manner on the right of this page as I type

For a website with such a tech-savvy readership, the Reg does have a habit of showing some of the most annoying adverts possible. Every now and then, when I'm using a or different new computer, I wonder if the site has been hijacked or if a typo has sent me to a domain squatter. It's often the trigger that reminds me to install an adblocker.

13
0

Pre-order your early-bird pre-sale product today! (Oh did we mention the shipping date has slipped AGAIN?)

AndyS
Silver badge

Re: I wanted a Linux video editor

I've been in the same boat as you, I even suffered Openshot's endless bugs and crashes for 7 months of extensive video making in Africa in 2011.

I've been using Kdenlive recently, and it's a real breath of fresh air. It works well, it feels grown up, and it has a lot of decent editing options that others I've tried just never had. Also, it doesn't crash very often. And when it does, it has a good autosave function, so you don't lose work.

2
0

Ransomware scum straighten ties, invest in good customer service

AndyS
Silver badge

My friend's dad...

The real-time help in transferring bitcoin reminds me of my friend's dad, who was once riding a bike in a rural bit of a certain South East Asian country, when he was mugged by bandits.

Since he (unexpectedly, from the bandit's point of view) spoke the local language, he was able to quickly spark some banter with them. Although they relieved him of everything he was carrying, they allowed him to keep his bike as, after all, "they wouldn't want him stuck out here where the bandits might get him."

I've never been in the situation but imagine that dealing face to face with your muggers, looking for their help, must be... odd.

4
0

China pollutes ocean with bloody big rocket

AndyS
Silver badge

Re: Elsewhere reported flight aborted one hour after launch...

The "Particular Asian Particularity" is nothing to do with being upset when things go wrong, but rather a complete submission to authority, leading to a structural inability to question the status quo or learn properly from mistakes.

It's been going a long time, and caused a lot of problems. This is a good read, for example, of how a perfectly good 747 was flown into the ground due to the first officer's inability to correct the actions of the pilot. Despite it being literally his job to monitor and correct the pilot, his cultural inability to do so directly caused the crash. The AAIB report, if you have time, is extremely interesting.

1
0

Met Police laggards still have 18,000 Windows XP machines in use

AndyS
Silver badge

Why?

So, what are the main reasons for slow progress?

Is it just cash? Or is it the usual mix of bureaucracy and resistance to change that large organisations seem to ooze?

6
0

UK parliamentary email compromised after 'sustained and determined cyber attack'

AndyS
Silver badge

Re: Passwords must be

"how did that AC up there with the lecture get all those downvotes?"

Gave an ill-timed & boastful lecture, as AC, in response to a joke he apparently didn't get?

6
0

Linus Torvalds slams 'pure garbage' from 'clowns' at grsecurity

AndyS
Silver badge

Re: Ego Overload

Jake, what a useless comment.

I take it you wouldn't dare criticise the people involved in fitting the cladding to Grenfell Tower, since you yourself don't personally operate a successful business retrofitting aging tower blocks?

No doubt you'd never criticise Trump (or Obama), since you're not the President of the USA?

46
6

Virtual reality audiences stare straight ahead 75% of the time

AndyS
Silver badge

Re: Clever image processing algorithm

> So if the Creationists are bashing away as hard as they can...

Sorry, who in this thread brought up any of that anti-science nonsense? Oh, that's right, nobody. Instead we have yet another boring, off topic series of rants about something that nobody said, that does not relate to the topic, and that nobody here has disagreed with.

As the other man said, time and place. This is neither. Give it a break.

0
0
AndyS
Silver badge

> ...not everyone sees the same thing, creating debate later...

That sounds like an interesting art project, but an awful way to tell a story.

13
1

Page:

Forums

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2017