* Posts by Adam 52

1867 posts • joined 18 Jun 2009

Brexit has shafted the UK's space sector, lord warns science minister

Adam 52
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Re: An insider speaks

"I hold The Guardian and the Daily Mail at about the same level in terms of oral frothing"

Guardian articles tend to be researched or obvious opinion pieces. They don't usually lie. Daily Mail articles tend to be propaganda disguised as news and the facts are often just plain wrong (either through poor research or deliberate lying).

By all means compare the Guardian and Telegraph for polarised journalism, but the Mail isn't really on the same spectrum.

"Picking on the DM's like shitting in a barrel full of dead fish, easy enough to do but pointless and unbecoming."

There are still people who believe it's acceptable, even erudite, to read the Daily Mail in public. 4 million people read it. The more public humiliation these people suffer​ the more likely they are to change their ways. A bit like it's no longer acceptable to keep slaves, beat your wife or drink drive.

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UK consumer help bloke Martin Lewis is suing Facebook over fake ads

Adam 52
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Defamation Act 2013:

This section applies where an action for defamation is brought against the operator of a website in respect of a statement posted on the website.

(2)It is a defence for the operator to show that it was not the operator who posted the statement on the website.

(3)The defence is defeated if the claimant shows that—

(a)it was not possible for the claimant to identify the person who posted the statement,

(b)the claimant gave the operator a notice of complaint in relation to the statement, and

(c)the operator failed to respond to the notice of complaint in accordance with any provision contained in regulations.

Facebook will be arguing that (2) and (3c) apply. I suspect that Facebook are following the letter of the regulations, suitably spun, if not the spirit.

But (2) feels like dodgy ground for an advertisement, it's not some random poster it's Facebook themselves posting the advert.

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Time to ditch the front door key? Nest's new wireless smart lock is surprisingly convenient

Adam 52
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Re: Lock makers that you can trust?

"The best defence against burglary is a high detection and successful prosecution rate (of the perpetrators)."

It's true, a conviction for burglary will put your local burglar out of action for a few hours whilst they're in police custody being charged and at court; during which time they'll be unable to break in anywhere.

But I suspect you thought that the small fine (which will go unpaid) or community service (which will go unserved) would be a deterrent.

Unless there's been violence and a weapon used then a custodial sentence is unlikely. Or by some miracle it's gone before a proper judge rather than a magistrate defendant has annoyed them by skipping bail.

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Two's company, Three's unbowed: You Brits will pay more for MMS snaps

Adam 52
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It does seem a peculiar position to take, if it's not a material change then presumably if they don't get paid then they won't consider that to be material either.

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Facebook previews GDPR privacy tools and, yep, it's the same old BS

Adam 52
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Re: 'Mission accomplished.'

"I just don't do business with those companies"

I guess you don't have car insurance then.

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Adam 52
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The entire Ad industry is doing this. Led by Google and Group M. It needs stopping, urgently. Write to your MP.

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Jeff Bezos purple prose reveals Amazon Prime's passed 100m customers

Adam 52
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Re: 99m, 999 thousand, 999 now

I'm considering ditching Prime when it renews in November too. It's no longer next day and the prices for Prime items are typically inflated by the cost of next day delivery anyway. I was looking at my order history over the weekend, I haven't bought anything over £20 and shipped by Amazon this year (which is why my add-on items are still sitting in the basket).

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OK, this time it's for real: The last available IPv4 address block has gone

Adam 52
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Re: Compatibility

It's not "no problem" at all. I, for example, want to know if two addresses are the same. With IPv4 I look at them, do strcmp or simple 32 bit integer arithmetic; with IPv6 I have do do a massively complex normalisation step first then line them up on paper and use my fingers.

IPv4 addresses (without CIDR) can be understood by humans in their heads. IPv6 ones can't.

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Cambridge Analytica's ex-CEO decides not to front UK Parliamentary Committee again

Adam 52
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Re: "There is no legal reason for him to appear."

If Parliament committees retained any honour then you may have a point. But committees have descended to the point where they are a forum for MPs to score political points by slinging abuse and unsubstantiated allegations at people which, without parliamentary privilege, would be actionable slander.

They've become the modern equivalent of a tar-and-feather. It's understandable not to want to attend.

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Europe wants cloud giants to cough up data from anywhere in 6hrs

Adam 52
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Re: But of course it will be for terrorism

From this bit:

"at least three years ... and terrorism-related crimes"

Then someone's clearly intending to redefine terrorism to include, picking something at random off of the crimes with less than 3 years, "Procurement of a woman by false pretences".

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Car-crash television: 'Excuse me ma'am, do you speak English?' 'Yes I do,' replies AMD's CEO

Adam 52
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Re: F1 is a Car Crash

"what Formula E are doing - their emphasis seems to be on fan engagement and large audiences"

I really want to like Formula E, but I don't. It's boring, way more so than f1. There's not enough power to make it visually impressive, the obsession with remaining charge just makes it feel like a resource management game, a load of failed f1 drivers makes it feel second class and and fan boost - really? Next year's rule change to give points for most economical lap shows that the organisers don't really care about racing. All in all it feels like a FIA PR exercise to the environmental lobby.

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Data watchdog fines Brit council £120k for identifying 943 owners of vacant property

Adam 52
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Re: I apologize for being ignorant in this...

"and how would this differ from contact addresses in wjhis no longer being permitted under GDPR"

Land registry disclosure is authorised by parliament; Land Registry Act 2002 s66.

Whereas whois is an agreement between private companies.

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Scotland: Get tae f**k on 10Mbps Broadband USO

Adam 52
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Re: Englandshire

UK != Scotland + England.

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Adam 52
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Re: Meanwile in France

That's not my experience. Even parked on the Col de la Lezette I can get a fast WiFi connection from the cafe and my apartment in Deux Alpes has a perfectly good 2mbit connection.

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Where's my free monitoring service, One Plus? – hacked-off customers

Adam 52
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"We have been working with partners across the world..."

As a OnePlus customer I'm a bit concerned that they've just shared/leaked my details with partners across the world.

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Police chief wants citizens to bring 'net oligarchs to heel

Adam 52
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Re: To Use an Offline Example

If the ne'er do wells plotted their activities in the pub *and* the landlord refused throw them out when notified and refused to supply the CCTV footage then you might. That's the point being made.

A landlord doing that would likely have their licence removed (happened to a pub near work), but that option isn't available on the Internet.

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Adam 52
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Re: Not really dispelling the idea that generally the police are a little dim ..

"Anyone pointed that out to our employers and government recently?"

Lord Neuberger, Lady Hale, Lord Mance and Lord Kerr on 21st February.

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Adam 52
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Re: Not really dispelling the idea that generally the police are a little dim ..

"Why not sue the Highways agencies, for enabling criminals to move around ?"

In the past the Highways Agency had no idea who were using their roads, so they couldn't really help much. Now they have ANPR and can, and do, supply ANPR information to the Police. Murderers have been caught using ANPR.

Similarly the big Internet giants have analytics. They can, it is argued, identify fraudsters and quite probably patterns associated with criminal activity like people trafficking. Following the human rights ruling earlier this year all organisations now have a duty to preserve human rights. So they have a duty to use their analytics to stop murders and trafficking.

That's the argument. Shame El Reg didn't report properly. It holds together at first glance, whether it holds together in the face of Silicon Valley's best lawyers remains to be seen.

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Adam 52
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Re: Civil laws

I've read the article in The Times now. He's making two points, both badly reported by El Reg. Quite possibly misrepresented by The Times too.

The second is that, under Human Rights law individuals have a right to Life and organisations have an obligate duty to protect that right (this is new law, made by the judiciary in the Warboys case). Therefore web sites that knowingly or negligent facilitate murder can be held liable for deaths they contribute too.

That's not something the Police can do - they can only investigate crime and recommend CPS prosecute. Corporate manslaughter would be impossible to prove (and the fine would be trivial).

One would imagine that the same argument applies to other Human Rights in his realm, such as the prohibition of torture and slavery.

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Adam 52
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Re: Civil laws

"They seem to have plenty of resources for lots of things that don't matter very much"

Are you Theresa May, Tom Winsor or Amber Rudd?

So many that you seem unable to come up with any examples! There's bound to be some badly reported Daily Mail headline and quite probably a one in a million genuine case, but for the most part our police are hugely under resourced. Apparently there's a report on it that the Home Office are suppressing so that Amber Rudd can pretend everything's fine.

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Adam 52
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Re: Civil laws

If he's consistent with his previous position, then because Plod just doesn't have the resources. Remember the British Police have been cut to the point where we don't have enough officers to attend murders.

I haven't read the article yet so don't know if this is his argument, but there are some things the Police can't do. Like request your Facebook history without a lot of approval, which takes time and effort. In most cases Facebook will have deleted the data before all the legal hoops have been jumped through.

You as an individual can request that data much more simply by making a subject access request.

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Adam 52
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Re: As always

I see your point, Facebook is only making $4bn a year. Hardly worth the effort.

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NUC, NUC! Who's there? Intel, warning you to kill a buggy keyboard app

Adam 52
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VNC

Maybe it's just me, but I've never managed to get VNC working properly. I can just about get the console to display remotely on a good day but if I try to spawn a new desktop for each login I always end up with people seeing each others desktops or not being able to get back to their old one. And you have to create huge great holes in the firewall. Then when it is connected it's really sluggish. OK for some remote admin but not really usable for day to day work.

I don't suppose there's a Linux rdp server is there? A quick search didn't find one.

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'Every little helps'... unless you want email: Tesco to kill free service

Adam 52
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Re: Damn

"Buy your own domain. A lot come with a mail service and if they don't at least owning the domain allows you to relocate providers without changing your address."

Dishonourable mention for uk2.net at this point. Their domains used to come with email but they withdrew the service and started charging for mail forwarding. And they charge to move your domain away from them.

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Adam 52
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They don't have to be harvesting anything to be a liability. The GDPR fines, breach notification and subject access request requirements are enough to make running anything for free way too risky to be worthwhile.

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Shhh! Don’t tell KillBots the UN’s about to debate which ones to ban

Adam 52
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"forbidding the use of blinding lasers, landmines, booby traps and incendiary weapons."

That's forbidding in a "not really forbidding at all" sense:

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Personnel_halting_and_stimulation_response_rifle

https://www.gov.uk/government/news/uk-helps-rid-war-torn-afghanistan-of-lethal-landmines-making-thousands-safer

http://www.lexpev.nl/fuzesandigniters/unitedkingdom/firingdevicedemolitioncombinationl5a1.html

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mark_77_bomb

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Facebook want us to believe banning Putin's troll army safeguards Russian democracy

Adam 52
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If your multi national has assets in the EU then the fines can be enforced, as they were against Microsoft and Google. Facebook pushes €5bn ish through the EU so it's not a trivial risk.

Enforcing against Lady Luck Casino, Mississippi is going to be tricky, but they probably don't get a huge number of European visitors.

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Adam 52
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"Does he understand that?"

I suspect Facebook's lawyers understand GDPR better than almost anyone else's, and know which loopholes they intend to stretch and which they can tie up the courts for decades.

For the record, it isn't "about where the data" are. It covers EU legal entities processing data on US citizens in the US and US entities processing data on EU citizens in the US.

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Microsoft: Yes, we agree that Irish email dispute is moot... now what's this new warrant about?

Adam 52
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Re: Shots Heard

"Seriously I cant see how its possible to resolve GPDR and the CLOUD act."

Then you really should read the GDPR, because your problem is explicitly resolved in it - see Article 48.

But better would be the UK Data Protection Act which takes the national opt-out allowing the US (or any other country) to ask for data without breaching GDPR.

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UK regulator bans slasher-flick parody ad for OnePlus 5 mobe

Adam 52
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Re: Too slow?

No, the ASA shouldn't be given more powers. Or any powers. They're a trade body, just like the Direct Marketing Association, NICEIC or the British Parking Association. None of those organisations should have any powers beyond those of any other citizen.

If an advert is unlawful or criminal then we have courts of law to fix the problem.

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Here's the list of Chinese kit facing extra US import tariffs: Hard disk drives, optic fiber, PCB making equipment, etc

Adam 52
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Re: @ Tom 38 You don't get it...

I think a peaceful nuclear armed state is very much in American interests, and you can draw your own parallels with a united Germany.

Will be interesting to see how this pans out and what they are actually trying to coax out of China.

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That long-awaited Mark Zuckerberg response: Everything's fine! Mostly fixed! Facebook's great! All good in the hoodie!

Adam 52
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Kohan

"Kogan, who claims he's being scapegoated"

He wrote an app that scraped 30 to 50 million peoples' information, claiming to be for an academic research project and then passed that data to CA.

He's not being made a scapegoat, he's being called up for exactly what he did.

Massive Data Protection Act breach and you've got to ask about Cambridge University's ethics committee.

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Horn star Sudan, last male northern white rhino, dies aged 45

Adam 52
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Re: the Chinese are the real arseholes

"things that work ... (like acupuncture)."

Except that acupuncture doesn't work either. Not in large scale controlled tests. Its only benefit is that it's a cheap placebo.

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US govt's final bid to extradite Lauri Love kicked into touch

Adam 52
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Re: Good reasons not to extradite aplenty

"A medical condition may be taken into account during sentencing, it is not a defence to committing a crime"

Yes it is. Search for automatism.

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Brit police forces spend peanuts on cybercrime training

Adam 52
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It's a truly awful piece of research, based on vaguely worded questions.

I know, for example, that pretty much all forces include some basic training in their IPDLP, not just North Wales, although IPDLP has been drastically scaled back to reduce costs. New officers are expected to have a Policing degree, which covers basic cyber crime.

There are also regular "how to investigate computer crime" modules on other courses; such as the counter-terrorism one or the cyber-bullying one. The generic "searching for stuff" course moves from searching a woodland to searching a car to searching a laptop.

Also ignores that some forces will outsource their investigations, either to other forces or to private companies.

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US cops go all Minority Report: Google told to cough up info on anyone near a crime scene

Adam 52
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"when you need the police to protect you. The problem of course is that the police do not offer this service, at least not to Joe Public. "

I know it was a long way back in the thread, but I feel the need to call out this utter twaddle. The Police are not your personal servants, turning up whenever you have a disagreement with someone, but they do protect you. A quick look at the news today shows a dangerous driver arrested, a bombing investigated (a long time ago), an investigation into possibly dangerous housing, a child rapist convicted and a suspected child killer arrested.

All of those helping to protect Joe Public.

It also has significant criticism of West Midlands police for failing to stop something they knew nothing about. Maybe we should place all children under 24/7 big brother coverage by the Police because parents can't be bothered to find out who their 14 year old is shagging and want to blame anyone but themselves.

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Adam 52
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Re: RE: RE: Tigra 07

Introducing doubt (not negative proof) into the prosecution evidence of where you were has been part of a defence's job since Cain. It's not a new thing.

Mobile phone location has been used since dumb mobile phones.

Tracking by similar journey is published academic research, not private to Facebook. I'm not aware of any prosecution using it.

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Uber breaks self-driving car record: First robo-ride to kill a pedestrian

Adam 52
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Re: Didn't see that coming

"Taking cyclists off the roads would save a lot more accidents. Cycling is a Victorian mode of transport – incredibly dangerous on modern roads"

I have a feeling that taking cars off the roads would make them much safer!

If you look at the stats - the DfT publish them - then cycling has about the same injury rate per km as walking. Motorcycling on the other hand...

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Adam 52
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Re: Clear cut...

The bit you cut out did mention the parked cars...

You don't end up limited to 5mph. That's only because of the "thinking time" need for humans. An autonomous car tracking all the potential hazards shouldn't need that. And you don't need to come to a complete stop, just slow enough that injury is the same as running into a brick wall. There are formula for stopping distance. Run them, you get 16mph to 23mph depending on the street and visibility.

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Adam 52
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Re: Clear cut...

"somewhere closer becomes occupied unexpectedly"

Somewhere closer never becomes occupied unexpectedly. It always becomes occupied because something a little further away moved there (time travel excepted). Just as traffic lights never go red unexpectedly.

So if you're prepared to go slow enough and are perfectly attentive you can avoid all collisions.

Sure, that means you have to go really slow on narrow streets with cars parked either side and you end up being limited to around 20mph in built up areas, but is that really so much hardship for a world with no pedestrian road traffic injuries?

Avoiding fast moving objects like deer and other vehicles is a much harder problem.

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Bitcoin's blockchain: Potentially a hazardous waste dump of child abuse, malware, etc

Adam 52
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Re: "inter-poll" ?

Crime is fairly well defined in most countries. All Interpol is is a glorified secretariat, so whilst being on a wanted list because you've upset Putin is inconvenient it doesn't magically project Russian criminal law onto any other country.

Which is why Andrei Lugovoi and Dmitry Kovtun are still free.

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Here is how Google handles Right To Be Forgotten requests

Adam 52
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Re: Google writes their own laws

Alan's post gives more detail about the case than the Court is allowing to be published. Report post button pushed.

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Google to 'forget me' man: Have you forgotten what you said earlier?

Adam 52
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Re: What DOES the EU Want Google to Be?

This is primarily about the Rehabilitation of Offenders Act 1974. A piece of UK legislation passed before the EU in its current form was dreamt of.

The EU part is merely a convenient baseline for what would have been a decision for the English judiciary anyway, and there would probably have been some common law fluff if it didn't exist.

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Ex-Equifax exec charged with insider trading after bagging 1 MEEELLION dollars in stock sale

Adam 52
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Re: What a moron

Exactly. In fact if you know there are going to be eyes all over it why risk everything for $1m instead of $900k? Unless he really thought Equifax were toast and his shares would be worthless. Or he's innocent and just unlucky with the timing.

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Adam 52
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This is white collar crime in the US. They do things differently there.

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UK.gov urged to ensure punters can 'still roam like at home' after Brexit

Adam 52
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Re: Brexit wins

'when asked directly if UK citizens will be able to keep using their EHIC card he [David Davis,Brexit secretary] responded that they will "probably" lose access, adding: "Haven't looked at it."'

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Fun fact of the day: Voice recognition tech is naturally sexist

Adam 52
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"Voice recognition systems are sexist: they struggle to deal with female voices compared to male ones."

Others have alluded to it, but I'll just highlight this paragraph. Struggling to understand is not sexist. There is no prejudice or discrimination on the basis of gender. There is a difference in behaviour, but that's not the same thing.

All of which the article goes on the explain, so the only justification for that first paragraph is a "journalist" wanting to "sex up" the story or mislead the reader.

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Samba settings SNAFU lets any user change admin passwords

Adam 52
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I imagine that there are lots of Linux fans deeply offended at the suggestion that Samba isn't suitable for use as an AD domain controller.

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UK.gov's shift to AWS: It's squeezy-bum time for small cloud pushers

Adam 52
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"I see no reason why we should be unable to replicate that"

I forget the numbers (I've quoted them here before) but AWS is investing of the order of $10bn/ year. That's a big number but if you don't spend something like it your competitor will get left behind.

It's a brave politician who says "we're closing 15 hospitals to fund a UK cloud company". We've tried it before with Concorde and, whilst an engineering marvel, that was a commercial disaster which generated zero sales.

Arguably it's something we should do, and if it's as successful as AWS then it might actually pay for a hospital out of profit. Feels a bit too socialist for the current government and too forward thinking for the opposition. Maybe someone should suggest it to M.Macron, although he probably can't afford it either.

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Former Google X bloke's startup unveils 'self flying' electric air taxi

Adam 52
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London only allows *single engined* helicopter flights east of Barnes bridge over the Thames.

Multi-engined helicopters and the Police, HEMS and military can go wherever ATC let them.

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