* Posts by I ain't Spartacus

5973 posts • joined 18 Jun 2009

Wait, did Oracle tip off world to Google's creepy always-on location tracking in Android?

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Re: Oracle tipped off the world ...

David Nash,

I was just responding to the suggestion that you need location services enabled to use Maps.
.

You do. To use it properly. Google Maps isn't just any application. It's one of the core components of the software. You don't have to give dialler access permisison to the phone app, because Google don't have any other permissions hooked into that - so why's it different with maps?

There's only one reason why Google have crippled the maps app, unless you turn on location services. It's because by doing that, you have to agree to let Google slurp your data - and Google really, really, really want to slurp your data.

You can still turn location services on, and disallow access to other apps, but once on, Google get what they really want. To use your phone as a data logger in their global network.

Partly this is to track you personally, for advertising. And partly it's to improve the overall quality of Android and Google's services, with stuff like accurate traffic flow info, keeping the WiFi database up-to-date for faster aGPS and whatever other clever stuff their engineers can come up with.

So it's not all about Google evilly cackling away in their bond-villain lair. But I think they've gone too far by linking a global online advertising and data monopoly with a smartphone monopoly. They've earned both those monopolies by being better, in important ways, but the downside of being a monopoly is that society gets to decide what you're allowed to do with it. And I think Google need bringing down a peg or two. The kind of arrogance and disregard of both the law, and their users' reasonable privacy expectations, shows that they need a good regulatory kicking.

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Re: Oracle tipped off the world ...

David Nash,

The phone has a fucking satellite receiver. It can easily pinpoint its location without sending all your data to Google. The only reason it doesn't is that Google wrote the software, to force you to make that choice.

There should be no choice. Satnav data should always be availble in maps - location services only needs to be optionally available in order to stop apps (and Google) from slurping your data.

That's why Google make only about 5% of their revenue from Android and almost all of their money from selling adverts and your data.

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Re: Oracle tipped off the world ...

Pissed off that Google is doing this? Think about AT&T, Verizon, T-Mobil, Sprint, EE ... they all do it.

That's completely different.. As part of the service they are delivering to you - they automatically must know where you are, in order for it to work. Which is all fine and dandy. It's in their terms of service smallprint somewhere, and it's unavoidable. Although obviously they could delete all records of your previous movements, except I think they're regulated by government and required to maintain that data for a certain period.

Google similarly do this with location services. They use your permission to turn that on as an excuse to havrvest all sorts of you personal data. Except they don't do this as a neccessary part of the service, but in order to increase their profit margins. And to be fair, to improve the service, though there are ways of doing that which would cost money that they get to avoid by harvesting your data. So if you use satnav, Google are able to add your speed of movement and location to their data - and do traffic mapping, withough paying for roadside sensor data. They also maintain their almost global map of WiFi hotspots by getting your phone to report where you've been and what hotspots it saw. Keeps their database up-to-date to improve satnav speed, almost for free. Also means they have data on exactly where you've been.

All of those services were on if you enabled location services. Which you couldn't use maps without, and there was no way of opting out of giving that free data to Google without accepting their terms. Maybe recent updates to Android have improved this? But I doubt it.

Still, even that is fine. If you care, you know what you're getting. You can avoid Droids, or turn location services off except when you need mapping - and it's all in the privacy smallprint somewhere.

This, on the other hand, isn't covered by the privacy policy or part of the workings of the service, and so is illegal, as it's in breach of data-protection laws.

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Permissionless data slurping: Why Google's latest bombshell matters

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Re: Are we surprised?

tiggity,

I'm not sure the UK has particularly more CCTV cameras than anywhere else. That famous figure from a few years ago showing we had startling more than anyone else, turned out to be from two researchers counting the cameras in two streets in Paddington. So was basically meaningless.

Also, though we do have many cameras, most of them are just connected to videos, that get over-written every day - or hard disks that persist a bit longer (depending on storage). So aren't actually much of a threat. Sure they can be pieced together, but still only manually. I remember when that serial killer was on the loose in Ipswich, the police said they'd collected 80,000 hours of video material in a week. For one, small city. So the logistics of that are still too hard.

Google, on the other hand, are a massive privacy threat right now. As are Facebook. And to a much lesser extent, Microsoft and Apple.

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Phone fatigue takes hold: SIM-onlys now top UK market

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The weird thing is your Moto handset is getting an Android upgrade. But when I just looked at Lenovo Android tablets, they all seem to be 2 or even 3 Android releases behind the latest. I don't really care about getting upgrades in my phone, I just want the security patches. Many people just want a phone for communications, though with bigger ones many use them instead of tablets. But yet they don't upgrade their tablets, which are mostly used for the computer-y things.

Which I guess means I'm getting an iPad. I only renew phones when needed, but with harder use, they tend not to last much more than 3 years. Whereas my current iPad is 4-5 years old, so I expect more effort in updates.

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Re: RE:m0rt

I doubt most users are aware of the lack of updates. Or security. There is smartphone malware out there, but there's not been any big outbreaks that hit the news yet. Personally I suspect that's only a matter of time, and I'm amazed Google have got away with being half-arsed about security for so long - though obviously controlling the app store helps a lot.

In fact a lot of users don't even want feature updates. Once they've learnt how to operate it, they get grumpy when the software and UI changes.

I think being network unlocked is much more important. As well as price, obviously. But then the two are related. You don't have to sign up to long contracts, you can switch to a cheaper deal and not have to pay £20 to unlock the thing. Which is also really good even if you like to upgrade every year, as many people won't take a second-hand phone off your hands if it's locked to a different network to them.

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Debian package depicts 'Tux the penguin' with sheep in intimate ASCII

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Re: I don't wish to complain, but

Wow! Just because a man innocently suggests burying Birmingham, he gets accused of fascism...

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I don't wish to complain, but

Over the years, I've noticed that there appear to be a few people on the internet who have too much time on their hands.

Would society not be better served by using them as slave labour to do useful things, like say my cleaning. Or building a giant wall to keep him out, and making Piers Morgan pay for it.

Or maybe polishing the moon, to get all those ugly dark spots cleaned off it.

Or burying Birmingham under 50ft of soil...

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Bitcoin outfit 'Tether' reveals US$31m BitBuck BitHeist

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It sounds like the company also control the blockchain, given that it's their digital currency. So they've simply forked the blockchain so that this transaction gets stopped. Assuming they can get their other users to also join that fork, then they can try and reverse the transaction.

Which is obviously both good and bad. It means that miscreants can't get away with blatant theft. Or it means that the people controlling the sytem can just reverse any transaction you make at any time, and take your digital money back off you again.

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Dick move: Navy flyboy flings firmament phallus for flabbergasted folk

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Happy

What a shame he wasn't flying a Jumbo...

Just drawing one.

Insert your own jokes about Fokkers and Bristols.

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New UK aircraft carrier to be commissioned on Pearl Harbor anniversary

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Re: Pearl Harbour

They also missed the USS Phoenix. A lucky ship that apparently didn't take a single hit during the war, including at Pearl. It was then sold and renamed the General Belgrano - and didn't get to fire a single shot in its next war.

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Prince of Wales isn't really named after Charlie either. It's named after the other ships that have been called Prince of Wales. Which has been a capital ship name going back to the 18th Century.

Personally I think we need to honour and even older name used by the RN. It's time we called a ship, "The Lion's Whelp" again. I think we've had ten of them so far, it's time for another. I believe they were build as a single class, by the Duke of Buckinham, who was apparently a man of very limited imagination and so called them, The Lion's Whelp I through to The Lion's Whelp X.

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Help desk declared code PEBCAK and therefore refused to help!

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Re: Early symptom of the demise of $BIGCO?

I've got a Panasonic phone here. In order to divert calls to another number, I have to type in 17 digits - to be fair that does include the phone number - but is still ludicrously long.

There are 12 named buttons on the phone, none of which does this and a further 12 programmable buttons, where the only way to program them is with these silly codes.

Cancelling divert is 8 numbers!

I don't know who designs these phones, but I do know that nobody can bloody use them!

There is of course no button for divert to voicemail, or pick up voicemail. What a pile of shite.

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Amazon Key door-entry flaw: No easy fix to stop rogue couriers burgling your place unseen

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Devil

Re: Insurance

One of the few things it specifically excludes is damage by people you invite into your house..

Otherwise known as the Dracula clause...

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$232m blockchain startup Tezos faces sueballs for alleged investor fraud

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Re: Backward causation

Nope.

The SEC decision isn't legally binding, but applies to existing securities law. Basically they had a long investitgation and decided that current law already applies to ICOs that they quack and waddle like securities and therefore are. However they've just paid some lawyers to do that. This has not yet been tested in court. I guess this current case could be the one that sets that precedent.

If the people issuing ICOs didn't do their legal due-dilligence, and have to hand back all the money then tough. They're all probably scams anyway, so I'm sure the money's already disappeared.

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How about that time Russian military used a video game pic as proof of US aiding ISIS?

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Re: medieval terror-bastards - thumbs up on that one!

What happens when the remnants of ISIS merge with the remnants of SCO?

They won't be in Iraq or Syria anymore, so get shortened back to IS, then added to SCO. Giving us SCOIS. That doom-laden acronym that tells us SCO will be with us FOREVERRRRRRRRrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr......

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Re: Jesus Toast

Of course Jesus-toast is fake! Greggs have only recently revealed the truth with their advent calendar picture of the shepherds worshipping the sausage roll in the manger.

What more evidence do you need!?!?

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Re: The worrying thing...

That's sort of what they have done. Not that it's a formal alliance, or anything close to one. But Syria welcomed allowed Al Qaeda into the border territories with Iraq during the insurgency after the war in 2003. That was how they smuggled in fighters and suicide bombers - particularly as it borders the Sunni West of Iraq where AQ were strongest.

ISIS are a weird coalition of ex-AQ people and a bunch of Saddam's ex military guys, plus extra religious nutters.

So they quickly took Eastern Syria when the civil war started, because Assad concentrated all his fire on the "more moderate" rebels, who tended to be more associated with the Muslim Brotherhood (started in Egypt but now include groups like Hizbollah, Hamas).

So when Russia, Syria and Iran were trying to take back Aleppo for example, they concentrated all their air-strikes on the rebels holding the place, but also attacked them on the other side of the city, where the rebels were also fighting against ISIS - who were essentially a "third side" in the civil war.

Clearly this is a massive over-simplification because there are way more than 3 sides in that civil war, the lot that remained loyal to Al Qaeda for example eventually decided to renounce AQ and changed their name - but were always a part of the "moderate" rebels. Partly I suspect because we mostly didn't arm the rebels (and the Saudis only seriously began to do so later in the war), so AQ were the guys with the guns, the funding and the trained fighters.

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Devil

Re: medieval terror-bastards - thumbs up on that one!

Surely as ISIS have now been almost kicked out of their strongholds in Iraq and have lost Raqqa in Syria their new name should be TISWAS...

I hope that Chris Tarrant doesn't declare a fatwa on me for this...

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Pastry in a manger: We're soz, Greggs man said

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Would you believe that some people think the Old Testament is accurate and not a bunch of myths?

If you've ever studied ancient history, you'd know that the Old Testament is a very important source. It suffers from bias of course, but then so does every document you read. It also has the usual problem with sources that straddle the time period of the use of writing - which is that they combine old stories that have probably been told round the fireside for centuries with written records made at the same time as events. so you'll find just as many myths in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicles, the writings of the Venerable Bede or ancient Greek history.

There's a line in Heredotus' Histories where he says that in Persia there are ants the size of foxes - and I have spoken to people who have actually seen them. This is the reason that he's called "the father of history", for consciously trying to write a history that left out what were thought to be myths, but also known as "the father of lies", because he often failed to do so.

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I ain't Spartacus
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Re: I ain't Spartacus

MJI,

Although I broadly agree with you, you're on pretty dodgy ground assailing the likes of Krispy Kreme for their "sickly diabetes on a plate". At least you are if you're doing it while defending a deep fried sweet bread product that contains jam (about 50% sugar*) and is then covered in more sugar.

*That's for home made jam. Commercial stuff tends to have less fruit, and more sugar - which is going to be especially true for the non-specific "red flavour" jam that tends to lurk inside your average jam doughnut.

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Re: I ain't Spartacus

The only true doughnut is the cinnamon-dusted ring (shaddup). All those iced or jam-filled... things are mere cakes and no doughnut at all!

Guards! Seize him!

Burn the heretic!

The one true doughnut is an irregular globular shape and filled with jam and covered in sugar. All others are impostors. After all, it's called a doughnut, not a doughring. I'm sure it's fine if you want to ice them, or add cream, or other such fripperies. I'm even willing to be liberal, and accept that maybe the custard doughnut is not actually a crime against humanity.

There's nothing wrong if you wish to consume a ring doughnut. Iced or covered in cinamon as you wish. Just so long as you accept that yours is an inferior form, and bow to the obvious superiority of The One True Doughnut.

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Devil

I'd say this isn't a problem for Greggs.

If you go to their head office you'll find a chart, which breaks the population down into two important demographic groups.

1. Potential Customers

2. Potential Ingredients

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you can always pull in at a rest stop and pick up a few sausage rolls for lunch while the camels are tanking up.

Have you ever seen a camel? The smelly buggers are grumpy enough already, without getting them drunk!

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Re: Grammar!

I once got given a chocolate nativity set for St Nicholas' Day, while working in Belgium. HR got in early and all our desks had speculoos cookies (yum) and choccy shepherds, Marys, Josephs and Jesuses (yum-yum).

As I bit the baby Jesus' head off, I did wonder if this was some weird kind of blasphemy...

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Re: Who'd have thought

We've got evidence for the existence of a bloke called Jesus, and the trouble he and his followers caused.

Obviously divinity is a tad more a stretch to prove. But there are multiple contemporaneous ancient sources mentioning him, which is comparitive riches against a lot of figures in ancient history.

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Re: While we're on the subject of outrage...

Don't tell anyone, but they use porcuswine. It's terribly hush-hush.

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Re: Howay in a manger

NOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOoooooooooooooo!!!!!!!!!!!!!

The sausage roll is the food of the Gods! Divinely inspired piggy goodness. The steak bake is nasty cheap meat. Obviously so is the sausage roll, but the advantage of sausages is that's how they're supposed to be.

Their bread pudding and Belgian buns are also superb. However they need to have a serious word with themselves about the doughnuts. The "jam" ones are too doughy, not crispy on the outside, have insufficient jam and are dusted with soft icing sugar instead of crunchy granulated stuff. All wrong! And the less said about selling horrible jam-less ring doughnuts the better...

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Had a meeting with the company accountant today. In Greggs. Sausage rolls and Belgian Buns to follow. Yum!

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Google says broader right to be forgotten is 'serious assault' on freedom

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nijam,

But expiring criminal records is censorship! That's the whole bloody point. It's deliberate forgetfullness by society in order to give people a second chance. Which is why I think serious offences only expire if they occur while the perpetrator is still a minor - you get the chance to grow up and have a clean slate.

In the past printed records still existed, and you could search for them if you wanted to do so. But they weren't available to casual searching, or even anyone but the most determined employer or investigator. But you weren't allowed to re-publish that information.

Those laws were created in an era before the internet, and many of those records became instantly globally searchable. So the answer is that we try to patch the system to keep society working the way we intended it, or we change society to deal with the new realities. Google may squeal, but it's much easier to legally compel them to solve the problem, than to change social attitudes.

To give a lesser example, think of job recruitment. We're in a brief window of social change where the pepole doing the recruting are probably in their 30s and older - but often have access to the Facebook records of people who were teens when they had FB accounts. Hence there's a risk of a bit of sneaky research on potential employees getting them disqualified as a non-serious party-animals for stuff they got up to (and posted) when they were 17. And very drunk. Probably this problem goes away in 15 years, when the people in HR doing the recruiting have their own dodgy FB background to compare with those they're looking at. Whereas what people of my generation did when teenagers could only be recorded on film cameras, and if you were that drunk you probably didn't remember to process the film - in the unlikely event you'd taken a camera out with you.

So the question is, do we hope this is a minor problem and ignore it, or make a law that makes it illegal for HR to demand people's Facebook passwords?

Basically the intervention of new tech changes society in unexpected ways. But people tend to form their expectations of what's reasonable when quite young, and we're not all that good (or fast) at changing them. So sometimes you have to force society to change with laws, or you may have to use a legal sticking-plaster to give people a chance to catch up emotionally with what technology has suddenly made possible.

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ratfox,

It's an awkward compromise. This is simply society slowly catching up with technological progress.

Newspapers never used to have this problem, because you published about someone's conviction say, and when that conviction was spent - you weren't legally obliged to go back to the newspaper archives and delete it. You just assumed that nobody would find it, without serious research.

Once that archive becomes completely transparent and searchable with no effort, then you either have to make people delete all that public facing data (undesirable and probably impossible), give up on the idea of things like rehabilitation and spent convictions (also undesirable) or find a messy compromise.

Google are now a global public utility. That may be tough on them, they didn't ask for it and nobody wants to get regulated by governments all the time. But they established a global search monopoly, and it pays them very well, so that's just tough shit.

It's never going to be posible to regulate millions / billions of individual websites. But Google are huge, make loads of money, and so can get pushed around by government. This can obviously have some seriously bad effects, but then Google getting to decide things to suit themselves can also. There's never going to be a right answer here. Just a series of messy and imperfect compromises.

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Amazon to make multiple Lord of the Rings prequel TV series

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Devil

Re: Running up stairways of falling rocks

Teiwaz,

Spanking you say? Then LotR has already got you covered.

Sauron and Saruman have got whips and dungeons.

And have you not read the chapter, 50 Shades of the Grey Havens?

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Brace yourselves, fanboys. Winter is coming. And the iPhone X can't handle the cold

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Happy

Re: Diversity figures are meaningless without context

the midwife that delivered me (back in 1975) was male.

he was also apparently quite annoyed because I took my time to appear causing him to miss the home game at coventry that afternoon

Very impressive! To have done your first good deed while still in the womb.

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Devil

Re: Oh dear... but I have a plan!

Just out of interest, when did you dive on Angelina Jolie?

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Parity's $280m Ethereum wallet freeze was no accident: It was a HACK, claims angry upstart

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Re: ...thus setting back blockchain development by years ...

Why invent a conspiracy when you already have so much incompetence?

It's not the blockchain that's been hacked, but the second attack on one company's crappy wallet software.

The banking industry are all over the idea of blockchains at the moment. But international banking have already got pretty low transaction fees sorted, on a much larger scale than Bitcoin, which is apparently now averaging $6 per transaction - and that's not including the larger fees if you wish to use an exhange to convert Bitcoin to real money.

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Stop your moaning, says maker of buggy Bluetooth sex toy

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Unhappy

Re: This is nonsense

Update 08:50 - [happy face] Ooh look at the pretty glowing lights!

Update 08:51 - [excited face] What does this button do?

Update 08:52 - [confused face] Even more flashing lights and now sirens - what a noisy place!

Update 08:53 - [sad face] Oops.

Update 08:54 - [ad] Nookbook recommends the cancer-curing properties of goji berry extract

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Teensy weensy space shuttle flies and lands

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Linux

Re: The vehicle looks a lot like NASA's Space Shuttle

So do penguins...

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The day I almost pinned my tushie as a Google Maps landmark

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Re: Pictures!

I'd prefer if it didn't happen...

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Re: This is why I keep reading Something for the Weekend, Sir?

Can your pecker do a marathon?

No, but it does snickers...

And, as the advert says, "Get some nuts!"

Although I've now created a very disturbing mental image for myself involving Mr T. I'd go and have a cuppa to recover, but that involves teabagging, which just isn't helping.

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The NAKED truth: Why flashing us your nude pics is a good idea – by Facebook's safety boss

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Re: WTF???

What's a wombat?

Is it a thing you need to play wom?

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Irish priests told to stop bashing bishops

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Re: no helpline required

Please note: the only acceptable responses to this post are "Amen" and a repost or link.

What about: Burn the heretic!

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Happy

Perhaps what they need is lawyers?

Then priests might start getting automated phone calls saying, "Have you been bullied by the baby-eating Bishop of Bath and Wells? If so, simply press 5 and we can help you with getting compensation. Where there's blame, there's a claim."

Or did they not mean that kind of helpline?

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NASA reconfirms 2019 will see first launch of Space Launch System

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Happy

Re: 2019?

Perhaps we can kill two birds with one stone, and Trump can crew it.

Musk's first flight with Dragon put an orange cheese into orbit, so there's a precedent. Not to mention Ham in the first Mercury capsule...

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Brit moron tried buying a car bomb on dark web, posted it to his address. Now he's screwed

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Happy

Re: Improvised Marketing Term to defend the defence industry.

So what should I look for when buying my explosives online? Are they supposed to be CE marked? Will the electrics have been PAT tested? What are my consumer rights?

That's it! I've had enough of this rip off! I'm writing to Watchdog!

Dear BBC,

I ordered some goods online. And when they were delivered, not only had they exchanged my order for something different, but they'd also informed the police. What are my consumer rights?

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Re: Should have bought the How To book off WH Smiths

Anarchists Cookbook review

1 star

Recipes gave me gas, projectile vomiting and explosive diarrhoea.

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I ain't Spartacus
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What's the delivery cost on a Tsar Bomba?

A quick Wiki suggests that it's 27 tonnes - and 8m x 2.1m diameter - so you can't even use the forklift in your garage to unload it off the delivery lorry.

Still, given the cost, I suppose it's not that much more expensive to just buy a lorry and never take it off that until you're ready to use it.

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American upstart seeks hotshot guinea pig for Concorde-a-like airliner

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Re: I've seen their site. The story does not add up.

Concorde took off on afterburner. It was loud. I used to work under the flightpath - admittedly only a few miles from the runway.

When I say loud, I mean that I couldn't hear myself talking on the phone (let alone the caller) for over a minute, inside a building. Oh and my coffee cup was vibrating - along with everything else...

I'm sure it was much better when cruising.

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Better filters won't cure this: YouTube's kids nightmare

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Happy

Re: When I were a lad...

Can't you just lock your children in a filing cabinet when you're not there? It worked for Chris Morris in Brass Eye...

Also, if you're really lucky, they might grow up to be Hong Kong Phooey.

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Lord of the Rings TV show shopped around Hollywood

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Coat

Re: love-interest for Treebeard

Well the Entwives are long gone. Are there any Entmistresses?

If not, what about Enthookers?

As the Ents have perfected a drink that will make your extremities grow - they can obviously fund their sex and drugs lifestyle by selling penis enlargement pills online. Side effects: When drunk, may cause a stiff neck...

JRR said that Merry and Pippin had got taller, he was perhaps too polite to mention any other effects. OK, I'll get my coat then - the long, dirty mac, obviously.

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Parity calamity! Wallet code bug destroys $280 MEEELLION in Ethereum

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Re: A tragedy? @ Messrs Spartacus & Tick

If I might throw another dog or two on the fire, low inflation may be a good thing, negative real interest rates are most certainly not

Mr Anon,

You're a bit hard on the poor old doggies there...

As a general rule you are correct. Negative real interest rates are bad (i.e. interest rates below inflation). This is probably the main cause of the Euro crisis - when French and German inflation and growth were both down around 1-2% in the early 2000s, ECB interest rates were way too low for countries like Ireland and Spain. Causing runaway housing booms - which now means they need lower interest rates than say Germany.

However after the last recession we needed to generate inflation. Yes we needed to generate growth, to get out of recession. But was also needed to generate inflation itself. The reason for this often offends purveyors of the morality-play that Germany has deployed in the Euro-crisis, "poor savers must be protected from inflating away the debts of the feckless". There may even be some justice in that - however it's economically disastrous. As Keynes pointed out. If you have no inflation, then people with debts go bust, and they take the economy with them. That's the disaster of deflation. So the savers (owners of that debt) may complain that they're not getting their full pound of flesh, but what they don't realise is they face a stark choice. Debts that can't be paid, won't be paid. So they're better to accept a bit of inflation eating away at the principal and still getting interest plus repayments - because the alternative is the debtor going bust, and them getting nothing. Once that happens at a national scale, you get a 1930s style depression. So by generating inflation and stopping all the banks going bust, what our central banks did was to pass a bit of pain to the savers so that the borrowers didn't go broke and send the economy into a death-spiral.

Look how it took the Japanese central bank 3 years of insanely massive money-printing and government spending (Abenomics) in order to force their economy to start generating inflation again. Plus all the shorter and less extreme programs of government spending and QE they've done over the last 20 years that failed.

Your second point about deflation in the tech industry seems to be a misunderstanding / confusion of terms.

Deflation in the macro-economic sense means a rising in the value of money. Just as inflation is a fall in the value of money. And it truly is doom-ageddon. Once triggered it generates its own expectations, which cause it to continue. And the way to beat it is economically irrational, so the market can't easily get out of it without massive government intervention.

When you talk about deflation in the computer industry, you're actually talking about productivity rises. Society being able to produce more stuff with the same input of resources, due to new technology, automation and economies of scale. That's the best kind of economic growth.

If that happens in enough industries at once, it might cause deflation in the overall economy - such as in the 1870s - which if vague memories of my 19th C economic history serves, was down to globalisation (in food in particular) causing a long period of wage stagnation lack of investment. Deflation is the enemy of investment, and investment is what tends to fund productivity growth - which is what makes us better off by getting us more stuff for less effort.

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