* Posts by Adam 52

1773 posts • joined 18 Jun 2009

IT peeps, be warned: You'll soon be a museum exhibit

Adam 52
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Re: What job will last forever

Policeman, in the traditional sense, is going in the UK. It is being replaced by two new roles - muscle bound, taser wielding stormtrooper with an IQ of about eighty and form filling, quota chasing, jobsworth bureaucrat.

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Putting the urgency in emergency: UK's delayed emergency services network review... delayed

Adam 52
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Re: Vehicle Solution

"Solution, give each emergency responder a keyfob with their user id. "

Pandas have this for the black box (so the logger knows who was driving). It is awful. Consistently fails to recognise the presence of the key fob and screams at the driver. Scrambling around for a keyfob whilst driving at 80mph on an A-road isn't ideal.

A simple PIN has worked well for Airwave for years.

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New Google bias lawsuit claims company fired chap who opposed discrimination

Adam 52
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Unfortunately that's become impossible, companies like Google are under huge pressure from lobby groups and the media and so force those politics onto their workforce.

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Crunch time: Maplin in talks to sell the business

Adam 52
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Re: Like their own stock?

You used to be able to ring through an order - using that home made touchtone order system they had - at lunchtime and it'd arrive at 7.30am next day just before school. That was when first class post used to arrive before breakfast.

As a teenage I was excited by the arrival of a physical shop.

These days there's one 10 mins walk from both home and work. The St Paul's shop always has a big queue. I've bought a fair bit from them at the £20 mark; batteries, power supplies, Arduino and tools as well as an urgently needed 30p phono plug. I guess their overheads are too high.

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Adam 52
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Re: A great shame, but probably inevitable.

"The Arduino software project seems happy with the idea of clones"

Are you sure? Your link goes to a donation page but doesn't provide any support for your statement.

Below what the project actually says:

https://blog.arduino.cc/2014/11/14/the-perfect-teal/

"He detailed out what ‘counterfeit Arduinos’ are, and why they are harmful to the whole open-source hardware movement. We release Arduino’s hardware design files so that people could make their own versions, but this doesn’t mean manufacturing boards only for profit and pretending to be Arduino.

" We don’t release any element of the Arduino brand identity (logo and graphics of the boards), so whoever uses the trademarked Arduino graphics makes a deliberate act of Trademark infringement and prevent us in our effort to guarantee the quality of our products, always replaceable if defective."

And:

https://www.arduino.cc/en/Products/Counterfeit

Most of the eBay sellers make no attempt to differentiate themselves from the real product. There's a difference between an IBM PC and an IBM-Compatible PC.

Anyway, the original point is that it's really stupid to criticise Maplin for selling a genuine product more expensive than a counterfeit.

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Adam 52
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Re: A great shame, but probably inevitable.

"Maplin want £19.99 for an Arduino Nano - which ebay UK vat paying sellers do for under £3 including 2nd class post."

Maplin's is a genuine Arduino Nano, whose price includes quality control and a contribution back to the Arduino project. Your Chinese clone from eBay doesn't.

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Hot NAND: Samsung wheels out 30TB SSD monster

Adam 52
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Why have you compared an expensive SSD with a cheap HDD? There are 1TB SSDs for £220 on Amazon. Mine was £120, but I bought it on an Amazon deal of the day and prices seem to have risen in the intervening couple of years.

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Adam 52
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Re: Backup

We - and I presume most others - take periodic incremental snapshots from empty and never do a full backup.

Full restore takes a long time though.

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Year-old vuln turns Jenkins servers into Monero mining slaves

Adam 52
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"Here's a salutary reminder why it pays to patch promptly: a Jenkins bug patched "

Clearly not written by someone who's ever attempted to patch Jenkins. It can easily take a year just to work through all the incompatibility and broken plugins that a new release creates.

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*Wakes up in Chrome's post-adblockalyptic landscape* Wow, hardly anything's changed!

Adam 52
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This is going to be quite unpopular, but those ads are subsidising your subscription. You could rephrase Pascal's response as:

"If you have paid a subscription and you're still getting ads, you haven't paid enough."

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UK.gov's Brexiteers warned not to push for divergence on data protection laws

Adam 52
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Re: @ Halcin

There was no 2016 vote on leaving the European Single Market. In fact the *only* democratic vote on membership of the single market was one to join. So it's a little disingenuous to talk about retrospectively adding clauses to a referendum.

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Adam 52
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Re: BoJo's divergence priorities

"Is the only concrete result of Brexit going to be that we have taken back control of our ability to displace amphibians and gastropods?"

Unfortunately not. The concrete results already are a mad woman as Prime Minister, economic slowdown, higher prices, more racist violence, loss of skilled workers and an erosion of civil liberties. And that's before we've even left.

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Helicopter crashes after manoeuvres to 'avoid... DJI Phantom drone'

Adam 52
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... until it was discovered that the coloured markings broke up the aircraft outline and acted like camouflage, making aircraft harder to spot.

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Facebook told to stop stalking Belgians or face fines of €250k – a day

Adam 52
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There must be someone out there who understands our new DPA, but I haven't met them yet. Even our lawyers are still chasing the seemingly endless references. Enforcing it is going to be a nightmare. A cynic might think that was deliberate.

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If this laptop is so portable, where's the keyboard, huh? HUH?

Adam 52
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"please share these regulations."

Certainly.

http://www.hse.gov.uk/pubns/books/l26.htm

Which says:

"Screen: stable image, adjustable, readable, glare/reflection-free Keyboard: usable, adjustable, detachable, legible"

Now there might be laptops with adjustable screens and detachable keyboards (the original Compaqs had detachable keyboards, for example) but if they exist they are rare.

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Adam 52
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I am currently having a row with my IT department, who seem to think that a laptop screen and keyboard are suitable for someone who works full-time on a computer.

I sent them the regulations and they've said that they'll see how things develop. Which I guess is code for "come back when you're crippled."

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Top tip: Don't bother with Facebook's two-factor SMS auth – unless you love phone spam

Adam 52
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Re: guys this is phishing

It's illegal in the EU and US, but Facebook has the EU regulator in their pocket and has the money to tie any action in the courts up for decades.

Almost impossible to prove intent and I imagine whoever authorised it has already deleted their sent email box.

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When it absolutely, positively needs to be leaked overnight: 120k FedEx customer files spill from AWS S3 silo

Adam 52
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Re: Expand GDPR

I tend to blame both. Developers are sloppy and set permissions to get their app working. Suits motivate them to do that by rewarding quick development over secure development.

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Adam 52
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"no one seems to be paying any attention"

A bit harsh. I paid attention and deleted a few buckets that the tool flagged. They were false positives but easy enough to fix. I imagine thousands of others have too, we just don't come to the attention of the press.

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Bloke sues Microsoft: Give me $600m – or my copy of Windows 7 back

Adam 52
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Re: Re:Figure out your next step...

"The likes of LibreOffice, Gimp, etc are certainly fit for purpose"

Depends on your purpose. LibreOffice isn't fit for purpose for delivering my coursework, because LibreOffice docs don't render the same on my examiner's copy of Word.

GIMP is in no way a replacement for Photoshop.

" but until Photoshop, popular accounting and business software, games run natively on Linux, most users won’t consider switching."

I keep considering switching, every time I see that irritating Windows 10 login screen with the advert text on it, every time it randomly upgrades and is unusable for hours, every time "telemetry" consumes all CPU; but there are so many apps that are Windows only and don't have alternatives.

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Crypto-gurus: Which idiots told the FBI that Feds-only backdoors in encryption are possible?

Adam 52
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Governments are quite capable of keeping secrets if they want to. Prism was secret for 5 years and that required ISP cooperation. Bletchley Park for 32 years (from the public, not the Russians). John Major and Edwina Currie secret for 18 years. It's impossible to know how many secrets have died with people.

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Three in hospital after NSA cops open fire on campus ram-raid SUV

Adam 52
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Re: Ever try to hit a driver in a vehicle on the move?

I should probably have added "whilst being confident of not hitting any innocent bystanders" ;-)

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Adam 52
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There's always one "I can hit a nickel at twenty yards" comes out after these incidents. Fine; can you do it when the target is obscured and moving, you don't have a good firing position, there are buckets of adrenaline in your blood, you're in fear for your life and you've just run to the scene?

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Stop calling, stop calling... ICO goes gaga after home improvement biz ignores warnings

Adam 52
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You don't get to pick your criminal court, it's up to the Magistrate to refer up if they feel their powers are insufficient.

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Facebook smartmobe app's pre-ticked privacy settings violate German data protection law

Adam 52
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They know that you were physically in the UK because that's where their shop is. And you paid cash so their cash records will balance at the end of the day.

If you buy online the vendor needs proof of which country you were in so that they can charge, and be audited, the correct tax rate. And they need to prove that the credit card transaction matches the invoice amount.

Such are the rules of VAT accounting, and you don't mess with whoever Customs and Excise are these days because they have all sorts of powers to shut you down.

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Adam 52
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"but I can't think of any other reasonable exceptions"

If you've paid us we need to keep records for seven years to comply with tax audit requirements.

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Data scientist wanted: Must have Python, spontaneity not required

Adam 52
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Re: is there really a skills shortage?

...And that is the medium term benefit of a strong union. I doubt that tube driver is a good long term career choice for a school leaver hoping to retire in 2048 now though.

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Facial recognition software easily IDs white men, but error rates soar for black women

Adam 52
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Not only that but "individuals

from three African countries (Rwanda, Senegal, South Africa) and three European countries (Iceland, Finland, Sweden) selected for gender parity in the national parliaments"

The authors are so blinded by their desire to find a bias on gender and skin colour that they've picked a test dataset that is massively skewed on ethnicity, age, health and social class.

They also tie themselves in knots trying to reconcile biological gender with gender identity, so their benchmark gender classification is suspect in the first place (it's based on Mr, Mrs and the "appearance of the photo").

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Yorkshire cops have begun using on-the-spot fingerprint scanners

Adam 52
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Re: "App on their smartphones"

"alongside their Met Vest, belt kit, baton, radio and CS spray (technically a Section 5 firearm thanks to a weird quirk of firearms law wording). Officers can and have been disciplined and sacked for taking home restricted equipment such as ASPs and Tetra handsets"

Hmm, despite using some of the correct terminology - albeit it very dated, you're either wrong or referring to a force I'm not familiar with. Everything listed except the spray (because it's a firearm) is usually taken home.

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Adam 52
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Re: "App on their smartphones"

"Do firearms officers take their guns home?"

No, because guns are a teensy bit dangerous and there is legislation governing their storage. And because firearms officers are encouraged to rotate weapons to avoid becoming accustomed to the characteristics of a particular weapon.

"Do traffic cops take their pursuit car home?"

No, because those cars average 23 hours a day running time. And because nobody wants that sort of publicity.

"Do mounted policemen take their horses home?"

You're absolutely right. A complete hole in my argument, obviously there's no reason people shouldn't take horses home with them to their city flat.

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Adam 52
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Re: "App on their smartphones"

"ZERO reason for them to need to fingerprint someone while not carrying out their duties, and PLENTY of capacity for misuse of the system if they have 24/7 unfettered access to it."

What scenario do you imagine? Sitting at home over Sunday lunch and suddenly forcing granny's finger into a smartphone?

Or a James Bond style lifting of fingerprints from the empty glasses on the Dog and Duck to find out if Dave from next door really is Dave?

Anyway, as JB says, everything logged.

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Adam 52
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Re: But does it actually save time?

Since I've managed to acquire lots of downvotes in a short period of time, here's the link to the relevant section in PACE:

http://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/1984/60/section/24

Although I suspect the uninformed would rather remain uninformed.

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Adam 52
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Re: "App on their smartphones"

It runs on work smartphones. And officers take their phones home to read their email and do the same unpaid overtime that the rest of us do.

Police constables are never fully off-duty, btw. The obligations of the office are continual.

What's the problem? Are you similarly concerned that they take their uniforms, notebooks and batons home?

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Adam 52
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Re: But does it actually save time?

"Someone who is chased by the police and charged with three offences will surely be arrested and taken to a police station"

This is wrong. Which undermines the rest of your argument. Easy proof of identification will often remove the need to arrest (and necessity is an arrest criteria). Surely nobody's campaigning for more unnecessary arrests?

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You can resurrect any deleted GitHub account name. And this is why we have trust issues

Adam 52
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Re: It's Not GitHub's fault

It also means that your site won't get the latest patches, so unless you've got a vulnerability scanner in your pipeline somewhere you may end up with your site mining crypto currency anyway.

I can't help feeling that there's a halfway house somewhere between "go get" and the nightmare that is Maven.

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Adam 52
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Re: "A platform which truly understood the nature of free and open-source"

"it's all about the ego."

Cannot upvote this enough.

You should have seen the uproar when we suggested that (a) code paid for by the company should be licensed by the company, (b) in private repos by default and (c) use corporate friendly usernames.

Management caved in and as a result we got hacked using information gleaned from our public repo and nobody knows who's comitting what.

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No sh*t, Sherlock! Bloke suspected of swallowing drug stash keeps colon schtum for 22 DAYS

Adam 52
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"Presumably this bit indicates using the back door approach"

Yes, the article has been changed. Archive.org has the original.

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Adam 52
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"Dunno what he swallowed"

See below, probably nothing.

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Adam 52
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"He is believed to have wolfed down several packages of drugs"

That would be unusual. It's very risky and needs careful packaging. More likely they would have been inserted via the anus, which is standard procedure for a dealer concerned about being searched.

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Adam 52
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Not sure why this is news, it happens all the time. These people make themselves very ill. And have to be watched 24 hours a day because they will swallow if they can, and then one of the bags may rupture inside. So that's one of the places your tax is going.

If he dies from his self-inflicted injuries there will be an automatic IPCC (whatever they're called now) investigation and you can bet somewhere a minor paperwork issue (there are 30 forms a day need authorising to keep him in custody) will lead to someone getting in trouble. Remember this next time you see death in custody statistics and are tempted to a knee jerk response.

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EE unveils shoebox-sized router to boost Brit bumpkin broadband

Adam 52
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Re: They did a bang up job installing it

"hold something that light up"

I suspect mass is insignificant in comparison to wind loading.

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As GDPR draws close, ICANN suggests 12 conflicting ways to cure domain privacy pains

Adam 52
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Re: On GDPR...

"From what I can see"

It's not May yet. What you're seeing is companies stretching the old regulations to build a contact pool that will tide them over for however long they think that they can justify grandfathering consent.

Google, as always, are attempting to redefine normal how they want it to be - same as they did for copyright and cookie consent, but they're big enough to play by different rules to the rest of us.

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Former HP workers one small step closer to throwing one giant sueball at tech goliath

Adam 52
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By making this painful for HP these 15 are making other "scumbags" less likely to do the same thing. For that we should be grateful.

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UK worker who sold customers' data to nuisance callers must cough up £1k

Adam 52
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"report them to the TPS"

And then what happens?

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Elon Musk's Tesla burns $675.3m in largest ever quarterly loss

Adam 52
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Re: Unwarranted Trumpanzee

Hopefully you're a troll. If not El Reg should probably have better moderation, but Elon probably won't sue.

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New strife for Strava: Location privacy feature can be made transparent

Adam 52
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Re: It's not the first time it's been said

Go on then, as a non-idiot, describe something better.

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Adam 52
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Re: GDPR

No it doesn't.

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Adam 52
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Re: GDPR

So much misunderstanding about GDPR. So much ignorance about Strava.

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Adam 52
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This is going to be the "I heard it from a friend who read it on an Internet forum" level of proof. Possibly based on the dubious syllogism issued by the Welsh police - "There are more bike thefts. More cyclists are using Strava therefore Strava causes bike thefts".

It might be true, and possibly is in a few cases. Being seen wheeling an expensive bike into your shed is a much more likely explanation.

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Adam 52
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Re: It's not the first time it's been said

Fantastically obvious to my girlfriend too. And me. Can't honestly remember if it was obvious because it's mentioned on the site when you set one up.

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