* Posts by scrubber

555 posts • joined 18 Jun 2009

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FUKE NEWS: Robot snaps inside drowned Fukushima nuke plant

scrubber
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Mushroom

Go nuclear

Fukushima: the best advert for nuclear power ever.

Outdated design, earthquake out with specs and the only issue was not having an air supply for emergency generators above the wave. And NO-ONE died! Modern facilities are ten times as safe and could withstand a plane strike. Nuclear power now!

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US laptops-on-planes ban now applies to just one airport, ends soon

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Big Brother

"TSA continues to find guns-a-plenty"

Given how awful the TSA are at doing their ostensible job, it makes you wonder the number that are actually in the air within arm's reach at any time. Yet for some reason these 'dangers' never seem to materialise into hijackings or taking planes down. It's almost like the whole security thing is some kind of macabre performance intended to make us feel nervous about the potential dangers and simultaneously reassured that Big Brother the government is doing something about it...

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AI bots will kill us all! Or at least may seriously inconvenience humans

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Terminator

"Kill limit"

-9 surely?

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scrubber
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Childcatcher

UK traditions

"the traditional method of regulation, in which rules follow disaster and public outcry"

Like in the UK where politicians obviously make legal highs illegals because... And cannabis is illegal because... And some Japanese manga is illegal because... And so-called extreme porn is illegal because...

Here's how it works in the UK: government decides policy; swiftly followed by compliant media publishing sensationalist stories (usually about some young girl) - often later shown to be false or based on incomplete information - planted by police in the papers; which helps whip up some public outrage; allowing laws the government wants to pass without too much outrage at the destruction of our civil liberties and personal freedoms.

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Facebook users pwnd by phone with account recovery vulnerability

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Megaphone

Facebook

Your security is just as important to us as your privacy.

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UK spookhaus GCHQ can crack end-to-end encryption, claims Australian A-G

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Re: "In this house we obey the laws of thermodynamics!!"

"What about the Newton's law of universal gravitation?"

We all know they don't apply near black holes, and Australia is...

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scrubber
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Childcatcher

I think he has the trifecta...

they are also used “ … by people who seek to do us harm. They're being used by terrorists, they're being used by drug traffickers, they're being used by paedophile rings.”

Yep, all three bogey men used to scare the people into doing what he wants. Terrorists, drug traffickers and paedophiles. Although I do see sex traffickers starting to come into this elite group.

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Adult toy retailer slapped down for 'RES-ERECTI*N' ad over Easter

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Great decision

It should stay about the torture and execution of quite a nice bloke.

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May the excessive force be with you: Chap cuffed after Star Trek v Star Wars row turns bloody

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Coat

"Whyte has since been charged with assault, possession of marijuana"

The weeds of the many...

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It's time for a long, hard mass debate over sex robots, experts conclude

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Re: "I still don't understand why pseudo images are illegal."

Won't someone think of the cartoon children???

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Shock: NASA denies secret child sex slave cannibal colony on Mars

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FAIL

Almost...

NASA: OK, you caught us, we've been lying and covering this up for decades and we fully admit ... wait, child sex slaves on Mars? No, I can completely deny that.

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Not Apr 1: Google stops scanning your Gmail to sling targeted ads at you

scrubber
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Re: I see what you did there.

"gee i don't much care for someone reading my email..."

Ignoring Romney's "corporations are people too", Google aid none opened and read your mail as it was an automated system that scanned them. This was somehow accepted in court. And whaddya know, the NSA used the same argument in FISA court and since it had legal precedence then were allowed to store, scan and index every email in the world that they could get their Constitution breaking mitts on.

Thanks Google, how's that "do no evil" thing working out for us?

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Hacker exposed bank loophole to buy luxury cars and a face tattoo

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Holmes

NAG...

Having worked on online banking for NAG, I hope they take the 100k from the total cowboy* consultancy they had working on this.

* CB and YB use the same backends, accounts and processing, but somehow the YB online bank was 3 months ahead in development?!? Everyone looked like I'd taken a dunno on the table when I brought this up in a meeting. Quit after only 4 weeks there.

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Reg Radicals lecture encompasses far right, libertarians, and mushrooms...

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Stockholm syndrome

Libertarian society only seems radically different because of the stultifying, all-encompassing state we are living in. A bit like how democracy was radically different to those under the yoke of totalitarian communism behind the Iron Curtain.

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Teen girl who texted boyfriend to kill himself guilty of manslaughter

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Re: Future Supreme Court case

Absolute fucking nonsense. If anyone hits you for what you say they ho to jail for assault. If anyone harms another because of what you said then it has to be obvious to an impartial, reasonable observer that that was a likely or intended outcome - and even then it still has to be what a reasonable person would do, i.e. winding up religious or political nutjobs is unlikely (but not impossible) to count but offering payment to criminals does.

And you don't understand the first thing about freedom of speech if you think there are state consequences for it. It is criminal in very listed circumstances, VERY limited. Everything else is untouchable and it is the state's job to protect you from criminal consequences. Not social consequences though, you can be ostracised quite freely. Coincidentally also protected by freedom of association in the first amendment :)

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scrubber
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Future Supreme Court case

Where they will find that the first amendment protects this speech despite the horrific outcome in this instance.

SCOTUS is extremely wary of listing free speech after they made a complete arse of it during WW1 leading to the idiotic trope that "you can't shout fire in a theatre" when you clearly can without getting arrested (in the US, the UK has a breach of peace law that it may fall under).

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Google plans to scrub 'inflammatory' and terror vids from youTube

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Can we see the guidelines...

...and do the government have a say in it?

i.e. is it state censorship enabled by a corporation (sure there's a word for that) or is it a profit maximising decision?

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Brit hacker admits he siphoned info from US military satellite network

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WTF?

"No one should think that cyber crime is victimless"

Actually, this is the perfect example of a victimless crime - he got access and copied some data. Then did nothing with it. There is no victim here, just a system that requires securing.

A real world analogy would be a workplace that already had a broken lock, someone went in, took a picture, then left and did nothing with the picture. To then claim the person with the picture created damages equal to the price of a new lock is laughable.

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Labour says it will vote against DUP's proposed TV Licence reforms

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Mushroom

Re: I Think We Need The BBC

@Shadmeister, the quality, or value for money (£3.7bn is it?) Is not the issue. The issue is who pays, how they pay, why they pay, and how much they each pay.

Should the person who is never off sky pay the same as someone in love with the BBC's rightly lauded nature programs? Should a student in Swansea pay the same as a banker in London? Should a large family pay more than a single person? Should the BBC be allowed to control as much of the media in the UK as it does?

I'm not saying I have the answers to any of these but I am saying that the current model is regressive, uncompetitive and unfair, and all the fucking David Attenborough in the world ain't gonna change it.

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scrubber
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Re: I Think We Need The BBC

@Dan55 Your comment shows EXACTLY the problem I was talking about. You admit the NHS is not in a good state but can't accept anyone saying so and jump to the reasons why it's bad - but can't let anyone say it's bad.

These stupid British institutions are worse than a flaming cult. They let Savile (allegedly?) rape and molest people for decades because pointing it out might make the institution look bad. They stop people using their reasoning faculties and make anyone pointing out any potential flaws into the enemy.

Is anyone seriously saying that the license fee is a more equitable and desirable funding model for the BBC than a sales tax on TVs or being paid from general taxation? Anyone?

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Re: I Think We Need The BBC

@Commswonk "Is it acceptable that the poor pay just as much as the rich for a washing machine / car ..."

A great argument against progressive taxation, one I might even have some sympathy for, however you are not comparing apples to apples. If you show me a similar situation where, for example, I have to buy a BMW if I want to buy an Audi you'd maybe have some point.

It's not even like it's a sales tax where people who can afford more expensive TVs pay more than people with 2nd hand CRTs. It is the most regressive tax in the UK but because people think the BBC makes Britain important in the world they will accept no criticism of it in any way, much like the terrible NHS.

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scrubber
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Re: I Think We Need The BBC

You miss that there are two threads to this - a criticism of the funding model (should be from taxation rather than a poll tax on households with TVs) and a more general criticism of the BBC funding being mandatory to watch any of the paid broadcast services, as well as the inequity of the policing of the system.

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Re: I Think We Need The BBC

I don't need to buy Amazon to watch Netflix, but I do need to pay the BBC to watch Sky or ITV. If you have a TV you should be able to watch the ad-funded news, the current licensing fee stops this. If it was funded through general taxation then it would be more equitable and would not put an undue burden on the poor.

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scrubber
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Re: I Think We Need The BBC

Dear Shadmeister,

Is it acceptable that the poor pay just as much as the rich for an essential service? NB. The essential service here is the ability to see any broadcast, not just the BBC. Is it acceptable that the poor, and women, are targeted for prosecution for non-payment of the licence fee? Is it acceptable that Buckingham Palace only need to pay a single licence fee, but a student flat with locks on each room need to pay for each bedroom? Is it acceptable that anyone unable or unwilling to pay the BBC's licence fee is then barred from watching live broadcasts from commercial providers?

If the BBC is such good value for money then you shouldn't need to force people to pay for it with threat of prison if they refuse. It should be able to compete in the marketplace without being subsidised.

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scrubber
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Re: News to me

Not just news, and not just BBC, but any live broadcast over the airwaves, even the ones you already pay for via subscription or ads.

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Pizza proffer punctures privacy protection, prompts pals' perfidy

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Preponderance of Ps

Piss poor privacy proxy program proves pizza predeliction.

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Say hello to Dvmap: The first Android malware with code injection

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Learn from https

Google have decided that unencrypted connections are bad, they should be doing the same for apps. Any app that requires additional access should have to justify it before an update is allowed on the store. Doesn't stop lazy programmers that want full access on first install (HSBC!) But would be a start.

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NetApp puts everything it's got into a hyperconverged box

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Joke

For fun

Anyone remember IBM Pure?

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UK PM Theresa May's response to terror attacks 'shortsighted'

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The purpose of knee jerk laws...

...is to find patterns that can apply to other people, possibly political dissidents, in order to finger them as possible "bad people". If this happens to catch some actual terrorists then so much the better (for PR) but that's not the aim.

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UK PM May's response to London terror attack: Time to 'regulate' internet companies

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Re: Fix the motivation

"they are no more religious fundamentalists than an IRA bomber who took communion"

That may or may not be true, but they are using their religion as the motivating factor to commit these acts, whereas the IRA bomber was using a nationalistic fervour to convince himself that murdering people was for a greater good. Get rid of religion and patriotism and we'd be a fair way towards stopping attacks on civilians. But we keep calling out their religion as it is a key driver to their acts and also calls out the local religious community to be on the lookout for anyone else who might go down a violent path. Even if we ultimately ignore them as we seem to have done in both Manchester and London with tragic consequences.

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scrubber
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Headmaster

No DNS != no internet

The internet would still be fine, we'd just have to know the address of any site we wanted to visit, e.g. El Reg: 159.100.131.165 But yes, with no internet attacks would still take place.

Before the blood is even dry on the street May is claiming we need to ban encryption despite there being no evidence the attackers used any encrypted services. Never mind the fact that some of these people were already known to police and had been highlighted by people in the community and, ironically, due to a lack of resources the security services were unable to properly investigate and track them.

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Utah fights man's attempt to marry laptop

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...is the only logical outcome.

Actually, the only logical outcome is for the state to get out of the marriage business. Be careful what you wish for.

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Virtual reality headsets even less popular than wearable devices

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MS back in the game

The MS strategy appears to be ready to pay off. Or fail miserably. But I hope someone does it right and does it cheap.

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Social media vetting for US visas go live

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Devil

Trump's head

So, Kathy Griffin isn't getting back in then?

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Google can't spare 113 seconds of revenue to compile data on its gender pay gap

scrubber
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Google are clearly lying. As they were when they said the WiFi slurp their maps cars were doing was an accident. Or when they said they deleted said data. Or any of the hundreds of illegal or unfair breaches of privacy they have done in the name of better service. Sorry, I meant making another buck. My android phone auto corrected that for me.

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British prime minister slams Facebook and pals for votes

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Big Brother

Looks like it's not just Islam that needs an Enlightenment

In the free marketplace of ideas we are so afraid that our ideas won't win out that we seek to ban other people's.

And that, boys and girls, is how it begins.

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scrubber
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Joke

Re: I'm not sure I buy Corbyn's argument about foreign policy...

Even if everything you say is true he clearly wouldn't have harmed anyone had Facebook just had better filters in place, right?

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Huawei missed memo that PC's dead – so here are three new notebooks

scrubber
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Manufacturers like Apple! Their tablets have headphone ports.

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LastPass now supports 2FA auth, completely undermines 2FA auth

scrubber
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"an arbitrary subset"

It may not be arbitrary, their backend system may be so poor that the ! character will break into a shell command, or a % will allow you to execute SQL.

Never underestimate how crap some systems are or how stupid people are.

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Huawei spied, US federal jury finds

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Mushroom

Solution

Any company found to be violating user privacy or committing corporate espionage has all its patents invalidated and made open and free to use.

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No laptop ban on Euro flights to US... yet

scrubber
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Re: Why Israel didn't ban electronic devices on flights to Tel Aviv?

They (US agents) also come back (from Israel) recommending religious and racial profiling which is not currently acceptable in the US due to The Constitution.

Unlike in the UK where our historic rights are completely ignored but we won't do (non-Irish) racial or religious profiling because PC.

I'm not necessarily in favour of this type of profiling, but I am in favour of doing it, or not, for the right reasons and the UK is certainly not doing that.

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Banking association calls for end of 'screen-scraping'

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Paris Hilton

Re: I am confused

I would guess that 'supporting screen scraping' involves not moving fields around and changing names of elements, or making users actively enter pins or passwords on virtual keyboards. But that's just an assumption.

The question is whether APIs, or more specifically the granularity of access that OAuth allows, is going to lead to safer services than the global access screen scraping software currently requires. One would normally assume yes, but given the number of apps that require blanket access to contacts, camera etc. that people happily install and the recent Google Docs debacle I'm not so sure anymore.

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Beeb hands £560m IT deal to Atos. Again

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Facepalm

Bargain

I have a bunch of hardly used XP computers they can have cheap.

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America 'will ban carry-on laptops on flights from UK, Europe to US'

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Home of the brave

There might be a legitimate reason for this panic, but given the past hysteria I am dubious and would rather travel unsafe and unmolested than what they offer me now.

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Leaked: The UK's secret blueprint with telcos for mass spying on internet, phones – and backdoors

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Russian Reversal

In Soviet Britain email reads you.

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FCC's Pai: I am going to kill net neutrality in US

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Re: Net neutrality

"Service level is, or can be made, a matter of contract."

And that would be ideal, except ISPs and mobile operators often have clauses like "we reserve the right to change the terms of this agreement including, but not limited to: price; allowances; service levels; your phone number; your passwords; your last name; your blood type etc. without informing you and you have to suck it up, bitch." Also doesn't help that the majority of the US is effectively a monopoly as most consumers only have a single broadband provider. I'd rather have a competitive market sort it, but if it won't then 'the greater good' and all that.

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scrubber
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Big Brother

Net neutrality

There are very good arguments against net neutrality, for example Netflix paying to have a server filled with 4k content nearer their customers, but the dangers of providers restricting some content is massive.

Imagine if the ISP, at the behest of a TLA agency, decided to massively slow down all content it couldn't decipher, well there goes your VPN. They could ask for the key to speed it up but there goes the whole point of having a VPN.

The best solution is for the ISP to have to* provide unfettered access at the speed you pay for and if content providers want to pay them extra to give YOU better service then good on them.

* This will require some form of regulation, not necessarily as restrictive as title 2.

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UK.gov throws hissy fit after Twitter chokes off snoop firm's access

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Would you please

Stop looking over my shoulder when I type...

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As you stare at the dead British Airways website, remember the hundreds of tech staff it laid off

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Headmaster

Re: Correlation is not causation

@Christoph: "There's nothing like proper testing..."

Correct.

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Democrats draft laws in futile attempt to protect US internet privacy

scrubber
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Americans don't know history

The reason privacy was originally enshrined was because a conservative judge got embarrassed when his video store* rental list was released and it wasn't the list of a True Christian... So the Republicans made releasing such information illegal.

* A video store was a place people went to rent** films on cassettes the size of house bricks.

** Renting is when you take temporary ownership*** of something from someone else for money.

*** Ownership is when something is yours and yours alone.

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