* Posts by I ain't Spartacus

5819 posts • joined 18 Jun 2009

MH370 final report: Aussies still don’t know where it crashed or why

I ain't Spartacus
Gold badge

Re: @Ledswinger

There was actually a fire a couple of years ago (fortunately on the ground) in the water-activated emergency beacon on the roof of a plane at Stansted or Gatwick. So even these need to be shut down sometimes.

I don't know what the failure rates on components on modern aircraft are, but I wouldn't be surprised if every 2 or 3 flights globally take off with some system powered down until they can get the plane to overnight maintenance. I know that all the manufacturers provide a list of components that are either non-essential, or have so many back-ups, that you can fly with them not working.

6
0
I ain't Spartacus
Gold badge

Re: planet is surrounded by spy satellites

Bahboh,

OK. Quickly searched for your example of Meteosat.

It's a weather satellite, not a spy sat, so wasn't designed for looking for small things on the surface, so much as weather patterns.

According to the info here:

The Meteosat-8 satellite belongs to the second generation of Meteosats and is much more capable than the first generation Meteosat-7 — delivering imagery from 12 instead of 3 spectral channels, with higher spatial resolution and with an increased frequency, every 15 instead of every 30 minutes. Of the 12 spectral channels, 11 provide measurements with a resolution of 3 km at the subsatellite point. The twelfth, so-called HRV (High Resolution Visible) channel of SEVIRI (Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager), provides measurements with a resolution of 1 km

So the High Resolution camera has a resolution of 1km, and records an image every 15 minutes. You might be able to see the flying saucer from Independence Day, but you've got bugger-all chance of seeing any planes.

11
0
I ain't Spartacus
Gold badge

Re: planet is surrounded by spy satellites

The planet is surrounded by spy satellites, pointing their cameras at interesting places. Not the very, very empty Southern Indian Ocean. Which is empty.

Did I mention there's bugger-all there?

23
1

Bad news! Astroboffins find the stuff of life in space for the first time

I ain't Spartacus
Gold badge
Happy

Re: To find life throughout the universe...

Not to mention Milky Way and Galaxy wrappers.

3
0
I ain't Spartacus
Gold badge

Yeah, but we want to find them. Not to cause them to hide and refuse to answer our signals.

Or worse, declare war on us.

5
0
I ain't Spartacus
Gold badge

Re: The stuff of life found everywhere

Except, strangely, 1600 Pennsylvania Ave....

Nope. It's life Jim, but not as we know it.

Thinks... Does pond slime come in orange as well as green...

7
2
I ain't Spartacus
Gold badge
Happy

Re: Word Salad vs Gobbledegook

Chokes!

Did I just see amanfromMars 1 complaining about the comprehensibility of someone else's writing style? A phrase involving black a pot, and a kettle is screaming its way through my mind at the moment.

I guess the shoe's on the other foot now. Assuming he doesn't have tentacles / pseudopodia...

8
0

Thomas the Tank Engine lobotomised by fat (remote) controller

I ain't Spartacus
Gold badge

Re: High self opinion?

A friend of mine was a gold miner in the deep outback. Hundreds of miles from even the closest town, as due to security all the services were provided inside the mining camp. I guess they're less worried about the miners taking iron ore home...

He did a few years of 8 hours underground, 8 hours in the pub, 8 hours asleep. With trips out every couple of months.

Does not sound fun to me, even though well enough paid that he could come back to the UK and buy a large chunk of a house with all the money he hadn't spent.

5
0

Smart burglar alarms: Look who just tossed their hat into the ring ... It's, er, Ring

I ain't Spartacus
Gold badge
Happy

You lied to me!

Your headline writers got me here under false pretences.

For some reason I read the headline as: Look who just tossed their hat into the ring ... It's El Reg

Hmmm, I thought. Who do I trust more with my precious security, Google's data hoovering and random product updating and end-of-lifing? Or a bunch of spaceplane-launching drunks off the internet?

0
0

Nobel Prize for boffins who figured out why you feel like crap after long-haul flights

I ain't Spartacus
Gold badge

Re: It's a start, but how to mitigate the effects? Bright lights, drugs etc

I know a totally blind kid, who's on melatonin. He's got no eyes, so no light perception at all to cue the body to regulate the hormone system.

He'll get tired and go to sleep like the rest of us. But after an hour just wakes up, if he doesn't remember to dose himself up before sleeping. Even with drugs I don't think he ever gets a full night's kip. So I guess he's permanently jet-lagged.

I wonder if this happens differently with people born totally blind? Or whether the brain adapts as they learn a sleep cycle as babies? The term visual impairment is preferred, because most "blind" people have at least some limited vision, or at least light perception.

4
0

There's a way to dodge Fasthosts' up-to-160% domain renewal hike but you're not gonna like it

I ain't Spartacus
Gold badge

Re: 123reg getting greedy

Nominet put their wholesale price up at the end of last year. Which explains the all the UK domain price-rises - or at least some percentage of them.

Then while you're at it, why not bung something on all the prices? The .clinic one could be whatever crap registrar bought that from ICANN in the hopes of .riches - but has ended up with .tumbleweed, and so is desperately trying to recoup their .losses...

5
0

Dildon'ts of Bluetooth: Pen test boffins sniff out Berlin's smart butt plugs

I ain't Spartacus
Gold badge
Coat

Re: "Having an adult toy unexpectedly...

Perhaps the question is how hard is it when you do wear your butt plug at work?

Coat, why yes. The long dirty raincoat please.

15
0
I ain't Spartacus
Gold badge
Stop

Something's wrong!

What's happened to El Reg? Have their normal staff been kidnapped?

This article mentions "penetration testing" and "master/slave" relationships - and there's not a singlepun, snigger or innuendo!

This must mean that terrorists have broken into the Register offices and are holding them hostage. Leaving this as their only way to ask for help, due to everything they type being watched.

47
0

BOFH: Come on, PFY, let's pick a Boss

I ain't Spartacus
Gold badge

Ah yes, that good old command: "Robot. Harvest organs!"

Hmmm. Think I'll try that tonight. Plug in my Amazon Echo again, and see how it responds to, "Alexa. Kill."

9
0

Ex-sperm-inate! Sam the sex-droid 'heavily soiled' in randy nerd rampage

I ain't Spartacus
Gold badge
Happy

Porn gave me warped expectations of how real like would turn out.

...I mean, who'd believe plumbers that turn up on the correct day?

25
0
I ain't Spartacus
Gold badge

That children thing's not a problem. You could gamify the whole situation.

You have to achieve certain objectives in your fumblings with the sex-bot Shaggadelic 2000TM. When you manage to engage the sensors in just the right way, then you get a LovelyBaby3000 through the post. Perhaps delivered by a driver dressed as a stork... You get a new bigger sized one each year, making clothes purchases far more predictable.

Then pay a vast sum of money to send it off to AI University.

9
0

Microsoft downplays alarm over Windows Defender 'flaw'

I ain't Spartacus
Gold badge

Re: *Boatload*

I agree. It must be a fuckton. Because you can also have a metric craptonne.

1
0
I ain't Spartacus
Gold badge
Happy

Re: *Boatload*

How does this boatload/shipload/shitload metric relate to the old imperial shedload?

4
0

NatWest customer services: We're aware of security glitch

I ain't Spartacus
Gold badge
Devil

Re: re Bank that cant't count

Did you win second prize in a beauty contest the next day?

Winner, Donald Trump...

7
0

¡Dios mío! Spain blocks DNS to hush Catalonian independence vote sites

I ain't Spartacus
Gold badge

So, are you comparing the US Independence War with what is happening in Catalonia? C'mon

Have people changed? There was a nationalist war in Yugoslavia only a few years ago. There were terrorist campaigns in Northern Ireland and the Basque region of Spain until very recently.

Catalonia has a lot of autonomy within Spain. This may be enough for everyone. In which case nothing bad will happen, and there will just be lots of complaining.

What true facts should I read?

You say that Spain is a democracy. Then why cannot the Catalans vote on this issue? Canada has done this with Quebec twice, the UK with Scotland, Czechoslovakia split into two countries amicably. So that's 3 countries that allowed one group to vote to decide their future.

Why not Spain?

If Spain fails to allow this issue to be settled by reasonable politics, then I would argue that Spain is not a very good democracy.

Perhaps nationalism blinds you to common sense.

What gives Spain the right to govern Catalonia? In a true democracy the answer is the consent of the goverened. That's the people of Catalonia. If Spain fails to keep that consent, then Spain is an empire, and Catalonia its colony. That is democracy.

A bit like when the Spanish government says Gibraltar should belong to Spain. No. Gibraltar belongs to the people of Gibraltar. They get to decide who governs them. This is the basic principle of self-determination.

7
0
I ain't Spartacus
Gold badge

Re: Catalonia Government is spreading false information

democracy. Democracy means respecting the others, and using laws to change the laws.

jordipalet,

Democracy is about losers as well as winners. And minorities as much as majorities.

So democracy only works if the loser accepts that they've lost, and that this was fair. In the long term it also only works if the majority respect minorities. If they don't, then the minority who can never win (because they're a minority) may decide that the system is stacked against them - and so they stop believing in it. This may result in mass non-voting, civil disobedience, people refusing to pay taxes, even violence, terrorism etc.

What it is very unlikely to lead to, is those people believing in the system, or that it has their best interests at heart.

So if the Spanish government refuses to deal with Catalan national feeling by legal/political means and negotiate, what will happen next? So far we've had the regional politicians attempt to solve this by getting people to vote. Pro-independence parties got a majority last election. So you can't claim there isn't a large amount of support for the idea.

If Spain will not allow any legal means to deal with this issue, and people believe passionately in it, then they will call those laws unjust. And they will break them.

This will be the Spanish government's fault.

Therefore the Spanish government must do something else. While a majority of Catalan people are still likely to vote to remain Spanish.

6
0
I ain't Spartacus
Gold badge

No. I think it's just a clash of competing ideas. If you're spanish and reasonably nationalist, maybe you feel that Catalan secession is an attack on you. I mean Catalonia hasn't been an independent state in a very long time.

A bit like some English people took the idea of Scottish independence somewhat personally - and certain people in the EU have reacted to Brexit. Perhaps some combination of hurt pride, hurt feelings, feeling of an attack on what you thought was a common group.

But if you're Catalan and don't feel Spanish, this makes no sense. If you can persuade enough Catalan people to agree with you, then what business is this of the rest of Spain? You're offski, and any attempt by them to keep you in the union is basically colonialism.

Then I'm sure there's loads of people in the middle. Who'll be the ones who decide in the end. Will the rest of Spain continue to just say no, and ignore the problem? If they do will most Catalans accept it, as they have much internal autonomy and independence isn't worth the hassle? Or will things turn nasty - and the extremists on both side poison the relationship to such an extent that secession becomes inevitable?

3
1
I ain't Spartacus
Gold badge

Terrorism is illegal. Campaigning for Catalan secession is not.

I agree that the referendum itself is illegal - which gives the Spanish government the right to take action against the Catalan regional government. But it doesn't give them the right to close down websites discussing the referendum.

7
0
I ain't Spartacus
Gold badge

Re: Catalonia Government is spreading false information

This is politics. The law matters, but is not a shield a government can always hide behind. Particularly if the government has the power to change that law.

If a law is unjust (or even seen by a large number of people as unjust), and you refuse to even negotiate on changing that law - then what are people supposed to do? The Catalans are not a majority in Spain. All they can do is gather the biggest democratic mandate they can (their regional elections) and see what happens.

If the Spanish government is unwilling to even discuss the matter, then what you are saying is that there is literally nothing the Catalans can do. Unjust laws have often been removed because of campaigns of non-violent protest against them. Which often involve breaking them.

The next step then depends on how strongly people care about the issue. If they care deeply, and are unable to remove what they see as an unjust law by non-violent means, what will they do next? Go home and forget all about it? Or will some resort to violent means? And if a government stifles all legal protest, then also the non-violent ilegal type, what should it expect next?

5
1
I ain't Spartacus
Gold badge

ESmub68,

I didn't want Scotland to leave the UK. But it turns out that about 45% of Scots currently do. Refusing to have a referendum was not going to make that number smaller. So we had one. The discussion all came out in the open.

Because the result was close, that won't be the end of it. After a few years things may settle down, we'll probably have to have another referendum and maybe that will settle matters, as it did in Quebec.

But if Scots don't feel that democracy is working for them, because they're in a country whose institutions they don't think meet their needs - then they should be independent. I think the UK has given them about as much autonomy as our system can cope with. If they still decide they need more, then we're either going to have to totally re-write our constitution (and maybe create an unwanted system of regional government in England) or they will decide to separate.

Which would be sad. But is not rebellion. It is their democratic right.

12
0
I ain't Spartacus
Gold badge

Catalonia has never been a Spanish colony. Although in lilving memory people have been imprisoned for speaking the language. By the Spanish government who banned that language.

Do you think this is likely to make Catalan people feel:

a) warm and fuzzy feelings for the Spanish government, or

b) distrust and possible dislike?

Hmmmmm? I wonder...

So question, what do you do about it? If Spain refuses to engage with reasonable Catalan requests for discussions on a referendum on independence, then what will happen next? Will the Catalans decide that Spain are right, and their national feeling is just something they've imagined? Or will this unite the majority who don't want independence with the minority who currently do?

If Spain forces Catalans to be part of Spain when a large majority don't want to be, what is the difference then whether you call them a colony or not?

The sensible thing to do is to negotiate now. If Spain acts reasonably now, then everyone may get some of what they want. The secessionists get a referendum which they lose fair-and-square, and Spain gets to stay a whole country.

The alternative is far more uncertain.

7
0
I ain't Spartacus
Gold badge

ESmub68,

Your english is fine. It's difficult working in another language.

And I understand your point, about the Spanish constitution. BUT, what if your constitution disagrees with international law?

Chapter 1 of the UN Charter calls for the right of self-determination of peoples.

That's a foundational document of international law, which Spain is signed up to. So if a large majority of Catalan people don't want to be Spanish, what then? What gives the rest of Spain the right to tell them?

Not that this is simple. It's fair to set rules for referenda. But is it really acceptable to just say no? If Spain uses force to stop Catalans expressing their freedom, at what point does that make Catalonia just a colony of the rest of Spain?

16
0
I ain't Spartacus
Gold badge

True, but unhelpful.

If enough people have a reasonable political ambition, just making it illegal doesn't work. The Spanish government can stick their fingers in their ears while the pressure for a referendum grows, and hope that it all blows over as the economy continues to recover - but that's a high risk ploy. Support for secession may just continue to grow, until it's unstoppable.

Or they can act like a mature democracy, and have talks about it, followed by a referendum.

One problem is that this isn't like Scotland. There's no economic debate here, Catalonia pays in a huge amount more than it receives from the Spanish treasury. They're one of the economic power-houses of the country. So they've already got plenty of local autonomy - meaning it may come down to the rest of Spain accepting they've got to take a little less for the central pot, or risk losing it all. Or it may just be that having a referendum lances the boil - and the Catalans want to feel they've been listened to.

7
0
I ain't Spartacus
Gold badge

Re: FC Barcelona

What about creating a joint Catalan-Scottish league? Solves both problems.

1
0
I ain't Spartacus
Gold badge
Happy

Good idea. Nobody would expect that...

9
0
I ain't Spartacus
Gold badge

Re: re. Scotland had its referendum. With few problems

So what exactly happened when the subject was floated a few months back, that Scotland should vote for independence again before the UK jumps the EU boat? Some unspecified threats from London.

Nope. No threats, specified or unspecified. The UK government said they wouldn't pass a referendum bill. The SNP complained loudly. But polls showed that there was only something like 30% support for another referendum, even though 45% voted for independence last time. And the polls still show that about the same percentage support independence.

Then there was a general election at which the SNP lost support and the unionist parties won some seats back. Now referendum talk has gone quiet. Unsurpisingly really.

It is not unreasonable for the UK government to say that Scotland has voted to stay in the EU, and has to wait its turn for another go while the whole government is busy with Brexit. It would appear that many Scots agree.

The Spanish government refuses to even have talks about holding a referendum on independence for Catalonia. Something that's politically stupid, morally wrong and in breach of the UN charter.

9
1
I ain't Spartacus
Gold badge

There's already been a referendum in Northern Ireland on whether they wanted to remain in the Union or not. Back in the 70s. There was also a referendum on the Good Friday agreement.

There was a majority in the Catalan assembly to hold this referendum - so they got to hold it. Not circumstantially in majority either, it was one of the main issues in the last regional election.

The Northern Irish assembly doesn't work the same. If there isn't a coalition formed with parties from both communities in it, there is no Northern Irish government. So without parties from both nationalist and unionist communities involved - this couldn't happen.

However I don't think any UK government would stop a referendum in Northern Ireland. We've just had one in Scotland, there's broad agreement that the Scots will get another go after Brexit if they want it, and few people would object if Northern Ireland wanted to vote.

Admittedly things get stickier if the leaving devolved assembly break the law. But the difference in the UK is that there shouldn't be a need to, as central government is flexible enough to allow the votes. If the Spanish government ignore a greater than 50% win for separatist parties calling for a vote - then they've no right to complain if they get ignored in return.

Self-determination is a human right, enshrined in the UN charter. Part of being a real democracy is accepting that, even if you don't like the result. If the Catalans feel they should be a separate country, then that is their right.

13
0
I ain't Spartacus
Gold badge

Re: re. Franco would be proud.

Scotland had its referendum. With few problems. It's pretty much agreed that they'll get another one, after the Brexit fun-and-games are all over.

Perhaps, in this case, the Spanish government might learn something from the British...

18
0
I ain't Spartacus
Gold badge

It's surely much easier to stop the referendum from happening than to deal with it if the result goes against. Obviously if there's only a turnout of 2% it'll be fine - but it looks bad enough stopping it from happening - let alone suppressing a result you've lost.

As I understand it, the Catalan assembly doesn't have the power to call this referendum - and it may even take a change to the constitution for the central government to allow one. But much better to face it early than wait - as support for independence looks to be growing. Pro-independence parties got a majority in the regional elections (for the first time ever I think), as I understand it on the promise of this referendum rather than because a majority want independence.

4
0

'Alexa, play Charlie Bit My Finger.' I can't do that, Dave. No, really

I ain't Spartacus
Gold badge

Re: Internet of Silos

Presumably intelligence agencies can use Shazam to do the same.

3
0
I ain't Spartacus
Gold badge

Re: Internet of Silos

I got a Google Chromecast - to watch a bit of iPlayer and NFL online. Which is fine, other than crap UI sometimes, which I can cope with.

Then I got the Amazon Prime trial. And not only was there not a Chromecast button on their app - but they'd also blocked the Chrome browser plug-in - so I couldn't cast it the hard way either.

With Kindle, they were hardware agnostic. I lost a lot of trust in their brand that day. Now, how do I know they'll keep that up with music and books, given they keep pushing into hardware devices?

2
0

Alleged dark web drug baron cuffed – after he flew to US for World Beard Championships

I ain't Spartacus
Gold badge

Re: Major kingpin

Well there was also lots and lots of money. Admittedly only Bitcoin, so the first few are worth a lot, but if you try and sell more than a few in a day you'll probably crash the price.

4
0
I ain't Spartacus
Gold badge
Happy

Re: inb4

Goatee the airport now.

15
0

EasyJet: We'll have electric airliners within the next decade

I ain't Spartacus
Gold badge

Re: Crashing with style?

Just dump passengers.

What's the problem? This is Ryanair.

"Ladies and gentlemen. This is your captain speaking. Due to a technical malfunction this aircraft will need to dump weight in order to safely carry out an emergency landing."

"Your cabin crew will shortly be going round the cabin with credit card readers. The 15 pasengers who pay the least, will be ejected from the emergency shutes in 5 minutes."

6
0

Is this cough cancer, doc? No: it's a case of Playmobil on the lung

I ain't Spartacus
Gold badge
Trollface

Re: @Dave

If you can't have non-food objects inside your candy, how come you're allowed to buy Hersheys?

29
1
I ain't Spartacus
Gold badge
Devil

Re: This is why

So the answer is Stickle Bricks.

Perhaps ones made of metal, with extra-sharp ends. A proper educational toy!

8
0

Alexa and her kind let the disabled or illiterate make the web work

I ain't Spartacus
Gold badge

Re: Yes and no.

There are a lot more tools built into Windows and iOS than there ever used to be. It's only a decade since you have to have dedicated screen-readers, for example.

And touch screens are great for some phyical disabilities. And also I'd imagine for cognitive / learning disabilities. The mental leap to press thing you want on screen in front of you to make it do stuff is much less than the extra layer of abstraction required to get a keyboard or mouse to interact with it.

Also tech is putting specialist tools into everyone's hands. I briefly experimented at school with a CCTV system to enlarge work for me. That was about £3,000 of kit in the early 80s - and took up a considerable amount of the corner of the classroom. And the local education authority weren't about to pay for me to have one at home as well. As happens, for my level of sight, I've come to the conclusion that large print is too unweildy, and that 5x magnifiers on my reading glasses are the best way to work. But I now own a portable CCTV system, for which I paid the grand sum of £130. My 3 year old Lumia Windows phone - though obviously any smartphone with reasonable sized screen is equally capable. MS even do a specialist app now, though I've been using smartphone cameras and zoom to read menus/labels for years before that. Only a decade ago a portable CCTV with 6" screen was selling for £700.

As the article states, some kind of specialist voice-controlled home-automation system was horrendously expensive a decade ago. Now it's becoming cheap consumer tech. Which also tends to mean its better made and easier to use than specialist kit aimed at selling (often via government). Hence my reading glasses are still a piss-poor design that requires being held together with tape (as they've been for the last 35 years), because the NHS buy them and don't do user-testing - and there's little profit in selling a few thousand units a year of something at £500.

2
0
I ain't Spartacus
Gold badge

You'd think disabled people who cant get out much would have investigated the net years ago.

It's almost as if they were suffering from an impairment to their ability to do stuff - and that this was holding them back somehow...

For example, braille is harder to use than text. It's slower to produce, slower to read, physically harder to do and takes up loads of space. My Mum is qualified as a VI teacher in her 40s - and has taught braille ever since. But she was never able to read it by feel - not a problem as she just looks. But many people who go blind later in life, also can't - and end up having to learn moon. Which uses bigger shapes - and thus takes up even more space. A blind kid I know did Lord of The Rings in English at school. It's a 13 volume book, each volume being 2' square and an inch thick.

Speech and listening area also slower than typing and reading text. And create problems if you try to do them in noisy environments.

Though you can now get a brilliant screenless laptop called a Braillenote (other brands may be available) which has either a 20 or 40 character braille display done with moving pins. But they are quite hard to use.

A few years ago, a company created a satnav. Entirely voice interface. But the layers of menus required to get most sat navs to work how you want, meant that only the brightest blind people with the best memories could operate it. Nested menus are so much easier to navigate when you can see them / and don't have to hold the menu structure in your head. So what you can now get is a sat nav where it tells you where you are. Thus if you get on the right bus / train, you know where to get off. It is either programmed for a specific destination from your home PC, or you can press the save this location button - so you can navigate your way back somewhere.

If you're deaf/blind then of course voice interfaces are bugger-all good to you.

If you suffer from certain physical disabilities, then you're only going to get on the net voice-activated if you've got someone else to physically set up the system for you.

Plus, as a general rule, some people are better at problem-solving than others. And that difference applies to disabled people as much as anyone else. They just have more problems they need to solve, and often less money/help to be able to solve them with.

6
0

After Microsoft calls out HP Inc over stalled Windows 10 logins, HP bounces back with a fix

I ain't Spartacus
Gold badge
Happy

Ooh a success!

I wonder how long we'll have to wait for HP to fix their shoddy printer drivers?

How long is it until the heat-death of the universe again...

4
1

Why Uber isn't the poster child for capitalism you wanted

I ain't Spartacus
Gold badge

Some minicab companies have similar (ish) apps. So I guess he's trying to see whether there's an advantage in economies of scale or not if Uber are a cab company. As eventually this kind of tech gets cheaper, and any minicab company can have it. Or in 10 years Google just integrate it into Android "find my nearest empty cab).

So I guess the question is, should Uber have gone for the less sexy, and less world-domination, play of just coming up with a really good system for booking cabs - like Hungry House does with takeaways? Then they'd just become a piece of infrastructure that cab companies could slot into, and get a small percentage. Plus lots of lovely data to sell of course.

Or alternatively they could have been even more boring, and just sold services to the cab industry.

But if they're no cheaper at doing the cab bit than the cab firms, then they're never going to be able to dominate the market, and eventually their tech will be beaten by some other system that consumers are happy with. Clearly it's much easier as a user to just go to one app and find the nearest/cheapest cab from all the competing local companies.

4
0

Web devs griping about iPhone X notch: You're rendering it wrong

I ain't Spartacus
Gold badge

Re: I don't get it

And when you turn it sideways?

Surely that's Apple's problem. The browser should just display in the useable part of the screen. The rest is pointless for websites. If the status info is useless on its side, then it should just default to black, and then the screen can look like it has a bigger bezel at the top - which is perfectly fine. If Apple don't like that, they should have done a better job of design, or not tried to pretend they could have a phone without a bezel, when the phone's got a bezel.

24
0

How Apple is taming the ad biz. Just don't expect Google or Zuck to follow

I ain't Spartacus
Gold badge

Re: Logical move for Apple

Bing actually has marketshare in the US. So it could be there are people there who don't visit Google on a daily basis. At which point their cookies will get deleted after a day too.

Also, Apple control the way they use searching in the address bar. So they could not count that as a visit to Google for cookie purposes. Though I imagine if they did, Google might block the built-in browser search on iDevices.

4
0

Sysadmin tells user CSI-style password guessing never w– wait WTF?! It's 'PASSWORD1'!

I ain't Spartacus
Gold badge

As I was typing it I was thinking, "and how the hell does that help exactly?" All it means is that you've now got two incomprehensible gobbets of letters, instead of one. So you've actually made the job harder as you've now got more work...

It helped them to spot mathematical patterns, of course. Which would be no bloody use to me, being a bear of very little brain.

What's even more astounding is that they had an Enigma machine to play with, smuggled out of Poland, and then later got some from captured subs. Whereas they never got a physical Lorenz machine, and had to work everything out from just the signals they saw.

Damned clever chaps!

17
0
I ain't Spartacus
Gold badge

Re: Pft, amateurs

I know someone who changed one of their accounts to:

Username: password

Password: admin

Which is actually surprisingly hard to enter, as your hands just automatically try to type them in the other way round, whatever your brain tells them to do.

30
0

NASA, wait, wait lemme put my drink down... NASA, you need to be searching for vanadium

I ain't Spartacus
Gold badge
Happy

Re: Saussages!

Why not just look for sausages?

Sausages are a sign of civilised life. Even if they've all rotted away with age, you should be able to find the frying pans and grill pans that were used to cook them. Or baking trays, with traces of sausage and yorkshire pudding.

All civilisations will eventually reach the toad-in-the-hole stage of development.

13
0

Forums

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2017