* Posts by deadlockvictim

637 posts • joined 19 Jun 2009

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Despite high-profile hires, Apple's TV plans are doomed

deadlockvictim

Apple do devices

Apple's forte is in devices. If they want to dominate the home TV space, then they need to work on a TV that is so fine, that it does everything we would like it to do, and more, and that we would want one.

This is setting the bar quite high but Apple has answered such a challenge in the past.

I'm still of the opinion that Apple should go into the games market. They should have just about enough to buy a controlling share of EA. With such a control they could ensure that all games were first released for Apple devices and that games optimised accordingly to give Apple devices an unfair advantage. There may even be an anti-trust suit as a consequence.

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UK and Ecuador working on Assange escape mechanism

deadlockvictim

Compromise

How about this for a compromise?

The governments of Ecuador, the U.K. and Sweden come to an agreement.

Allow the Swedes to hold Assange on trial within the Ecuadorian embassy. Televise the trial live, as an open trial within an embassy is not at all easy.

If Assange is found guilty, then he serves his jail sentence in Ecuador. The U.K. government would let him travel safely to the airport for transport.

This way everybody but the Americans are happy.

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Every time Apple said 'machine learning', we had a drink andsgd oh*][

deadlockvictim

Let me get this right

Apple said at an Apple event that we know what you will want.

Trust us.

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Uber CEO Travis Kalanick has resigned, says report

deadlockvictim

Government Work

I expect that he'll go into Government work. He seems to be the perfect fit for the current U.S. president.

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Ego stroking, effusive praise and promise of billions: White House tech meeting in full

deadlockvictim

So, the federal government will purchase Macintosh computers for all of its employees which they will use to access Office 365, it store all of its data in Azure databases and make all of its purchases through Amazon. Google will handle special ops. It has the data.

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Ever wonder why those Apple iPhone updates take so damn long?

deadlockvictim

Re: Apple vs Google vs Microsoft

You are correct. I realised it too late and the 'edit' button had disappeared.

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deadlockvictim

Re: Apple vs Google vs Microsoft

Sil» Please stop with the old stories about MSFT, do you think that the ~~ 400 millions Windows 10 users, not counting the hundreds of millions of Windows 7 users have nothing else to do than bear ill will ?

My understanding of Microsoft is that they make their profits on server licences — SQL Server, Windows Server and the likes. I am open to correction on this though. It may well be that The Cloud (Azure, subscription-based access to services etc.) becomes a big money maker for them in the future but I haven't read anywhere yet that it has reached the point of serious profitability.

I can only speak from personal experience and people whom I know really don't like the ribbon (I, personally, quite like it) and miss Windows XP and 7. Windows 8-10 may be faster, more energy efficient, safer and less trouble but the UI changes have not been well received,

And Apple is still a hardware company. While they make lots of money from the iTunes Store and apps, they also sell a great many tablets, smartphones, gimmicky devices (as well as a few actual computers). The iTunes Store and the devices go hand-in-hand. One makes the other great.

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deadlockvictim

Apple vs Google vs Microsoft

If Google had done it, my first thought would have been that it was a data-slurping exercise, because this is what Google does. It makes money by connecting all of the various bits of your data and metadata and then selling it to the highest.

Apple, on the other hand, is a hardware company. They want to sell you expensive hardware as often as possible. This means causing as few problems to the end-user as possible, The hardware and software must just work. There must as little hassle as possible. This tactic of theirs, while bold [1] in the extreme, is not at all bad. 30 minutes' separation discomfort and sweet bliss.

Microsoft is a software company and wants you to buy expensive software licences as often as possible. It is caught in the middle. It lacks the panache of Apple and has a much more heterogeneous base than Apple. There might have more goodwill towards Microsoft had they not interfered with their UI as much as they did (the ribbon in Office and all UI changes from Windows 8 onwards).

[1] For Irish readers, it was naughty too.

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Specsavers embraces Azure and AWS, recoils at Oracle's 'wow' factor

deadlockvictim

Re: I Vs we?

Well more along the lines of, I have caused 75 people to be retrained.

He summonsed 75 people into a hall and told them that they would be learning O365.

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Feeling old? Well, we're older than that: Newly found Homo sapiens jaw dates back 350k years

deadlockvictim

Re: Must be fake news

Gordon Pryra» Wont someone think of the sky fairy's?

Won't anyone think of the Sky Fairy's what? Sky Fairy's is in the genitive. It either needs an object or a correction.

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Russian hackers and Britney Spears in one story. Are you OK, Reg?

deadlockvictim

Hit me baby one more time?

Title says it all really.

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No nudity please, we're killing ourselves: Advice to Facebook mods leaks

deadlockvictim

Abortion

Facebook says that aborted foeti may be shown as long as they are not nude.

This implies that Facebook is of the opinion that a foetus is a person, for one doesn't talk about naked (internal) body-parts. Nudity in people is strongly forbidden.

I'm sure that that revelation will exercise many to complain that foeti are not people.

In the meantime, women (and men too, I suppose), if you are planning on televising the abortion of your foetus, please, please, please have the good sense to dress it up tastefully before displaying it all of its glory on Facebook.

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Management's agile, digital (insert buzzword here) strategy ossifying? Blame the Red Queen

deadlockvictim

Management & Sysadmins

IT hardware is expensive, good sysadmins are expensive and a poorly functioning IT infrastructure is very expensive.

In my experience sysadmins aren't especially greedy. With this in mind, I have never understood, why sysadmins are given budgets. The sysadmins should be able to say what they'll need, when (and why, of course) and signed cheques should follow.

Management wants consistency in its IT-infrastructure. IT should be almost invisible and only noticed when its not available. It should allow the company to run smoothly.

In my experience, it is upper management that decides what technologies get used, and, as a rule, it tends to be something expensive like Oracle, anything from Microsoft and the like. As a rule, sysadmins would choose something different, something safer and less disruptive. Furthermore, too much interference by management in the running of IT-systems drives the good sysadmins away and prevents an optimally run IT-services.

In short, my point is that management should look for good sysadmins and let them make the technical decisions. One doesn't go to a doctor and tell him the way you want your condition treated. One doesn't go to a programmer to design a database. One doesn't go to a marketing specialist for decisions on SANs, choice of OS or server hardware.

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Virtual reality upstart UploadVR allegedly had in-house 'kink room,' drugs, rampant sexism

deadlockvictim

Cultural-Marxist/corporate/globalist "equality" wage-slavery/depopulation propaganda

One of the previous ACs complained about «Cultural-Marxist/corporate/globalist "equality" wage-slavery/depopulation propaganda».

This sounds like interesting reading.

Can you recommend any works that incorporate all (or even most) of the above philosophies together?

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Michael Dell? More like Michael in-Dell-nial: No public cloud, no future

deadlockvictim

Public Cloud

Do we really want (let alone need) public Clouds?

It seems to me that they are devices which allow the corporations to extract money from from on a monthly basis rather than whenever you choose (as would be the case if you owned and maintained your own hardware).

They also tether you to an Internet connection, which isn't always to your advantage.

And finally, they give the corporations much more power. And these corporations have been known to become very greedy. Rates can be raised at any time. Outages are your problem, insofar that you have to wait until we fix the problem, but we have you by the short-and-curlies, so there is little that you will do about it. And if you are not happy, you can go through the pain of taking all of your stuff off our Cloud and put it somewhere else. It will cost you though...

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Jimbo announces Team Wikipedia: 'Global News Police'

deadlockvictim

G. Orwell

Those who control the Past, control the Future.

Those who control the Present, control the Past.

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PC sales are up across Europe. You read that right. PC sales are up

deadlockvictim

How could I forget about the Raspberry Pi? Hangs head in shame.

It is well most important computer to come out in the last 20 years.

My apologies all.

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deadlockvictim

Brexiteer

What's wrong with «Brexiteer»? It's a handy neologism to describe the 50%+ of the voting population of the United Queendom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland that voted to secede from the E.U. It has connotations of going forth bravely into a brave new world. I find it useful.

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deadlockvictim

Well, obviously the Brexiteers are waiting to buy Great British computers, once they arrive (or are revived [1]), instead of having all of that foreign muck foisted upon them.

Or the computer buying populace is not at all happy that fall in Sterling has made imported goods more expensive and this is putting many off.

[1] Ah, BBC Micro, we do miss you.

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So, you're 'ISO 27001 accredited', huh? Just saying so doesn't cut it

deadlockvictim

Re: Can be misleading

An ISO 9000-certified company that makes concrete lifevests make good concrete lifevests. They have been certified to be reliably well made. If you don't want concrete lifevests, then this is not the product for you.

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Mondays suck. So why not spend yours playing with an original Mac and games in your browser

deadlockvictim

PRAM batteries

To anyone who has an old mac in the cupboard, open it up and take out the PRAM battery. It is a 3,6V ½AA battery. These were never intended to be left in machines for 30 years and they been known to rupture and ruin and otherwise working motherboard. Most macs don't really need a PRAM battery as it is (some, though, won't start without it).

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UK.gov cuts deal with Microsoft to avoid £15m post-Brexit price hike

deadlockvictim

Re: Cloudy Outlook

Briexit? Rejecting foreign soft cheese for proper hard Cheddar?

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Google fumes after US Dept of Labor accuses ad giant of lowballing pay for women

deadlockvictim

Comparing like with like

Maybe I'm very wrong here, but men tend to be the ones who apply for the technical, code-based roles and women tend to apply for touchy-feely-, style-over-substance- or dealing-with-people-roles, at least in my experience. How can one say that the person at the codeface deserves more or less than the one who spins a very favourable picture of one version of reality for a living?

I was under the impression that Google paid well for the best people, regardless of their sex.

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Gartner halves tech splash forecasts, blames the US dollar

deadlockvictim

Out of interest

How accurate do Gartner's projections tend to be?

Are they like horoscopes, where one only remembers the ones that were correct (confirmation bias?).

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Goodbye, cruel world! NASA's Cassini preps for kamikaze Saturn dive

deadlockvictim

Saturn's atmosphere is cold

Subhead» Only 22 orbits to go before it burns up in glory

Saturn's atmosphere is cold (100K-160K acc. to Wikipedia). Will the heat generated by the atmospheric plunge be enough to burn it in an atmosphere that is -110C?

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Mac Pro update: Apple promises another pricey thing it will no doubt abandon after a year

deadlockvictim

Apple (well, at least the computer side of it anyway) is split in it's personality between her two main co-founders. The Jobs-ian side builds computers that tend towards appliances. They are what the mainstream user would like to have, if they had the money for it. They tend to be elegant in design. the Cube from the late Nineties is the personification of this. The colourful iMacs were the affordable version. They are typically only slightly expandable.

The Woz-ian side builds technically interesting and expandable systems. The Apple II series best express his side of the company.

Every now and then though, they produce machines that express the two sides in harmony, and they are usually workstations or servers. The Mac II series, the G3-G4 series starting with the Blue-&-White Mac and the Aluminium Mac Pros are all good examples of this fusion.

My only wish is that Apple would go for bigger market share with the Macintosh. Jean-Louis Gassée blew their opportunity to have a *much* larger marketshare in the late 1980s. Now that many are dissatisfied with Microsoft after all of their GUI changes to Office and Windows 8 onwards, Apple have the resources and the opportunity to get a Mac inside everyone's home — somthing like an expandable mini-tower that competes with the likes of Asus et al.

They won't do it, of course, because it would mean having to sacrifice their precious and needlessly high profit margins.

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Steppe thugs pacified by the love of stone age women

deadlockvictim

Mitochondrial DNA

Mitochondrial DNA is a marker handed down by women. Offhand I can't think of any genetic markers handed down exclusively from males. There is the Y-Chromosome, I suppose, but that is massive (from a genetic perspective).

If this paper is correct, then the mitochondrial DNA of Europeans should be different from Central Asian women while the male marker should be present in both groups.

Of course, I should actually read the paper...

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Wet, wild Mars stripped off by hot young star, left barren and red faced

deadlockvictim

iron-nickel core

Am I right in inferring the that Mars has no large, magnetic iron-nickel core, because if it did, it would have created a martian van Allen belt and protected Mars from the ionizing particles in the solar winds?

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iPhone-havers think they're safe. But they're not

deadlockvictim

Re: Headline rewrite

But it is true though. People who, as a rule, own and use smartphones and tablets take more care of the safety of the device than they do of the data and metadata that it allows to be harvested. Otherwise they wouldn't be using said device. Smartphones and tablets are data-harvesting devices.

As for a relevant technical background, no, my course of study was in medical science.

As for comprehensive reading skills, there were soooo many words and big ones too.

The article was about malware and mobile devices. I simply commented that since the device owners care little about their data anyway, I can't see them taking much action against malware. From what I see around me, people actively don't want to think about anything bad happening to them on the Internet, so they ignore the dangers they are warned about.

Do you recommend the 'Daily Mail' BTW? I've heard a lot about it and since the Little Englanders have won their freedom from Big Bad Brussels, it seems to express the wishes of the majority. I wonder if the EU will partition the UK the way that Ireland, Cyprus and others were divided after centuries of UK rule?

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deadlockvictim

Headline rewrite

Rather than owners of iPhones thinking that they are safe, I believe that it would be more accurate to say that owners of iPhones (and any other computing device for that matter) don't think about safety at all. Safety to an iPhone owner (etc.) means that the handset is safe rather than the contents. iPhone owners care as much about their data as a patron of a brothel does about fidelity.

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Calling your redundancy programme Baccarat? Immense Bummer, Management

deadlockvictim

client excellence leader

client excellence leader — with a title like this, hanging is too good for him.

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Large Hadron Collider turns up five new particles

deadlockvictim

Re: Strange

One can (and may) approve or disapprove of your comment with 'up' and 'down' respectively too.

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Google's stock rating downgraded as YouTube ad boycott contagion goes global

deadlockvictim

Draining the Swamp

I'm new to U.S. English, but it seems to me that when someone Drains a Swamp, it usually involves giving those in Big Business more power and influence. Maybe they know more about swamps and drains and, are, therefore, the best informed to do it.

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Rap for chat app chaps: Snap's shares are a joke – and a crap one at that

deadlockvictim

Snap reminds of a KitKat ad from the Eighties

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q4VbSbNJWso

(Apologies that the video quality is so poor.)

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Get this: Tech industry thinks journos are too mean. TOO MEAN?!

deadlockvictim

Critical

When I was younger, my sister liked to paint watercolours. Our mother reprimanded me every time I gave a criticism that was not 100% positive. My sister, on the other hand, valued my criticism. It gave her ideas as to where she should work on.

On the same note, I rarely trust anything I read from Microsoft and friends. Because it is usually overhyped, I end up being disappointed (In-Memory OLTP in SQL Server 2014 anyone?) reality rarely meets expectations.

Because El Reg is only behoven to their local publican, I am much more likely to trust the articles and commentary from El Reg than I am from an organisation so heavily dependent upon marketing.

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Munich may dump Linux for Windows

deadlockvictim

Re: Every fecking time someone comes up with these fictional anecdotes.

Concerning that old lady, the shareholders had a meeting and the majority of them voted to promote her and she was then fired as a consequence. It seems that they were much taken by her private e-mail server.

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deadlockvictim

Pain

(This comment has been prompted by the Sad mac picture)

It seems to me as if the City of Munich is taking the masochistic approach to IT (although I suspect that they had a hard time finding enough people to support the tens of thousands of machines).

I'd like to recommend Macintosh System 6 (version 6.0.8 in particular). Mac Pluses for the peons, LCs for the middle managers and speedy (for the time) Mac IIcis for upper managment. Microsoft products are supported. Networking is supported. The Internet might even be supported.

The advantages are staring you in the face — distraction-free writing (although let's hope that no-one finds Tetris or Crystal Quest), your love of inflicting pain upon yourselves and MicroSoft Office before it was called Office. Oh, and ye haven't tried Apple yet, so I want to get in first before I start reading about the City of Munich moving all of her staff to iPhones.

There may be one or two disadvantages (such as the fact that the main source of Macintosh Pluses is now eBay...) but this will be nothing compared to what you are inflicting upon yourself now.

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WINNER! Crush your loved ones at Connect Four this Christmas

deadlockvictim

Poker with Maltesers

I rather like playing poker with children using Maltesers as the thing being gambled. The game is over when all of the Maltesers have been eaten.

Once the children have ventured beyond the safe (and losing position) of only betting when they have a good hand, it becomes quite fun. I'm usually doomed as well at this point.

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Soon only Ticketmaster will rip you off: Concert scalper bots face US ban

deadlockvictim

Re: Local artists & venues offer better experience

Re: sitting down at an AC/DC gig

I think, for many, the spirit is willing but the body is weak. Pains in joints, high blood-pressure and one too many cigarettes haven't helped and the typical fan isn't 17 any more.

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Vegans furious as Bank of England admits ‘trace’ of animal fat in £5 notes

deadlockvictim

Faecal matter

I'd be more concerned about the numbers of faecal bacteria that seems omnipresent and especially on money.

Just thought I'd lower the tone a bit.

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Mac book, whoa! Apple unveils $300 design tome

deadlockvictim

Pretty pictures of Macintoshes

If you are so inclined to want a book with pretty pictures of Macintosh computers (and some other paraphernalia), then I recommend Jonathan Zufi's tome 'iconic' [1]. The price isn't bad for a coffee-table book (£40 on amazon.co.uk) and a good deal cheaper than J. Ive's masterwork.

And it goes back beyond 1998 for all those who need ther Apple III fix.

[1] https://www.amazon.co.uk/ICONIC-Photographic-Tribute-Apple-Innovation/dp/098858171X/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1479297389&sr=8-1&keywords=iconic

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By Juno! NASA delivers first new snaps from Jupiter

deadlockvictim

Re: Missing data

Well, you don't have to worry about Airstrip One going there.

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Apple crumbles: Mac sales slump while Dell, HP Inc, Lenovo shift PCs

deadlockvictim

«Macintosh»

What I'd like to know is what percentage of new machines sold that run the Mac OS were made by Apple.

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Astroboffin discovers exoplanet by accident ... in 1917

deadlockvictim

Re: Grey Dwarf?

For «dirty dwarf», may I nominate Tyrion Lannister?

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Computer says: Stop using MacWrite II, human!

deadlockvictim

Re: We had a Mac network in college in the late 80s.

I had fun with that too, only I used John Cleese's 'Are there any women here today?' from 'The Life of Brian'. The consternation it caused was immense. Ah, happy days.

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Motorola-powered Mac from 1989 used to write smartphone apps

deadlockvictim

caps

Hi Pascal,

This machine is 26 years' old. The caps on the motherboard, the analog-board or the PSU are likely to go soon. I would strongly recommend that you get at least the first two and preferably all 3 re-capped. There are people on sites like 68kmla.org that'll do it for you or at least sell you the capacitors themselves to allow you to do it themselves. The internal SCSI on mine went 2 years' ago and I had my motherboard recapped.

Also, invest in a new PRAM battery. They are 3.6V ½AAs. They cost about €10. The red and white Maxell brand batteries have a notorious reputation. They are known to explode and destroy keyboards. I don't think that anyone expected that machines would still be in use well into what was then the new century.

Lastly, I would recommend that you invest in a SCSI2SD. It is an adaptor that allows you to plug a micro-SD card into the 50-pin SCSI inside the SE/30. This has three benefits — it makes your SE/30 much, much quieter, it improves the airflow inside the Mac and it reduces the amount of heat generated, this putting less heat stress on the internal components. If you are lucky with your choice of HD, you can put in a 80-pin U320 SCSI drive with an 80-pin to 50-pin adapter. If you get one, be sure that it has jumpers for termination. Many U320 drives, but not all, support 8-bit SCSI. These are quieter and faster than HDs from 1990.

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BOFH: I want no memory of this pointless conversation. Alcohol please

deadlockvictim

faster and better

I would have thought that the simple answer to the demand that the Internet be made faster and better is to say 'sure' and send boss on his way. Then send said boss an official report two days' later stating the Internet has been made faster and better. It's in a report, so it must be true.

The two of them should start work on the Pinternet. A similar project but it involves measuring throughput in order to get more delivered and of a better quality. It may involve some out-of-house research nearby though in order to, em, validate the results.

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The planets really will be in alignment for the next month

deadlockvictim

Eye of Sauron

Is there any coincidence that the Eye of Sauron will be making an appearance?

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Working with Asperger's in tech: We're in this together

deadlockvictim

The Price of Genius - Asperger’s syndrome and Irish History

For those with an interest or a knowledge of Irish history, Michael Fitzgerald has written on this topic in 'Autism and Creativity: Is there a link between autism in men and exceptional ability?' and it is published by Brunner-Routledge.

One might also add the great Irish politician, Robert Stewart (a.k.a. Lord Castlereagh). He represented the United Kingdom at the Congress of Vienna in 1815.

Mark Harkin has a book review here:

http://www.asnz.exofire.net/web_documents/asperger__s_and_irish_history.pdf

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UK cyber-spy law takes Snowden's revelations of mass surveillance – and sets them in stone

deadlockvictim

Facebook

Isn't that the purpose of Facebook & Twitter, namely to spew out whatever's on one's mind without thinking about it first?

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