* Posts by Graham 25

121 posts • joined 19 Jun 2009

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EU's tech giant tax plan moves forward

Graham 25

Indeed. This has always been the problem with people who use Amazon and complain that Amazon doesn't pay much.

So they sit at home, and go online to a foreign website, owned by a foreign company, and order stuff which is mostly made overseas, which is paid for on a credit card held by a foreign bank most likely, and the goods are shipped from overseas to the customer (via a UK distribution warehouse).

Squeeze too much and the warehouse shuts down, the people lose their jobs and the Royal Mail/DHL or whomever gets to deliver a parcel from an overseas warehouse. Slight increase in shipping costs to the consumer - massive loss of jobs in the UK.

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Graham 25

Re: Silly people, they already have the mechanism

How will you enforce the fines when they simply move offshore and tell people to use the internet as before ?

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Graham 25

"European countries are furious that under the current rules, digital companies are only taxed on profits"

I thought that all companies are taxed on profits, via Corporation Tax.

What is the EU going to do if Google, Facebook and others go entirely offshore - block the most popular parts of the Internet ?

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MP brands 1,600 CSC layoffs as the 'worst excesses of capitalism'

Graham 25

Re: The 'worst excesses of capitalism'

"the bitterness of poor quality is remembered long after"

Yes, some of us with longer memories remember thats what you got asking the Uk workers to deliver.

People should not assume that if its delivered from the UK, that it will be of a better quality. The only thing you can be certain about is that it will cost more and there will be more industrial action.

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To Hull with the crap town naysayers: UK Culture City's got some amazing... telecoms

Graham 25

Re: Needs more than culture

Got any evidence for that claim ?

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If only our British 4G were as good as, um, Albania's... UK.gov's telco tech report

Graham 25

Re: is anyone surprised?

Yes, that train makes a difference. Windows are tinted slightly using a metallic layer in the middle of the laminated glass, and that metal acts as a Faraday barrier. It depends entirely upon the glass and the train makers choices. Its a well known issue in the rail industry and just one of many reasons which high speed data will not be available on the deep tube sections of London Underground.

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Graham 25

Its not an excuse.

You may understand IT but try understanding the laws of physics and radio propagation. Higher frequencies = faster fall off of signal so overlapping cell sites at 2G have gaps in 3G in rural area, and the gaps get bigger and bigger for 4G and for 5G.

The rest of the rant is irrelevant. Go read a physics book.

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Graham 25

The problem with the UK is that because we were early users of 2G, the majority of cell sites were put in place to suit GSM coverage and as we move to 3G, 4g and 5G, the cells will be much smaller and more towers will be needed - a LOT of towers.

Try telling Joe Public that if they want 4G or even 5G they will have to have a lot more cell towers near them and they will throw a wobbly and will try and ignore the laws of physics.

Developing countries never had a 2G network in rural areas at all, and so when they get 4G, the cell towers are in the right place.

Its a acse of the laws of physics versus the British mentality to expect coverage without towers and of course, never to actually pat for the 10,000 towers needs to give some sheep coverage in a Scottish valley with a road going through it.

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Brits think broadband more important than mobes, cars or savings

Graham 25

Re: Those in large contry houses...

"The sooner Openreach are forced into a separate holding company (and Oi! Ofcom! Don't forget the razor wire ringfence!) the better."

So you're one of those people who think that Openreach being a separate company will mean the laws of economics will no longer apply and will be able to borrow money as cheaply as BT ? If its uneconomical to provide a service to which you clearly feel entitled now, what makes you think a new supplier with less money will be able to make 1+1=3 ?

Let me know when the sound of reality crashing down on you becomes too much to bear.

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Shamoon malware returns to again wipe Saudi-owned computers

Graham 25

Well its not as if the Aramco Cyber team in Dammam got stuck in a fight between IT and Corporate Security on who the team should report to - to IT to hide their incompetence or to Corporate Security to sack the corporate IT folks who fought against the recovery programme as to do otherwise would imply it was their fault in the first place is it ?

Its not as if the locals plug in USB sticks all the time is it ?

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Ofcom to force a legal separation of Openreach

Graham 25

Re: Openreach to the installs & repairs - facours BT customers

"Anyone who has ................ know " is usually followed by an unsubstantiated claim.

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Graham 25

Re: Explanation please...

Spot one - too many halfwits think that having Openreach as an independent body will suddenly mean it will fibre the entire country and defy the laws of economics and put in £100,000 of cables, dig up miles of roads to serve a dozen homes who only want to pay £7 a month for it.

On its own, Openreach will have even less financial clout and won't be able to borrow much to invest because it will be seen as being easily dominated by Ofcom.

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China gets mad at Donald Trump, threatens to ruin Apple

Graham 25

Re: Thin Skin

Apple can diversify whatever it wants, but its supply chain resides in China by and large. The reason the iPhone costs so little to make is because all the components are made in the factory next door.

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End all the 'up to' broadband speed bull. Release proper data – LGA

Graham 25

Re: Er... ? Comparing different providers to the same property?!

Spot on - the same half-wits who do not understand what 'up to' means are the same people who think that switching between ISPs who use the exact same final connection will give them a better speed.

FWIW my parents two next door neighbours get 7Mb connections on ADSL, and my father gets 2.4Mbit despite bing on the same cable, and we have tweaked, adjusted, playe with the terminating equipment with the ISP.

Bad copper is just bad copper.

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Free Windows 10 upgrade: Time is running out – should you do it?

Graham 25

The Old Adage appplies

If it aint broke, don't try and fix it.

To the average user, there is zero 'need' to upgrade.

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Telco bosses' salaries must take heat for cyber attacks, says MPs' TalkTalk enquiry

Graham 25

How about Parliamemtarians salaries are docked if they fail to do their job properly ?

If it's good enough for industrialists, then only fairs fair for the idiots in government and public service.

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Your broadband speeds are up by 6Mbps, boasts UK watchdog Ofcom

Graham 25

Re: Urban areas

Maybe the laws of physics and more importantly, an education in economics would help ?

Nobody, and I mean nobody, is going to spend tens if not hundreds of thousands of pounds putting fibre into locations with no return.

Actually, a dictionary definition of 'uneconomic' might be helpful as well.

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So where has the legal 'right' to 10Mbps broadband gone?

Graham 25

"But the Good Sinking Ship Cameron is willing to spend more than £50bn on a train set that will never be profitable."

It may not in itself be profitable, but in terms of economic value by taking thousands of car journeys off the road etc, it will yield a benefit.

No modern railway upgrade has ever turned out to be a white elephant - they all get full up and not to slowly either. I understand why affected people dont like it, and why lefties think they can ignore the problem and give the money away to the homeless, but it will get filled up, it will be popular and after a few short years, people will wonder how on earth we ever managed with out iy.

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Graham 25

Re: That is not competition

"Just "increasing competition" is not going to make the final 5% any easier to reach."

Spot on.

Too many technologically and economically illiterate folks out there expect £50k investment for their broadband line and expect to only pay £20 a month.

1+1=2 and not any number you may otherwise want.

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Doctor Who: Even the TARDIS key can't unpick the chronolock in Face the Raven

Graham 25

Rule #1

The Doctor Lies ...... remember that.

And remember The Rebel Flesh / The Almost People......

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Five things that doomed the big and brilliant BlackBerry 10

Graham 25

"and intent to keep it until it falls apart or becomes unusable. And then, I'll be looking for replacements."

there's one POS being used as a door stop you can buy from me :)

Truly awful - its sole redeeming feature was that nobody sane would steal it for their own use.

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'Why don't you buy from foreign sites?' asks Commish, snapping on the gloves

Graham 25

Because when I order something, I'd like to know that if there is a problem, then shipping it back isn;t a problem.

Quite apart from the concept of buying from a local based organisation (even if a multinational) and keeping local folks in jobs -I bought a Videocamera about 10-12 years ago, when DV tape cameras were the best available, but when it had a problem it cost me a small fortune in shipping and insurance to get it there for repair.

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Tax Systems: The good, the bad and the completely toot toot ding-dong loopy

Graham 25

Waffle waffle waffle.

if there is a larger tax take, then everyone assumes some other poor sod is the one paying the extra tax.

The people who go on about changing things are the ones that should not be allowed any responsibility.

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Is EU right to expand 'right to be forgotten' to Google.com?

Graham 25

"Someone reads it inside the EU, a copy of that Californian website thereby being published inside a browser in the EU, and EU law does apply."

No.

Someone inside the EU is communicating with something in the US. The information is in the US and the EU person is bringing it into the EU - the US source is publishing nothing.

Its like telephoning someone in the US and then saying that the person in the US is bound by legal decisions based in the EU and so cannot talk about things the EU has decided shouldn't be disclosed.

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End well: this won't. European Copyright Society wants one EU law to rule 'em all

Graham 25

Re: Harmonization = everyone must accept the worst common denominator

The countries with more pro-creator copyright laws will be forced to accept the laws of the parasitic countries that have been stealing and cloning other peoples works for years.

FTFY

Anyone see eastern European countries voting to do anything except solve their problems with selling hooky copies of things other people create ?

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Lawyers mobilise angry mob against Apple over alleged 2011 Macbook Pro crapness

Graham 25

Re: Lawyers

Yes Apple is the liable entity no doubt.

When you say that the consumer purchased a product that didn't work well, do you have any data on that ?

I am guessing that the number affected is very small and Apple replaced and/or repaired any faults just like they do with all items so i cannot see what the lawyers are doing other than trying to make money.

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Google ordered to tear down search results from its global dotcom by French court

Graham 25

Not the same

The Argentinians agreed, in writing to US Court jurisdiction - specifically the NY courts, in a limited set of circumstances, for specific bonds. They then took advantage of this agreement to get a loan , and are now refusing to accept the jurisdiction they previously agreed to, purely because they don't like the consequences of sticking to the agreement - like repaying 100% of the borrowers on the same terms.

This case is like the Argentinians trying to sell land on the Falkland Islands and getting all snippy when its pointed out the land isn't theirs.

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Turn OFF your phone or WE'LL ALL DI... live? Europe OKs mobes, tabs non-stop on flights

Graham 25

welcome to the 21st century

Some of the comments herein suggest that this is all new fangled stuff. Its not.

Emirates long haul 380's and the occasional 777 ER aircraft have had in air wifi and OnAir mobile phone roaming, so a couple of things;

1. Wifi is severely congested on an aircraft where I pay $10 for about 100Mb of data - its good for messaging but forget everything else, even browsing. i doubt many people actually use it so an aircraft full of kiddies simply won't be a useable service.

2. Few people use the mobile phone option, as others have suggested as the facility is punitively expensive (good news there then)

I share peoples concern over the yakking 16 year old with a phone welded to their ear 24/7 no longer having to STFU during a flight. They might get away with it once, but when their parents get the first bill, then roaming suddenly becomes no longer an option on their tariff and sweet silence returns.

The biggest concern for me if it takes off (pun intended) is whether its very long before the first cellular phone blockers go active onboard a flight and those are going to be a worse scenario from a safety point of view.

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DON’T add me to your social network, I have NO IDEA who you are

Graham 25

Good article ....

Remember to choose the Ignore option, but to keep the mouse in the same place and you get the option to report as spam. If they do it enough, they lose their messaging privileges :)

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Comcast exec says wired broadband customers should pay-as-they-go

Graham 25

The problem is not Netflix, or an upstream competition issue.

its the lack of consumer choice for the supplier of the connectivity to the home. If Comcast had real competition by say, five or six effective alternatives like in a lot of the rest of the developed world, then they would STFU and concentrate on being more competitive rather than figuring out how they can screw the customer who has no choice.

http://www.npr.org/blogs/money/2014/04/04/299060527/episode-529-the-last-mile

America gets what it wants and deserves for that choice.

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France bans managers from contacting workers outside business hours

Graham 25

"Yeah, sure: Dress it up and play sexy. Let's pretend every 11am call is of critical importance and all the cool cats in the office are taking them.

I'm calling 'horse-shit' on that, though.

Because we all know that 95% of 11pm calls are because someone has lost a password, failed to read an email properly, can't follow instructions, or just wants their hand held because they are being a scaredy-cat can't take the responsibility of making a decision on their own. Ergo: A waste of fscking time that they could have avoided by way of having to think for five minutes before reaching for the phone."

I understand your perspective but to imagine your rather narrow base of experience is somehow representative of how the rest of your organisation actually works is somewhat naive. You clearly have no involvement with fee paying clients who keep your company and you in money, and other such nice things. Your experience is somewhat limited to the narrow field you illustrate.

Just this Thursday afternoon (based in UAE so weekend started an hour later) client asks for a best and final offer on a proposal , by close of play Sunday. This involves liaison with the UK who work on a different weekend a different timezone. This will involve a lot of people on a deal trying to keep their jobs. I am not making this up - this did happen on Thursday. One of my guys is off on a flight to the UK today (Saturday) so he can work with the team there - who are sensible enough to decide themselves whether answering the phone is appropriate or not.

So what do we do - ignore all the calls on the Friday asking for advice, and then have them refuse to answer on the day before submission and the day itself ? or hope we are bidding against a French company who won;t even read the email regarding the deadline?

Losing that bid means a lot of people who are directly affected and to suggest this is unreal is somewhat silly on your part. Just because you are not in a client facing part of the organisation does not mean their experience is valid. They keep you in a job and maybe you ought to think about that next time you stand up for your rights to the point you pick up your P45.

Remember that clients don't owe you a living and they can take the business elsewhere, and that standing up for your rights is fine until you lose your job..

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Graham 25

Fascinating. This reads just like a set of comments from the Guardian, from people whose jobs have never hung in the balance.

That is, okay in theory but in practice, unworkable. You can just see a group of people working on a 'must win or lose your job because the company folds' opportunity, simply turning off their mobile because the law says so. Try working in a multinational across timezone differences where this rule applies - because it will not. People will take their business elsewhere.

Fine, ignore the phone, ignore the email as instructed but when you come into work on Monday and find you have been out manoeuvred by a foreign company who used that extra time to do something which put them ahead of you. You lose that important piece of business, your company suffers, and ultimately you lose your job and end up wishing that someone would call you during their work hours while you sit around in your pyjamas.

Yes, it would be nice if such rules were universally applied across industry but such rules will never be applied in an international market like that on this plane of existence and doing it will eventually result in your business suffering and people will lose jobs as a result.

And God knows the French have enough problems with job creation without wondering how they will replace yet more lost jobs, due to another nail in the coffin of productivity.

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'iPhone 6' with '4.7-inch' display 'coming soon', but '5.5-incher' 'delayed'

Graham 25

Four icons or five ?

I don't spend any time looking at all these alleged images of lager iPhones, but all those I have seen, seem to show the same layout of icons as the iPhone 5.

If the screen were bigger, surely folks would increase the icon count per page ?

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Google and Apple in DRAG RACE: It's fanboi Mercs VS fandroid Audis

Graham 25

iPhone 3GS is still supported .....

in the Audi MMI. Along with the 4 as well. Cradles still available for both, but not for the 5 because its bit longer than the space in the armrest.

I have two Audis - one owned in the UK, one leased oversees and they already work fine with Apple.

Why on earth would I want to spoil a car by adding more toys and gimmicks to it ? As you have said, its unnecessary.

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Google deletes Maps satellite photos of 14-year-old's unsolved murder

Graham 25

Streisand effect in action

Distressing as it would be for the family, perhaps if they hadn't made a big issue of it with the press, nobody would have come across it.

No, I didn't go and look.

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Android mobes outsell iPhones, but Apple gets MORE PROFIT THAN ALL

Graham 25

Could someone explain ......

The article goes on about Apple profits compared with Android profits.....

I thought Android was a largely free OS which various manufacturers of hardware use, to power their phones and so any profits are mostly split up between the myriad of manufacturers, and the profits cover the hardware, distribution, manufacturing and of course some for the OS supplier.

Is the comparison valid then ? Can someone correct me please ?

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Alcatel-Lucent slashes 10,000 jobs worldwide

Graham 25

Only a French manufacturing company could go for seven years of losses without being restructured surely.

Who else would put up with it ?

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Samsung isn't alone: HTC profits take a huge dive

Graham 25

Apple won't have (as much of) problem because their profit per handset is much higher.

When volume drops HTC/Samsung will suffer, Apple less so.

Reasons for purchase are irrelevant.

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What do you mean WHY is Sony PS4 so pricey in Oz?

Graham 25
FAIL

It's just another Guardianista whinge

Anyone who suffers from low blood pressure should try reading the Guardian as its enough to make any sane persons blood boill with the rampant hatred, outright lies and utter contempt for the law and common sense.

It's become the Daily Mail of the left wing radicals and while it was originally the bastion of genuine concern for the poor and downtrodden it's only theme is take money from those who are successful and earn it and give it to those who are not because its unfair otherwise.

To the Guardianisa, consoles should be provided free on the NHS so everyone can have one without having the embarrassment of having to work for the money to buy one, and of course everyone who creates such a technological marvel should do it for free.

The communist party of the Soviet bloc had nothing on the frothing mouth lunatics of the Guardian CiF these days so the above article is a thinly veiled attempt at suggesting the manufacturers should ignore the entire economic system and give them away for free to their Socialist brothers down under, as nobody in the Znorthern hemisphere would give them the time of day.

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Psst, wanna block nuisance calls? BT'll do it... for a price

Graham 25
Unhappy

Wouldn't it be simpler ?

To just have BT and other UK carriers, block any calls coming from overseas which do not have full CLI attached so at least the recipient knows its a call from overseas and treat it accordingly.

That way, the majority of calls from India for example, can be immediately spotted by the recipient and safely ignored. If the caller then buys a block of UK numbers to use, they pay out up front and then lose them if they spam thereby costing them a small fortune.

My current bane is from the 0843 410 XXXX lot who are working each of those 9,999 CLI's to make automated calls.

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Brits are so outraged by Amazon, they voted it TOP for shopping

Graham 25
Megaphone

This is how it works ..

You go online and go to a foreign hosted website.

You order stuff and you pay with a credit card whose systems are hosted overseas.

The stuff you order is made overseas and is stored overseas.

Your order is sent from overseas to a marshalling store as part of a bulk consignment.

The stuff is delivered to your home by a local carrier or Royal Mail.

You are not nor ever have been, dealing with a UK company. If the laws were changed, they could move their warehouse to mainland Europe and post your stuff to you - it would cost more and you'd have to wait longer. And a lot of folks would lose their jobs.

Thats the reality and there is no way around it.

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Apple's iOS 6 maps STILL muddle Mildura

Graham 25

Anyone else really not care in the slighest ?

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Amazon makes BEELLIONS from British customers, pays pennies in tax

Graham 25
FAIL

Too many outraged Muppets with low IQ's

You buy from a website hosted in a foreign country, owned by a foreign company, and you pay on a credit card whose offices are overseas, on a clearing system also overseas. The goods are made in a foreign country, and are shipped to the UK by a foreign courier, until they arrive in the UK, when the Royal Mail or equivalent, delivers them. They might stay in a storage unit in the UK for a couple of days before delivery and the staff are paid in the UK, pay UK taxes, the warehouse owner pays taxes, and the company pays NI.

So no, Amazon is not a UK company and doesn't pay much in the way of taxes. If they wanted to be awkward, they could pull out of the UK, close down the distributions centre, and move it to Calais, and post the goods from there, and there still won't be aUK company. there will alos be 10,000? less employees in the UK paying taxes, several more empty factory units, a whole lot less NI payments but at least no "UK companies' are avoiding anything.

Karma.

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EU mobe warning system for imminent disasters won't work on iPhone

Graham 25
Pirate

Re: "Four buttons good, one button bad" ?

"Honestly, think about what you've just said there. You're advocating allowing people to die because they don't run fucking Android? Good man."

Its almost as daft as expecting to survive a scenario where they actually need to use a nationwide broadcast facility. If the event is that bad, you may well be better off not knowing the meteorite is coming and the type of handset is completely irrelevant. Besides which, even if your mobile doesn;t get the message, all the other folks around you will get it on theirs.

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Google expects Apple to block its not crap iOS maps app

Graham 25
FAIL

No, not exactly

"Google has piled money into its mapping software for years, having recognized that for many smartphone users (particularly those who drive), mapping is a very important application".

No.

The majority of folks use the route planner on a computer, not on an iPhone. the iPhone options available are more expensive than a standalone unit so people who drive and have an iPhone are actually likely to be a vanishingly small number of iPhone users.

So many cars have satnav as standard so the utility of a mapping and route following programme is marginal at best.

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'Apple's iOS 6 maps app is SHOCKING, rushed and half-baked'

Graham 25
FAIL

Meh ...

Yeah, its far from good. It'll get better though eventually. Its not as if Google maps was perfect first time around is it ?

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UK to hold public consultation on social-media troll prosecutions

Graham 25
Thumb Down

If you want informed debate, don;t involve the great British public.

Do we really want laws set by people who avidly watch X factor, Katie Price and One Direction ?

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EE screams UK iPhone 4G exclusive, rest of pack sobs quietly

Graham 25
WTF?

Anyone got a decent table which clarifies this ?

Seems ideal for a diagram with frequencies on one axis, and operators on another with phone capability mapped out on the area. I'm just confused ....

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iPhone 5 adaptors goldrush begins

Graham 25

Re: Not for me

Not touching Apple because they don;t use USB ?

The phone charges off a USB port.

The phone charges off a USB plug.

You only need one charger - one with a USB port in it for £3 and you;re sorted.,

All the difference is, is a small cable costing 50p which you aready get with every phone.

And thats the best reason you can come up with ?

If you don't want to buy then fair enough but using that as an "excuse" is pretty pathetic.

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UK.gov blacklists Fujitsu from future contracts - report

Graham 25
IT Angle

Re: But who *will* bid for HMG's barely spec'd super-mega projects with 4 yr supplier selection?

The issue with breaking a large project down into smaller contracts is someone has to be responsible for making sure all the bits work when connected back up - something the government is utterly useless at doing as it has neither the skills or the intellect to do.

People frequently forget that most if not all of these 'blacklisted' companies have hundreds or thousands of satisfied, content clients plus the UK government. The problem is the Uk government, its contract structures, its failures to adhere to its side of the contract in almost all cases. Without HMG contracts, these companies would be smaller but do just fine.

Blacklisting wouldn't help in the slightest as eventually everyone gets blacklisted.

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