* Posts by Dave 32

344 posts • joined 22 Jun 2009

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Raspberry Pi burning up? Microsoft's recipe can save it and AI

Dave 32
Pint

Cooling

Ok, so where's the picture of the obligatory geek who's cooled one with Liquid Nitrogen? Or, Liquid Helium for bonus points?

Dave

P.S. Hey, don't use all of the Liquid Nitrogen for cooling the chip; I need a bit of it for cooling my beer.

P.P.S. Sorry, I'm an American. We like our beer cold, as opposed to other parts of the world.

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Look! Over there! Intel's cooked a 17-qubit chip quantum package

Dave 32
Pint

Re: How?

I rather doubt you're going to get down to .02K with Nitrogen. That's firmly in the realm of Liquid Helium, and probably some of the exotic cooling methods, too, such as laser cooling:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Laser_cooling

Dave

P.S. I don't know how they get the shark with the laser beam attached to its head in there.

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Dave 32
Devil

Windows 7? That'll never be a success. I'm going to hold out for the one that runs Windows XP.

Dave

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Dave 32
Pint

Re: 0.02K?

So, not what you'd call a "hot babe"?

Dave

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SCARY SPICE: Pumpkin air freshener sparks school evacuation

Dave 32

Pumpkin Pie Spice

Don't forget that pumpkin pie spice is a mixed spice, typically consisting of Cinnamon and Nutmeg, perhaps with a few other spices thrown in (Ginger, Cloves).

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pumpkin_pie_spice

Then, remember that Nutmeg is a hallucinogen!

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nutmeg#Psychoactivity_and_toxicity

I had a buddy who ate a small spice can of Nutmeg one weekend. He said he was seeing pink elephants floating around the room for the next week.

Do you really want your kids snorting the stuff?!?

Dave

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What does the Moon 4bn years ago and Yahoo! towers this week have in common? Both had an awful atmosphere

Dave 32
Coat

Party at the Pole

"NASA’s administrator Robert Lightfoot said the agency “has been directed to develop a plan for an innovative and sustainable program of exploration with commercial and international partners to enable human expansion across the solar system, returning humans to the Moon ..." "

What this project needs is a good code-name. Since it appears that they may be planning a base near the Moon's polar regions, to take advantage of the water which may be there, I'll propose the code-name: Party at the Pole.

Dave

P.S. I'll get my coat. It's the one with the lunar map in the pocket.

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Is that a bulge in your pocket or... do you have an iPhone 8+? Apple's batteries look swell

Dave 32
Coat

Fire in the Hole

I recommend Apple users start practicing the saying "Fire in the Hole!", because it won't be long before the things start blowing up, probably while wedged in the back pants pocket of teenage girls' pants.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fire_in_the_hole

Dave

P.S. I'll get my coat. It's the one with a bottle of beer in the pocket. But, I'm not about to waste good beer putting out someone's flaming pants!

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WDC being a real Bain in the butt as it tries to bar Toshiba memory sale

Dave 32
WTF?

Chinese Government?

"Bain has applied to the Chinese government for regulatory approval of the deal."

Why the Chinese government? Isn't Toshiba a Japanese company? Did I miss something?

Dave

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Ex-Harrods IT man cleared of stealing company issued laptop

Dave 32
Flame

Erasing a laptop

He could have erased the information from the machine with an axe. I'm told that Thermite also works quite well.

Dave

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Is this cough cancer, doc? No: it's a case of Playmobil on the lung

Dave 32
Coat

Re: Hg

I once crushed a Mercury-based thermometer in my mouth, too. However, it happened in a doctor's office. The doctor rammed the thermometer in my mouth just as I sneezed. Glass and bits of Mercury went all over the place (my mouth, the table, the office, him, etc.).

Metallic Mercury isn't all that toxic. Heck, drinking a bit of it used to be a folk-remedy for an upset stomach! Now, other Mercury compounds, such as Dimethyl Mercury, can be exceedingly toxic.

Anyway, it doesn't seem to have hurt me. Or, maybe that explains why I'm a cryptographer now?

Dave

P.S. I'll get my coat. It's the one with the pocket full of Mercury-based thermometers. Have to have something to snack on, don't I?

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Dave 32
Pint

Re: Oh, Lester, your presence is missed.

Which is why Kinder eggs are banned in the USA. :-(

They're available in Canada, though, but don't even think about trying to smuggle them across the border.

Dave

P.S. You can bring beer across the border, but make sure you declare it. Otherwise, the Customs guys can confiscate it and stick you with a huge fine. Oh, and if you do want to try smuggling it, make sure it's premium beer. ;-)

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BOFH: We're only here because they said there would be biscuits

Dave 32

Re: More spying?

Ah, but what y'all don't realize is that, if you stick the right kind of gaffer tape over the built-in web-cam, it causes it to function like an x-ray camera, and allows it to form images of people under their clothes.

Of course, it has to be the right kind of gaffer tape, such as this stuff I'm selling for one hundred dollars per piece. ;-)

Anon Y. Mous

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Asteroid Florence buzzes Earth, brings two moons along for the ride

Dave 32
Coat

Re: only ones saved

"Yes but that was when they could all fit on a single 3.5" floppy disk..."

Do you think they could double that number if I slipped them a 2.88MB diskette? I think I still have a stack of them....somewhere.

Dave

P.S. I'll get my coat. It's the one with the 2.88MB diskettes in the pocket.

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Deputy AG Rosenstein calls for law to require encryption backdoors

Dave 32
Coat

Re: Impossible

"or people who REALLY want to keep information secret - it is possible to use multiple encryption programs in series "

That's why I double encrypt everything with ROT-13 when I want to make sure it stays secret. ;-)

Dave

P.S. I'm waiting for an intelligent genius to develop an encryption routine which, when the data is decrypted with one key, produces the secret text, but, when decrypted with an alternate key, produces a grocery list.

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Bitcoin Foundation wants US Department of Justice investigated

Dave 32

Re: Bad lawmakers make bad laws

My Senator is Rand Paul, who scored a 100% rating for the latest session of Congress (93% cumulative) on the "Freedom Index" for the latest session of Congress. :-)

That's better than Senator Feinstein, who scored a 10% for the latest session of Congress (Cumulative 11%), and is tied with Senator Kamala Harris. :-(

https://www.thenewamerican.com/freedom-index

Dave

P.S. My Representative, Thomas Massie, is one of the highest scoring legislators, at 98% cumulative (100% for the latest session).

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Airbus issues patch to prevent A350 airliner fuel tanks exploding

Dave 32
Coat

In-tank Fuel Pumps

According to a long-time auto mechanic friend, most (all) automobiles with in-tank fuel pumps (which are a majority of them now?) depend upon the fuel cooling the pump. Thus, you get much longer fuel pump life if you refill the fuel tank when you're down to about a quarter of a tank, rather than allowing it to get lower.

Oh, and remember that gasoline is MUCH more flammable than jet fuel.

Dave

P.S. I'll get my coat; it's the one with the spare can of gasoline in the pocket.

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Can North Korean nukes hit US mainland? Maybe. But EMP blast threat is 'highly credible'

Dave 32
Pint

Re: Obvious question. Could you split the whole grid into smaller sections to be more survivable?

At one point, the US electric grid was divided into 10 regions. But, it's been a decade or two since I was involved with emergency planning/management, and I believe that some of those regions have been merged. Still, even with 10 regions, almost all of those regions were large enough to cause significant issues due to an EMP event.

Plus, look at how much damage an errant tree limb can cause, even within a single region:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Northeast_blackout_of_2003

As for the special steel used for transformer cores, quite a bit of that is "Cold Rolled Grain Oriented" Silicon steel:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electrical_steel

Dave

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Dave 32

Re: Never understood the obsession with ICBMs

"Why not just put it into a s. korean shipping container - or a chinese one - or a vietmanese one etc"

Shipping containers are monitored for gamma/x-ray emissions prior to entering the country:

https://www3.epa.gov/radtown/shipping-port-security.html

Given that a fission warhead, based on Plutonium-239 has a fairly high spontaneous fission rate (both from the Pu-239 itself, and from higher order enrichment products), and that the criticality of a bomb core is awfully close to 1.00 to begin with (such that it just needs a slight bit of compression to push the criticality above 1.00), it's going to be sitting there fissioning like crazy (so much so that the core of a fission weapon feels noticeably warm to the touch). And, all of those spontaneous fissions, and the secondary fissions they induce, are going to be spewing gamma rays like crazy. Thus, all one has to do is to look for gamma rays of the energy of those fissions. And, as hot as those gammas are, they're going to be awfully difficult to shield.

Dave

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Dave 32
Coat

Bigger is not better

"He points out that the Starfish Prime tests in 1962 used a 1.4 megaton device and caused limited damage. The much smaller device attributed to the North Koreans, even supposing that it and the missile delivery system work, would cause less damage."

The problem is that bigger is not necessarily better when it comes to EMP weapons. The issue is that a 1.4 megaton device is a fission-fusion type weapon, and the small fission type primary very well may cause ionization of the atmosphere, such that the gamma rays released by the fusion secondary are "shorted out", minimizing the EMP effect of the larger device. Thus, you may get almost as much bang for the buck by using a thin cased fission weapon, as you would with a two or three stage thermonuclear fusion design.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nuclear_electromagnetic_pulse#Weapon_yield

"Hence, small pure fission weapons with thin cases are far more efficient at causing EMP than most megaton bombs."

Now, take that approach, and use somewhere between three to five fission bombs, strategically spread across the continent and timed to go off within a few milliseconds of each other, and bad things happen.

Dave

P.S. I'll get my coat. It's the one with the Aluminum foil beanie in the pocket.

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This post has been deleted by a moderator

Commentard Quizwall experiment ends with more quizzing than commenting

Dave 32
Coat

Beans

Why am I reminded of that musical jingle:

"Beans, beans, the musical fruit..."

Dave

P.S. Oh, dear, I've went off on a tangent, haven't I? But, surely, you expected a comment about flatulence, didn't you? Never mind. I'll get my coat. It's the one with the pocket full of beans.

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Ancient IETF 'teapot' gag preserved for posterity as a standard

Dave 32
Pint

Re: As mentioned elsewhere

I seem to remember that a Coke (TM) machine even predates the coffee pot:

http://www.cs.cmu.edu/~coke/

Dave

P.S. Hmm, maybe a beer machine should have been even earlier?

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US military gets authority to shoot down citizens' small drones

Dave 32
Coat

Re: 250 sized racing quads

Why did I just have the mental picture form of a US Air Force A-10 Thunderbolt II, with it's GAU-8 Avenger 30 mm gatling gun cannon loaded with rat-shot?

Dave

P.S. I'll get my coat. It's the one with the pockets full of tickets to a show like that.

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Dave 32
Pint

Drone Slayer

We already have the Drone Slayer in Kentucky:

https://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/2017/03/judge-rules-in-favor-of-drone-slayer-dismisses-lawsuit-filed-by-pilot/

It looks like Russian drones, though, are the preferred military drones:

http://www.dailystar.co.uk/news/latest-news/633311/russia-news-ukraine-vladimir-putin-ammo-dump-attack-drone-grenade-explosion-video-sanction

Dave

P.S. Can Skynet be far behind?

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Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg: Crypto ban won't help trap terrorists

Dave 32
Coat

Old School

Some inks are delible (as opposed to the more common indelible inks). Thus, the process of steaming an envelope open very well may cause the ink to run and smear. Will it be enough to make it unreadable? I don't know; I've never tried it. The trick, of course, may be finding a suitable delible ink, given that most ball-point pens are indelible. However, some fountain pen inks are delible (Yes, one of my hobbies is using a fountain pen; Used one all though high school and college. And, it's getting darned hard to find good ones any more, but they are still available, if you look hard enough. Oh, and don't knock over the ink well. That makes one h*ll of a mess, even with delible inks. That's why desks used to have a depression, so as a safe place to sit the ink well. But, when's the last time anyone saw a desk with an ink well depression in it?).

As for the recording the return addresses, as mentioned by another poster, I don't know of any post office which does verification on return addresses (well, unless the letter is refused and returned). So, I could put my return address as Donald Trump, 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue, etc., and almost no one would notice.

As for ripping the envelope open, and replacing it, remember that one of the spy techniques used in the past was to place a microdot under the stamp. Thus, the contents of the letter were totally useless. But, the recipient would steam the stamp off and remove the microdot with the secret information on it. Ok, so photographic methods have mostly disappeared by now. But, couldn't a similar technique be done with a laser printer with sufficiently high resolution? Who wants to try it? (Oh, note that the information being printed doesn't have to be Latin-alphabet text. It can be something like a QR code, or some type of dot matrix encoding. And, even if someone did find this, would they have a clue as to how to decode it?).

Also, don't forget that it was common practice, in decades past, to write a normal letter, and then to go back and write a secret message in invisible ink (One of the more common "invisible inks" was lemon juice.). How many people even look for invisible ink any more?

There are probably LOTS more techniques I haven't mentioned. Just remember "Those who do not learn from the past are doomed to repeat it.".

Dave

P.S. I'll get my coat. It's the one with a copy of "Between Silk and Cyanide: A Codemaker's War 1941-1945" by Leo Marks, in the pocket. Oh, that's a thoroughly enjoyable book, for anyone with an interest in the SOE, or the history of WWII, or cryptography...

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The ultimate full English breakfast – have your SAY

Dave 32
Pint

Proper Breakfast

A proper breakfast really should include Canadian Bacon. The only problem, though, is that if you go to Canada, and try to order Canadian Bacon, all you'll get will be strange stares. :-(

Dave

P.S. Hey, yeah, beer for breakfast.

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.. ..-. / -.-- --- ..- / -.-. .- -. / .-. . .- -.. / - .... .. ... then a US Navy fondleslab just put you out of a job

Dave 32
Mushroom

Morse Code

They could always draft some old ham radio operators. Quite a few of us still know Morse Code.

Then, again, would you really want a bunch of grumpy old men (and women) sailing around on boats with nuclear weapons on board?

Dave

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Blunder down under: self-driving Aussie cars still being thwarted by kangaroos

Dave 32
Pint

Frozen Chicken

I'm surprised that no one has mentioned hitting a frozen chicken. Oh, wait, wrong kind of vehicle. ;-)

The problem with American deer is that they dream of being actors/actresses. And, they frequently mistake headlights for spotlights. So, when they see those beams approaching them on the road, they absolutely must stop and do their rendition of a tap-dance. I think it goes two steps to the right, a hop to the left, and then spin around. Of course, by that time, there's usually an almighty PLOP, and a US$3000 bill for the owner of the car. :-(

I had a buddy who encountered one of these tap-dancing deer at speed late one night. Luckily, his wife had moved from the passenger seat to the back seat, because, when the PLOP occurred, there was also a mighty shattering of glass, and he looked over to see the bloody remains of the deer smeared all over his passenger seat. It seems that they're just about the right height to fly over the hood (bonnet), smash into the windshield (windscreen), and are heavy enough to penetrate it.

Now y'all know why most of the rednecks have pickup trucks with huge bush-bars on the front. ;-)

Dave (who happens to own a pickup truck...

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Leaked NSA point-and-pwn hack tools menace Win2k to Windows 8

Dave 32
Coat

Leaked NSA point-and-pwn hack tools menace Win2k to Windows 8

And, what makes you think that SB would have sold them an exclusive copy of the purloined tools? Maybe they'd sell them a copy, and then, next month, they'd sell the Russians a copy, and the Chinese a copy, and the Norks a copy, and....

Dave

P.S. I'll get my coat. It's the one with the non-exclusive copy of the SB tools in the pocket.

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Sysadmin 'trashed old bosses' Oracle database with ticking logic bomb'

Dave 32
Pint

Serial Numbers

Most companies track items via serial numbers (I know, because it's the time of the year when I have to do the annual equipment audit, which means I have to go around checking all of my equipment, and verifying that the serial numbers match what's in the database. Can you say "Mostly a waste of time"?). So, anyone who even had half a clue (or even a quarter of a clue) should have known that turning in a laptop with a different serial number would, eventually, ring all sorts of alarm bells. :-(

Dave

P.S. Is it Beer-o-clock yet?

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BOFH: Defenestration, a solution to Solutions To Problems We Don't Have

Dave 32
Pint

Basement

Sadly, over here, they often put I/T departments in the basement. It does make it a bit more challenging to push the boss out the window, but, where there's a will... ;-)

Dave

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Boeing-backed US upstart reckons it'll be building electric airliners

Dave 32

Re: Catapult takeoff?

Darn, y'all beat me to the catapult takeoff idea. Oh, well, great minds think alike, and all that.

As for the 3-4 gs, I've personally experienced a sustained 3.5Gs (courtesy of a NASA centrifuge), and, while not what I'd call comfortable, it wasn't exactly painful (It did make me want to toss my cookies when I turned my head, although I was able to suppress the urge, just barely.). Still, that was back while I was still rather young and in good physical shape. I'm not sure an octogenarian, or someone with heart problems, would fare nearly as well.

Dave

P.S. I'll get my coat. It's the one with the "Astronaut Training Guide" in the pocket.

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Sorry eh? Canadian mounties own up: Yes, we own 10 IMSI-catchers

Dave 32
Pint

It was the Russians!

Down south of the border, someone would claim that it was the Russians.

Dave

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Crafty Fokker: Norfolk surgeon builds Red Baron triplane replica

Dave 32
Coat

I remember attending a talk that Cole Palen (RIP), of Old Rhinebeck Aerodrome fame, gave 30 years ago, or so. He stated that one of the reasons that the Fokker Dr.1 was so successful was that it was aerodynamically unstable. It required constant input from the pilot to keep it flying straight and level. Absent that continuous input, it would tend to spiral out of control. But, as a result, it was also very adept at turning quickly, much more so than some of the Allied fighters of the time.

http://oldrhinebeck.org/

Also, as of that time, there had been several reproductions of Fokker Dr.1s built, but all of them had lengthened the fuselage, in order to increase aerodynamic stability. From the article, it appears that this reproduction may be original with respect to the length. If that's the case, then I wish the pilot well.

Plus, the Germans had mastered the art of the interrupter for the machine guns, so that they could fire through the propeller arc, without shredding the propeller. That allowed the guns to be mounted so that the pilot could sight down them directly, rather than having them offset, as the Allies were required to do.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Synchronization_gear#Fokker.27s_Synchronizer_and_other_German_gears

As for the Lycoming four cylinder engine, that's quite a deviation from the original design, which used an Oberursel Ur.II 9 cylinder rotary engine. The rotary engines contributed, somewhat, to the handling problems of the original planes, since the heavy mass of the engine, spinning as it did, created a rather tremendous gyroscopic effect. As such, planes with rotary engines tended to turn and dive in one direction much better than the other direction, and exceptional pilots tended to recognize this, and make predictions on which way an opposing pilot would turn while in a dog-fight.

Of course, rotary engines presented a BUNCH of rather serious problems. One was that they were two stroke engines, with the oil being mixed in with the gasoline. The throttle was typically set in a fixed position, and power was controlled by controlling how many cylinders fired on each revolution of the engine. In order to avoid fouling the spark-plugs, Castor Oil was frequently used. Unfortunately, the exhaust stream of these engines tended to direct a lot of the exhaust gases, which contained a fair amount of the unburned Castor Oil, back into the pilot's face. Consuming Castor Oil has a certain effect on the human digestive system. Not all emergency landings were due to mechanical problems with the plane!

Even with the lubrication system, the lifetime of a typical rotary engine was approximately 25 hours between rebuilds. OUCH!

Maybe that Lycoming 4 cylinder engine isn't such a bad idea.

Dave

P.S. I'll get my coat. It's the one with the roll of toilet tissue in the pocket.

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Pong, anyone? How about Pong on a vintage oscilloscope?

Dave 32

Re: Kudos for the effort....

<sigh> This makes me feel old...

There was a version of a pong circuit which was published in, I think, Popular Electronics magazine a little over 40 years ago (I seem to remember a rather dark cover with a green image.). I remember saving up my lunch money to buy a copy. I never built the device, but it was interesting to study the schematic.

Dave

P.S. I'll get my coat. It's the one with the punched cards in the pocket.

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It's 30 years ago: IBM's final battle with reality

Dave 32
Coat

Re: succesful standard

Ah, you forgot about the 2.88MB floppy disks.

I happen to have an IBM PS/2-model 9595 sitting here under the desk with one of those drives in it. ;-)

Ah, yes, the model 9595; those had that little 8 character LED "Information Panel" display on the front of the case. It only took a tiny bit of programming to write an OS/2 device driver to turn that into a time-of-day clock. For years, that was the only thing that I ran on that 9595 (I called it my "600 Watt clock".).

Hmm, why was there suddenly a price spike for old IBM PS/2-model 9595 machines? ;-)

Dave

P.S. I'll get my coat; it's the one with the copy of Warp in it.

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How to leak data from an air-gapped PC – using, er, a humble scanner

Dave 32
Coat

Hmmm

I may (or may not; you'll have to decide) have some knowledge of secure buildings/systems.

Some installations do not allow outside repair personnel into restricted areas. Any failing equipment must be removed from the restricted area, which usually requires "sanitizing" the equipment. Any equipment reinstalled in the restricted area must be examined and approved for information leakage purposes. This gets around the issue of the "copier repair" person having access to the restricted area, or from removing the hard disk from the copier that contains copies of all of the images ever scanned (Look it up if you don't believe me!).

As for the scanner, remember that most Silicon photosensors are highly sensitive to infrared, well, unless a rather expensive infrared filter has been installed on them. So, just mount an infrared laser on the drone and have it sit 250 feet away from the building and pump out infrared all day (Or, mount the laser on a fixed item, such as another building, or a television/cell-phone tower, or...). Yeah, the window will absorb/reflect some of the infrared, but probably not too much for near infrared. How many high security installations regularly do an infrared scan of their buildings? (Darn. Just gave away a new job opportunity!).

If y'all want to do some research in the library, go look up how early black epoxy encapsulated transistors were sensitive to infrared light, so much so that removing the cover from a piece of equipment, and holding a light over it would dramatically change the bias conditions on the circuits being examined. The problem, as it turned out, was that that "black" epoxy was only black for optical wavelengths of light; For infrared light, it was almost completely transparent. That's been fixed now. Mostly.

That still leaves LEDs exposed, and LEDs can make great photosensors, at least if the circuit that they're wired into makes for reading from the port pin that the LED is connected to (And, when is the last time any of you examined the circuit connections for the machine you're using, with LEDs on it? Heck, when they're connected to an IC, can you even guess whether that pin on an IC is an output, an input, or some programmable combination of I/O?).

Of course, rather than going to all of the trouble to fit a laser on a drone, it'd probably be easier to just drop a pr*n magazine outside the building, with the commands/data encoded steganographically in some of the images. (Darn! I'm giving away all of my good ideas today.).

As for getting hired in as a janitor, the other option is to get hired in as a security guard. Not too long after the introduction of the PC, one of the security guards at the place I worked at was caught loading up the trunk of his car with the company's PCs. Whoopsie.

Then, again, it's sometimes easier just to call the network administrator and tell them that you forgot your password. :-(

Dave

P.S. I'll get my coat. It's the one with the punched card deck in the pocket that's labeled "Top Secret".

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Europe to push new laws to access encrypted apps data

Dave 32
Coat

Re: Back to the future

Oh, sort of like the messages, intended for the French Underground/Resistance, transmitted in the clear by the BBC, just prior to the D-Day landings, during World War II?

Everything old is new again?

Dave

P.S. I'll get my coat. It's the one with a pocket full of message slips, with phrases such as "John has a brown cow.", "Becky has a large garden."

4
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Samsung plans Galaxy Note 7 fire sale

Dave 32
Coat

Re: ET Atari games

Alamogordo, New Mexico landfill, 728,000 game cartridges:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/E.T._the_Extra-Terrestrial_(video_game)

Dave

P.S. I'll get my coat. It's the one with the "Missile Command" cartridge in the pocket.

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UK digital minister Matt Hancock praises 'crucial role' of encryption

Dave 32
Coat

Encryption

Well, the obvious problem is that people are using the wrong encryption algorithm. What needs to happen is that everyone needs to start using ROT13 to encrypt their data. Then, there will be perfect security, yet the government will be able to break it when needed. For really secure data, people can even resort to doubly encrypting their data with ROT13.

Dave

P.S. I'll get my coat. It's the one with the Jefferson Disks in the pocket.

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Dave 32
Pint

Inventor of the radio?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reginald_Fessenden

Dave

0
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How Ford has slammed the door on Silicon Valley's autonomous vehicles drive

Dave 32
Pint

Re: ... start your vehicle and warm it up from inside the house on a cold day...

I have to wonder how many police officers, firemen, ambulance crewmen, etc., would fall victim to this rule?

Locally, there was a report of a bar fight which was telephoned into the local police agency. A police officer responded, in his patrol car, and slid it to a stop outside the bar (lights going and all that). He ran into the bar, which was dead quiet, and asked the bored bartender where the fight was. Turns out that there was no fight. But, when the police officer left the bar, he found that his patrol car was gone! Whoopsie!

Dave

P.S. They found it parked on the side of a major road, about 8 miles away, with the lights still going, but with it out of gasoline. I don't think they ever did catch the person who stole it.

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BOFH: Don't back up in anger

Dave 32
Coat

Re: Ooooh...

What elephant? Oh, so you're seeing imaginary elephants in the dining room? What colour are they? Pink, perhaps? Exactly what have you been drinking, or what kind of drugs have you been taking? Should you really be coming to work after you've consumed those items? ;-)

Dave

P.S. I'll get my coat. It's the one with the pocket full of peanuts.

5
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NASA finds India's missing lunar orbiter with Earth-bound radar

Dave 32
Coat

Doppler?

It would be interesting to know if they determined the orbital speed of the craft by using the doppler shift of the returned signal. Of course, to do that, they'd have to factor in the ground motion of the transmitting and receiving stations, as well as the motion of the Moon (libration and other).

Dave

P.S. I'll get my coat. It's the one with the radar detector in the pocket.

1
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Time crystals really do exist, say physicists*

Dave 32
Coat

Morin Transition

Sounds sort of like a Morin Transition, only using laser radiation rather than thermal radiation (phonons) to excite the system.

Dave

P.S. I'll get my coat. It's the one with the pocket full of Hematite.

2
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Spy satellite scientist sent down for a year for stowing secrets at home

Dave 32
Pint

Re: And the rest...

While she reportedly did have a security clearance, most classified information is shared on a "Need to know" basis, and it was presumed that she did not have a need to know about that particular bit of classified information.

Dave

P.S. On the other hand, even the internal telephone book tends to be classified in most places.

0
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Dave 32
Coat

Re: [red pen]

I think that's one of those British versus American things:

https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/dove#Verb

https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/pled#Verb

Dave

1
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Hold 'em, don't fold 'em: How to bite Bitcoin pools

Dave 32
Coat

Re: house of cards question

> It could be used for another cryptocurrency

But, wouldn't the next cryptocurrency be based on SHA-512, or SHA-3? That would make all of those SHA-256 ASICs even more obsolete.

Dave

P.S. I'll get my coat. It's the one with the pockets full of corned beef HASH.

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BOAR-ZILLA stalks Fukushima's dead zone

Dave 32
Pint

Self-cooking Bacon

Yum! Need I say more?

Dave

5
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BONG! Lasers crack Big Ben frequency riddle BONG! No idea what to do with this info BONG!

Dave 32
Coat

Chladni Patterns

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ernst_Chladni#Chladni_figures

Dave

P.S. I'll get my coat. It's the one with the vibrating pocket.

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